new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged Retratos dos Mascots

O Boss, a mascote dos Salmoura, a portar-se muito bem!

 

Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art

 

--

 

Boss, Salmoura's mascot, being a good boy!

 

Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art

Militia Company of District II under the Command of Captain Frans Banninck Cocq, Known as the ‘Night Watch’, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, 1642

 

olieverf op doek, h 379.5cm × w 453.5cm. More details

 

Rembrandt’s largest, most famous canvas was made for the Arquebusiers guild hall. This was one of several halls of Amsterdam’s civic guard, the city’s militia and police. Rembrandt was the first to paint figures in a group portrait actually doing something. The captain, dressed in black, is telling his lieutenant to start the company marching. The guardsmen are getting into formation. Rembrandt used the light to focus on particular details, like the captain’s gesturing hand and the young girl in the foreground. She was the company mascot.

 

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669)

Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn was born in Leiden, the son of a miller. After finishing Latin School, his parents enrolled him at Leiden University. Rembrandt soon dropped out and became an apprentice painter under Jacob van Swanenburch in Leiden, and later Pieter Lastman in Amsterdam. Back in Leiden, he set up as an independent artist together with Jan Lievens. At this time, Rembrandt mainly painted biblical scenes in a precise style and with vibrant colours.

 

In 1631, he moved to Amsterdam where he received numerous commissions for portraits. His many pupils included Ferdinand Bol, Govert Flinck and Carel Fabritius. In this period, Rembrandt develop a more powerful chiaroscuro, a looser brush and a greater sense of drama. He focused more on historical scenes, and made numerous etchings and drawings.

 

In 1634, Rembrandt married Saskia Uylenburgh. They had a son, Titus, in 1641. Then a year later Saskia died. Later, in 1654, Rembrandt had a daughter with Hendrickje Stoffels. By now, he had accumulated huge debts and was forced to sell his house and property. He died in 1669 and was buried in Amsterdam's Westerkerk.

 

Rijks Museum - National Museum of Netherlands

 

Vision:

 

The Rijksmuseum links individuals with art and history.

 

Mission:

 

At the Rijksmuseum, art and history take on new meaning for a broad-based, contemporary national and international audience.

 

As a national institute, the Rijksmuseum offers a representative overview of Dutch art and history from the Middle Ages onwards, and of major aspects of European and Asian art.

 

The Rijksmuseum keeps, manages, conserves, restores, researches, prepares, collects, publishes, and presents artistic and historical objects, both on its own premises and elsewhere.

 

From 1800 to 2013

 

The Rijksmuseum first opened its doors in 1800 under the name ‘Nationale Kunstgalerij’. At the time, it was housed in Huis ten Bosch in The Hague. The collection mainly comprised paintings and historical objects. In 1808, the museum moved to the new capital city of Amsterdam, where it was based in the Royal Palace on Dam Square.

 

After King Willem I’s accession to the throne, the paintings and national print collection were moved to the Trippenhuis on Kloveniersburgwal, while the other objects were returned to The Hague. The current building was put into use in 1885. The Netherlands Museum for History and Art based in The Hague moved into the same premises, forming what would later become the departments of Dutch History and Sculpture & Applied Art.

The beginning

 

On 19 November 1798, more than three years after the birth of the Batavian Republic, the government decided to honour a suggestion put forward by Isaac Gogel by following the French example of setting up a national museum. The museum initially housed the remains of the viceregal collections and a variety of objects originating from state institutions. When the Nationale Kunstgalerij first opened its doors on 31 May 1800, it had more than 200 paintings and historical objects on display. In the years that followed, Gogel and the first director, C.S. Roos, made countless acquisitions. Their first purchase, The Swan by Jan Asselijn, cost 100 Dutch guilders and is still one of the Rijksmuseum’s top pieces.

Move to Amsterdam

 

In 1808, the new King Louis Napoleon ordered the collections to be moved to Amsterdam, which was to be made the capital of the Kingdom of Holland. The works of art and objects were taken to the Royal Palace on Dam Square, the former city hall of Amsterdam, where they were united with the city’s foremost paintings, including the Night Watch by Rembrandt. In 1809, the Koninklijk Museum opened its doors on the top floor of the palace.

 

A few years after Willem I returned to the Netherlands as the new king in 1813, the ‘Rijks Museum’ and the national print collection from The Hague relocated to the Trippenhuis, a 17th-century town-palace on Kloveniersburgwal, home to what would later become the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Much to the regret of the director, Cornelis Apostool, in 1820 many objects including pieces of great historical interest were assigned to the Kabinet van Zeldzaamheden [Royal Gallery of Rare Objects], which had been founded in The Hague. In 1838, a separate museum for modern 19th-century art was established in Paviljoen Welgelegen in Haarlem. Contrary to the days of Louis Napoleon, very few large acquisitions were made during this period.

 

Cuypers Cathedral

 

The Trippenhuis proved unsuitable as a museum. Furthermore, many people thought it time to establish a dedicated national museum building in the Netherlands. Work on a new building did not commence until 1876, after many years of debate. The architect, Pierre Cuypers, had drawn up a historic design for the Rijksmuseum, which combined the Gothic and the Renaissance styles. The design was not generally well-received; people considered it too mediaeval and not Dutch enough. The official opening took place in 1885.

 

Nearly all the older paintings belonging to the City of Amsterdam were hung in the Rijksmuseum alongside paintings and prints from the Trippenhuis, including paintings such as Rembrandt’s Jewish Bride, which had been bequeathed to the city by the banker A. van der Hoop. The collection of 19th-century art from Haarlem was also added to the museum’s collection. Finally, a significant part of the Kabinet van Zeldzaamheden, which had by then been incorporated into the new Netherlands Museum for History and Art, was returned to Amsterdam.

 

Renovations

 

Over the years, collections continued to grow and museum insight continued to expand, and so the Rijksmuseum building underwent many changes. Rooms were added to the south-west side of the building between 1904 and 1916 (now the Philips wing) to house the collection of 19th-century paintings donated to the museum by Mr and Mrs Drucker-Fraser. In the 1950s and 1960s, the two original courtyards were covered and renovated to create more rooms.

 

In 1927, while Schmidt-Degener was Managing Director, the Netherlands Museum was split to form the departments of Dutch History and Sculpture & Applied Art. These departments were moved to separate parts of the building after 1945. The arrival of a collection donated by the Association of Friends of Asian Art in the 1950s resulted in the creation of the Asian Art department.

 

The 1970s saw record numbers of visitors of almost one-and-a-half million per year, and the building gradually started to fall short of modern requirements.

‘Verder met Cuypers'

 

The current renovation reinstates the original Cuypers structure. The building work in the courtyards are removed. Paintings, applied art and history are no longer displayed in separate parts of the building, but form a single chronological circuit that tells the story of Dutch art and history.

 

The building is thoroughly modernized, while at the same time restoring more of Cuypers original interior designs: the Rijksmuseum has dubbed the venture ‘Verder met Cuypers‘ [Continuing with Cuypers]. The Rijksmuseum will be a dazzling new museum able to satisfy the needs of its 21st-century visitors!

 

Every year, the Rijksmuseum compiles an annual report for the previous year. Annual reports dating back to 1998 can be found here (in Dutch only). Reports relating to the years before 1998 are available in the reading room of the library.

 

O Museu Rijks é um dos maiores e mais importantes museus da Europa.É o maior dos Países Baixos, com acervo voltado quase todo aos artistas holandeses. As obras vão desde exemplares da arte sacra até a era dourada holandesa, além de uma substancial coleção de arte asiática.

Esse é o Rijksmuseum, o Museu Nacional dos Países Baixos. E aproveite, caro leitor, porque o Rijks esteve parcialmente fechado para reforma durante 10 anos – voltou a funcionar só em 2013. Ou seja, quem esteve em Amsterdam na última década não conheceu o Rijks, pelo menos não completamente.

 

Mas o quê tem lá? Muita coisa. Destaque para as coleções de arte e História holandesas. Os trabalhos dos pintores Frans Hals e Johannes Vermeer são alguns dos mais concorridos, mas imbatível mesmo é Rembrandt van Rijn, considerado um dos maiores pintores de todos os tempos. Se você não é um fã de museus de arte, mas faz questão de conhecer o trabalho desses grandes artistas, uma dica: assim que chegar ao Rijks, vá direto para a ala onde estão as obras-primas. Assim você vê o mais importante no início da visita, quando ainda está descansado e poderá dedicar o tempo necessário para essas obras.

A mais famosa delas é a “A Ronda Noturna”, de Rembrandt, uma obra que inspirou músicas, pinturas, filmes e até um flash mob. Quando o Rijks foi reaberto, artistas recriam a cena mostrada no quadro dentro de um shopping de Amsterdam. A ação está no vídeo abaixo e eu te garanto que vale a pena dar play.

 

Read more: www.360meridianos.com/2014/01/museus-de-amsterdam.html#ix...

Read more: www.360meridianos.com/2014/01/museus-de-amsterdam.html#ix...

Rijksmuseum, Museu Nacional

42 Stadhouderskade

Amsterdam

 

O museu Rijksmuseum de Amsterdã é o Museu Nacional da Holanda, onde você encontrará uma impressionante coleção permanente, formada por 5.000 pinturas e 30.000 obras de arte, além de 17.000 objetos históricos.

 

Esse museu nacional foi fundado em 1885 e está instalado em um edifício de estilo neogótico. A sua principal atração é a extensa coleção de quadros pintados por artistas holandeses, abrangendo um período que vai do séc. XV aos dias de hoje. A obra de arte mais famosa em exibição é o quadro A Ronda Noturna, de Rembrandt.

O museu Rijksmuseum está dividido em cinco departamentos: pintura, escultura, arte aplicada, arte oriental, história dos Países Baixos e gravuras. O núcleo da coleção é a pintura e suas obras mais representativas são as que pertencem ao Século de Ouro holandês, com quadros de artistas como Rembrandt, Vermeer ou Frans Hals.

Ver fonte: dreamguides.edreams.pt/holanda/amsterda/rijksmuseum

 

Museu Rijks, Amesterdão

O Museu Rijks (Museu Nacional) é um edifício histórico, sendo o maior museu nos Países Baixos. O Museu é o maior no numero relativamente às suas colecções, na área do edifício em si, no financiamento e no numero de funcionários empregados.

Cada ano, mais de um milhão de pessoas visitam o Museu Rijks. O Museu emprega cerca de 400 pessoas, incluindo 45 conservadores de museu que são especializados em todas as áreas.

O Museu Rijks é internacionalmente reconhecido pelas suas exibições e publicações, mas não só apenas por estes produtos de grande qualidade, mas também pelas áreas no museu em si que são fonte de inspiração e encorajam a criação de novas ideias.

O museu também tem recursos consideráveis para a educação, para a decoração e apresentação de exibições. Importantes designers são regularmente chamados a trabalharem em projectos no Museu Rijks.

O edifício principal do Museu Rijks está a ser renovado. A boa noticia é que a melhor parte da exposição está apresentada na redesenhada ala Philips. O nome desta exposição denomina-se "The Masterpieces'.

O museu abre diariamente das 10 da manhã até ás 5 da tarde.

A entrada é pela Stadhouderskade 42.

www.rijksmuseum.nl

 

Rijksmuseum

Origem: Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre.

O Rijksmuseum é um museu nacional dos Países Baixos, localizada em Amsterdão na Praça do museu. O Rijksmuseum é dedicado à artes e história. Ele tem uma larga coleção de pinturas da idade de ouro neerlandesa e uma substancial coleção de arte asiática.

O museu foi fundado em 1800 na cidade da Haia para exibir a coleção do primeiro-ministro. Foi inspirado no exemplo francês. Pelos neerlandeses ficou conhecida como Galeria de Arte. Em 1808 o museu mudou-se para Amsterdã pelas ordens do rei Louis Napoleón, irmão de Napoleão Bonaparte. As pinturas daquela cidade, como A Ronda Nocturna de Rembrandt, tornaram-se parte da coleção.

Em 1885 o museu mudou-se para sua localização atual, construído pelo arquiteto neerlandês Pierre Cuypers. Ele combinou elementos góticos e renascentistas. O museu tem um posição proeminente na Praça do Museu, próximo ao Museu van Gogh e ao Museu Stedelijk. A construção é ricamente decorada com referências da história da arte neerlandesa. A Ronda Nocturna de Rembrandt tem seu próprio corredor no museu desde 1906. Desde 2003 o museu sofreu restaurações, mas as obras-primas são constatemente presentes para o público.

A coleção de pinturas inclui trabalhos de artistas como Jacob van Ruysdael, Frans Hals, Johannes Vermeer e Rembrandt e de alunos de Rembrandt.

Em 2005, 95% do museu está fechado para renovação, mas as pinturas da coleção permanente ainda estão em mostra em uma exibição especial chamada As Obras-primas.

Algumas das pinturas do museu:

Rembrandt van Rijn

A Ronda Nocturna

Os síndicos da guilda dos fabricantes de tecidos

A noiva judia

A lição de Anatomia do Dr. Deyman

Pedro negando Cristo

Saskia com um véu

Retrato de Titus em hábito de monge

Auto-retrato como Apóstolo Paulo

Tobias, Ana e o Bode

Johannes Vermeer:

A Leiteira

A Carta de Amor

Mulher de Azul a ler uma carta

A Rua pequena

Frans Hals:

Retrato de um jovem casal

A Companhia Reynier Real

O bebedor alegre

Retrato de Lucas De Clercq

Retrato de Nicolaes Hasselaer

Retrato de um homem

Página oficial do Rijksmuseum

Virtual Collection of Masterpieces (VCM)

O melhor museu de Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

O Commons possui uma categoria contendo imagens e outros ficheiros sobre Rijksmuseum

 

Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

  

1/4

Se você visitar Amsterdam, precisará conhecer o Museu Nacional da Holanda: Rijksmuseum Amsterdam. O Museu Nacional fica na Praça do Museu, situada no centro de Amsterdam. O Museu Nacional, ou Rijksmuseum, possui uma maravilhosa coleção de arte e história holandesas. Após uma visita ao Rijksmuseum, você saberá mais sobre história e arte e terá visto alguns dos maiores marcos culturais da Holanda.

 

Obras-primas do Museu Nacional

Ao todo, a coleção do Rijksmuseum apresenta a história da Holanda em um contexto internacional, desde 1.100 até o presente. Há alguns ícones da história e cultura da Holanda que você não pode perder:

 

Ronda Noturna (de Nachtwacht) de Rembrandt é uma das mais famosas obras desse mestre holandês e é de tirar o fôlego.

 

O Rijksmuseum tem uma das melhores coleções de pinturas dos grandes mestres do século XVII, como Frans Hals, Jan Steen, Vermeer e Rembrandt.

 

Assim como o Museu Histórico de Haia, o Rijksmuseum apresenta lindas casas de bonecas, mobiliadas em detalhes, datando de 1676.

 

Se você não puder ir ao Delft Real, pode ainda apreciar algumas das melhores cerâmicas de Delft, de conjuntos de chá a vasos, no Museu Nacional.

 

Museu que é visita obrigatória em Amsterdam

Quer sua estadia em Amsterdam seja breve ou longa, você deve visitar o Rijksmuseum. Chegue cedo para evitar enfrentar filas. Combine a visita ao Rijksmuseum com várias outras atrações próximas, como o Museu Van Gogh, o Museu Stedelijk Amsterdam e a Coster Diamonds

 

Para obter mais informações sobre Amsterdam, retorne à página sobre Amsterdam ou à página sobre os museus de Amsterdam.

   

Militia Company of District II under the Command of Captain Frans Banninck Cocq, Known as the ‘Night Watch’, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, 1642

 

olieverf op doek, h 379.5cm × w 453.5cm. More details

 

Rembrandt’s largest, most famous canvas was made for the Arquebusiers guild hall. This was one of several halls of Amsterdam’s civic guard, the city’s militia and police. Rembrandt was the first to paint figures in a group portrait actually doing something. The captain, dressed in black, is telling his lieutenant to start the company marching. The guardsmen are getting into formation. Rembrandt used the light to focus on particular details, like the captain’s gesturing hand and the young girl in the foreground. She was the company mascot.

 

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669)

Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn was born in Leiden, the son of a miller. After finishing Latin School, his parents enrolled him at Leiden University. Rembrandt soon dropped out and became an apprentice painter under Jacob van Swanenburch in Leiden, and later Pieter Lastman in Amsterdam. Back in Leiden, he set up as an independent artist together with Jan Lievens. At this time, Rembrandt mainly painted biblical scenes in a precise style and with vibrant colours.

 

In 1631, he moved to Amsterdam where he received numerous commissions for portraits. His many pupils included Ferdinand Bol, Govert Flinck and Carel Fabritius. In this period, Rembrandt develop a more powerful chiaroscuro, a looser brush and a greater sense of drama. He focused more on historical scenes, and made numerous etchings and drawings.

 

In 1634, Rembrandt married Saskia Uylenburgh. They had a son, Titus, in 1641. Then a year later Saskia died. Later, in 1654, Rembrandt had a daughter with Hendrickje Stoffels. By now, he had accumulated huge debts and was forced to sell his house and property. He died in 1669 and was buried in Amsterdam's Westerkerk.

 

Rijks Museum - National Museum of Netherlands

 

Vision:

 

The Rijksmuseum links individuals with art and history.

 

Mission:

 

At the Rijksmuseum, art and history take on new meaning for a broad-based, contemporary national and international audience.

 

As a national institute, the Rijksmuseum offers a representative overview of Dutch art and history from the Middle Ages onwards, and of major aspects of European and Asian art.

 

The Rijksmuseum keeps, manages, conserves, restores, researches, prepares, collects, publishes, and presents artistic and historical objects, both on its own premises and elsewhere.

 

From 1800 to 2013

 

The Rijksmuseum first opened its doors in 1800 under the name ‘Nationale Kunstgalerij’. At the time, it was housed in Huis ten Bosch in The Hague. The collection mainly comprised paintings and historical objects. In 1808, the museum moved to the new capital city of Amsterdam, where it was based in the Royal Palace on Dam Square.

 

After King Willem I’s accession to the throne, the paintings and national print collection were moved to the Trippenhuis on Kloveniersburgwal, while the other objects were returned to The Hague. The current building was put into use in 1885. The Netherlands Museum for History and Art based in The Hague moved into the same premises, forming what would later become the departments of Dutch History and Sculpture & Applied Art.

The beginning

 

On 19 November 1798, more than three years after the birth of the Batavian Republic, the government decided to honour a suggestion put forward by Isaac Gogel by following the French example of setting up a national museum. The museum initially housed the remains of the viceregal collections and a variety of objects originating from state institutions. When the Nationale Kunstgalerij first opened its doors on 31 May 1800, it had more than 200 paintings and historical objects on display. In the years that followed, Gogel and the first director, C.S. Roos, made countless acquisitions. Their first purchase, The Swan by Jan Asselijn, cost 100 Dutch guilders and is still one of the Rijksmuseum’s top pieces.

Move to Amsterdam

 

In 1808, the new King Louis Napoleon ordered the collections to be moved to Amsterdam, which was to be made the capital of the Kingdom of Holland. The works of art and objects were taken to the Royal Palace on Dam Square, the former city hall of Amsterdam, where they were united with the city’s foremost paintings, including the Night Watch by Rembrandt. In 1809, the Koninklijk Museum opened its doors on the top floor of the palace.

 

A few years after Willem I returned to the Netherlands as the new king in 1813, the ‘Rijks Museum’ and the national print collection from The Hague relocated to the Trippenhuis, a 17th-century town-palace on Kloveniersburgwal, home to what would later become the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Much to the regret of the director, Cornelis Apostool, in 1820 many objects including pieces of great historical interest were assigned to the Kabinet van Zeldzaamheden [Royal Gallery of Rare Objects], which had been founded in The Hague. In 1838, a separate museum for modern 19th-century art was established in Paviljoen Welgelegen in Haarlem. Contrary to the days of Louis Napoleon, very few large acquisitions were made during this period.

 

Cuypers Cathedral

 

The Trippenhuis proved unsuitable as a museum. Furthermore, many people thought it time to establish a dedicated national museum building in the Netherlands. Work on a new building did not commence until 1876, after many years of debate. The architect, Pierre Cuypers, had drawn up a historic design for the Rijksmuseum, which combined the Gothic and the Renaissance styles. The design was not generally well-received; people considered it too mediaeval and not Dutch enough. The official opening took place in 1885.

 

Nearly all the older paintings belonging to the City of Amsterdam were hung in the Rijksmuseum alongside paintings and prints from the Trippenhuis, including paintings such as Rembrandt’s Jewish Bride, which had been bequeathed to the city by the banker A. van der Hoop. The collection of 19th-century art from Haarlem was also added to the museum’s collection. Finally, a significant part of the Kabinet van Zeldzaamheden, which had by then been incorporated into the new Netherlands Museum for History and Art, was returned to Amsterdam.

 

Renovations

 

Over the years, collections continued to grow and museum insight continued to expand, and so the Rijksmuseum building underwent many changes. Rooms were added to the south-west side of the building between 1904 and 1916 (now the Philips wing) to house the collection of 19th-century paintings donated to the museum by Mr and Mrs Drucker-Fraser. In the 1950s and 1960s, the two original courtyards were covered and renovated to create more rooms.

 

In 1927, while Schmidt-Degener was Managing Director, the Netherlands Museum was split to form the departments of Dutch History and Sculpture & Applied Art. These departments were moved to separate parts of the building after 1945. The arrival of a collection donated by the Association of Friends of Asian Art in the 1950s resulted in the creation of the Asian Art department.

 

The 1970s saw record numbers of visitors of almost one-and-a-half million per year, and the building gradually started to fall short of modern requirements.

‘Verder met Cuypers'

 

The current renovation reinstates the original Cuypers structure. The building work in the courtyards are removed. Paintings, applied art and history are no longer displayed in separate parts of the building, but form a single chronological circuit that tells the story of Dutch art and history.

 

The building is thoroughly modernized, while at the same time restoring more of Cuypers original interior designs: the Rijksmuseum has dubbed the venture ‘Verder met Cuypers‘ [Continuing with Cuypers]. The Rijksmuseum will be a dazzling new museum able to satisfy the needs of its 21st-century visitors!

 

Every year, the Rijksmuseum compiles an annual report for the previous year. Annual reports dating back to 1998 can be found here (in Dutch only). Reports relating to the years before 1998 are available in the reading room of the library.

 

O Museu Rijks é um dos maiores e mais importantes museus da Europa.É o maior dos Países Baixos, com acervo voltado quase todo aos artistas holandeses. As obras vão desde exemplares da arte sacra até a era dourada holandesa, além de uma substancial coleção de arte asiática.

Esse é o Rijksmuseum, o Museu Nacional dos Países Baixos. E aproveite, caro leitor, porque o Rijks esteve parcialmente fechado para reforma durante 10 anos – voltou a funcionar só em 2013. Ou seja, quem esteve em Amsterdam na última década não conheceu o Rijks, pelo menos não completamente.

 

Mas o quê tem lá? Muita coisa. Destaque para as coleções de arte e História holandesas. Os trabalhos dos pintores Frans Hals e Johannes Vermeer são alguns dos mais concorridos, mas imbatível mesmo é Rembrandt van Rijn, considerado um dos maiores pintores de todos os tempos. Se você não é um fã de museus de arte, mas faz questão de conhecer o trabalho desses grandes artistas, uma dica: assim que chegar ao Rijks, vá direto para a ala onde estão as obras-primas. Assim você vê o mais importante no início da visita, quando ainda está descansado e poderá dedicar o tempo necessário para essas obras.

A mais famosa delas é a “A Ronda Noturna”, de Rembrandt, uma obra que inspirou músicas, pinturas, filmes e até um flash mob. Quando o Rijks foi reaberto, artistas recriam a cena mostrada no quadro dentro de um shopping de Amsterdam. A ação está no vídeo abaixo e eu te garanto que vale a pena dar play.

 

Read more: www.360meridianos.com/2014/01/museus-de-amsterdam.html#ix...

Read more: www.360meridianos.com/2014/01/museus-de-amsterdam.html#ix...

Rijksmuseum, Museu Nacional

42 Stadhouderskade

Amsterdam

 

O museu Rijksmuseum de Amsterdã é o Museu Nacional da Holanda, onde você encontrará uma impressionante coleção permanente, formada por 5.000 pinturas e 30.000 obras de arte, além de 17.000 objetos históricos.

 

Esse museu nacional foi fundado em 1885 e está instalado em um edifício de estilo neogótico. A sua principal atração é a extensa coleção de quadros pintados por artistas holandeses, abrangendo um período que vai do séc. XV aos dias de hoje. A obra de arte mais famosa em exibição é o quadro A Ronda Noturna, de Rembrandt.

O museu Rijksmuseum está dividido em cinco departamentos: pintura, escultura, arte aplicada, arte oriental, história dos Países Baixos e gravuras. O núcleo da coleção é a pintura e suas obras mais representativas são as que pertencem ao Século de Ouro holandês, com quadros de artistas como Rembrandt, Vermeer ou Frans Hals.

Ver fonte: dreamguides.edreams.pt/holanda/amsterda/rijksmuseum

 

Museu Rijks, Amesterdão

O Museu Rijks (Museu Nacional) é um edifício histórico, sendo o maior museu nos Países Baixos. O Museu é o maior no numero relativamente às suas colecções, na área do edifício em si, no financiamento e no numero de funcionários empregados.

Cada ano, mais de um milhão de pessoas visitam o Museu Rijks. O Museu emprega cerca de 400 pessoas, incluindo 45 conservadores de museu que são especializados em todas as áreas.

O Museu Rijks é internacionalmente reconhecido pelas suas exibições e publicações, mas não só apenas por estes produtos de grande qualidade, mas também pelas áreas no museu em si que são fonte de inspiração e encorajam a criação de novas ideias.

O museu também tem recursos consideráveis para a educação, para a decoração e apresentação de exibições. Importantes designers são regularmente chamados a trabalharem em projectos no Museu Rijks.

O edifício principal do Museu Rijks está a ser renovado. A boa noticia é que a melhor parte da exposição está apresentada na redesenhada ala Philips. O nome desta exposição denomina-se "The Masterpieces'.

O museu abre diariamente das 10 da manhã até ás 5 da tarde.

A entrada é pela Stadhouderskade 42.

www.rijksmuseum.nl

 

Rijksmuseum

Origem: Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre.

O Rijksmuseum é um museu nacional dos Países Baixos, localizada em Amsterdão na Praça do museu. O Rijksmuseum é dedicado à artes e história. Ele tem uma larga coleção de pinturas da idade de ouro neerlandesa e uma substancial coleção de arte asiática.

O museu foi fundado em 1800 na cidade da Haia para exibir a coleção do primeiro-ministro. Foi inspirado no exemplo francês. Pelos neerlandeses ficou conhecida como Galeria de Arte. Em 1808 o museu mudou-se para Amsterdã pelas ordens do rei Louis Napoleón, irmão de Napoleão Bonaparte. As pinturas daquela cidade, como A Ronda Nocturna de Rembrandt, tornaram-se parte da coleção.

Em 1885 o museu mudou-se para sua localização atual, construído pelo arquiteto neerlandês Pierre Cuypers. Ele combinou elementos góticos e renascentistas. O museu tem um posição proeminente na Praça do Museu, próximo ao Museu van Gogh e ao Museu Stedelijk. A construção é ricamente decorada com referências da história da arte neerlandesa. A Ronda Nocturna de Rembrandt tem seu próprio corredor no museu desde 1906. Desde 2003 o museu sofreu restaurações, mas as obras-primas são constatemente presentes para o público.

A coleção de pinturas inclui trabalhos de artistas como Jacob van Ruysdael, Frans Hals, Johannes Vermeer e Rembrandt e de alunos de Rembrandt.

Em 2005, 95% do museu está fechado para renovação, mas as pinturas da coleção permanente ainda estão em mostra em uma exibição especial chamada As Obras-primas.

Algumas das pinturas do museu:

Rembrandt van Rijn

A Ronda Nocturna

Os síndicos da guilda dos fabricantes de tecidos

A noiva judia

A lição de Anatomia do Dr. Deyman

Pedro negando Cristo

Saskia com um véu

Retrato de Titus em hábito de monge

Auto-retrato como Apóstolo Paulo

Tobias, Ana e o Bode

Johannes Vermeer:

A Leiteira

A Carta de Amor

Mulher de Azul a ler uma carta

A Rua pequena

Frans Hals:

Retrato de um jovem casal

A Companhia Reynier Real

O bebedor alegre

Retrato de Lucas De Clercq

Retrato de Nicolaes Hasselaer

Retrato de um homem

Página oficial do Rijksmuseum

Virtual Collection of Masterpieces (VCM)

O melhor museu de Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum

O Commons possui uma categoria contendo imagens e outros ficheiros sobre Rijksmuseum

 

Rijksmuseum Amsterdam

  

1/4

Se você visitar Amsterdam, precisará conhecer o Museu Nacional da Holanda: Rijksmuseum Amsterdam. O Museu Nacional fica na Praça do Museu, situada no centro de Amsterdam. O Museu Nacional, ou Rijksmuseum, possui uma maravilhosa coleção de arte e história holandesas. Após uma visita ao Rijksmuseum, você saberá mais sobre história e arte e terá visto alguns dos maiores marcos culturais da Holanda.

 

Obras-primas do Museu Nacional

Ao todo, a coleção do Rijksmuseum apresenta a história da Holanda em um contexto internacional, desde 1.100 até o presente. Há alguns ícones da história e cultura da Holanda que você não pode perder:

 

Ronda Noturna (de Nachtwacht) de Rembrandt é uma das mais famosas obras desse mestre holandês e é de tirar o fôlego.

 

O Rijksmuseum tem uma das melhores coleções de pinturas dos grandes mestres do século XVII, como Frans Hals, Jan Steen, Vermeer e Rembrandt.

 

Assim como o Museu Histórico de Haia, o Rijksmuseum apresenta lindas casas de bonecas, mobiliadas em detalhes, datando de 1676.

 

Se você não puder ir ao Delft Real, pode ainda apreciar algumas das melhores cerâmicas de Delft, de conjuntos de chá a vasos, no Museu Nacional.

 

Museu que é visita obrigatória em Amsterdam

Quer sua estadia em Amsterdam seja breve ou longa, você deve visitar o Rijksmuseum. Chegue cedo para evitar enfrentar filas. Combine a visita ao Rijksmuseum com várias outras atrações próximas, como o Museu Van Gogh, o Museu Stedelijk Amsterdam e a Coster Diamonds

 

Para obter mais informações sobre Amsterdam, retorne à página sobre Amsterdam ou à página sobre os museus de Amsterdam.

   

There are two basic requirements for a stranger portrait: having a camera and meeting a stranger. Sometimes, you may not be out to do a portrait but an opportunity to do so will come to you.

 

It was the case for my encounter with Andréa.

 

I have been taking photos since a couple of years around what is called the Complexe environmental St-Michel (CESM). This is a site neighboring the Cirque du Soleil’s head office in the north of Montréal. The CESM was originally a major quarry. It was afterwards the largest refuse dump site on the Island of Montréal. It will over the course of a generation be transformed into an important green park.

 

A number of parks have been created following the same process throughout the city. For the moment, there are still pipes collecting gases from the refuse landfill and a plant treating them hidden at the lowest point of the CESM. It will take years before this place becomes a choice picnic spot but we can thank the city for playing ahead.

 

Until recently, the CESM Park was essentially a cycling and running path around the periphery of the huge excavation. Along this path, an indoor soccer park is currently awaiting completion and a skateboarding complex, the Taz, has been open for a few years.

 

Behind the Taz, there is an outdoor skate park. I had been reluctant to this date to photograph the skaters as many are minors and I’m not sure how to deal ethically with that. This time, I thought I would try to take a photo of a sculpture that stands as a mascot near the skaters and show some skaters as blurred figures in the background. As I was trying to work out settings to do this right, I heard someone call my name. It was a young woman named Gabrielle that I had initially met last summer while working on my project quartiersnord.photos/les-gens-the-people . She rode her board my way and we chatted a bit. Her opinion was that every skater would like to be photographed!

 

At that point, she called over her friend Andréa. The two ladies were enjoying the beautiful Friday afternoon on their boards. They were helping out and coaching a young girl named Maya in a spontaneous gesture of feminine comradeship.

 

Before shooting this portrait, I photographed the three skateboarders together. I’ll likely post that photo tomorrow.

Gabrielle and Andréa are gearing up for a great summer. Gabrielle will be heading to Peru and Andréa will visit friends in northern Italy in an area close to France.

 

I wish them and Maya to fully enjoy the coming months and thank them for accepting to be photographed.

 

Il y a deux exigences de base pour un réaliser le portrait d’un inconnu: disposer d’un appareil photo et rencontrer un inconnu. Parfois, vous partez faire des photos ans avoir en tête de faire un portrait, mais une occasion de le faire se présente d’elle-même à vous.

 

Ce fut le cas pour ma rencontre avec Andréa.

 

Je prends des photos depuis quelques années autour de ce qui s’appelle le Complexe environnemental St-Michel (CESM). C’est un site voisin du siège social du Cirque du Soleil dans le nord de Montréal. Le CESM était à l'origine une carrière importante. Il devint après le plus grand site d’enfouissement d’ordures sur l'île de Montréal. Le temps que passe une génération, il sera transformé en un grand parc vert.

 

Un certain nombre de parcs ont été créés en suivant le même processus dans toute la ville. Pour le moment, il y a encore des tuyaux collectant les gaz émanant des déchets enfouis et une usine pour les traiter cachée au point le plus creux du CESM. Il faudra des années avant que cet endroit devient un lieu de pique-nique populaire mais nous pouvons remercier la ville de planifier à long terme.

 

Jusqu'à récemment, le parc du CESM était essentiellement une piste pour les cyclistes et coureurs autour de la périphérie de cette grande excavation. Le long de ce chemin, un parc de soccer intérieur est actuellement en voie d'achèvement et un complexe pour skaters, le Taz, est ouvert depuis quelques années.

 

Derrière le Taz, il y a un parc de skate en plein air. Je me suis montré réticent à cette date à photographier les skaters. Beaucoup sont mineurs et je ne suis pas sûr de l’éthique à adopté dans leur cas. Cette fois, je me disais que je pourrais essayer de prendre une photo d'une sculpture qui se dresse comme une mascotte près des patineurs tout en montrant certains d'entre eux comme des figures floues en arrière-plan. Comme je travaillais sur les réglages adéquats, j'ai entendu quelqu'un appeler mon nom. C’était une jeune femme nommée Gabrielle que j'avais rencontré l'été dernier en travaillant sur mon projet quartiersnord.photos/les-gens-the-people. Elle s’est approchée de moi sur sa planche et nous avons bavardé un peu. Gabrielle était d’opinion que chaque patineur souhaite être photographié!

 

À ce moment-là, elle appela son amie Andréa. Les deux dames profitaient de ce beau vendredi après-midi sur leurs planches . Elles aidaient et conseillaient une jeune fille nommée Maya dans un élan de camaraderie féminine.

 

Avant de prendre ce portrait, j’ai photographié les trois skateboarders ensemble. Je prévois vous montrer cette photo demain.

 

Gabrielle et Andréa se préparent pour un bel été. Gabrielle se rendra au Pérou et Andréa va visiter des amis dans le nord de l'Italie dans une région proche de la France.

 

Je leur souhaite, ainsi qu’à Maya, de profiter pleinement des mois à venir et je les remercie d'avoir accepté de se faire photographier.

 

This photo is part of my 100 strangers project. Find out more about the project and see pictures taken by other photographers at the 100 Strangers Flickr Group page www.flickr.com/groups/100strangers/

 

Part of a series I did for a friend of mine. She inspired herself in Lady Gaga for a picture to be included in the invitation for a birthday party she's throwing.

Parte de una serie que hice para una amiga. Se inspiró en Lady Gaga para una foto que se incluiría en la invitación para su fiesta de cumpleaños.

No dia 5 de Outubro de 2013, a seção de frutas do Zaffari Bourbon de Novo Hamburgo, RS, Brasil, trouxe uma bela surpresa para os seus clientes durante aquele final de semana. Foram feitos retratos em relevo sobre sete melancias e um mamão também. Não resisti, fiz rápidas fotografias. Peço desculpas por demorar cerca de 15 dias para a publicação aqui. Na foto, o esquilo vermelho, tradicional mascote dos mercados Zaffari Bourbon.

 

On October 5 2013, the fruit section of Zaffari Bourbon Novo Hamburgo, RS, Brazil, brought a nice surprise for their clients during that weekend. Were made pictures in relief on seven watermelons and one papayas as well. I couldn't resist, I made rapid photographs. I apologize for taking about 15 days for publication here. In the photo, the red squirrel, traditional mascot markets Zaffari Bourbon.