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To finish off our trip to Utah Rob and I hit Vegas to grab a buffet. I’d been looking at buffet reviews online during the outlandish amount of time we spent in the coffee shop over the past week. We decided to make our move on one just outside of downtown Vegas and the bustle of the strip. Vegas is huge…by the time we’d gotten on the phone with the buffet place to get directions…we were way off where we needed to be. Rather than try and navigate the Vegas freeway system, which was/is in the midst of major construction we opted to pick another buffet from the list.

 

The winner was the Mirage….primarily because we could see it close by.

 

To say we ate a lot is an understatement. Rob has a video of me recapping everything I ate during the experience. It was a lot of food…most of it was very good. I made sure to eat my weight in crab and shrimp…as well as finishing off the whole ordeal with two big bowls of gelato….and toppings

 

I was full.

 

Painfully full.

 

Rather than immediately getting in the car and driving to Death Valley….we decided to shoot the strip and look at the Peter Lik Gallery….which was located in Mandalay Bay….We could see Mandalay Bay from the Mirage…we decided to make a little walk.

 

2 hours later…we arrived.

 

Vegas deceives you with distances. While you get a good visual of another casino on the strip…you have no idea that it’s really 2 mile walk to get there. It’s not an easy walk either. The casinos have purposely set up the sidewalk system so that in order to continue down the strip…you must walk through certain casinos…which ALWAYS ends up being a maze of confusion before you finally get back out to the strip…if indeed you’re even still headed the right direction when you do. I can’t tell you how many times we were foiled by this setup…and we were sober. I watched one poor drunk guy cursing and wandering aimlessly in one of these traps. I’m convinced he’s still lost somewhere in Excalibur.

 

I liked some of the Peter Lik gallery…some I wasn’t crazy about. I think mostly I was just really full of buffet…and tired of walking...so my artistic appreciation filter was a bit off. I’ll say this, the guy is a marketing genius to be able to get to the point he’s at now. Rob asked the guy working the desk which image was the best selling…it was a shot of Mossbrae Falls in Dunsmuir.

 

Crazy.

 

The nice thing about our walk to Mandalay Bay was that we were able to repeat it again on the way back to the car….funny how we got lost AGAIN on the way back…in completely different spots than we had on the way there.

 

I hate you Vegas.

 

The best part of the whole walk (there or back) was watching the fountains at the Bellagio do their dance. I don’t think I had ever seen them before…or wasn’t paying attention if I had. It was really very cool…and I almost wished I had taken the camera with me.

 

Driving OUT of Vegas is as confusing as driving IN Vegas. Turns out, they really would rather you didn’t leave. I’m convinced that’s how the motto; ‘What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas’ originated…you never get out to share it with anyone.

 

It took forever to finally get on the road towards Death Valley. Just in time for my buffet to decide it was no longer happy being in my belly. Turns out that what happens in a Vegas buffet doesn’t stay in Vegas either….to make a long story short, there is a very humiliated bush out in the Nevadan desert somewhere.

 

We made only one other stop before arriving in Death Valley, an out of the way casino/ RV place. When Rob and I walked in the door the population of the building doubled. (The other two were employees) They still had on dance music, and a disco-ball spinning.

I thought it would’ve been fun to have an spontaneous dance battle…but I was tired, and my stomach wasn’t entirely right…so we opted to keep our time brief, and buy only snacks.

 

It was after 2am when we arrived in Death Valley…under a cloudless desert sky we set up Rob’s tent in the Furnace Creek campground….sometime later that morning the coyotes howled their disapproval that we did not bring a crock pot for them.

 

Sunrise was dull. We chose to explore the Badwater area for the morning…but it wouldn’t have mattered where we shot…the sky just wasn’t cooperating. We took a few shots anyway before making the long drive north hoping we could finish with a bang in Lake Tahoe.

 

This is another shot from Antelope Canyon…this section of the canyon was lit beautifully, and I really liked the color palette the camera picked up.

 

SURPRISE! & Nooo dont get me wrong..i didn't go to Canada haha! Well, this is the 1st time i've posted a shot that is not mine! :)) This shot was taken by one of my mates in 2005 during her canada trip, in which i had the privilege to copy some of her beautiful shots across as my desktop wallpaper.

 

Quite a lot of ppl I know are too shy to share their photos online cos they think that their shots might not be of high quality enough esp when its taken from an inexpensive or old compact cam. Wrong wrong! :)) To me, everyone deserves an equal chance to share along what they've seen & let others enjoy it too. This is why I've decided to post this photo with full credit to my friend who prefers to remain anonymous ;) Of coz, with my itchy fingers, i've to at least first try it out in my hdr factory b4 its showcased. I'm really happy with the outcome esp how the foreground turns out even when its just a single shot tonemapping. Not truly a hdr too but enjoy!

 

View LARGE On Black to see the clarity of the water

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About

 

Lake Louise in Banff National Park, Alberta Canada

 

The Shot

 

Standard 1 exposure shot (0 EV) taken handheld using Ricoh Caplio R3

 

Photomatix

 

- Tonemapped generated HDR using detail enhancer option

 

Photoshop

 

- Added 2 layer mask effect of 'curves' to increase the contrast

- Added 1 layer mask effect of 'saturation' (greens) to tone up the water

- Added 1 layer mask effect of 'saturation' (blues) to desaturate the tone of snow

- Added 1 layer mask effect of 'saturation' (reds) to desaturate some rocks

- Added 1 layer mask effect of 'photo filter' (blues) to enhance the sky

- Slightly cropped part of the original shot for a better composition

- Applied noise reduction to foreground

 

You

 

All comments, criticism and tips for improvements are (as always) welcome. Be kind :P

 

Music

 

Enya - Amid The Falling Snow

 

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Rua dos Melos - Soure

Portugal 2011

www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMqsWc8muj8

Everything about you is how I wanna be

Your freedom comes naturally

Everything about you resonates happiness

Now I won't settle for less

 

Give me all the peace and joy in your mind

 

Everything about you pains my envying

Your soul can't hate anything

Everything about you is so easy to love

They're watching you from above

 

Give me all the peace and joy in your mind

I want the peace and joy in your mind

Give me the peace and joy in your mind

 

Everything about you resonates happiness

Now I won't settle for less

 

Give me all the peace and joy in your mind

I want the peace and joy in your mind

Give me the peace and joy in your mind

  

First of all, my apologies if i have not been to your photostreams yet. I have been studying for an exam almost the whole of last night and haven't had much chance to spend time online.Therefore thank you so much for your time to pop by again! Appreciate them as always & i will be back soon to catch up with you all! :D .....

 

....& wish me luck of course! :P The exam is going to commence in an hours time! from the min of this post!

 

As i am unable to process new hdr last night, I decided to post this shot which was captured ages ago.. i reckon its around the time when i just started doing hdr. This hdr has been done a long while back but have been re-processed to further remove noise artifacts. It might not be of a real high standard (still naive then LOL!) but hope you will enjoy it :)

 

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About

 

The Sunset Reflection at River Torrens

 

The Shot

 

Standard 3 exposure shots (-1..0..+1 EV) with tripod using the Canon kit lens EF-S 18-55mm

 

Photomatix

 

- Tonemapped generated HDR using detail enhancer option

 

Photoshop

 

- Added 1 layer mask effect of 'curves' to increase the contrast

- Added 1 layer mask effect of 'saturation' (yellows) to slightly tone up the whole image

- Applied slight dodging on the trees (not too much as i want to have silhouette feel to it)

- Added 1 layer mask effect of 'saturation' (reds & cyans) to brush off the ghost artifacts of the trees

- Used 'unsharp mask' (as always) on the background layer

 

You

 

All comments, criticism and tips for improvements are (as always) welcome.

 

Music

 

Christina Aguilera - Reflection

 

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Intentionally processed this to have that painting feel & look to it. NZ has always been like a fantasy world to me so hopefully this fits the bill & not totally disgust my lovely kiwi mates here. Sorry no bad intention here but if you are still not at all impressed, pls kindly have a look at some online, you might realise that this can't really be that bad rite lol! :P

 

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About

 

The view of Queenstown in South Island, New Zealand

 

The Shot

 

Standard 3 exposure shot (+2..0..-2 EV) in RAW taken handheld

 

Camera :: Canon EOS Rebel XTi (400D)

Lens :: Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 EX DC HSM

 

Photomatix

 

- Tonemapped generated HDR using detail enhancer option

 

Photoshop

 

- Added 2 layer mask effect of 'curves' for overall contrast

- Added 1 layer mask effect of 'levels' to lighten all dark areas

- Added 1 layer mask effect of 'levels' to bring out the details of the mountain

- Added 1 layer mask effect of 'saturation' (blues & cyans) to darken the sky

- Added 1 layer mask effect of 'saturation' (yellows & greens) to desaturate the vegetations

- Added 1 layer mask effect of 'saturation' (reds) to tone down the foregrounf

 

Music

 

Tommy Page - Paintings in My Mind

 

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Included in "nuove architetture" gallery

(www.flickr.com/photos/69901321@N08/galleries/721576295454...)

 

Best seen on black: press L to view.

Please press L (or simply click the image) to view on black.

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Warm, sunny summer weather has returned to Curitiba but I still wanted to post this series of wet windshield abstracts taken several days ago.

 

Hope your new week is off to a great (hopefully not too frantic) start.

 

Thanks for visiting.

Army Photography Contest - 2007 - FMWRC - Arts and Crafts - A Plumpish Proportion

 

Photo By: SSG Robert Stewart

 

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

 

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History

 

After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.

On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.

In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work... Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm...”

In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.

In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion ...to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

 

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”

Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.

To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.

The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.

After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.

Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.

Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.

Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.

In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.

Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.

While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.

In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”

The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.

In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”

In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.

The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”

In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.

As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”

At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.

When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.

In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.

The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.

During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.

The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.

In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.

Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”

The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.

In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.

After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.

The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, engraving and trophy sales, etc... New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.

The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.

The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.

The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:

* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc...)

* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence...)

* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.

* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things ...).

* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.

* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).

* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).

* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).

* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc...).

* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.

* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.

What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc... were far away places that most had not visited.

As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.

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© Angela M. Lobefaro

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

  

or Twilights of the Gods

 

Götterdämmerung on Wikipedia

   

Sunset

taken in Koh Phi Phi Don, Thailand. June 2008

 

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The Phi Phi Islands (Thai: หมู่เกาะพีพี) are located in Thailand, between the large island of Phuket and the western Andaman Sea coast of the mainland. Phi Phi Don, the larger and principal of the two Phi Phi islands, is located at [show location on an interactive map] 7°44′00″N, 98°46′00″E. Both Phi Phi Don, and Phi Phi Leh, the smaller, are administratively part of Krabi province, most of which is on the mainland, and is located at [show location on an interactive map] 8°02′30″N, 98°48′39″E.

 

Ko Phi Phi Don ("ko" (Thai: เกาะ) meaning "island" in the Thai language) is the largest island of the group, and is the only island with permanent inhabitants, although the beaches of the second largest island, Ko Phi Phi Lee (or "Ko Phi Phi Leh"), are visited by many people as well. There are no accommodation facilities on this island, but it is just a short boat ride from Ko Phi Phi Don. The rest of the islands in the group, including Bida Nok, Bida Noi, and Bamboo Island, are not much more than large limestone rocks jutting out of the sea.

 

Phi Phi Don was initially populated by Muslim fishermen during the late 1940s, and later became a coconut plantation. The Thai population of Phi Phi Don remains more than 80% Muslim.But the actual population if counting laborers, especially from the north-east, from the mainland is much more Buddhist these days.

 

Ko Phi Phi Leh was the backdrop for the 2000 movie The Beach. Phi Phi Leh also houses the 'Viking Cave', from which there is a thriving bird's nest soup industry. There was criticism during filming of 'The Beach' that the permission granted to the film company to physically alter the environment inside Phi Phi Islands National Park was illegal. [1] The controversy cooled down however, when it was discovered that the producers had done such a decent job of restoring the place that it finally looked better than it had done before.

 

Following the release of The Beach, tourism on Phi Phi Don increased dramatically, and with it the population of the island. Many buildings were constructed without planning permission.[citation needed]

 

Ko Phi Phi was devastated by the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004, when nearly all of the island's infrastructure was wiped out. Redevelopment has, however, been swift, and services like electricity, water, Internet access and ATMs are up and running again, but waste handling has been slower to come back online.

  

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from: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phi_Phi_Island

 

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Title: Missale romanum ordinarium. : Misale romanum nuper adoptatum co[m]modu[m] quoru[m]cu[m]q[ue] sacerdotu[m] summa diligentia distinctu[m]: atq[ue] ita ex nouo ordine digestu[m] vt apposit[is] introitib[us], gradualib[us], offertorijs [et] co[m]munionibus o[mn]es miss[a]e sint in suis loc[is] integre. In quo etia[m] adiunct[a]e sunt mult[a]e miss[a]e uou[a]e [sic], [et] alia plurima sup[er]addita, q[uae] in missalib[us] hacten[us] i[m]p[re]ssis d[e]sideraba[n]tur. 1561

Identifier: missaleromanumor00cath

Year: 1561 (1560s)

Authors: Catholic Church Espinosa, Antonio de, d. 1578. prt León, Nicolás, 1859-1929. fmo RPJCB

Subjects: Catholic Church CSAIP Missals Gregorian chants Imprint 1561

Publisher: [8], 330 leaves : ill., music

  

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London | Architecture | Night Photography

 

EXPLORE # 221, FRONT PAGE on the 24th...

 

The O2 is a large entertainment district including an indoor arena, a music club, a cinema, an exhibition space, piazzas and bars and restaurants, built within a large dome-shaped building (formerly the Millennium Dome), on the Greenwich peninsula in south-east London, UK. It is often incorrectly referred to as The O2 dome, the O2 Centre (which is actually a shopping centre in Finchley Road) or The O2 arena which is actually the name of the arena in The O2 and an arena in Dublin, Ireland. The name of the Entertainment District officially became The O2, when O2 plc (now Telefónica O2 Europe plc) purchased the naming rights from the developers, Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG), during the development of the entertainment district.

 

The dome-shaped building, also referred to as the Dome's canopy, was originally constructed as the Millennium Dome, often simply known as the Dome, and housed the Millennium Experience, a major exhibition celebrating the third Millennium. After the closure of the exhibition on December 31, 2000, the interior of the building was demolished leaving only the shell of the Dome. Although AEG has transformed the interior of the Dome's shell and have renamed it The O2, many still refer to it as the Dome.

 

Since the closure of the original exhibition celebrating the millennium, several possible ways of reusing the Dome's shell were proposed and then rejected. The official renaming of the Dome on May 31, 2005 gave publicity to its transition into an Entertainment District including an indoor arena, a music club, a cinema, an exhibition space, and bars and restaurants. The interior of the Dome's shell was completely cleared prior to the development and construction of the new facilities. The Dome's shell itself remained in situ but its interior and the area around North Greenwich Station, the QE2 pier and the main entrance area was completely redeveloped. In this role the plan is to host the 2009 World Gymnastics Championships and the artistic gymnastics and basketball events of the 2012 Summer Olympic Games,[1] as well as two National Hockey League games and a National Basketball Association game in 2007. The Tennis Masters Cup, which will be renamed to ATP World Tour Finals, is intended to be held in The O2 arena from 2009 to 2012. In 2008, Red Bull Air Race World Series came to the Greenwich Peninsula, although the actual event was over the River Thames, and stands were made on the bank, you had to book via the 02. The area is served by North Greenwich tube station, which was opened just before the millennium exhibition, on the Jubilee Line, and by bus routes.

 

Thames Clipper operate a river boat service for London River Services; the present dome tenants, AEG, purchased Thames Clipper in order to provide river links between Central London and The O2. As well as a commuter service, Thames Clipper also operate a new O2 Express service.

 

London Night ; O2 Dome

 

Color of The O2 Dome , London

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_O2

The 16. century Santa Maria de' Ricci church hosts all day concerts on its modern, magnificent organ as a way to raise funds for the restoration of the facade.

I was wandering about Via del Corso before going to the railway station, when suddenly the music of an organ caressed my ears. I went into the church. The interior is a bit too (late) Baroque for my taste, but the organ was so beautiful... I tried to capture its beauty for the eyes, leaving to your imagination the beauty of the music. This is by no means a perfect shot (in many churches it is not allowed the use of a tripod), but I have tried hard to convey a bit of the atmosphere I perceived in that moment.

 

Didacus67 (mostly off)'s photos on Flickriver

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Seasonal change in magical colors.

 

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(hat by azhippiechick, dress by moma10 (Everything for the Girl))

16 Things About Moi:

1. I LOVE the color orange!

2. I'm from Wisconsin, USA, but I moved to Scotland in 2003 when I got married.

3. I love Midwestern winters (tho not driving in them)--the weather here is a bit (well, way too) mild for me!

4. I love to watch WWE wrestling...

5. My fave authors are Jack Kerouac and Neil Gaiman.

6. Jim & I met online, at a Led Zeppelin message board...

7. ...but "classic rock "isn't really my thing...my fave groups are REM and The Clash!

8. I was the music director at my tiny college's radio station my senior year (go, WCCX!).

9. When I was in college, I shaved the hair off half my head and left the other side long. :)

10. I spent 6 weeks travelling around the (then) Soviet Union (inc. Siberia!) in January, 1989.

11. The Chicago Bulls are my fave NBA team (I love basketball).

12. Not counting any of Jim's CDs, I personally must have about 500, I think...!!!

13. My dream destination is Borneo.

14. I believe in fairies!

15. I'm glad that our neighbour's cat likes us and comes to visit--it's like having a vicarious pet! :)

16. I'm a passionate, sometimes hot-tempered, fiery redhead!

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

 

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. That whenever any form of government becomes destructive to these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards for their future security. --Such has been the patient sufferance of these colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former systems of government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over these states. To prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world.

 

He has refused his assent to laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.

  

He has forbidden his governors to pass laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation till his assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them.

 

He has refused to pass other laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of representation in the legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only.

 

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their public records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures.

 

He has dissolved representative houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people.

 

He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the legislative powers, incapable of annihilation, have returned to the people at large for their exercise; the state remaining in the meantime exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.

 

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these states; for that purpose obstructing the laws for naturalization of foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither, and raising the conditions of new appropriations of lands.

 

He has obstructed the administration of justice, by refusing his assent to laws for establishing judiciary powers.

 

He has made judges dependent on his will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries.

 

He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither swarms of officers to harass our people, and eat out their substance.

 

He has kept among us, in times of peace, standing armies without the consent of our legislature.

 

He has affected to render the military independent of and superior to civil power.

 

He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his assent to their acts of pretended legislation:

 

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:

 

For protecting them, by mock trial, from punishment for any murders which they should commit on the inhabitants of these states:

 

For cutting off our trade with all parts of the world:

 

For imposing taxes on us without our consent:

 

For depriving us in many cases, of the benefits of trial by jury:

 

For transporting us beyond seas to be tried for pretended offenses:

 

For abolishing the free system of English laws in a neighboring province, establishing therein an arbitrary government, and enlarging its boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule in these colonies:

 

For taking away our charters, abolishing our most valuable laws, and altering fundamentally the forms of our governments:

 

For suspending our own legislatures, and declaring themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever.

 

He has abdicated government here, by declaring us out of his protection and waging war against us.

 

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burned our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people.

 

He is at this time transporting large armies of foreign mercenaries to complete the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of cruelty and perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the head of a civilized nation.

 

He has constrained our fellow citizens taken captive on the high seas to bear arms against their country, to become the executioners of their friends and brethren, or to fall themselves by their hands.

 

He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian savages, whose known rule of warfare, is undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.

 

In every stage of these oppressions we have petitioned for redress in the most humble terms: our repeated petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A prince, whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.

 

Nor have we been wanting in attention to our British brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, enemies in war, in peace friends.

 

We, therefore, the representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress, assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the name, and by the authority of the good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these united colonies are, and of right ought to be free and independent states; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the state of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as free and independent states, they have full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and to do all other acts and things which independent states may of right do. And for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.

 

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London Set | Architecture Set | Night Set | London Underground

  

EXPLORE # 271

 

=======================================================================

 

Streaming Train in a Urban London UK Underground station...very quiet for a change, apart from a lost ghost train architecture. City of London Urban, Metropolitan

 

The London Underground is a metro system serving a large part of Greater London and neighbouring areas of Essex, Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire in England. It is the world's oldest underground railway system. It is usually referred to as the Underground or the Tube - the latter deriving from the shape of the system's deep-bore tunnels - although about 55% of the network is above ground.

The Underground has 268 stations and approximately 400 km (250 miles) of track,[1] making it the longest metro system in the world by route length,[4] and one of the most served in terms of stations. In 2007, over one billion passenger journeys were recorded.

Transport for London (TfL) was created in 2000 as the integrated body responsible for London's transport system. It replaced London Regional Transport. It assumed control of London Underground Limited in July 2003.

 

The Underground has been featured in many movies and television shows, including Sliding Doors, Tube Tales and Neverwhere. The London Underground Film Office handles over 100 requests per month. The Underground has also featured in music such as The Jam's "Down in the Tube Station at Midnight" and in literature such as the graphic novel V for Vendetta. Popular legends about the Underground being haunted persist to this day.

The Underground currently sponsors and contributes to the arts via its Platform for Art and Poems on the Underground projects. Poster and billboard space (and in the case of Gloucester Road tube station, an entire disused platform) is given over to artwork and poetry to "create an environment for positive impact and to enhance and enrich the journeys of ... passengers".[

 

The London Underground's 11 lines are the Bakerloo line, Central line, Circle line, District line, Hammersmith & City line, Jubilee line, Metropolitan line, Northern line, Piccadilly line, Victoria line, and Waterloo & City line. Until 2007 there was a twelfth line, the East London line, but this has closed for conversion work and will be transferred to the London Overground when it reopens in 2010.

 

Transport for London (TfL) was created in 2000 as the integrated body responsible for London's transport system. It replaced London Regional Transport. It assumed control of London Underground Limited in July 2003.[21]

 

TfL is part of the Greater London Authority and is constituted as a statutory corporation regulated under local government finance rules.[22] It has three subsidiaries: London Transport Insurance (Guernsey) Ltd., the TfL Pension Fund Trustee Co. Ltd. and Transport Trading Ltd (TTL). TTL has six wholly-owned subsidiaries, one of which is London Underground Limited.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waterloo_tube_station

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Underground

 

London Underground in Urban Architecture England

=======================================================================

O! say can you see by the dawn’s early light,

What so proudly we hailed at the twilight’s last gleaming,

Whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight,

O’er the ramparts we watched, were so gallantly streaming?

And the rockets’ red glare, the bombs bursting in air,

Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there;

O! say does that star-spangled banner yet wave,

O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

 

On the shore dimly seen through the mists of the deep,

Where the foe’s haughty host in dread silence reposes,

What is that which the breeze, o’er the towering steep,

As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?

Now it catches the gleam of the morning’s first beam,

In full glory reflected now shines in the stream:

’Tis the star-spangled banner, O! long may it wave

O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

 

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore

That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion,

A home and a country, should leave us no more?

Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps’ pollution.

No refuge could save the hireling and slave

From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave:

And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave,

O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

 

O! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand

Between their loved home and the war’s desolation.

Blest with vict’ry and peace, may the Heav’n rescued land

Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation!

Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,

And this be our motto: “In God is our trust;”

And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave

O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

 

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Next stop Trieste!

 

Venice is built on an archipelago of 117 islands formed by 177 canals in a shallow lagoon, connected by 409 bridges.

 

Venice (Italian: Venezia [veˈnɛttsja] ( listen), Venetian: Venexia [veˈnɛsja]) is a city in northeast Italy which is renowned for the beauty of its setting, its architecture and its artworks. It is the capital of the Veneto region. In 2009, there were 270,098 people residing in Venice's comune (the population estimate of 272,000 inhabitants includes the population of the whole Comune of Venezia; around 60,000 in the historic city of Venice (Centro storico); 176,000 in Terraferma (the Mainland), mostly in the large frazioni of Mestre and Marghera; 31,000 live on other islands in the lagoon). Together with Padua and Treviso, the city is included in the Padua-Treviso-Venice Metropolitan Area (PATREVE) (population 1,600,000).

 

The name is derived from the ancient Veneti people who inhabited the region by the 10th century B.C. The city historically was the capital of the Venetian Republic. Venice has been known as the "La Dominante", "Serenissima", "Queen of the Adriatic", "City of Water", "City of Masks", "City of Bridges", "The Floating City", and "City of Canals". Luigi Barzini described it in The New York Times as "undoubtedly the most beautiful city built by man". Venice has also been described by the Times Online as being one of Europe's most romantic cities.

 

The city stretches across 117 small islands in the marshy Venetian Lagoon along the Adriatic Sea in northeast Italy. The saltwater lagoon stretches along the shoreline between the mouths of the Po (south) and the Piave (north) Rivers.

 

The Republic of Venice was a major maritime power during the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and a staging area for the Crusades and the Battle of Lepanto, as well as a very important center of commerce (especially silk, grain, and spice) and art in the 13th century up to the end of the 17th century. This made Venice a wealthy city throughout most of its history. It is also known for its several important artistic movements, especially the Renaissance period. Venice has played an important role in the history of symphonic and operatic music, and it is the birthplace of Antonio Vivaldi.

 

Please visit en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venice for further information...

  

© Stephen B Whatley

 

A screen shot from the just-published December 2009 exhibit, "Images in Faith" - A Christmas Presentation of the Christian work of Stephen B Whatley online in Downtown LA Life Magazine International.

 

To view this new presentation of Stephen B Whatley's Christain paintings, please click the link below - enter via the first image - and click 'Images in Faith' on the left hand menu.

downtownlalife.com

 

" I was deeply touched and honoured when recently contacted by Don Noyes-More, Editor-in Chief of this popular online 'green' arts magazine, informing me that the magazine planned this presentation- now showing. A number of my Christian paintings have been beautifully presented on scarlet and set to beautiful holy music.

 

Aside from my online exhibition, Downtown LA Life - which to date has had over 27 million visitors - contains a wealth of eclectic features about the arts; together with the beautiful spiritual writings of the Editor; under Keeper of The Story.

 

It is a very enriching, thought-provoking and colourful magazine - which through my link should be viewed by many others beyond Southern California." ~ Stephen B Whatley

  

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The Hotel Sacher is located in the first District of Vienna after the Vienna State Opera. Famous specialty of the house is the original Sachertorte. The hotel is a member of the Leading Hotels of the World.

History

Anna Maria Sacher

On the grounds of the demolished Kärntnertortheatre, directly opposite the newly opened imperial Court Opera, was built a Maison meuble. The restaurateur Eduard Sacher bought the house modeled on a Renaissance palace and opened in 1876, Hotel de l' Opera with the restaurant. The son of Franz Sacher, the inventor of the Sachertorte, had however already made ​​a name for himself as a restaurateur, and named the house quickly to Hotel Sacher .

He married 1880 the 21- year-old Anna Fuchs, who henceforth cooperated in the hotel and quickly took over the business because of her husband's deteriorating health . Edward died in 1892, and Anna Sacher now ran the hotel as so-called widow operation. Which at that time was an extremely emancipated woman with cigar and her beloved French Bulldog (in Vienna: " Sacher-Bully" ) was always to be found, continued the business with rigor, but also with kindness. So they talked back then a company health insurance for their employees.

From the beginning, the Sacher was one of the best addresses in the city and in 1871 for the wine and delicatessen for kuk Appointed purveyor. This privilege his widow Anna was once again awarded after the death of Eduard Sacher. Before the opera you enjoyed the exquisite cuisine, they met in the legendary private rooms, and high-ranking representatives from politics always used the house for discreet meetings. The exclusive hotel was already a social institution . But then the economically difficult years after the First World War left its mark on the house.

Shortly before her death in 1930, Anna Sacher withdrew from the guide. Only after her death was announced that the hotel was heavily in debt and assets of the former was not much left. In 1934, finally came to bankruptcy.

The lawyer Hans Gürtler, his wife Poldi and the hotelier couple Joseph and Anna Siller acquired the now dilapidated house and renovated it extensively: from the heating system, electrics, running hot and cold water in all rooms has been adapted all the modern needs. From now on, the earned money should always flow back into the house. First time, the Sachertorte not only in their own premises were offered for consumption, but also sold on the street.

The house was again the meeting place for the growing company. But the annexation of Austria by Nazi Germany in 1938 brought this to an abrupt end. Swastika flags flying in front of the hotel now. During the Second World War but the house remained largely spared from damage. Immediately after the liberation of Vienna it was occupied by Soviet troops, the Vienna first district around the hotel but was soon jointly managed by the Allies and thus it came six years into British hands.

1951 got the Siller family and Gürtler their property back. Josef Siller had died in 1949. Again, the hotel had to be extensively renovated. As well as new dining venues emerged at the Sacher. Hans Gürtler also laid the foundation for the art collection of the 19th Century. Anna Siller died in 1962, and the hotel was entirely in the possession of the Gürtler family. In 1967 the company received the National Award and since then the federal coat of arms may be used in commercial transactions. The son Rolf Gürtler took over the business in 1970, but shortly thereafter, in an accident, after which he succeeded his son Peter Gürtler. This took over in 1989, the Austrian Court Hotel in Salzburg. This was later renamed the Hotel Sacher Salzburg. Since his death in 1990 his 1983 divorced woman Elisabeth Gürtler-Mauthner leads the family with their daughter Alexandra.

In 2006 the building, which is composed in its buildings of six town houses, refurbished thermally under the direction of architects Frank & Partners, and the loft conversion, in which a spa area was accommodated, provided while preserving the monument idea with a striking bright aluminum roof.

Offer

The Hotel Sacher at night

As a member of the Hospitality Association of The Leading Hotels of the World, which ensures quality control in five star hospitality sector, the Hotel Sacher is one of the best addresses in Austria. Since the expansion of 2006 also meets the criteria of a Leading Spa.

In the House, the Anna Sacher restaurant, the Red Bar, the Blue Bar, Confiserie, Café Sacher are and the Sacher Eck (coin). The cafe was founded in 2004 awarded the Golden Coffee Bean Jacobs.

Also in the building, but not as a part of the hotel, is the former imperial Court and chamber Supplier Wilhelm Jungmann & Neffe.

Since 1999, the Original Sacher-Torte is produced in a production office in Vienna Simmering, from where it is exported to the whole world. After a decades-long legal battle with the Imperial Sugar Bakery Demel only the dessert made ​​by Sacher may adorn with the title "original". The Sachertorte is imitated by many coffee houses, bakeries and pastry shops.

Rooms of the Hotel Sacher

The Sacher shop in the Hotel Sacher

The famous Sacher Torte

Famous guests

Main entrance of the hotel in the evening

Many prominent guests had the house in the Philharmonikerstraße. Anna Sacher had a photo gallery of her guests in her boudoir. The signatures of all she embroidered herself on a table cloth. Located in the middle of it Emperor Franz Joseph.

Crowned heads, statesmen, diplomats and politicians lodged at the Sacher: Edward VIII, Wallis Simpson, Elizabeth II, Prince Philip, Prince Rainier, Princess Grace, John F. Kennedy, Kofi Annan and many more.

Because of the close proximity to the Opera House of course many artists were under the guests: Herbert von Karajan, Leonard Bernstein, Leo Slezak, Plácido Domingo, José Carreras and Rudolf Nureyev. Music critic Marcel Prawy lived until his death in 2003, even as a permanent guest at the Sacher.

Graham Greene had here the idea for the screenplay of the film The Third Man. A British officer told him about the underground passages of Vienna, whereupon Greene in the bar wrote down the first ideas immediately.

Her role in the Sissi films Romy Schneider owed ​​their similarity with the bust of the Empress, who is at the hotel and was the director Ernst Marischka noticed. During filming, she lived with her mother Magda Schneider at the Sacher.

Invited to an unusual press conference in April 1969, John Lennon and Yoko Ono to the Sacher. They held one of her legendary "Bagism" actions in their hotel rooms to media representatives (including André Heller, who reported for the Ö3 jukebox), in order to express their ideas of world peace.

Traditionally, all suites are named for operas and composers (eg, La Traviata, Carmen, Idomeneo, The Magic Flute, Madame Butterfly, Nabucco, Rigoletto, Leonard Bernstein, etc.). The new suites on the top floor of the house bearing the names of contemporary operas, such as Lulu and Billy Budd named.

Hotel Sacher in film and on stage

The Hotel Sacher has been immortalized in numerous films and stage plays .

Hotel Sacher, 1939

In the German-speaking area, the hotel was also supported by the TV series Hello - Hotel Sacher ... Portier! popular with Fritz Eckhardt .

Literature

Ernst Hagen: Hotel Sacher. Austria slept in your beds. Zsolnay , Vienna , 1976, ISBN 3-552-02827-7

Ingrid Haslinger: customer - Emperor. The history of the former imperial purveyors. Schroll, Vienna 1996 , ISBN 3-85202-129-4 .

János Kalmár , Mella Waldstein: K.u.K. Purveyors of Vienna. Stocker , Graz 2001, ISBN 3-7020-0935-3 . Pp. 10-15 .

Monika Kellermann : The great Sacher-back book. Pastries, cakes and pastries. Seehamer -Verlag, Weyarn 1994, ISBN 3-929626-28-4

Franz Maier- Bruck : The great Sacher Cookbook. The Austrian cuisine. Seehamer -Verlag, Weyarn 1994, ISBN 3-929626-27-6

Leo Mazakarini : The Hotel Sacher in Vienna. Grafe and Unzer, Munich, 1977, ISBN 3-7742-5018-9

Emil Seeliger: Hotel Sacher. World history at supper. Publisher Schaffer, Berlin 1942

William Fraenkel: Establishment Eduard Sacher in Vienna: General Construction Journal, Volume 1877 (online at ANNO)

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hotel_Sacher

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Ronald James Padavona (July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010), better known as Ronnie James Dio, was an American heavy metal vocalist and songwriter.

 

He performed with, amongst others, Elf, Rainbow, Black Sabbath, Heaven & Hell, and his own band Dio. Other musical projects include the collective fundraiser Hear 'n Aid. He was widely hailed as one of the most powerful singers in heavy metal, renowned for his consistently powerful voice.

 

I only ever saw him on stage once, with Rainbow at Stafford's New Bingley Hall in about 1980.

 

He often ranks as one of the greatest rock vocalists of all time in various online polls and lists. He is credited with popularizing the "metal horns" hand gesture in metal culture.

 

Prior to his death, he was collaborating on a project with former Black Sabbath bandmates Tony Iommi, Geezer Butler, and Vinny Appice, under the moniker Heaven & Hell, whose only studio album, The Devil You Know, was released on April 28, 2009.

 

Dio sadly died of stomach cancer on May 16, 2010. One of the last songs he recorded was titled "Metal Will Never Die".

 

The Sandbach Crosses are two 9th-century stone Anglo-Saxon crosses now erected in the market place in the town of Sandbach, Cheshire, England. They are unusually large and elaborate examples of the type and have been designated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building, and are a scheduled monument.

 

The most recent and authoritative dating places the larger cross from the early part of the 9th century, and the smaller from about the middle of that century. Older theories, now outdated, included the view that they were erected to commemorate the conversion to Christianity of Peada of Mercia about 653.

 

Other sources date them to the 9th century. The original site of the crosses is unknown and it is believed that they were brought to Sandbach in the Middle Ages. The earliest documentary evidence is by William Smith, the Rouge-Dragon Pursuivant at Arms of Elizabeth I, who was from Nantwich.

 

In 1585 he wrote 'two square crosses of stone, on steps, with certain images and writings thereon graven [standing] hard together. Either after the Reformation or during the Civil War they were thrown down and their parts were scattered over a wide area.

 

Larger pieces of the crosses were found as far away as Oulton and Tarporley while smaller pieces were found on various sites in Sandbach. In the early 19th century they were collected together and in 1816 were reassembled and erected under the direction of George Ormerod, the Cheshire historian.

 

The crosses now consist of two upright columns set in sockets on a base of three stepped stones. The northern cross is the taller and has a mutilated head. The southern cross is truncated and has a mutilated head from a different cross.

 

The crosses have always been a pair and were carved by the same hand. They depict religious scenes, doll-like heads and beasts in panels, together with vine-scrolls, course interlace patterns and some dragons. Yep, here be dragons!

 

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Belem, Berardo Collection, Centro Cultural de Belem, Lisbon, Portugal

 

Materials : Oil on canvas

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

FROM WIKIPEDIA, THE FREE ENCYCLOPAEDIA

 

Gerhard Richter (German: [ˈʀɪçtɐ]; born 9 February 1932) is a German visual artist and one of the pioneers of the New European Painting that emerged in the second half of the twentieth century. Richter has produced abstract as well as photorealistic paintings, and also photographs and glass pieces. His art follows the examples of Picasso and Jean Arp in undermining the concept of the artist's obligation to maintain a single cohesive style.

 

In October 2012, Richter's Abstraktes Bild set an auction record price for a painting by a living artist at $34 million (£21 million).This was exceeded in May 2013 when his 1968 piece Domplatz, Mailand (Cathedral square, Milan) was sold for $37.1 million (£24.4 million) in New York.

 

This was further exceeded in February 2015 when his painting Abstraktes Bild sold for $44.52 million (£30.4 million) in London at Sotheby's Contemporary Evening Sale.

 

CHILDHOOD AND EDUCATION

 

Richter was born in Hospital Dresden-Neustadt in Dresden, Saxony, and grew up in Reichenau, Lower Silesia (now Bogatynia, Poland), and in Waltersdorf (Zittauer Gebirge), in the Upper Lusatian countryside, where his father worked as a village teacher.

 

Gerhard's mother, Hildegard Schönfelder, at the age of 25 gave birth to Gerhard. Hildegard's father, Ernst Alfred Schönfelder, at one time was considered a gifted pianist. Ernst moved the family to Dresden after taking up the family enterprise of brewing and eventually went bankrupt. Once in Dresden, Hildegard trained as a bookseller, and in doing so realized a passion for literature and music. Gerhard's father, Horst Richter, was a mathematics and physics student at the Technische Hochschule in Dresden. The two were married in 1931.

 

After struggling to maintain a position in the new Nationalist Socialist education system, Horst found a position in Reichenau. In Reichenau, Gerhard's younger sister, Gisela was born in November 1936.

 

Horst and Hildegard were able to remain primarily apolitical due to Reichenau's location in the countryside.

 

Horst, being a teacher, was eventually forced to join the National Socialist Party. He never became an avid supporter of Nazism, and was not required to attend party rallies. In 1942, Gerhard was conscripted into the Deutsches Jungvolk, but by the end of the war he was still too young to be an official member of the Hitler Youth.

 

In 1943 Hildegard moved the family to Waltersdorf, and was later forced to sell her piano. He left school after 10th grade and apprenticed as an advertising and stage-set painter, before studying at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts. In 1948, he finished higher professional school in Zittau, and, between 1949 and 1951, successively worked as an apprentice with a sign painter and as a painter.

In 1950, his application for study at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts was rejected as "too bourgeois". He finally began his studies at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts in 1951. His teachers were Karl von Appen, Heinz Lohmar (de) and Will Grohmann.

 

RELATIONSHIPS

 

In 1983, Richter resettled from Düsseldorf to Cologne, where he still lives and works today. In 1996, he moved into a studio designed by architect Thiess Marwede.

 

Richter married Marianne Eufinger in 1957; she gave birth to his first daughter.

 

He married his second wife, the sculptor Isa Genzken, in 1982. Richter had a son and daughter with his third wife, Sabine Moritz after they were married in 1995.

 

EARLY CAREER

 

In the early days of his career, he prepared a wall painting (Communion with Picasso, 1955) for the refectory of his Academy of Arts as part of his B.A. Another mural entitled Lebensfreude (Joy of life) followed at the German Hygiene Museum for his diploma. It was intended to produce an effect "similar to that of wallpaper or tapestry".

Both paintings were painted over for ideological reasons after Richter escaped from East to West Germany two months before the building of the Berlin Wall in 1961. After German reunification two "windows" of the wall painting Joy of life (1956) were uncovered in the stairway of the German Hygiene Museum, but these were later covered over when it was decided to restore the Museum to its original 1930 state.

 

From 1957 to 1961 Richter worked as a master trainee in the academy and took commissions for the then state of East Germany. During this time, he worked intensively on murals like Arbeiterkampf (Workers' struggle), on oil paintings (e.g. portraits of the East German actress Angelica Domröse and of Richter's first wife Ema), on various self-portraits and on a panorama of Dresden with the neutral name Stadtbild (Townscape, 1956).

 

When he escaped to West Germany, Richter began to study at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf under Karl Otto Götz. With Sigmar Polke and Konrad Fischer (de) (pseudonym Lueg) he introduced the term Kapitalistischer Realismus (Capitalistic Realism) as an anti-style of art, appropriating the pictorial shorthand of advertising. This title also referred to the realist style of art known as Socialist Realism, then the official art doctrine of the Soviet Union, but it also commented upon the consumer-driven art doctrine of western capitalism.

 

Richter taught at the Hochschule für bildende Künste Hamburg and the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design as a visiting professor; he returned to the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf in 1971, where he was a professor for over 15 years.

 

ART

 

Nearly all of Richter's work demonstrates both illusionistic space that seems natural and the physical activity and material of painting—as mutual interferences. For Richter, reality is the combination of new attempts to understand—to represent; in his case, to paint—the world surrounding us. Richter's opinions and perspectives on his own art, and that of the larger art market and various artistic movements, are compiled in a chronological record of "Writings" and interviews. The following quotes are excerpts from the compilation:

 

"I am a Surrealist."[16]

"My sole concern is the object. Otherwise I would not take so much trouble over my choice of subjects; otherwise I would not paint at all."[17]

"My concern is never art, but always what art can be used for."[18]

Photo-paintings and the "blur"[edit]

 

Richter's 1988 painting Betty (depicting his daughter) at Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin in 2012

Richter created various painting pictures from black-and-white photographs during the 1960s and early 1970s, basing them on a variety of sources: newspapers and books, sometimes incorporating their captions, (as in Helga Matura (1966)); private snapshots; aerial views of towns and mountains, (Cityscape Madrid (1968) and Alps (1968)); seascapes (1969–70); and a large multi-partite work made for the German Pavilion in the 1972 Venice Biennale. For Forty-eight Portraits (1971–2), he chose mainly the faces of composers such as Gustav Mahler and Jean Sibelius, and of writers such as H. G. Wells and Franz Kafka.[19]

 

From his "Writings", the following refer to quotations regarding photography, its relationship with painting, and the "blur":

 

"The photograph is the most perfect picture. It does not change; it is absolute, and therefore autonomous, unconditional, devoid of style. Both in its ways of informing, and in what it informs of, it is my source."[20]

"I don't create blurs. Blurring is not the most important thing; nor is it an identity tag for my pictures. When I dissolve demarcations and create transition, this is not in order to destroy the representation, or to make it more artistic or less precise. The flowing transitions, the smooth equalizing surface, clarify the content and make the representation credible (an "alla prima" impasto would be too reminiscent of painting, and would destroy the illusion)."[21]

"I blur things to make everything equally important and equally unimportant. I blur things so that they do not look artistic or craftsmanlike but technological, smooth and perfect. I blur things to make all the parts a closer fit. Perhaps I also blur out the excess of unimportant information."[22]

Many of these paintings are made in a multi-step process of representations. He starts with a photograph, which he has found or taken himself, and projects it onto his canvas, where he traces it for exact form. Taking his color palette from the photograph, he paints to replicate the look of the original picture. His hallmark "blur" is achieved sometimes with a light touch of a soft brush, sometimes a hard smear by an aggressive pull with a squeegee.

 

From around 1964, Richter made a number of portraits of dealers, collectors, artists and others connected with his immediate professional circle. Richter's two portraits of Betty, his daughter, were made in 1977 and 1988 respectively; the three portraits titled IG were made in 1993 and depict the artist's second wife, Isa Genzken. Lesende (1994) portrays Sabine Moritz, whom Richter married in 1995, shown absorbed in the pages of a magazine.[23] Many of his realist paintings reflect on the history of National Socialism, creating paintings of family members who had been members, as well as victims of, the Nazi party.[24] From 1966, as well as those given to him by others, Richter began using photographs he had taken as the basis for portraits.[23] In 1975, on the occasion of a show in Düsseldorf, Gilbert & George commissioned Richter to make a portrait of them.[25]

 

Richter began making prints in 1965. He was most active before 1974, only completing sporadic projects since that time. In the period 1965–74, Richter made most of his prints (more than 100), of the same or similar subjects in his paintings.[26] He has explored a variety of photographic printmaking processes – screenprint, photolithography, and collotype – in search of inexpensive mediums that would lend a "non-art" appearance to his work.[27] He stopped working in print media in 1974, and began painting from photographs he took himself.[26]

 

While elements of landscape painting appeared initially in Richter's work early on in his career in 1963, the artist began his independent series of landscapes in 1968 after his first vacation, an excursion that landed him besotted with the terrain of Corsica.[28] Landscapes have since emerged as an independent work group in his oeuvre.[29] According to Dietmar Elger, Richter's landscapes are understood within the context of traditional of German Romantic Painting. They are compared to the work of Caspar David Friedrich (1774–1840). Friedrich is foundational to German landscape painting. Each artist spent formative years of their lives in Dresden.[30] Große Teyde-Landschaft (1971) takes its imagery from similar holiday snapshots of the volcanic regions of Tenerife.[31]

 

Atlas was first exhibited in 1972 at the Museum voor Hedendaagse Kunst in Utrecht under the title Atlas der Fotos und Skizzen, it included 315 parts. The work has continued to expand, and was exhibited later in full form at the Lenbachhaus in Munich in 1989, the Museum Ludwig in Cologne in 1990, and at Dia Art Foundation in New York in 1995. Atlas continues as an ongoing, encyclopedic work composed of approximately 4,000 photographs, reproductions or cut-out details of photographs and illustrations, grouped together on approximately 600 separate panels.[32]

 

In 1972 Richter embarked on a ten-day trip to Greenland, his friend Hanne Darboven was meant to accompany him, but instead he traveled alone. His intention was to experience and record the desolate arctic landscape. In 1976, four large paintings, each titled Seascape emerged from the Greenland photographs.[33]

  

Two of Richter's 1983 memento mori paintings – Kerze and Schädel – on display at Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin in 2012

In 1982 and 1983, Richter made a series of paintings of Candles and Skulls that relate to a longstanding tradition of still life memento mori painting. Each composition is most commonly based on a photograph taken by Richter in his own studio. Influenced by old master vanitas painters such as Georges de La Tour and Francisco de Zurbarán, the artist began to experiment with arrangements of candles and skulls placed in varying degrees of natural light, sitting atop otherwise barren tables. The Candle paintings coincided with his first large-scale abstract paintings, and represent the complete antithesis to those vast, colorful and playfully meaningless works. Richter has made only 27 of these still lifes.[34] In 1995, the artist marked the 50th anniversary of the allied bombings of his hometown Dresden during the Second World War. His solitary candle was reproduced on a monumental scale and placed overlooking the River Elbe as a symbol of rejuvenation.[35]

 

In a 1988 series of 15 ambiguous photo paintings entitled 18 October 1977, he depicted four members of the Red Army Faction (RAF), a German left-wing terrorist organization. These paintings were created from black-and-white newspaper and police photos. Three RAF members were found dead in their prison cells on 18 October 1977 and the cause of their deaths was the focus of widespread controversy.[36] In the late 1980s, Richter had begun to collect images of the group which he used as the basis for the 15 paintings exhibited for the first time in Krefeld in 1989. The paintings were based on an official portrait of Ulrike Meinhof during her years as a radical journalist; on photographs of the arrest of Holger Meins; on police shots of Gudrun Ensslin in prison; on Andreas Baader's bookshelves and the record player to conceal his gun; on the dead figures of Meinhof, Ensslin, and Baader; and on the funeral of Ensslin, Baader, and Jan-Carl Raspe.

 

Since 1989, Richter has worked on creating new images by dragging wet paint over photographs. The photographs, not all taken by Richter himself, are mostly snapshots of daily life: family vacations, pictures of friends, mountains, buildings and streetscapes.

 

Richter was flying to New York on September 11, 2001, but due to the 9/11 attacks, including on the World Trade Center, his plane was diverted to Halifax, Nova Scotia. A few years later, he made one small painting specifically about the planes crashing into the World Trade Center.[37] In September: A History Painting by Gerhard Richter, Robert Storr situates Richter's 2005 painting September within a brand of anti-ideological thought that he finds throughout Richter's work, he considers how the ubiquitous photographic documentation of the 11 September attacks affects the uniqueness of one's distinct remembrance of the events, and he offers a valuable comparison to Richter's 18 October 1977 cycle.[38]

 

In the 2000s, Richter made a number of works that dealt with scientific phenomena. In 2003, he produced several paintings with the same title: Silicate. Large oil-on-canvas pieces, these show latticed rows of light- and dark-grey blobs whose shapes quasi-repeat as they race across the frame, their angle modulating from painting to painting. They depict a photo, published in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, of a computer-generated simulacrum of reflections from the silicon dioxide found in insects' shells.

 

ABSTRACT WORK

 

Coming full-circle from his early Table (1962) in which he cancelled his photorealist image with haptic swirls of grey paint,[ in 1969, Richter produced the first of a group of grey monochromes that consist exclusively of the textures resulting from different methods of paint application.

 

In 1976, Richter first gave the title Abstract Painting to one of his works. By presenting a painting without even a few words to name and explain it, he felt he was "letting a thing come, rather than creating it." In his abstract pictures, Richter builds up cumulative layers of non-representational painting, beginning with brushing big swaths of primary color onto canvas. The paintings evolve in stages, based on his responses to the picture's progress: the incidental details and patterns that emerge. Throughout his process, Richter uses the same techniques he uses in his representational paintings, blurring and scraping to veil and expose prior layers.

 

From the mid-1980s, Richter began to use a homemade squeegee to rub and scrape the paint that he had applied in large bands across his canvases.

 

In an interview with Benjamin H.D. Buchloch in 1986, Richter was asked about his "Monochrome Grey Pictures and Abstract Pictures" and their connection with the artists Yves Klein and Ellsworth Kelly. The following are Richter's answers:

 

The Grey Pictures were done at a time when there were monochrome paintings everywhere. I painted them nonetheless. ... Not Kelly, but Bob Ryman, Brice Marden, Alan Charlton, Yves Klein and many others.

 

In the 1990s the artist began to run his squeegee up and down the canvas in an ordered fashion to produce vertical columns that take on the look of a wall of planks.

 

Richter's abstract work and its illusion of space developed out of his incidental process: an accumulation of spontaneous, reactive gestures of adding, moving, and subtracting paint. Despite unnatural palettes, spaceless sheets of color, and obvious trails of the artist's tools, the abstract pictures often act like windows through which we see the landscape outside. As in his representational paintings, there is an equalization of illusion and paint. In those paintings, he reduces worldly images to mere incidents of Art. Similarly, in his abstract pictures, Richter exalts spontaneous, intuitive mark-making to a level of spatial logic and believability.

 

Firenze continues a cycle of 99 works conceived in the autumn of 1999 and executed in the same year and thereafter. The series of overpainted photographs, or übermalte Photographien, consists of small paintings bearing images of the city of Florence, created by the artist as a tribute to the music of Steve Reich and the work of Contempoartensemble, a Florence-based group of musicians.

 

After 2000, Richter made a number of works that dealt with scientific phenomena, in particular, with aspects of reality that cannot be seen by the naked eye.

 

In 2006, Richter conceived six paintings as a coherent group under the title Cage, named after the American avant-garde composer John Cage.In May 2002, Richter photographed 216 details of his abstract painting no. 648-2, from 1987. Working on a long table over a period of several weeks, Richter combined these 10 x 15 cm details with 165 texts on the Iraq war, published in the German Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung newspaper on 20 and 21 March. This work was published in 2004 as a book entitled War Cut.

 

In November 2008, Richter began a series in which he applied ink droplets to wet paper, using alcohol and lacquer to extend and retard the ink's natural tendency to bloom and creep. The resulting November sheets are regarded as a significant departure from his previous watercolours in that the pervasive soaking of ink into wet paper produced double-sided works. Sometimes the uppermost sheets bled into others, generating a sequentially developing series of images. In a few cases Richter applied lacquer to one side of the sheet, or drew pencil lines across the patches of colour.

 

COLOR CHART PAINTINGS

 

As early as 1966, Richter had made paintings based on colour charts, using the rectangles of colour as found objects in an apparently limitless variety of hue; these culminated in 1973–4 in a series of large-format pictures such as 256 Colours.

 

Richter painted three series of Color Chart paintings between 1966 and 1974, each series growing more ambitious in their attempt to create through their purely arbitrary arrangement of colors.

 

The artist began his investigations into the complex permutations of color charts in 1966, with a small painting entitled 10 Colors. The charts provided anonymous and impersonal source material, a way for Richter to disassociate color from any traditional, descriptive, symbolic or expressive end. When he began to make these paintings, Richter had his friend Blinky Palermo randomly call out colors, which Richter then adopted for his work. Chance thus plays its role in the creation of his first series.

 

Returning to color charts in the 1970s, Richter changed his focus from the readymade to the conceptual system, developing mathematical procedures for mixing colours and chance operations for their placement.[53] The range of the colors he employed was determined by a mathematical system for mixing the primary colors in graduated amounts. Each color was then randomly ordered to create the resultant composition and form of the painting. Richter's second series of Color Charts was begun in 1971 and consisted of only five paintings. In the final series of Color Charts which preoccupied Richter throughout 1973 and 1974, additional elements to this permutational system of color production were added in the form of mixes of a light grey, a dark gray and later, a green.

 

Richter's 4900 Colours from 2007 consisted of bright monochrome squares that have been randomly arranged in a grid pattern to create stunning fields of kaleidoscopic color. It was produced at the same time he developed his design for the south transept window of Cologne Cathedral. 4900 Colours consists of 196 panels in 25 colors that can be reassembled in 11 variations – from a single expansive surface to multiple small-format fields. Richter developed Version II – 49 paintings, each of which measures 97 by 97 centimeters – especially for the Serpentine Gallery.

 

SCULPTURE

 

Richter began to use glass in his work in 1967, when he made Four Panes of Glass. These plain sheets of glass could tilt away from the poles on whicht they were mounted at an angle that changed from one installation to the next. In 1970, he and Blinky Palermo jointly submitted designs for the sports facilities for the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich. For the front of the arena, they proposed an array of glass windows in twenty-seven different colors; each color would appear fifty times, with the distribution determined randomly. In 1981, for a two-person show with Georg Baselitz in Düsseldorf, Richter produced the first of the monumental transparent mirrors that appear intermittently thereafter in his oeuvre; the mirrors are significantly larger than Richter's paintings and feature adjustable steel mounts. For pieces such as Mirror Painting (Grey, 735-2) (1991), the mirrors were coloured grey by the pigment attached to the back of the glass. Arranged in two rooms, Richter presented an ensemble of paintings and colored mirrors in a special pavilion designed in collaboration with architect Paul Robbrecht at Documenta 9 in Kassel in 1992.

 

In 2002, for the Dia Art Foundation, Richter created a glass sculpture in which seven parallel panes of glass refract light and the world beyond, offering altered visions of the exhibition space; Spiegel I (Mirror I) and Spiegel II (Mirror II), a two-part mirror piece from 1989 that measures 7' tall and 18' feet long, which alters the boundaries of the environment and again changes one's visual experience of the gallery; and Kugel (Sphere), 1992, a stainless steel sphere that acts as a mirror, reflecting the space. Since 2002, the artist has created a series of three dimensional glass constructions, such as 6 Standing Glass Panels (2002/2011).[59]

 

DRAWINGS

 

In 2010, the Drawing Center showed Lines which do not exist, a survey of Richter's drawings from 1966 to 2005, including works made using mechanical intervention such as attaching a pencil to an electric hand drill. It was the first career overview of Richter in the United States since 40 Years of Painting at the Museum of Modern Art in 2002.

 

In a review of Lines which do not exist, R. H. Lossin writes in The Brooklyn Rail: "Viewed as a personal (and possibly professional) deficiency, Richter's drawing practice consisted of diligently documenting something that didn't work—namely a hand that couldn't draw properly. ...Richter displaces the concept of the artist's hand with hard evidence of his own, wobbly, failed, and very material appendage."

 

COMMISSIONS

 

Throughout his career, Richter has mostly declined lucrative licensing deals and private commissions.Measuring 9 by 9 ½ feet and depicting both the Milan Duomo and the square's 19th-century Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, Domplatz, Mailand [Cathedral Square, Milan] (1968) was a commission from Siemens, and it hung in that company's offices in Milan from 1968 to 1998. (In 1998, Sotheby's sold it in London, where it fetched what was then a record price for Richter, $3.6 million).

 

In 1980, Richter and Isa Genzken were commissioned to design the König-Heinrich-Platz underground station in Duisburg; it was only completed in 1992. In 1986, Richter received a commission for two large-scale paintings – Victoria I and Victoria II – from the Victoria insurance company in Düsseldorf.[64] In 1990, along with Sol LeWitt and Oswald Mathias Ungers, he created works for the Bayerische Hypotheken- und Wechselbank in Düsseldorf. In 1998, he installed a wall piece based on the colours of Germany's flag in the rebuilt Reichstag in Berlin.

 

COLOGNE CATHEDRAL

 

In 2002, the same year as his MoMA retrospective, Richter was asked to design a stained glass window in the Cologne Cathedral In August 2007, his window was unveiled. It is an 113 square metres (1,220 sq ft) abstract collage of 11,500 pixel-like squares in 72 colors, randomly arranged by computer (with some symmetry), reminiscent of his 1974 painting "4096 colours". Although the artist waived any fee, the costs of materials and mounting the window came to around €370,000 ($506,000). However the costs were covered by donations from more than 1,000 people.

 

Cardinal Joachim Meisner did not attend the window's unveiling; he had preferred a figurative representation of 20th century Christian martyrs and said that Richter's window would fit better in a mosque or other prayer house.

 

A professed atheist with "a strong leaning towards Catholicism", Richter's three children with his third wife were baptized in the Cologne Cathedral.

 

EXHIBITIONS

 

Richter first began exhibiting in Düsseldorf in 1963. Richter had his first gallery solo show in 1964 at Galerie Schmela in Düsseldorf. Soon after, he had exhibitions in Munich and Berlin and by the early 1970s exhibited frequently throughout Europe and the United States. In 1966, Bruno Bischofberger was the first to show Richter's works outside Germany. Richter's first retrospective took place at the Kunsthalle Bremen in 1976 and covered works from 1962 to 1974. A traveling retrospective at Düsseldorf's Kunsthalle in 1986 was followed in 1991 by a retrospective at the Tate Gallery, London. In 1993 he received a major touring retrospective "Gerhard Richter: Malerei 1962–1993" curated by Kasper König, with a three volume catalogue edited by Benjamin Buchloch. This exhibition containing 130 works carried out over the course of thirty years, was to entirely reinvent Richter's career.

 

Richter became known to a U.S. audience in 1990, when the Saint Louis Art Museum circulated Baader-Meinhof (October 18, 1977), a show that that was later seen at the Lannan Foundation in Marina del Rey, California.

 

Richter's first North American retrospective was in 1998 at the Art Gallery of Ontario and at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. In 2002, a 40-year retrospective of Richter's work was held at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and traveled to The Art Institute of Chicago, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C. He has participated in several international art shows, including the Venice Biennale (1972, 1980, 1984, 1997 and 2007), as well as Documenta V (1972), VII (1982), VIII (1987), IX (1992), and X (1997). In 2006, an exhibition at the Getty Center connected the landscapes of Richter to the Romantic pictures of Caspar David Friedrich, showing that both artists "used abstraction, expansiveness, and emptiness to express transcendent emotion through painting."

 

The Gerhard Richter Archive was established in cooperation with the artist in 2005 as an institute of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden.

 

SOLO EXHIBITIONS (SELECTION)

 

Gerhard Richter 4900 Colours: Version II at the Serpentine Gallery, London, United Kingdom. 2008[73]

Gerhard Richter Portraits at the National Portrait Gallery, London, United Kingdom. 2009[23]

Gerhard Richter: Panorama at the Tate Modern, London, United Kingdom. 2011[74]

Gerhard Richter at the Centre Pompidou, Paris, France. 2012[75]

Gerhard Richter: Panorama at the Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin, Germany. 2012[76]

 

RECOGNITION

 

Although Richter gained popularity and critical praise throughout his career, his fame burgeoned during his 2005 retrospective exhibition, which declared his place among the most important artists of the 20th century.

 

Today, many call Gerhard Richter the best living painter. In part, this comes from his ability to explore the medium at a time when many were heralding its death. Richter has been the recipient of numerous distinguished awards, including the State Prize of the state North Rhine-Westphalia in 2000; the Wexner Prize, 1998; the Praemium Imperiale, Japan, 1997; the Golden Lion of the 47th Biennale, Venice, 1997; the Wolf Prize in Israel in 1994/5; the Kaiserring Prize der Stadt Goslar, Mönchehaus-Museum für Moderne Kunst, Goslar, Germany, 1988; the Oskar Kokoschka Prize, Vienna, 1985; the Arnold Bode Prize, Kassel, 1981; and the Junger Western Art Prize, Germany, 1961. He was made an honorary citizen of Cologne in April 2007.

 

Among the students who studied with Richter at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf between 1971 and 1994 were Ludger Gerdes, Hans-Jörg Holubitschka, Bernard Lokai, Thomas Schütte, Thomas Struth, Katrin Kneffel, Michael van Ofen, and Richter's second wife, Isa Genzken. He is known to have influenced Ellsworth Kelly, Christopher Wool, Allan Banford and Johan Andersson (artist).

 

He also served as source of inspiration for writers and musicians. Sonic Youth used a painting of his for the cover art for their album Daydream Nation in 1988. He was a fan of the band and did not charge for the use of his image.

 

The original, over 7 metres (23 ft) square, is now showcased in Sonic Youth's studio in NYC.

 

Don DeLillo's short story "Baader-Meinhof" describes an encounter between two strangers at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The meeting takes place in the room displaying 18 October 1977 (1988).

 

Photographer Cotton Coulson described Richter as "one of [his] favourite artists".

 

POSITION ON THE ART MARKET

 

Following an exhibition with Blinky Palermo at Galerie Heiner Friedrich in 1971, Richter's formal arrangement with the dealer came to an end in 1972. Thereafter Friedrich was only entitled to sell the paintings that he had already obtained contractually from Richter.

 

In the following years, Richter showed with Galerie Konrad Fischer, Düsseldorf, and Sperone Westwater, New York. Today Richter is represented by Marian Goodman, his primary dealer since 1985.

 

Today, museums own roughly 38% of Richter's works, including half of his large abstract paintings.By 2004, Richter's annual turnover was $120m (£65m). At the same time, his works often appear at auction. According to artnet, an online firm that tracks the art market, $76.9m worth of Richter's work was sold at auction in 2010.

 

Richter's high turnover volume reflects his prolificacy as well as his popularity. As of 2012, no fewer than 545 distinct Richter's works had sold at auctions for more than $100,000. 15 of them had sold for more than $10,000,000 between 2007 and 2012.

 

Richter's paintings have been flowing steadily out of Germany since the mid-1990s even as certain important German collectors – Frieder Burda, Josef Fröhlich, Georg Böckmann, and Ulrich Ströher – have held on to theirs.

 

Richter's candle paintings were the first to command high auction prices. Three months after his MoMA exhibition opened in 2001, Sotheby's sold his Three Candles (1982) for $5.3 million. In February 2008, the artist's eldest daughter, Betty, sold her Kerze (1983) for £7,972,500 ($15 million), triple the high estimate, at Sotheby's in London.

 

His 1982 Kerze (Candle) sold for £10.5 million ($16.5 million) at Christie's London in October 2011.[83]

 

In February 2008, Christie's London set a first record for Richter's "capitalist realism" pictures from the 1960s by selling the painting Zwei Liebespaare (1966) for £7,300,500 ($14.3 million)[84] to Stephan Schmidheiny. In 2010, the Weserburg modern art museum in Bremen, Germany, decided to sell Richter's 1966 painting Matrosen (Sailors) in a November auction held by Sotheby's, where John D. Arnold bought it for $13 million. Vierwaldstätter See, the largest of a distinct series of four views of Lake Lucerne painted by Richter in 1969, sold for £15.8 million ($24 million) at Christie's London in 2015.

 

Another coveted group of works is the ABSTRAKTE BILDER SERIES, particularly those made after 1988, which are finished with a large squeegee rather than a brush or roller. At Pierre Bergé & Associés in July 2009, Richter's 1979 oil painting Abstraktes Bild exceeded its estimate, selling for €95,000 ($136,000). Richter's Abstraktes Bild, of 1990 was made the top price of 7.2 million pounds, or about $11.6 million, at a Sotheby's sale in February 2011 to a bidder who was said by dealers to be an agent for the New York dealer Larry Gagosian. In November 2011, Sotheby's sold a group of colorful abstract canvases by Richter, including Abstraktes Bild 849-3, which made a record price for the artist at auction when Lily Safra paid $20.8 million only to donate it to the Israel Museum afterwards. Months later, a record $21.8 million was paid at Christie's for the 1993 painting Abstraktes Bild 798-3.

 

Abstraktes Bild (809-4), one of the artist's abstract canvases from 1994, was sold by Eric Clapton at Sotheby's to a telephone bidder for $34.2 million in late 2012. (It had been estimated to bring $14.1 million to $18.8 million.)

 

When asked about amounts like that Richter said "IT'S JUST AS ABSURD AS THE BANKING CRISIS. IT'S IMPOSSIBLE TO UNDERSTAND AND IT'S DAFT!"

  

Gerhard Richter's Betty, 4:58 on YouTube, Smarthistory

In 2007, Corinna Belz made a short film called Gerhard Richter's Window where the media-shy artist appeared on camera for the first time in 15 years. In 2011, Corinna Belz's feature-length documentary entitled Gerhard Richter Painting was released. The film focused almost entirely on the world's highest paid living artist producing his large-scale abstract squeegee works in his studio.

 

QUOTES

 

"One has to believe in what one is doing, one has to commit oneself inwardly, in order to do painting. Once obsessed, one ultimately carries it to the point of believing that one might change human beings through painting. But if one lacks this passionate commitment, there is nothing left to do. Then it is best to leave it alone. For basically painting is idiocy."

 

"Perhaps because I'm sorry for the photograph, because it has such a miserable existence even though it is such a perfect picture, I would like to make it valid, make it visible – just make it (even if what I make is worse than the photograph). And this making is something that I can't grasp, or figure out and plan. That is why I keep on and on painting from photographs, because I can't make it out, because the only thing to do with photographs is paint from them. Because it attracts me to be so much at the mercy of a thing, to be so far from mastering it."

 

"No one painting is meant to be more beautiful than, or even different from any other. Nor is it meant to be like any other, but the same: the same, though each was painted individually and by itself, not all together and all of a piece, like Multiples. I intended them to look the same but not be the same, and I intended this to be visible."

 

"Painting has nothing to do with thinking, because in painting thinking is painting. Thinking is language – record-keeping – and has to take place before and after. Einstein did not think when he was calculating: he calculated – producing the next equation in reaction to the one that went before – just as in painting one form is a response to another, and so on."

 

"It makes no sense to expect or claim to 'make the invisible visible', or the unknown known, or the unthinkable thinkable. We can draw conclusions about the invisible; we can postulate its existence with relative certainty. But we all can represent is an analogy, which stands for the invisible but is not it."

 

"The best thing that could have happened to art was its divorce from government."[99]

 

"Everything made since Duchamp has been a readymade, even when hand-painted."[100]

 

At a Q&A ahead of his retrospective at the Tate Modern on 4 October 2011, he was asked: "Has the role of artist changed over the years?" Richter replied: "It's more entertainment now. We entertain people."

A brightly shining red poppy still life is standing out in contrast to a solarized evening sky filled up with shadowy symbols of the Industrial Revolution: A huge pylon decked with three power lines, a GDR-chimney, a double-barrelled street lamp and the gas main pipeline from Russia.

 

In its small area of DOF the macro landscape contains three hairy poppy stalks. One of these stems has hanging down a green seed capsule whose shape reminds of an unblown WWI hand grenade:

 

----► In Flanders Fields @warmuseum.ca

 

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

 

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved, and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders Fields.

 

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders Fields.

 

Author: John McCrae (1872-1918): poet, surgeon, soldier

A native of Guelph, Ontario, and a veteran of the South African War (1899-1902), John McCrae began the First World War as a surgeon attached to the 1st Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, 1st Canadian Division. After undergoing a baptism by fire at Neuve Chapelle, France, in March 1915, the Canadians moved to Flanders in mid-April, taking up position in the salient around the Belgian town of Ypres.

On April 22-23, in their first major battle, they distinguished themselves by holding out against the first German gas attack of the war while others around them fled. John McCrae was the officer in charge of a medical aid post in a dugout cut into the bank of the Yser canal, a few miles to the northeast of Ypres. Here, on May 2, McCrae's good friend, 22-year old Lieutenant Alexis Helmer of Ottawa, was blown apart by enemy artillery fire. With the parts of Helmer's body collected in a blanket, McCrae himself read the funeral service.

The next day, McCrae, who had been publishing poetry for many years, completed In Flanders Fields. Eyewitness accounts vary in detail, but agree that he worked on the poem while sitting on the back step of an ambulance near his medical aid post. In the field around him crosses marked the graves of dead soldiers, including those of Helmer and other Canadians killed the previous day. Accounts also agree that poppies grew in the area at the time and McCrae's own notes refer to birds singing despite the noise of battle.

John McCrae set the poem aside to concentrate on caring for the wounded at Ypres. He took it up again that fall after leaving the Ypres salient to serve in the relatively quieter circumstances of No. 3 Canadian General Hospital at Boulogne. When at last he had worked it to a satisfactory state he sent it to the British publication the Spectator, only to see his work rejected. He resubmitted it to Punch magazine, which published it anonymously, in its issue of December 8, 1915. [warmuseum.ca]

 

YouTube-Clips

----►In Flanders Fields with images and heroic music (Gods and Generals soundtrack by John Frizzel and Randy Edelman & The Man In The Iron Mask soundtrack by Nick Glennie-Smith)

----►Green Fields of France - antiheroic WW1 Memorial by John Mc.Dermott

 

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WWI - Poetry - Archive Wilfred Owen, Isaac Rosenberg, Robert Graves, Vera Brittain, Edward Thomas, ...... online repository of over 4000 items of text, images, audio, and video for teaching, learning, and research.

----► Friends of the Project Organisations and Societies

------► However, there is a kind of war memorial that is unique to the Germans.

------► This is the Nagelfiguren = Figure of nails.

WWI Red Cross Archive will be digitized Dick Eastman reported about the amazing Geneva WWI Red Cross Archive this morning ... these records have been kept in file drawers in the dusty basement of the Red Cross Museum in Geneva, Switzerland for the last 90 years.

The collection is made up of cards, as well as battlefield reports that were initially compiled by the German Army. These records most likely had a British counterpart that now seems to have been lost. But the original German documents remain in the Red Cross Archives.

About 20 Million WWI casualties are dealt with in the collection - many detailing the dead found on the battlefield, complete with the soldier’s name, number, rank, unit, and exactly where the person was found and buried.

The Red Cross now plans to preserve and then digitize the collection, making the cards accessible to researchers worldwide

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Red poppy, Field Poppy, Flanders Poppy, or Corn Poppy is the wild poppy of agricultural cultivation—Papaver rhoeas. It is a variable annual plant. The four petals are vivid red, most commonly with a black spot at their base. In the northern hemisphere it generally flowers in late spring, but if the weather is warm enough other flowers frequently appear at the beginning of autumn ...

It is known to have been associated with agriculture in the Old World since early times. It has most of the characteristics of a successful weed of agriculture. These include an annual lifecycle that fits into that of most cereals, a tolerance of simple weed control methods, the ability to flower and seed itself before the crop is harvested. Like many such weeds, it also shows the tendency to become a crop in its own right; its seed is a moderately useful commodity, and its flower is edible. ....

It has had an old symbolism and association with agricultural fertility.

It has become associated with wartime remembrance in the 20th century, especially during Remembrance Day in Commonwealth countries. As poppies bloomed in much of the western front in World War I, poppies are a symbol of military veterans, especially of that war.

 

Klatschmohn (Papaver rhoeas), auch Mohnblume oder Klatschrose genannt, eine Pflanzenart aus der Familie der Mohngewächse (Papaveraceae). ... Er ist ein Altbürger (Archäophyt) und seit dem Neolithikum Kulturbegleiter. Durch übermäßigen Herbizideinsatz ist er in Getreidefeldern oft sehr zurückgegangen, tritt aber dafür oft in Mengen z. B. an ungespritzten, offenerdigen Straßenböschungen auf.

 

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NODE - Entries [remembrance]

Remembrance Day ('Gedenktag') ►noun

✪ another term for Remembrance Sunday

✪✪ [historical] another term for Armistice Day

Remembrance Sunday ►noun (in the UK) the Sunday nearest 11 November when those who were killed in the first and second World Wars and later conflicts are commemorated. Also called Poppy Day.

✪✪Armistice Day ►noun the anniversary of the armistice of 11 November 1918, now replaced by Remembrance Sunday in the UK and Veterans Day in the US.

 

NODE - Entries [poppy]

poppy¹ a herbaceous plant with showy flowers, milky sap, and rounded seed capsules. Many poppies contain alcaloids and are a source of drugs such as morphine and codeine.

poppy head ►noun the seed capsule of a poppy

Poppy Day ►noun Brit. another name for Remembrance Sunday

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poppycock ►noun [mass noun] [informal] nonsense (--->: dutch pappekak | german Papperlapapp)

poppy² ►adjective (of popular music) tuneful and immediately appealing:catchy, poppy tunes.

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November 2008@nowpublic

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15th May 2014: 33,991 views

21st May 2015: 86,201 views

 

The Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus americanus) of Coney Island, Brooklyn, New York – This unique sea-dwelling rabbit, which is actually a close relative of the sea lion, was officially discovered and investigated by Henry Hudson when he first visited this land to colonize the area by order of the Dutch government. It was named New Amsterdam -- today’s New York City. This island was named after he saw the beach covered with strange swimming wild rabbits. The word “Coney Island” means “wild rabbit island” in Dutch (originally Conyne Eylandt, or Konijneneiland in modern Dutch spelling). Sea rabbits were also referred mermaid rabbit, merrabbit, rabbit fish or seal rabbit in the natural history documents in the 17th century. The current conservation status, or risk of extinction, of the sea rabbit is Extinct in the Wild.

 

This website features two species of sea rabbits, which have been taken care of by Dr. Takeshi Yamada at the Coney Island Sea Rabbit Repopulation Center, which is a part of the Marine biology department of the Coney Island University in Brooklyn, New York. They are – Coney Island Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus americanus) called “Seara” and Coney Island Tiger-striped Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus konjinicus) called “Stripes”.

 

The photographs and videos featured in this website chronicle adventures of the Coney Island sea rabbits and the world as seen by them. This article also documented efforts of Dr. Takeshi Yamada for bringing back the nearly extinct sea rabbits to Coney Island in the City of New York and beyond. Dr. Yamada produced a series of public lectures, workshops, original public live interactive fine art performances and fine art exhibitions about sea rabbits at a variety of occasions and institutions in the City of New York and beyond. Dr. Yamada is an internationally active educator, book author, wildlife conservationist and high profile artist, who lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

 

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Sea Rabbit

 

Other Common Names: Coney Island Sea Rabbit, Beach Rabbit, Seal Rabbit, mer-rabbit, atlantic Sea Rabbit.

 

Latin Name: Monafluffchus americanus

 

Origin: Atlantic coast of the United States

 

Description of the specimen: In the early 17th century’s European fur craze drove the fleet of Dutch ships to the eastern costal area of America. Then Holland was the center of the world just like the Italy was in the previous century. New York City was once called New Amsterdam when Dutch merchants landed and established colonies. Among them, Henry Hudson is probably the most recognized individual in the history of New York City today. “This small island is inhabited by two major creatures which we do not have in our homeland. The one creature is a large arthropod made of three body segments: the frontal segment resembles a horseshoe, the middle segment resembles a spiny crab and its tail resembles a sharp sword. Although they gather beaches here in great numbers, they are not edible due to their extremely offensive odor. Another creature which is abundant here, has the head of wild rabbit. This animal of great swimming ability has frontal legs resemble the webbed feet of a duck. The bottom half of the body resembles that of a seal. This docile rabbit of the sea is easy to catch as it does not fear people. The larger male sea rabbits control harems of 20 to 25 females. The meat of the sea rabbit is very tender and tasty.” This is what Hadson wrote in his personal journal in 1609 about the horseshoe crab and the sea rabbit in today’s Coney Island area of Brooklyn, New York. Sadly, just like the Dodo bird and the Thylacine, the sea rabbit was driven to extinction by the European settlers’ greed. When Dutch merchants and traders arrived here, sea rabbits were one of the first animals they hunted down to bring their furs to homeland to satisfy the fur craze of the time. To increase the shipment volume of furs of sea rabbit and beavers from New Amsterdam, Dutch merchants also started using wampum (beads made of special clam shells) as the first official currency of this country.

 

At the North Eastern shores of the United States, two species of sea rabbits were commonly found. They are Coney Island Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus americanus) and Coney Island Tiger-striped Sea Rabbit (Monafluffchus konjinicus). Sadly, due to their over harvesting in the previous centuries, their conservation status became “Extinct in the Wild” (ET) in the Red List Endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Currently, these sea rabbits are only found at breeding centers at selected zoos and universities such as Coney Island Aquarium and Coney Island University in Brooklyn, New York. The one shown in this photograph was named "Seara" and has been cared by Dr. Takeshi Yamada at Coney Island University.

 

The sea rabbit is one of the families of the Pinniped order. Pinnipeds (from Latin penna = flat and pes/pedis = foot) are sea-mammals: they are homeothermic (i.e having high and regulated inner temperature), lung-breathing (i.e dependant on atmospheric oxygen) animals having come back to semi aquatic life. As soon as they arrive ashore, females are caught by the nearest adult male. Males can maintain harems of about 20 females on average. Several hours to several days after arriving ashore, pregnant females give birth to eight to ten pups with a dark brown fur. As soon as birth occurs, the mother’s special smell and calls help her pups bond specifically to her. The mother stays ashore with her pup for about one week during which the pup gains weight. During the first week spent with her newborn, the mother becomes receptive. She will be impregnated by the bull, which control the harem. Implantation of the embryo will occur 3 months later, in March-April. During the reproductive period, the best males copulate with several tens females. To do so, males have to stay ashore without feeding in order to keep their territory and their harem. In mid-January, when the last females have been fecundated, males leave at sea to feed. Some of them will come back later in March-April for the moult. The other ones will stay at sea and will come back on Coney Island only in next November. After fecundation, the mother goes at sea for her first meal. At sea, mothers feed on clams, crabs, shrimps, fish (herring, anchovy, Pollock, capelin etc.) and squids. When she is back, the mother recovers her pups at the beach she left them. Suckling occurs after auditive and olfactory recognition had occured. In March-April, the dark brown fur is totally replaced by an adult-like light brownish grey fur during the moult that lasts 1-2 months. This new fur is composed by 2 layers. Externally, the guard fur is composed by flat hairs that recover themselves when wet. By doing so, they make a water-proof barrier for the under fur. The underfur retains air when the seal is dry. Because of isolating properties of the air, the underfur is the insulating system of the fur. In March-April, the fur of adults is partially replaced. First reproduction occurs at 1-yr old in females. Males are physiologically matures at 1 year old but socially matures at +2 years old.

 

NOTE: The name of Coney Island is commonly thought to be derived from the Dutch Konijn Eylandt or Rabbit Island as apparently the 17th century European settlers noted many rabbits running amuck on the island.

 

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Reference (videos featuring sea rabbits and Dr. Takeshi Yamada):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ek-GsW9ay0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJK04yQUX2o&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrCCxV5S-EE

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0QnW26dQKg&feature=related

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpVCqEjFXk0

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NlcIZTFIj8&feature=fvw

s87.photobucket.com/albums/k130/katiecavell/NYC%2008/Cone...

 

www.wondersandmarvels.com/2012/06/coney-island-sea-rabbit...

 

Reference (sea rabbit artifacts)

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417188428/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417189548/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5416579163/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417191794/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192426/in/photostream

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/5417192938/in/photostream

 

Reference (flickr):

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit13

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit12

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit11

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit10

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit9/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit8/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit7

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit6

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit5/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit4/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit3/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit2/

www.flickr.com/photos/searabbit1/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders3/

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/

www.flickr.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings/

 

flickeflu.com/photos/museumofworldwonders2

flickeflu.com/photos/museumofworldwonders

flickeflu.com/photos/takeshiyamadapaintings

 

Reference (newspaper articles and reviews):

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704828104576021750...

www.villagevoice.com/2006-11-07/nyc-life/the-stuffing-dre...

karlshuker.blogspot.com/2011/06/giant-sea-serpents-and-ch...

amusingthezillion.com/2011/12/08/takeshi-yamadas-jersey-d...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/12/07/art-of-the-day-freak-tax...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/10/27/oct-29-at-coney-island-l...

amusingthezillion.com/2010/09/18/photo-of-the-day-takeshi...

amusingthezillion.com/2009/11/07/thru-dec-31-at-coney-isl...

4strange.blogspot.com/2009/02/ten-of-takeshi-yamada-colle...

www.flickr.com/photos/museumofworldwonders/5440224421/siz...

 

Reference (fine art websites):

www.roguetaxidermy.com/members_detail.php?id=528

www.brooklynartproject.com/photo/photo/listForContributor...

www.bsagarts.org/member-listing/takeshi-yamada/

www.horseshoecrab.org/poem/feature/takeshi.html

 

Reference (other videos):

www.youtube.com/watch?v=otSh91iC3C4

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhIR-lz1Mrs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=BttREu63Ksg

 

(updated August 2012)

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

For any questions, please contact Dr. Takeshi Yamada. His email address is posted in the chapter page (the last page or the first page).

Sony RX10 Mk III Review

 

Friday, February 17, 2017

 

7:09 PM

 

Clipped from: www.kenrockwell.com/sony/rx10-iii.htm

 

24-600mm eq. lens, 14 FPS 20 MP

World's Best Super Zoom Camera

 

Stereo 4K video (2016-)

 

Sample Image Files Intro Specifications

 

Accessories USA Version Performance

 

Compared Usage Recommendations More

     

Sony RX10 Mk III (72mm filters, 38.5 oz./1,091g with battery and card, about $1,598) bigger. I got mine through B&H. I'd also get it at Adorama, at Amazon or at Crutchfield. It's so popular that its impossible to find in stock, so order it and be patient. See also How to Get It.

 

This ad-free website's biggest source of support is when you use those or any of these links to my personally-approved sources when you get anything, regardless of the country in which you live. Sony does not seal its boxes in any way, so never buy at retail or any other source not on my personally approved list since you'll have no way of knowing if you're missing accessories, getting a defective, damaged, returned, store demo or used camera. Buy only from the approved sources I use myself for the best prices, service, return policies and selection. Thanks for helping me help you! Ken.

   

NEW: Photos From Yosemite.

 

All Sony Cameras Compared.

   

Sony RX10 Mk III at 24mm setting. bigger. Yes, the shutter button is threaded to take a real cable release!

 

Pictures not fitting your screen? Just drag the lower right corner of your browser window to the left and everything will magically resize to fit the narrower window.

   

Sony RX10 Mk III. bigger.

 

Sample Images

 

Top Sample Image Files Intro Specifications

 

Accessories USA Version Performance

 

Compared Usage Recommendations More

 

NEW: Photos From Yosemite.

 

All these shots are from Normal JPGs, not raw files and not Fine JPGs.

   

Green Falls, Yosemite, 6:21 P.M, 12 May 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 125mm equiv. (44.9mm actual), f/4 at 1/50 at Auto ISO 100. bigger.

   

Anole, 15 June 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 600mm equiv. (220mm actual), f/4 at 1/250 at Auto ISO 320. bigger or full-resolution :copyright: file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution properly).

   

Sunset, 12 June 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 600mm equiv. (220mm actual), f/5.6 at 1/1,000 at Auto ISO 100. bigger.

   

Roots, Merced River, Yosemite, 11:02 A.M, 13 May 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 28mm equiv. (9.8mm actual), f/2.5 at 1/160 at Auto ISO 100, split toned print. bigger.

   

Hawaiian Torch at Sunset over Lahaina, 19 June 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 24mm equiv. (8.8mm actual), f/11 at 3 seconds hand-held at Auto ISO 500. bigger.

   

The Eerie Torus, May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 24mm equivalent (8.8mm actual), no flash, f/2.4 at 1/40 at Auto ISO 100, Perfectly Clear. bigger or full resolution to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution data properly).

   

Torches at Sunset, Lahaina, 19 June 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 185mm equiv. (67.5mm actual), f/4 at1/200 at Auto ISO 125. bigger or camera-oringal :copyright: file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution properly).

   

Full Moon over Lahaina, 19 June 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 41mm equiv. (14.7mm actual), f/3.2 at 1/10 hand-held at Auto ISO 6,400. bigger.

 

Introduction

 

Top Sample Image Files Intro Specifications

 

Accessories USA Version Performance

 

Compared Usage Recommendations More

 

Good Missing

 

The Sony RX-10 Mk III is so good, so competent and so much fun to use that it's addicting. Once I picked it up, I couldn't stop shooting with it for months; there isn't anything it doesn't seem to do well, all without ever having to change a lens.

 

It's an excellent camera with an extraordinary 24~600mm equivalent zoom lens. It's sharp and focuses super-fast at all focal lengths. I never run out of range; its zoom goes and goes and goes and never seems to stop. It's about a stop faster than other long telephoto zooms, with a fast f/4 at the long end.

 

The RX10 III has a fantastic viewfinder, built-in stabilization and great high-ISO performance so it's easy to shoot hand-held under any light.

 

It's superb for sports; it really does lock-on to faces and track them as they run down the field, and its non-rolling electronic shutter lets it run silently at 5 real frames per second as it tracks everything.

 

It's fantastic in that not only can I get head shots out on the field at 600mm, and that I don't have to change lenses to cover the close-in shots before and after the game. Want a camera for shooting surfing from shore? Here you go!

 

It's also great for paparazzi, surveillance, girl watchers and bird and nature shooters, giving great, tight shots in any light silently from any distance, all without looking like a big scary camera to frighten your game. I can fill the frame with a person down at the pool from the tenth floor of a resort. I can look 3 miles down the coastline and see which tables are occupied at a restaurant three miles away!

 

The RX10 Mk III's silent shutter lets newsmen, corporate and industrial photographers cover anything without intruding. Concert, medical and drama photographers and private investigators will love it, too. It really does do everything well: ultra-wide, ultra tele, macro, low light, sports, action and you name it.

 

Sony's cameras have come a long, long way in the past few years, and the RX10 III is astonishing in how much it does so well. For most things for most casual photographers, this RX10 Mk III will make more and better photos faster than a DSLR. This Sony will save you the trouble of having to change lenses and settings all the time; once set, it just goes faster than most people can juggle a DSLR system to do the same thing — and it has a much better shutter and flash system than any DSLR.

 

Its built-in flash works great for daylight fill-flash even at long distances because its ultrafast leaf-shutter allows for blazing 1/1,000 flash sync. This is better than the built-in flash performance of DSLRs whose very different focal-plane shutters won't synchronize with flash above about 1/200 of a second — making the RX10 Mk III's flash about five times more effective!

   

Katie at Tide Pools, 12 June 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III at 80mm equiv. (29.7mm actual), built-in flash ON, f/4 at 1/800 at Auto ISO 100. bigger.

 

Not only do I not need to carry a slew of lenses, I don't need to bring a separate flash to get enough power for daylight fill. Here in this telephoto shot the built-in flash balanced perfectly with harsh daylight - something that would have required a shoe-mount flash with four times more flash power for the same results on a camera with only 1/200 sync like a DSLR.

 

The RX 10 III shoots super-fast (up to 14 FPS with locked focus and 5 FPS with tracking autofocus), handles very well and makes-great looking photos. My RX10 Ⅲ pictures are always sharp, clear and well-exposed, better than I get from many other cameras that require more fiddling from shot to shot. This camera just gets out of the way by setting itself instantly and delivering fantastic pictures.

 

Video is superb, and even has Slo-Mo options that allow you to wait to trigger your recording until after your action (think bubble popping) happens! See Usage.

 

This RX10 Mk III is essentially the excellent RX100 Mk IV with a much bigger and longer lens. If a 24-70mm equivalent lens is what you need, then get the jewel-like RX100 Mk IV, but if you need essentially unlimited zoom range and don't mind the size and weight, get this RX10 Mk III. The only real difference is in how long the lens zooms, and that the RX100 Mk IV is mostly metal and tiny, and this RX10 Mk III mostly plastic and much bigger.

 

It's made in China and charges via USB.

 

Auto ISO works great; it's easy to set the minimum and maximum ISOs as well as the minimum shutter speeds. Better, it's just as easy to program the slowest speed to vary with focal length, and we have several options to shift it (all automatically) from there. Auto ISO also saves and recalls with the Memory Recall modes.

 

If its real 600mm equivalent lens isn't enough, digital zoom works great when you shoot at the lower resolution settings I use since it simply crops accordingly without having to resample, keeping the images just as sharp as optical zoom!

 

The electronic viewfinder (EVF) is always at the perfect brightness from night to direct sunlight. It's always sharp, colorful, and seems as if it's live with no apparent delay. EVFs have come a long way in the past few years, and Sony's are the best.

 

When set to Continuous shutter mode, it shoots completely silently. No one even knows I took any pictures.

 

My RX10 Mk III shoots instantly, fast enough even for drive-by-shooting, and my pictures look fantastic as-shot with no tweaking needed. This is what a camera is supposed to be; I can't help but love this Sony to death!

 

That's 99% of my review; the DSC-RX10 Mark III is a superb camera. It's easy to poke fun of super-zoom cameras because earlier ones were so fuzzy, slow and had to held at arm's length, but once you shoot with the RX10 Mk III, you'll find it hard not to love. It's quite an advance in the state-of-the-art in ultrazoom cameras.

 

Good

 

● Fantastic lens with huge zoom range works well without reservations; images as good as from a DSLR.

 

● Fantastic macro ability.

 

● No distortion, fast focus, perfect exposure and pretty good color rendition.

 

● Quiet leaf shutter and/or silent electronic shutter.

 

● Built-in flash works great with the leaf shutter's 1/1,000 sync speed!

 

● 14 FPS with locked focus; 5 FPS with tracking focus.

 

● Superb live finder looks perfect in any light.

 

● WiFi and NFC.

 

Why I Love 600mm

 

Here's a sunset snap at 35mm equivalent; about what you get with an iPhone:

 

Sunset in Palm Trees, 14 June 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 35mm equivalent (13.3mm actual), f/3.2 at 1/160 at Auto ISO 100.

 

And here's what you get zoomed-in:

   

Sunset in Palm Trees, Waikoloa, Big Island, 14 June 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 500mm equivalent (187mm actual), f/4 at 1/200 at Auto ISO 100. bigger.

 

The whole point of ultra-tele lenses is that you can turn every ordinary little sunset like this one into an epic sunset by zooming in. By filing the frame with whatever little red there is, BAM!, the whole frame explodes with color. These are JPGs essentially as they came from the RX10 MK III without any color fiddling.

 

Another advantage of an ultra-tele is that you make the disc of the sun huge. In this case I didn't move between these two snaps; I just zoomed-in. The palms you see in the better image are a very long way away. The very long lens enlarges everything to make a strong shot out of a dull one.

 

You have to consider depth of field; long lenses have very little. In this shot the trees are in focus, and the water beyond is not.

 

Missing

 

● No second card slot.

 

● No touch screen.

 

● No GPS.

 

● While autofocus tracks action wonderfully, you can't change the zoom setting while shooting a sequence.

 

● No M1 M2 memory recall modes on the top mode dial as we have on the A6300, just one "MR" mode from which you can recall your presets. This means you have to use several clicks to do what the A6300 does in just one.

 

Specifications

 

Top Sample Image Files Intro Specifications

 

Accessories USA Version Performance

 

Compared Usage Recommendations More

 

Image Sensor

 

5,472 x 3,648 pixels native (19.96 MP).

 

8.8 x 13.2mm, also marketed as " one inch," which it is not. This " one inch sensor" is much smaller than a DSLR sensor, but bigger than a cell phone camera's sensor. Therefore its technical image quality falls somewhere in between the two.

 

While its sensor is much smaller than a DSLR's, its sensor is larger than most other point & shoot cameras, so it usually performs better, especially in low light.

 

It gets fast autofocus through the ability to read the sensor for contrast detection at very high frame rates; it does not use phase detection and doesn't need it.

 

2.727x crop factor.

 

3:2 native aspect ratio, with 3:4, 16:9 and square (1:1) crops available. I program a button to allow fast selection of the different crops.

 

ISO

 

ISO 64 ~ 12,800; ISO 100 is optimum.

 

To ISO 25,600 with a multi image mode.

 

Auto ISO

 

Adjustable for high and low limits from ISO 100 to ISO 12,800 in full stops.

 

Auto ISO minimum shutter speeds adjustable either to track the zoom setting (and adjustable ± 2 stops from there), or settable in full stops from 30 seconds to 1/32,000.

 

Lens

   

Sony RX10 Mk III. bigger.

 

Actual Focal Lengths

 

8.8 ~ 220mm.

 

35mm Equivalent Focal Lengths

 

This 8.8 ~ 220mm lens sees the same angles-of-view on the RX10 Mk III's sensor as a 24 ~ 600mm lens sees on a 35mm or full-frame camera.

   

Temple of Ramses III at Bumfuq, Egypt, 09 May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 24mm equivalent (8.8mm actual), no flash, wide open at f/2.5 at 1/13 hand-held at ISO 100, Perfectly Clear. bigger or full resolution to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution data properly).

 

Optical Construction

 

18 elements in 13 groups.

 

7 ED and one Super ED glass element.

 

6 aspherical elements, two of which are ED.

 

Voice coil focus.

 

Close Focus

 

1.2" (3 cm) at wide and 29" (72 cm) at tele.

 

It's much better than rated, see Macro.

 

Diaphragm

 

9 blades.

 

Round to f/11.

 

f/16 minimum aperture at all focal lengths.

 

Defeatable aperture clicks with a slide switch on the lens barrel.

 

Maximum Apertures

 

Actual focal length

 

(shown in EXIF)

 

35mm equivalent

 

(shown as zoomed)

 

Maximum aperture

 

8.8mm

 

24mm

 

f/2.4

 

9.2 ~ 9.5mm

 

25 ~ 26mm

 

f/2.5

 

9.9 ~ 12.5mm

 

27 ~ 34mm

 

f/2.8

 

12.8 ~ 20.2mm

 

35 ~ 55mm

 

f/3.2

 

20.5 ~ 36.3mm

 

56 ~ 99mm

 

f/3.5

 

36.7 ~ 220mm

 

100 ~ 600mm

 

f/4

 

Zooming

 

It zooms either via the electronic zoom ring or the little lever around the shutter.

 

It's a pumper zoom, getting longer as zoomed.

 

It retracts when off, as shown at the top. It extended this far at 24mm:

   

Sony RX10 Mk III, zoom set to 24mm equivalent. bigger.

 

It retracts just a little as zoomed from 24mm to 75mm equivalent, and at 75mm equivalent is back at the 24mm mark on the barrel. From 75mm to 600mm equivalent it gets longer and longer and longer. Here is is at 600mm equivalent:

   

Sony RX10 Mk III, zoom set to 600mm equivalent. bigger.

 

Stabilization

 

Optical.

 

Rated "4½ stops improvement."

 

Hood

 

The plastic bayonet hood is included:

   

Sony RX10 Mk III. bigger.

 

Shutter

 

Remote Releases

 

The shutter button is threaded to take a real cable release!

 

You can also use the RM-VPR1 wired Remote Commander.

 

There's a Remote Camera Control program to control just about everything from your computer via USB.

 

Mechanical Shutter

 

1/2,000 to 30 seconds in all modes except AUTO, whose maximum time is 4 seconds.

 

The leaf shutter only runs to 1/2,000 at f/8 and smaller. At f/2.8 it only goes to 1/1,000. If you need faster than 1/1,000 at f/2.4, no worries; use the electronic shutter:

 

Silent Electronic Shutter

 

1/32,000 to 30 seconds in all modes except AUTO, whose maximum time is 4 seconds.

 

This Sony's electronic shutter is designed not to have any distortion when photographing moving subjects, a problem which plagues most electronic shutters.

 

Flash

 

Built-in.

 

1/1,000 sync speed.

 

The hot shoe has 20 pins with power for use with all sorts of microphones and other accessories.

 

Still Formats

 

JPG and/or raw.

 

20MP, 10MP and 5MP JPG image sizes.

 

Adobe and sRGB.

 

Video

 

4K, HD and Slo-mo to 1,000 FPS

 

S-Gamut/S-Log2

 

Clean HDMI output

 

Time Code / user bit

 

Gamma display assist

 

Slo-Mo as explained under Usage.

 

File Formats: XAVC S 4K, XAVC S HD, AVC HD and MP4.

 

It runs at 1,000 progressively-scanned frames per second at some resolutions; these aren't misprints.

 

3,840 x 2,160: 29.94p, 25p, 23.97p.

 

1,920 x 1,080: 1,000p, 960p, 500p, 480p, 250p, 240p, 59.94p, 50p, 29.97ps, 25p, 23.97p, 59.94i, 50i.

 

1,824 x 1,026p: 1,000p, 500p, 250p, 240p, 480p, 960p.

 

1,676 x 566p: 1,000p, 960p, 500p, 480p, 250p, 240p.

 

1,280 x 720: 29.97p, 25p.

 

Audio

 

Recorded only along with video.

 

AAC LC, AC3, Dolby Digital 2 channel, Linear Stereo PCM.

 

Stereo microphones built in.

 

Mic-in jack with plug-in power overrides built-in mic.

 

Headphone jack.

 

Finder

 

0.39" XGA OLED.

 

4:3 aspect ratio.

 

2,359,296 dots.

 

0.7x magnification at 50mm equivalent setting, rated.

 

1.0x magnification at 70mm equivalent setting, measured.

 

Auto brightness control.

 

-4 to +3 diopters.

 

21.5mm eyepoint.

 

LCD

   

Flipping LCD Screen, Sony RX10 Mk III. bigger.

 

3" (7.5cm) diagonal.

 

4:3 aspect ratio.

 

Swivels up 107º and down 42º, but not left or right.

 

Anti-reflection coated.

 

1,288,800 dots.

 

Connectors

 

Mic-in jack with plug-in power overrides built-in mic.

 

Headphone jack.

 

Multi/Micro USB 2.0.

 

Micro D HDMI.

 

WiFi

 

802.11b/g/n.

 

2.4 Gigacycles.

 

NFC.

 

Storage

 

SD, SDHC and SDXC.

 

Various Sony Memory Stick formats.

 

Body

 

Mostly plastic, with weather seals.

 

Power

 

It's rated to consume 2.3W using the rear screen, and 2.6W with the finder.

 

Battery

 

NP-FW50 lithium ion battery.

 

Rated 420 shots or 210 minutes with rear LCD; 370 shots or 185 minutes with finder for stills.

   

Sony NP-FW50 battery. enlarge.

 

Charging

 

Charges via USB, and the camera can run from USB power.

 

If you have no USB source, Sony includes an AC -> USB adapter which both can charge the battery and power the camera indefinitely.

 

Quality

   

Sony RX10 Mk III. bigger.

 

Made in China.

 

Size

 

5¼″ x 3¾″ x 5⅛″ WHD.

 

132.5 x 94.0 x 127.4 millimeters WHD.

 

Weight

 

38.470 oz./1,090.65 g with battery and card, actual measured.

 

Rated 38.7 oz. (1,095g) with battery and card, 37.1 oz. (1,051g) stripped.

 

Environment

 

Operating: 0 ~ 40º C (32 ~ 104º F).

 

Included

 

Camera

 

Lens Hood

 

NP-FW50 battery

 

AC-UUD12 / UUE12 AC -> USB adapter

 

Micro USB cable

 

Shoulder strap

 

Lens cap

 

Hot Shoe Cap

 

Eyepiece cup

 

Printed basic manual and warranty card

 

Price

 

$1,598, December 2016 ~ January 2017. This is one of the very few examples where a camera was so popular because it was just so good that Sony actually raised the price $100 a few months after it was introduced! They couldn't make enough to meet the demand at $1,498.

 

$1,498, May-July 2016.

   

Sony RX10 Mk III. bigger.

 

Optional Accessories

 

Top Sample Image Files Intro Specifications

 

Accessories USA Version Performance

 

Compared Usage Recommendations More

 

Custom case

 

Microphones

 

The 20-pin hot shoe has power for all sorts of things, especially Sony's microphones.

 

With these, there's no need for any other power or audio connections; just slide them in and you're done!

 

ECM-XYST1M pivoting stereo mic

 

This mic is a huge improvement over the built-in microphone because it's isolated from the camera to avoid mechanical noise, has more and adjustable stereo separation and has much larger microphone capsules for better low-frequency response as well as much lower electronic noise.

 

Use this for music, as well as any general use where you're close enough.

 

ECM-GZ1M mono zoom shotgun microphone

 

This one-piece mic just slips into the hot shoe and you're done. It's a directional mic that varies its pickup angle as you zoom the lens. It's designed to pick up audio from longer distances where you can't place a wireless mic closer.

 

Use this for things where you're using your 600mm lens, like bird songs and sports.

 

UWP-D11 Professional UHF mic

 

This professional system includes a mic, transmitter and receiver.

 

Attach this receiver to the SMAD-P3 adapter which provides power from the camera and direct-connects the audio via the hot shoe!

 

Use this if you want to put a mic on your talent and hide the transmitter behind them, as we do on TV.

 

We use these both in studio, as well as for interviews in the field.

 

Of course you can use a Sennheiser wireless system, but you'll have to change batteries in the receiver and plug audio into the RX10's mic input, while this dedicated Sony system powers the receiver from the camera and needs no audio cables.

 

Getting a Legal USA Version (for USA only)

 

Top Sample Image Files Intro Specifications

 

Accessories USA Version Performance

 

Compared Usage Recommendations More

 

In the USA, be sure your box has a "UC2" on the sticker near the bar codes.

 

If the letters are different, you got ripped off with a gray market version from another country. This is why I never buy anyplace other than from my personally approved sources. You just can't take the chance of buying elsewhere, especially at any retail store, because non-USA versions have no warranty in the USA, and you won't even be able to get firmware or service for it — even if you're willing to pay out-of-pocket for it when you need it!

 

Always be sure to check your box while you can still return it, or just don't buy from unapproved sources, so you'll be able to have your camera serviced and get free updated firmware as needed.

 

The legal USA version also has a warranty card from Sony USA:

   

USA Sony warranty card. bigger.

 

If there's a question, you can call the number on the card to confirm your serial number, or just get yours from the same places I do so you don't need to worry.

 

Performance

 

Top Sample Image Files Intro Specifications

 

Accessories USA Version Performance

 

Compared Usage Recommendations More

 

Ergonomics Finder High ISOs Long Exposures

 

Auto ISO Flash Image Quality Macro Mechanics

 

Noise & Vibration Sharpness Stabilizer Sunstars

 

Zooming Movies Top LCD Rear LCD Playback

 

Data Clock Accuracy Power & Battery

 

Overall

 

Performance top

 

The RX10 Mk III is a real eye-opener. Sony has pulled out all the stops to give us a camera that honestly gives us a one-piece alternative to a DSLR and several zoom lenses in a much smaller package.

 

This camera is as fast and just as good optically as my bigger cameras, and I don't have to change lenses. No, its sensor isn't as big as a DSLR's, but sensors are so good today that it doesn't matter anymore. By using a somewhat smaller sensor Sony has been able to design a lens around it that does things that no larger lens can do. Sony has decades and decades of experience making video cameras with long-range zooms, and many decades of sensor experience (I was an application engineer for Sony's CCDs 25 years ago!), and they've put all this together into one fantastic camera.

 

If you need a camera with a great ultrawide to ultra-tele lens, this is the best there is. I can't get a lens with this broad a zoom range for any DSLR.

 

Autofocus

 

Performance top

 

Autofocus is fantastic. It's fast and sure in any light, even with moving targets. It has a dedicated AF mode switch (good), but the switch isn't that convenient to use by feel.

 

Face recognition is fast and good, finding faces and tracking them all over the frame automatically.

 

Autofocus is also great in dim light, not needing the AF illuminator for great shots in the dark.

   

Katie runs with a sponge at her second-grade field day, 09 June 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 435mm equivalent (160mm actual), wide-open at f/4 at 1/160 at Auto ISO 100, Perfectly Clear. bigger or full-resolution file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display full resolution images at full resolution).

 

Autofocus is fast in any light, and facial recognition works great. See the sports shot above? The RX10 Mk III has no problem shooting continuously and tracking focus and faces, and does it all silently. It's honestly the easiest camera I've use for shooting sports; it just finds targets and stays locked on them as it motors away.

 

99% of the time, once I've turned on Face Recognition (hidden in the Camera 6 menu), it just figures out where to focus and does it instantly.

 

1% of the time I might need to assign a focus area, but I don't know of an instant way to do that.

 

Sadly there is not always an in-finder indication of the focus mode as you move the AF mode switch; you have to be sure to set the DISP mode to show enough details to see this.

 

The good news is that there's a dedicated (and unmarked) focus-lock button on the left side of the camera at the base of the lens. Focus on something else the same distance, hold the button as you recompose, and you're good.

 

For long sports sequences, about 50% of the shots are in perfect focus, 30% are in very good focus, 15% are a bit soft, and 5% are completely out of focus. This is better than I usually get with a DSLR, and the DSLR is a lot more trouble to set up.

 

Bokeh

 

Bokeh is wonderful.

   

Flowers, 06 May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 240mm equivalent (87mm actual), no flash, f/4 at 1/250 at Auto ISO 160. bigger or camera-original :copyright: JPG file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution data properly).

 

Not only is it always soft and undistracting, the RX10 3's Program exposure mode seems to be optimized to shoot at large apertures under most conditions.

 

As with all lenses, shoot at the longest focal length for the blurriest backgrounds.

   

Davis 6250 weather station, 04 May 2016. Bigger or Camera-original :copyright: file.

   

Davis 6250 weather station, 04 May 2016. Bigger or Camera-original :copyright: file.

   

Davis 6250 weather station, 04 May 2016. Bigger or Camera-original :copyright: file.

   

Davis 6250 weather station, 04 May 2016. Bigger or Camera-original :copyright: file.

   

Davis 6250 weather station, 04 May 2016. Bigger or Camera-original :copyright: file.

   

Davis 6250 weather station, 04 May 2016. Bigger or Camera-original :copyright: file.

 

Distortion

 

Performance top

 

At shot as JPG, the RX10 Mk III has no visible distortion at any setting.

   

Palms in a Cage, 07 May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 48mm equivalent (17.6mm actual), no flash, wide open at f/4 at 1/640 at Auto ISO 100, Perfectly Clear. bigger or camera-original :copyright: file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution data properly).

 

The camera is smart enough to correct any lens distortion automatically, so you never see it either in the finder or in your photos.

 

I suspect if you shoot raw and use random software to open the file that the distortion may not be automatically corrected.

 

It's at least as free from distortion as construction is straight; buildings are never perfect, either.

   

Three windows, 07 May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 24mm equivalent (8.8mm actual), no flash, wide open at f/2.4 at 1/125 at Auto ISO 100. Bigger.

 

Falloff

 

Performance top

 

Just as with Distortion, falloff is automatically corrected, so there is no visible light falloff (darkening) in the corners.

 

Exposure

 

Performance top

 

As I expect from mirrorless cameras, exposures are almost always perfect, regardless of how crazy the light.

 

The Program exposure mode is a little odd, almost always shooting at the lens' widest aperture to give the softest possible backgrounds. If you want smaller apertures; just turn the rear dial to shift the program.

 

Ergonomics

 

Performance top

 

Sony has the worst menu system in the business along with Fuji, but the good news is that with programmable function buttons, once you get the camera set, it's pretty fast to use. See Usage for hints.

 

The RX10 Mk III is fiddly and confusing to set at first, but once set to your preferences, it roars with speed.

 

Once set, everything works very fast, although I miss having dedicated M1, M2 and M3 positions on the top dial. The MR setting still requires a few more clicks to select memory recall settings.

 

Most buttons can be programmed as you like them in MENU > Gear 5.

 

Most buttons are flush with the camera surface, making them difficult to find by feel.

 

The Playback-mode button-function markings aren't in blue; they're in the same silver gray as everything else, making it more confusing.

 

The Flash button is too long a reach across the top of the camera.

 

The aperture ring lacks an A setting, so we still have to select the A mode on the top dial to activate this. Fuji and Contax cameras do this much better.

 

The battery goes in four ways, but only clicks home and works in one of them.

 

There is a little plastic tip that pops out from between the zoom and focus rings, so the camera sits well on a table without banging the rings or the front of the lens.

 

It goes to sleep after a few minutes of disuse and retracts the lens automatically. When asleep, tapping the shutter or menu button wakes it back up and erects the lens.

 

Finder

 

Performance top

 

The electronic view finder (EVF) is superb. It's always sharp and colorful in any light, from daylight to night time inside or out.

 

I've never used a better EVF, but the one thing no EVF can do is work under starlight or dim moonlight without any man-made light. SLRs are much better here. It's easy to autofocus and lock the RX10 on the moon for infinity focus, but for astronomical work like trying to photograph the Milky Way, the finder goes completely black because there isn't enough light; you'll have to guess where to zoom and make test exposures to see what's in your image.

 

Even though you can't see anything in the finder under starlight, the RX10 makes swell time exposures under any light; once the shot is completed you can see it just fine in the finder.

 

The diopter adjustment is well out of the way, so it stays where you set it.

 

Bravo, Sony!

 

High ISOs

 

Performance top

 

High ISOs look swell.

 

Cameras have come a long, long way over the years, and even this little 9x11mm sensor looks great at crazy-high ISOs.

 

I can shoot the RX10 III in any light and get great results, no problems here.

 

ISO 800

   

Yosemite Falls by Moonlight, 9:28 P.M. 13 May 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 30mm equiv. (10.8mm actual), f/2.8 at 30 seconds at ISO 800. bigger.

 

ISO 1,000

   

Ryan signs for Dad's credit-card refund, 08 May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 70mm equivalent (25.6mm actual), wide-open at f/3.5 at 1/80 at Auto ISO 1,000, Perfectly Clear. bigger.

 

ISO 1,000 looks lovely.

 

ISO 1,250

   

Ryan shops for motor homes, 07 May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 36mm equivalent (13.3mm actual), f/3.2 at 1/125 at Auto ISO 1,250, Perfectly Clear. bigger.

 

ISO 1,250 looks lovely.

 

ISO 1,600

   

Ryan Cooks Lunch. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 29mm equivalent (10.8mm actual), f/2.8 at 1/125 at Auto ISO 1,600, Perfectly Clear. bigger.

 

No worries at ISO 1,600.

 

ISO 4,000

   

Ryan on Mom's iMac, 07 May 2016. ( Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 45mm equivalent (16.3mm actual), f/3.2 at 1/125 at Auto ISO 4,000, Perfectly Clear.) Bigger or camera-original :copyright: file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution data properly).

 

ISO 4,000 is starting to get a little grainy, and it's fine to use any time you need it in dim light. In this case, Ryan's playing with the lights off and working by window light behind him.

   

Los Angeles Walkway at Night, 8:46 P.M. 15 May 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 24mm equiv. (8.8mm actual), f/2.5 at 1/8 hand-held at Auto ISO 4,000. bigger.

 

ISO 6,400

 

ISO 6,400 has some noise, but so what, it's still trivial to shoot hand-held under moonlight!

   

Full Moon over Lahaina, 19 June 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 41mm equiv. (14.7mm actual), f/3.2 at 1/10 hand-held at Auto ISO 6,400. bigger.

 

The smear across the moon is due to a smear I had across my filter that needed cleaning.

 

Long Exposures

 

Performance top

 

Long exposures are easy, and let you shoot at ISO 100 under starlight.

 

Simply use the Bulb setting and a standard threaded locking cable release.

   

Yosemite Falls by Starlight, 10:22~10:27 P.M. 14 May 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 40mm equiv. (14.2mm actual), f/3.2 for five minutes at ISO 100. bigger or full-resolution file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution properly).

 

It was partly cloudy, so we're looking at the stars through blowing clouds in this five-minute exposure.

 

If you have Long Exposure NR ON as I did here, the camera sits around displaying PROCESSING... for an additional five minutes making a dark-frame exposure to subtract from the image. More at Usage.

 

Auto ISO

 

Performance top

 

Auto ISO is perfect.

 

Auto ISO is so good that I don't have to select ISO manually unless I'm putting the camera on a tripod to use ISO 100 at night; Auto ISO always grabs whatever ISO I need without ever having to set it.

 

It gives me complete flexibility to program the ISO ranges and minimum shutter speeds I need so the RX10 can set itself exactly as I would under any situation.

 

We can set Auto ISO to use any ISO from 100 to 12,800 in full stops as minimum or maximum, and can set any full-stop shutter speed from 30 seconds to 1/32,000 as the minimum speed below which the RX10 starts increasing its ISO.

 

We also can set Auto ISO to follow the lens' focal length for minimum speed, and offset this by ±2 stops in full stops either way.

 

Bravo!

 

Flash

 

Performance top

   

Ryan with what he made Mom at school for Mother's Day, 06 May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 44mm equivalent (16.9mm actual), flash ON, f/4 at 1/1,000 at Auto ISO 100, Perfectly Clear. bigger.

 

Note how the camera automatically chose 1/1,000 so it had plenty of flash power to fill in dark shadows in direct sunlight.

 

The little built-in flash work extremely well for daylight fill-flash because the ultrafast leaf-shutter allows for blazing 1/1,000 flash sync. This lets the small flash compete well with the sun.

 

This is better than the built-in flash performance of DSLRs whose very different focal-plane shutters won't synchronize with flash above about 1/200 of a second — making the RX10 Mk III's flash about five times more effective!

 

Just pop up the flash and it works great even at long distances with the long lens. I'm impressed; I wasn't expecting this.

   

Katie with what she made Mom at school for Mother's Day. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 36mm equivalent (13.3mm actual), flash ON, f/3.2 at 1/125 at Auto ISO 125, Perfectly Clear. bigger.

 

Works great in shade, too!

 

The camera locks-up while the flash is recharging, which can be a couple of seconds if the flash needed to fire at high power.

 

Image Quality

 

Performance top

   

Blue Thai, 07 May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 95mm equivalent (34.7mm actual), no flash, wide open at f/3.5 at 1/50 at Auto ISO 320. bigger or camera-original :copyright: file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution data properly).

 

The RX10 III almost always gives sharp, vivid images automatically. I can program it for smooth colors for people, and snappy colors for places and things in its Creative Styles settings (more at Usage).

 

Images look swell in any light, and exposures are almost always perfect. The Image Stabilization and Auto ISOs systems work wonders, so I can't recall making any blurry shots in any light.

   

Flowers, 06 May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 46mm equivalent (16.9mm actual), no flash, f/11 at 1/30 hand-held at Auto ISO 100, Perfectly Clear. bigger or camera-original :copyright: JPG file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution data properly).

 

My biggest reservation about this camera are that while it's among the best I've seen yet from Sony, its color rendition in as-shot JPGs still isn't quite as good as I get directly out of my professional Canon DSLRs when I tweak the in-camera settings for my personal preferences. Most people never notice these subtleties, but color rendition is a critical component of my work. Color rendition as set in the Creative Styles menus is completely different from laboratory-measured color accuracy; color rendition is how a camera sees and renders real-world color when set the way you want it. There's no right or wrong; it's all up to an artist to judge for himself. I prefer the look I get from other cameras, but you may prefer this Sony.

 

Auto White Balance is very good in every light, although the newest Nikon D500 is even better under artificial light.

 

If you shoot raw and/or use other software to create your images, this doesn't matter since you're on your own, but if you rely on the camera's own internal image processing ability as I do to get usable JPGs right out of the camera, I get more refined images from my Nikons and Canons. There's no way to measure this; you see this by shooting and looking at what you get.

 

If you do shoot raw files (I don't), at least my RX10 III came with a coupon for free download of a version of Phase One Capture One that only works with files from Sony cameras.

 

It seems this Sony is somewhat more sensitive to blown highlights than my Fujis, Nikons or Canons, whose Adaptive Lighting options seem to do a better job than Sony's D-Range Opt options.

 

This compact's images and technical capacity are far better than the photographic abilities of 99% of the people who'll use it. It's more fun and easier to carry and shoot than a DSLR and lenses.

 

Macro

 

Performance top

   

Crazy Las Vegas Roll, May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 60mm equivalent (22.2mm actual), no flash, f/3.5 at 1/80 at Auto ISO 1,250, Perfectly Clear. bigger or full resolution to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution data properly).

 

Macro performance is spectacular.

 

There's no need for any macro buttons; it simply focuses right up to the front of the lens at the wide setting. It focuses so close that you'll have a hard time getting light on your subject, since it's pretty much touching the lens:

 

At 600mm, you don't have to be close to be close. Here's a 9-year-old's eyeball from several feet away. You can see me in the reflection:

   

Ryan's Eyeball. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 600mm equivalent (220mm actual), wide-open at f/4 at 1/125 at Auto ISO 1,600, Perfectly Clear. bigger.

 

Mechanics

 

Performance top

 

The RX10 Mk III is mostly plastic, unlike the mostly metal RX100 Mk IV.

 

The only metal exterior parts of the RX10 III are its focus and zoom rings, exposure compensation knob, shutter button, strap lugs, tripod socket and screws.

 

Everything else is plastic. The top cover, flash housing, mode dial, zoom lever, power switch, top buttons, top LCD cover, lens filter threads, lens front barrel, aperture ring, lens rear barrel, focus mode lever, focus lock button, left and right sides, grip, both connector covers, memory card door, bottom cover and the battery door are all plastic.

 

The RX10 Mk III's lens has to motor out and then back in every time you turn it off or it goes to sleep. These complex and delicate plastic mechanisms eventually break or get jammed, but people usually replace these cameras at about the same time the warranty expires.

 

This isn't a LEICA M3 or Hasselblad 500 C/M or a that will still be working well 50 years from now. Like all digital cameras, this is something you buy to take loads of great pictures today and for the next few years, and then replace with something even better three or four years from now.

 

Noise and Vibration

 

Performance top

 

The RX10 Mk III has a quiet leaf shutter; much quieter than a LEICA and certainly quieter than a DSLR.

 

Even better, the RX10 3 also has a completely silent electronic shutter. In this mode, the RX10 shoots completely silently; no one will know you've taken any pictures.

 

Sharpness

 

Performance top

   

Fine Home at Dusk, 07 May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 240mm equivalent (87.1mm actual), no flash, wide open at f/4 at 10 seconds rested on a fence at ISO 100, Perfectly Clear. bigger or full resolution to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution data properly).

 

It's super-sharp, even shot wide open as I did here. (Of course many of the trees were blowing around.) I didn't even have to turn off image stabilization for the 10-second exposure; it simply figured it out on its own as I rested the RX10 Mk III on a fence.

   

Katie draws at breakfast, 08 May 2016. ( Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 50mm equivalent (18.2mm actual), wide-open at f/3.5 at 1/250 at Auto ISO 100, Perfectly Clear.) Bigger or camera-original :copyright: file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution data properly).

 

I'm very impressed; the RX10 and its ZEISS lens is super sharp — better than most of Sony's SLR lenses!

 

The Program auto exposure usually shoots wide-open, and the darn thing is always super sharp throughout the entire frame, even at 600mm.

 

At 600mm the autofocus system is sometimes a little off; you may have to try a few shots to get perfect focus at 600mm if you're picky.

 

If you're not getting sharp pictures, you're doing something wrong, like letting your subject move or shooting through heat shimmer at longer zoom settings.

 

Of course it gets softer at high ISOs; noise reduction dulls the image as it reduces noise.

   

Olive Tree Sunset, 07 May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 425mm equivalent (155.4mm actual), no flash, wide open at f/4 at 1/250 at Auto ISO 160, Perfectly Clear. bigger or camera-original :copyright: file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution data properly).

   

Tree Trunk, May 2016. Sony RX10 Mk III, lens at 600mm equivalent (220mm actual), no flash, f/4 at 1/250 at Auto ISO 320, Perfectly Clear. bigger or camera-original :copyright: JPG file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution data properly).

   

Pine Needles, Yosemite Valley, 8:55 A.M, 15 May 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 400mm equiv. (151.1mm actual), f/4 at 1/400 at Auto ISO 100. bigger.

   

Deer eating, Yosemite, 6:28 P.M, 12 May 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 600mm equiv. (220mm actual), f/4 at 1/125 at Auto ISO 640. bigger or full-resolution file to explore on your computer (mobile devices rarely display the full resolution properly).

   

Climber on the face of El Capitan above Yosemite Valley, 12:06 P.M, 13 May 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 600mm equiv. (220mm actual), wide-open at f/4 at 1/800 at Auto ISO 100. bigger.

   

Crop from above image — shot from about a mile away!

   

Jetliner 35,000 feet above Yosemite Valley, 11:48 A.M, 13 May 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 600mm equiv. (220mm actual), f/5 at 1/1,000 at Auto ISO 100. bigger.

   

Crop from above image. You almost can read the tail number! Not bad for an object 7 miles away shot with a small hand-held camera.

 

Image Stabilizer

 

Performance top

 

The stabilization system is great.

 

It gets sharp shots hand-held at 600mm, it also stabilizes the image in the finder to make it easy to hand-hold and frame images at ultra long zoom settings.

 

There's no need for a tripod here.

 

Bravo!

   

Running River, Yosemite, 7:26 A.M, 13 May 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 185mm equiv. (67.5mm actual), f/8 at 1/25 hand-held at Auto ISO 100, split toned print. bigger.

 

The image stabilizer makes it trivial to use slow shutter speeds with long focal lengths to shoot flowing water hand-held.

   

God Beams at the Base of Yosemite Falls, 8:07 A.M, 13 May 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 52mm equiv. (18.9mm actual), f/8 at 1/30 hand-held at Auto ISO 100, split toned print. bigger.

   

Hawaiian Torch at Sunset over Lahaina, 19 June 2016. 2016 Sony RX10 Mk III at 24mm equiv. (8.8mm actual), f/11 at 3 seconds hand-held at Auto ISO 500. bigger.

 

In this case I held my RX10 III against the railing, and shifted the exposure program to f/11 to get some depth-of-field. This resulted in a 3 second exposure, and it's sharp! Otherwise I'd have needed ISO 45,000 to use 1/30 at f/11.

 

Sunstars

 

Performance top

 

The rounded diaphragm rarely makes sunstars, except at f/16:

   

At 55mm (150mm equivalent) at f/9. bigger.

   

At 55mm (150mm equivalent) at f/13. bigger.

   

At 55mm (150mm equivalent) at f/16. bigger.

 

Zooming

 

Performance top

 

The incredible lens zooms very well. It's easy to set precise framing with the zoom ring, and just as easily you can use the little zoom lever in front of the shutter button to get in range quickly. Unlike camcorders, the zoom rings and lever only work at one speed each, with the lever faster than the ring.

 

At the lower 10MP and 5MP image sizes, it zooms through 1.5x or 2x "digital" zoom, while in fact it's smart enough simply to be doing some clever cropping of the full-resolution 20MP image and reformatting it to 10MP or 5MP; in other words, 1.5x or 2x zoom really does get to the equivalent of 900 or 1,200mm without losing sharpness at the 10MP and 5MP image settings, which are where I usually shoot.

 

The finder reports the equivalent focal length as you zoom from 24mm to 600mm, while the file's EXIF (and file information in Playback mode) reports the actual focal lengths (8.8 to 220mm).

 

In A mode, the lens always uses the aperture set on the aperture ring from f/4 to f/16. The lens has a variable maximum aperture, but the aperture ring has fixed markings. If you set wider than f/4 and the lens can't go that wide at longer zoom settings, no worries, the lens simply uses its widest aperture.

 

I find the zoom ring is too far back; sometimes I grab the front (focus) ring, which doesn't zoom the lens.

 

Movies

 

Performance top

 

I didn't spend much time with movies. Sony's been defining the state-of-the-art in video cameras for way over 50 years, so I doubt there's much I can add.

 

Not only does it shoot all sorts of high definition and 4K content; it also runs at frame rates up to 1,000 FPS for slow motion.

 

More at Usage.

 

Top LCD

 

Performance top

 

The top LCD is medium sized and shows some basic information.

 

It has a dedicated button for a blood-orange LED backlight.

 

I never use or need this LCD, which is a throwback to 35mm SLRs. It's there mostly to make this camera look fancier; no one needs a top LCD anymore since everything is shown better on the rear LCD or the finder.

 

It goes completely blank when the camera is turned off. It would be more useful if it showed battery state and shots left when off, as some cameras do.

 

Rear LCD Monitor

 

Performance top

 

The LCD is sharp, bright and colorful.

 

It's bright enough to see in direct sunlight; about as bright as an iPhone 6s Plus; which is pretty bright.

 

It has no auto brightness control, but always seems to look well in any light.

 

I rarely use the rear LCD; I prefer the electronic finder, but to each their own.

 

The rear LCD pivots up or down, but not left or right, and it can't flip far enough for self-portraits.

 

Playback

 

Performance top

 

You have to turn on the RX10 and let the lens motor out to play. You can't just hold the PLAY button.

 

Playback is fast and fine; no difference here from other Sony models.

 

The finder and rear LCD have 4:3 aspect ratios, so the full 3:2 frame fits with dark bars across the top and bottom.

 

If you shoot 4:3 crops, the image has black bars on the sides while shooting, but in playback, the 4:3 images grow compared to standard 3:2 images to fill the entire screen or EVF.

 

Square images have bigger black bars on the sides while shooting, but fill the screens vertically when played back.

 

All image shapes fill the screen when zoomed.

 

Data

 

Performance top

 

Card Formatting

 

It takes 9.5 seconds to format a Sony 64GB SDHC card.

 

Cards are not titled properly. They come up as "Untitled" instead of being titled properly like "SONYRX10" as they should.

 

Image Sizes and Crops

 

At lower resolution settings, the RX10 Mk III is nice in that it tends to retain the same amount of megapixels as the crops are changed. In other words, if shooting at 10 megapixels as I usually do, you get 10 megapixels at either of the native 3:2 or cropped 4:3 settings.

 

JPGs

 

JPG files are expertly coded; file sizes vary with image complexity for constant quality.

 

They are tagged at 350 DPI.

 

Daily Folder Creation

 

I LOVE how I can set it to create a new folder each day. See Usage for how.

 

WiFi

 

WiFi works fine for picture transfer to an iPhone, but it takes a while to set up because the setup procedure is poorly designed.

 

It tells you to do all sorts of crazy things in obtuse language, but if you're patient and actually get it going, it works as well as other apps for picture transfer.

 

Clock Accuracy

 

Performance top

 

Every sample will be different. Mine lost 13.5 seconds in 51 days, or 265 mS per day.

 

This is slow 8 seconds per month, which is typical.

 

Power & Battery

 

Performance top

 

Battery life is swell; I never run it down in a day. I don't need a spare battery so long as I can charge it each night.

 

So long as I'm full in the morning, I'm good all day.

 

For instance, I shot all day and made 131 shots, and my battery still read 85% full. I get the best life turning the RX10 off when I'm done any group of shots rather than letting it time-out after a minute.

 

Even better, when shooting sports as continuous sequences without playing each one back, I made 1,782 shots one morning and the battery still read 54%!

 

It takes about 4 hours to charge from 15% to 100%, during which it draws about 480 mA.

 

When full, it continues to draw about 40 mA idle current.

 

Compared

 

Top Sample Image Files Intro Specifications

 

Accessories USA Version Performance

 

Compared Usage Recommendations More

 

NEW: All Sony Cameras Compared.

 

DSLRs versus Mirrorless

 

Compared to DSLRs

 

DSLRs won't have a lens like this. There is no DSLR lens that covers the equivalent of 24~600mm, and those that come close, like 28~300mm lenses, are only f/5.6. They're all about as sharp.

 

Better DSLRs will have much better sets of dedicated controls allowing us to set them more quickly without having to piddle in all the menus of the RX10. Basic DSLRs will need the same sorts of menus as the RX10 to make basic settings.

 

Canon DSLRs are usually faster to set and configure, while too many Nikons still lack camera memory recalls and only have idiotic "settings banks" instead, so I find the RX10 Mk III faster to configure for each shot than a Nikon D500!

 

I love shooting the RX10M3. It takes a while to set at first, but once set, it's fast and fun.

 

While I prefer the colors I get from my DSLRs, the RX10 is just as sharp as my DSLRs, and freer from distortion. I'd have no problem using the RX10 in my studio for macro shots and just about everything I need to shoot.

 

Compared to the Sony RX100 Mk IV

 

The RX100 Mk IV is the same thing, but with a faster lens (f/1.8~2.8), a more limited zoom range (24~70mm) and no exposure compensation dial. They both handle the same, with the same menu and control system and very similar controls.

 

The RX100M4 is smaller, lighter, less expensive and better made with more metal, but only zooms to the equivalent of 70mm, not 600mm.

 

The difference is all in the lens, which defines the size and weight of each camera, as well as the construction mostly of plastic or metal.

 

Compared to the Sony A6300

 

The A6300 is very similar, and very different.

 

The A6300, with its kit 16-55mm lens, is very similar to this RX10 III, except smaller and with a more limited zoom range. They both handle the same, with the same menu and control system.

 

The A6300 has interchangeable lenses and a much larger sensor, but I don't see any significant difference in picture quality; the colors, image rendition and handling are pretty much the same in actual use.

 

The A6300 has no exposure compensation dial, but it's easy to program its rear dial for this.

 

The best thing about the A6300 is that it has dedicated memory 1 and memory 2 instant recall settings on its mode dial. This greatly speeds up swapping between snapping people or snapping places and things, which is very important to me.

 

If you need to go to beyond the equivalent of 70mm without changing lenses, the RX10 III is the winner, but if a more reasonable zoom range is good enough, I prefer the A6300 and kit 16-55mm lens over either of the other two. I'd prefer the RX10 III to an A6300 and two zooms; the A6300 is a fun camera (not serious like DSLR), and therefore I prefer one zoom over having to swap between a normal and a tele zoom. If I want to carry lenses, I'd prefer a real DSLR like a small Canon or Nikon instead.

 

Usage

 

Top Sample Image Files Intro Specifications

 

Accessories USA Version Performance

 

Compared Usage Recommendations More

 

Memories

 

Here's how and why I set my memories.

 

I set these by first setting the camera as I like, then MENU > Camera 9 > Memory > (select location to which you'd like to save the camera's current setting) > and press the center rear button to save the settings there.

 

Each memory also recalls your zoom setting, so I set mine about midway between tele and wide so I'm at a normal setting at first.

 

Memory Setting

 

Where Set*

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

Subject

 

Places & Things

 

People

 

Sports & Action

 

Resolution

 

Menu > Camera 1

 

10 MP**

 

5MP**

 

5MP**

 

Creative Style

 

MENU > Camera 5, or Rear Fn button, then bottom middle of screen

 

Vivid with +3 Saturation

 

Standard, with +1 Saturation

 

Standard, with +1 Saturation

 

Auto ISO minimum speed

 

MENU > Camera 4

 

"Slow," which varies automatically with zoom setting; typically 1/8 at wide and 1/30 at tele

 

1/125 to freeze people

 

1/250 or 1/500 to freeze action

 

Advance mode

 

Rear Fn button, then bottom left of screen

 

Single Shooting

 

Continuous Shooting

 

Continuous Shooting

 

* You can reprogram many of these to come up elsewhere for your convenience.

 

** 5 MP is more than enough for anything and increases my workflow speed and throughput. I only use 10MP for place and thing photos, but even 5MP is plenty. No one needs 20MP; it slows your computers. I have no problem selling 5MP files to McDonald's and Merck Pharmaceuticals for thousands of dollars, so don't worry.

 

When you change anything after you've recalled a memory setting, it stays changed until you recall another setting. Turning the RX10 III off and on won't reset the recalled memory setting; you have to recall a new one.

 

Hints

 

If you change a setting, the RX10 remembers it even if you turn the camera off and back on. If you want to recall the originally saved preset, you have to select it again.

 

Sony's menu system is poor, so you'll wind up erasing and resetting these by accident for a while until you realize that MEMORY really means ERASE MEMORY.

 

If you're trying to recall a setting, only press things that say MEMORY RECALL. Be sure it says RECALL, or you'll erase your carefully set settings in one click.

 

Memory Recall

 

You'll need an SDXC card to recall your memory settings. What? Even if you aren't recording video, Sony demands an SDXC card for recording 4K video, and since the RX10 III defaults to a 4K video setting, attempting to recall a saved preset without having an SDXC card won't work; it won't recall your setting.

 

Either use an SDXC card, or be sure to program the video to a format that will work with slower cards.

 

You can't program a button to recall setting presets. If you assign this by pressing MENU > Gear 5 > Custom Key(Shoot.) > Custom Button 2 > Memory, that function SAVES the current state to that memory location; it doesn't recall it. Oops; Sony needs to add a way for fast recall, not fast saving.

 

I set my Fn button to display a Memory Recall option in MENU > Gear 5 > Function Menu Set.

 

I find the fastest way to recall a Memory Recall setting is to turn the top dial away and back to the MR position, select the setting I want, and then hit the center button to get to it.

 

Fast Menu Guide

 

There is no My Menu or any way to organize the menus, so expect to have to pore through everything every time to find anything.

 

Here's my cheat sheet of where I find what I actually need:

 

Camera 1: Basic still image resolution, shape (aspect ratio) and quality settings. Also adjusts Dual Rec (stills recoded while rolling video) settings.

 

Camera 2: Video and Panorama settings.

 

Camera 4: ISO and Auto ISO

 

Camera 6: Long Exposure NR and Smile/Face Detect.

 

Camera 9: Memories. "Memory recall" is one way to recall saved settings, but "Memory" actually means to erase stored settings and replace them with however the camera is currently set.

 

Gear 5: Here's where we can assign what buttons and dials do; see the next section.

 

Play 1: Set Display Rotation to "Auto" and playback rotates as you turn the camera, just like an iPhone.

 

Suitcase 1: Go here to turn the beeps off.

 

Suitcase 4: Time and date.

 

Suitcase 5: Format, copyright info and file prefixes. I set my files to begin "RX3", so I know with what camera I shot them.

 

Suitcase 6: "Set "Folder Name" to "Date Form" so that the RX10 starts a new folder each day.

 

Face Recognition Auto Focus

 

This is off by default.

 

Set this to ON (MENU > Camera 6 : Smile/Face Detect > Face Detection ON), otherwise face detection doesn't work.

 

Sports

 

For sports, set facial recognition ON as above.

 

Set the AF mode switch on the front of the camera to C, for continuous focus.

 

Set the advance mode (Fn > wind the box at the bottom left for advance mode) to continuous (the bearded rectangle).

 

Now just hold down the shutter button and the RX10 Mk III does the rest, and motors along with a silent shutter.

 

Hint 1: You can't zoom with a half-pressed shutter. You only can zoom with your finger off the shutter button. It may help not to try to use the zoom ring, since it will be ignored while you're rolling. f you use the lever at the shutter button you'll have to take your finger off the shutter to zoom — the only way it works.

 

Hint 2: Turn off Image Review so the viewfinder isn't trying to show what you just shot while you're still shooting it. Trust me, it works much better with Image Review off.

 

Hint 3: Since you'll be zoomed way in, it's tough to see what and where things are moving. I get much better results shooting with both eyes open. With practice you can shoot even with each eye seeing a different magnification, and keep the camera both zoomed-in and on-target.

 

C1, C2 and C3 Buttons

 

Using MENU > Gear 5 > Custom Key (Shoot), I set these buttons to:

 

C1: Aspect Ratio (cropping)

 

C2: Image Size (Resolution)

 

C3: Zoom Assist (more about this feature below)

 

Exposure Mode

 

I almost always use P (Program), which favors wide apertures in the RX10.

 

No worries if I want smaller apertures; I just flick the rear dial until I get the combination of aperture and shutter speed I prefer.

 

Silent or Leaf Shutter

 

The RX 10 Mk III selects these based on your advance mode settings. I never noticed a separate setting; my RX10 shoots silently in the continuous advance modes, and uses the almost-silent leaf shutter in the single-shot advance mode.

 

Macro

 

The RX10's Macro performance is spectacular at wide and long tele settings, but not in the midrange from about 100~300mm.

 

No worries; if you can't get it to focus close, just zoom out, or stand farther away and zoom in.

 

It can focus so close at 24mm that your subject will be sitting against the lens, and therefore in the dark. Put the subject a little farther away so you can get light on it, and zoom in to fill the frame.

 

Dual Record

 

There are two Dual Record options. They have the same name, but do entirely different things.

 

One records stills while rolling video; the other records a second lower bitrate video file in parallel with a 4K file.

 

Dual Rec (stills with video)

 

You can get 17 MP stills while rolling video, but only with HD video. The camera's processors are so busy shooting 4K that the stills are simply the native 8MP image size of 4K.

 

You set this option in MENU > Camera 1 > Img. Size(Dual Rec) and MENU > Camera 1 > Quality(Dual Rec).

 

Dual Video Record

 

This records a second lower-bit rate video file when recording 4K video. The RX10 records a low-rate (3 MBPS) 1280/30p MP4 file for online or other basic use at the same time as the full resolution file. You get this format for the low-rate file and that's it; you can't adjust it.

 

You set this in MENU > Camera 2 > Dual Video REC > ON.

 

This 3 MBPS Dual Video Record is the lowest bit rate you can get, but this trick only works in XAVC S 4K format. Otherwise the slowest bit rate is 6 MBPS in other modes.

 

Video

 

Card Types

 

You need to use an SDXC card to record 4K video. Sony does this because you need to use EXFAT card formatting to record files bigger than 4GB, and that requires an SDXC card. Sony figures that you'd rather not have the camera stop, or split the take into 2 files, when the file size reaches 4GB, so that's why Sony requires the SDXC card.

 

HD video is perfectly happy with FAT32. XAVC S, used with 4K video and high frame rates, also demands EXFAT.

 

Video Settings

 

There is no video settings menu.

 

Video rate, file and format settings are hidden in MENU > Camera 2.

 

The video P, A, S, and M exposure modes are even more well hidden. To set them, set the top dial to the Movie mode (35mm film frame icon), press Fn on the back of the camera, select the bottom right on-screen 35mm frame icon, and then select these with the rear control dial. Whew!

 

High Frames Rates and Slow Motion (HFR)

 

"HFR" on the mode dial and menus means high video frame rates.

 

These are set in MENU > Camera 1 > HFR Settings.

 

The Slo-Mo options capture clips at high frame rates to the sensor's ultra high-speed DRAM, and then encodes and records this data as a video file which will play at a slower, normal, frame rate.

 

The "Record," "Frame Rate," "Priority" and "Record Timing" settings need some explanation:

 

The "Record" setting (MENU > CAMERA 1 > HFR Settings > Record Setting) selects the rate at which the file will play back.

 

The "Frame Rate" setting (MENU > CAMERA 1 > HFR Settings > Frame Rate) selects the capture rate of 240, 480 or 960 FPS. The higher the frame rate, the slower the motion, but potentially at a lower resolution.

 

The Priority Setting (MENU > CAMERA 1 > HFR Settings > Priority Setting) simply selects whether the camera shoots for 4 seconds (Quality Priority) or for 2 seconds (Shoot Time Priority).

 

Here's the coolest part: since the RX10 III is grabbing all this high speed sensor data on the sensor's own DRAM, the RX10 allows you to start recording after your action has happened! It will continuously buffer video, and stop and record whatever just happened for a couple of seconds before you press the shutter! This makes it easy to catch a slo-mo of something random happening.

 

You set this in MENU > CAMERA 1 > HFR Settings > REC Setting. Start trigger is normal (records for a couple of seconds after you press the shutter). End Trigger records the couple of seconds before you press the shutter!

 

Of course these couple of seconds can stretch out to minutes of playback time depending on how you set it.

 

180º Shutter Angles

 

Like all video cameras, exposure times get shorter in good light, leading to choppier video that can start to look strobed.

 

If you want exposure times to approximate 180º shutter angles to render motion more smoothly to look more like film, use a 72mm neutral density filter.

 

Autofocus Lock

   

AF lock button and mode switch, Sony RX10 Mk III. bigger.

 

There is an unmarked button on the side of the lens where it meets the body. Hold it to lock the autofocus.

 

AF Mode Display in Finder

 

You have to set the DISP mode to show enough details to see this.

 

In the simpler display modes I use the RX10 isn't smart enough to blip these up for a moment as I move the switch; I have to stop and look at the front of the RX10.

 

Silent Mode

 

I never did figure out where to set this.

 

When set to Continuous shutter mode, it shoots completely silently. No one even knows I took any pictures.

 

I set this for my people pictures, and unexpectedly when I hand my camera to a stranger, they wind up firing off 24 shots, all not realizing that the camera was shooting. This is great because it means I get quite a few shots from which to select instead of just one. This shot was made this way:

   

Dad and kids in an E400 convertible. (

The many shades of red inhabit a vast portion of the visible light spectrum, but none so alurringly autumnal as the many multiplicities meandering around maroon.

 

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Army Photography Contest - 2007 - FMWRC - Arts and Crafts - Son in the Tub

 

Photo By: MAJ Aaron Haney

 

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

 

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History

 

After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.

On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.

In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work... Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm...”

In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.

In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion ...to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

 

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”

Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.

To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.

The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.

After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.

Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.

Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.

Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.

In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.

Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.

While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.

In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”

The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.

In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”

In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.

The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”

In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.

As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”

At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.

When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.

In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.

The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.

During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.

The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.

In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.

Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”

The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.

In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.

After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.

The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, engraving and trophy sales, etc... New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.

The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.

The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.

The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:

* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc...)

* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence...)

* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.

* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things ...).

* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.

* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).

* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).

* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).

* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc...).

* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.

* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.

What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc... were far away places that most had not visited.

As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.

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The one that I singled out amongst the many. Why this one? I was gently guided by my algorithmic hunt for a great abstract of this red oak mixed with a bit of serendipity. Here is a moment in time that only occurred once and will never occur again. The one that I singled out, forever about.

 

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Army Photography Contest - 2007 - FMWRC - Arts and Crafts - Eye of the Holder

 

Photo By: SGT Pablo Piedra

 

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

 

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History

After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.

On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.

In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work... Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm...”

In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.

In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion ...to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

 

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”

Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.

To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.

The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.

After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.

Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.

Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.

Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.

In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.

Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.

While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.

In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”

The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.

In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”

In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.

The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”

In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.

As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”

At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.

When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.

In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.

The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.

During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.

The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.

In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.

Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”

The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.

In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.

After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.

The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, engraving and trophy sales, etc... New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.

The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.

The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.

The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:

* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc...)

* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence...)

* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.

* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things ...).

* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.

* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).

* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).

* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).

* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc...).

* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.

* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.

What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc... were far away places that most had not visited.

As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.

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Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames, in Battersea, an inner-city district of South West London. It comprises two individual power stations, built in two stages in the form of a single building. Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to its east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the well known four-chimney layout.

 

The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II* listed. The station's celebrity owes much to numerous cultural appearances, which include a shot in The Beatles' 1965 movie Help!, appearing in the video for the 1982 hit single "Another Thing Comin´" by heavy metal band Judas Priest and being used in the cover art of Pink Floyd's 1977 album Animals, as well as a cameo appearance in Take That's music video "The Flood."

 

In addition, a photograph of the plant's control room was used as cover art on Hawkwind's 1977 album Quark, Strangeness and Charm.

 

The station is the largest brick building in Europe and is notable for its original, lavish Art Deco interior fittings and decor. However, the building's condition has been described as "very bad" by English Heritage and is included in its Buildings at Risk Register. In 2004, while the redevelopment project was stalled, and the building remained derelict, the site was listed on the 2004 World Monuments Watch by the World Monuments Fund. The combination of an existing debt burden of some £750 million, the need to make a £200 million contribution to a proposed extension to the London Underground, requirements to fund conservation of the derelict power station shell and the presence of a waste transfer station and cement plant on the river frontage make a commercial development of the site a significant challenge. In December 2011, the latest plans to develop the site collapsed with the debt called in by the creditors. In February 2012, the site was placed on sale on the open property market

through commercial estate agent Knight Frank. It has received interest from a variety of overseas consortia, most seeking to demolish or part-demolish the structure.

 

Built in the early 1930s, this iconic structure, with its four distinctive chimneys, was created to meet the energy demands of the new age. Sir Giles Gilbert Scott – the man who also designed what is now Tate Modern and brought the red telephone box to London – was hired by the London Power Company to create this first of a new generation of ‘superstations’, with the building beginning to produce power for the capital in 1933.

With dimensions of 160 m x 170 m, the roof of the boiler house 50 m tall, and its four 103 m tall, tapering chimneys, it is a truly massive structure. The building in fact comprised two stations – Battersea ‘A’ and Battersea ‘B’, which were conjoined when the identical B section was completed in the 1950s, and it was the world’s most thermally efficient building when it opened.

 

But Battersea Power Station was – and is – so much more besides. Gilbert Scott lifted it from the prosaic into the sublime by incorporating lavish touches such as the building’s majestic bronze doors and impressive wrought-iron staircase leading to the art deco control room. Here, amongst the controls which are still in situ today, those in charge of London’s electricity supply could enjoy the marble-lined walls and polished parquet flooring. Down in the turbine hall below, meanwhile, the station’s giant walls of polished marble would later prompt observers to liken the building to a Greek temple devoted to energy.

 

Over the course of its life, Battersea Power Station has been instilled in the public consciousness, not least when Pink Floyd famously adopted it for its Animals album cover and launch in 1977. As a result of its popularity, a great deal of energy has been expended in protecting this landmark.

 

Following the decommissioning of the ‘A’ station in 1975, the whole structure was listed at Grade II in 1980 before, in 1983, the B station was also closed. Since that time, and following the listing being upgraded to a Grade II* status in 2007, Battersea Power Station has become almost as famous for plans heralding its future as for its past. Until now, that is.

 

The transformation of Battersea Power Station – this familiar and much-loved silhouette on the London skyline – is set to arrive, along with the regeneration and revitalisation of this forgotten corner of central London. History is about to be made once more.

 

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new desktop background :)

 

followed a tutorial online for the text silhouette and put my own little twists on it. i am SO happy with how it came out! hoping to try it on some other pictures soon. :)

  

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Hi guys!

 

Just returned after 2 weeks away so I may need a bit of time to catch up with everyone ; )

 

These 'classic racecars' and other vintage automobiles are a surprise post from me!

I was planning to upload a 'flower photo' upon my return to Flickr... but found myself attending a classic car race yesterday and took a few photos while I was there : )

 

(( If anyone knows the make, model or year of any of these vehicles, please post the info in a comment. I'll be sure to add it in the description area and give you credit of course! ))

 

I decided on a 4 panel photo because there were hundreds of cars at this event... and I wanted to give you an idea of the different types of vehicles which were showcased.

 

This was not an event I was planning to attend yesterday... I had been out shopping and began to see classic autos driving up & down the streets... and then realized that some type of gathering must be going on!

So I checked online and luckily made it to the event in time to get a few pics : )

 

This old car race is in memorial to Prince Bertil of Sweden.

He was fond of cars and also raced them (from my understanding).

 

The panels above include 4 cars that I enjoyed seeing there. The one in the top-left section was very classy and the occupants dressed (& acted) the part so well (notice the guy waving!)

The vehicle in the lower-right area looked to be some type of old amphibious design (notice the rowing oar on the side & the tub shaped bottom of the car!). I'd love to know more about this machine if anyone has more knowledge of it : )

 

The remaining red & blue autos are very old racecars (the blue one at least) and I captured them making their way out of a sandy area before joining the starting line of the race! The driver in the blue car is gripping what seems to be a gear shift or stabilizer bar protruding from outside the sitting area, I only noticed it after seeing the photo! The red car 'gunned it' and kicked up some sand just after making a left turn in front of me... so that made for a nice action shot : )

 

Again, I had not planned to attend this but found it very entertaining and would definitely go again!

They had Dixieland style music playing throughout the event and served grilled foods as well : )

 

From my understanding, only cars which are 50 years or older can compete in the 2.5 kilometer race.

There were also cars from the 70's & 80's being shown too, I saw a few classic Mustangs and a very nice Buick Grand National!

 

This selection really sticks out from my other uploads... but I suppose it's another way of branching out in my photography : )

I don't have much experience with capturing moving vehicles so I was pleasantly surprised that some of these turned out okay : )

  

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks to Gösta Knochenhauer for the following info! : )

(( Pay him a visit and let him know that CRUSH sent you over! ))

 

Black car: 1929 Chevrolet Phaeton

 

Red car: 1930 Austin 7 Sports

 

Blue car: In the Swedish car registry it's said to be an Amilcar CGS Surbaisse, I can't find the model year, but it seems to have been produced between 1926 and 1929. However, in the organizer's list of participants there is no Amilcar, only two Bugattis, one 1928 Bugatti T 43, and one 1929 Bugatti 37A Grand Prix. The Amilcar was known as 'the poor man's Bugatti'.

 

Brown car: 1943 Volkswagen 166 Schwimmwagen (amphibian)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

  

* * * a note from me regarding this automobile photo * * *

 

I know that most of you who follow me enjoy nature photography (as I do too!) but I'm hoping you find this selection enjoyable as well (or at least an interesting change!) : )

  

Appreciate your support so much my friends!

Will slowly catch up & see you all again soon : )

  

CRUSH

  

This picture I do not post because of it being in any way extrordinary, but because I want to upload something and to give a sign of life on Flickr.

 

We've been through some rough times this Christmas as my girlfriend lost a dear family member unexpectedly.

 

Before that happened, I did take some pictures of us and the parts of our families and friends we managed to meet. As I wanted to capture the warm atmosphere, I mostly went without a flash and with my good old Nikon prime lens that hasn't seen much use recently. I was amazed (again) by the quality I got from it with my Nikon at up to ISO 6400 and from using aperture f/2 most of the time.

 

The other thing I realized again (and again and again) was how much music helps me to keep the upper hand. Sometimes it is quiet, contemplative music that gets me going again as I think through whatever is bothering me, but this time, it was upbeat, uplifting punk from Red City Radio's "The Dangers Of Standing Still". I got the vinyl as one of the Christmas gifts this year from my girlfriend and had it on heavy rotation through online streaming already before that for the past few weeks.

 

When today, after coming back exhausted from Johanna's family yesterday and having had a busy day again, we finally managed to sit down for a few minutes, I put on the record "for real" for the first time.

 

So this picture in a way sums up what has been going on with me this Christmas.