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Réalisé le 18 août 2019 au Marais Léon-Provancher, Neuville, Québec.

 

cliquez sur la photo pour l'agrandir / click on the photograph to enlarge it.

 

Made on August, 18th / 2019 at Marais Leon-Provancher, Neuville, Quebec.

Chokecherry tree loaded with ripening berries on the Domtar Overlook portion of the Bridge to Bridge Trail in Mountjoy Township in the City of Timmins in Northeastern Ontario Canada

Prunus virginiana

 

Thank you to everyone who visits, faves, and comments.

Seeing a male Indigo Bunting in full sun never fails to take my breath away. The pink background is an ornamental Cherry in full bloom in the distance. I was lucky to get this shot, because heavy rain last night finished the Cherry blossoms.

Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana) can be found growing along the Bridge to Bridge Trail in the City of Timmins Northeastern Ontario Canada.

Prunus virginiana

 

Thank you to everyone who visits, faves, and comments.

Choke Cherry (prunus virginiana)

Leaf of the chokecherry (Prunus virginiana).

Orchid family (Orchidaceae). Endangered species in Ohio. Photographed on Marblehead peninsula, Ottawa Co., Ohio.

 

While monitoring the federally threatened Tetraneuris herbacea in an abandoned limestone quarry, my group came across a small patch of this rare orchid.

 

It was interesting to see such a delicate orchid growing right out of the limestone gravel and bedrock at this site. The water table sits high due to nearby Lake Erie, with the gravel and marl saturated just below the surface. This keeps these orchids' feet wet and happy.

 

A number of nice rarities and high quality fen/prairie species were growing in association with the lady's slippers and lakeside daisies such as: Carex garberi, C. eburna, C. viridula, C. crawei, Eleocharis compressa, Juncus balticus, Packera paupercula, Liatris spicata, Lonicera dioica, Schizachyrium scoparium, Prunus virginiana, Rhus aromatica, Juniperus virginiana and Quercus muhlenbergii.

 

Aronia, the chokeberries, are deciduous shrubs in the family Rosaceae, native to eastern North America and most commonly found in wet woods and swamps.[2][3][4] The genus is usually considered to contain two species.[5] One species is naturalized in Europe.[6] Chokeberries are cultivated as ornamental plants and as food products. The berries can be eaten raw off the bush but are more frequently processed. Chokeberries can be found in wine, jam, syrup, juice, soft spreads, tea, salsa, chili starters, extracts, beer, ice cream, gummies and tinctures.[7] The name "chokeberry" comes from the astringency of the fruits, which create a sensation making your mouth pucker.[7]

The chokeberries are often mistakenly called chokecherries, which is the common name for Prunus virginiana. Further adding to the ambiguity, there is a variety of Prunus virginiana named melanocarpa.[8][9] This is easily confused with Aronia melanocarpa, commonly referred to as "black chokeberry" or "aronia berry." Aronia berries and chokecherries are both high in polyphenolic pigment compounds, like anthocyanins, further contributing to confusion. In fact, the two plants are only distantly related within the Rosaceae.

The natural history of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands :.

London :Printed at the expence of the author, and sold by W. Innys and R. Manby, at the West End of St. Paul's, by Mr. Hauksbee, at the Royal Society House, and by the author, at Mr. Bacon's in Hoxton,MDCCXXXI-MDCCXLIII [i.e. 1729-1747].

biodiversitylibrary.org/page/40753201

Prunus virginiana var. 'Canada Red'. The purple foliage vs. the unripe green fruit seems like a total reversal of how a cherry tree should look.

I spotted some of wildflowers popping in Fish Creek Park on my walk this morning.

Lieu historique national des Forges du Saint-Maurice / Forges du Saint-Maurice National Historic Site. Trois-Rivières , Mauricie, Québec, Canada.

....with the sound of Grosbeaks!

 

We visited the foothills of the Uinta Mountains in search of a flock of Evening Grosbeaks said to number upward of 400 individuals. We only found about 150, but in addition to the Grosbeaks there were numerous Cedar Waxwings, American Goldfinch and one RUSTY BLACKBIRD. Apparently the blackbird was only the sixth such sighting on record in the state of Utah.

 

The birds were dining on chokecherry. Chokecherry is widely regarded as an important wildlife food plant and provides habitat, watershed protection, and species diversity. Fruits, leaves, and twigs are utilized. Large mammals including bears, moose, coyotes, bighorn sheep, pronghorn, elk, and deer use chokecherry as browse.

A guide to the wild flowers..

New York,F. A. Stokes[1899].

biodiversitylibrary.org/page/40764555

On a bush that just volunteered in our side yard.

This hairstreak is rarely seen because it generally stays high in pine trees and other conifers on dwarf mistletoe. Sierra County, CA.

Réalisé le 18 août 2019 au Marais Léon-Provancher, Neuville, Québec.

 

cliquez sur la photo pour l'agrandir / click on the photograph to enlarge it.

 

Taken on August, 18th / 2019 at Marais Leon-Provancher, Neuville, Quebec.

These Flycatchers are very common here in the deciduous forest habitat, but I don't often have the opportunity for a clean and open shot. I caught this one while it was pausing briefly on a Chokecherry Tree. (Prunus virginiana)

 

Emily Murphy Park. Edmonton, Alberta.

 

Member of the Flickr Bird Brigade

Activists for birds and wildlife

The Chokecherry Trees can be found along the Domtar Overlook section of the Bridge to Bridge Trail located in the City of Timmins Northeastern Ontario Canada

 

Chokecherry fruits are edible and used to make wine, syrup and jams. Fruits have traditionally been used to treat canker sores and cold sores. Chokecherry is ideal for the wildlife-oriented garden, acting as a host for more than 200 species of butterflies and moths, including Canadian and Eastern tiger swallowtails. Approximately 70 bird species eat the berries, including woodpeckers, cedar waxwings and thrushes. Deer and moose enjoy the foliage.

Prunus virginiana

St John's NL

Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana) in full bloom at the Gillies Conservation Area located in the City of Timmins Northeastern Ontario Canada.

Baltimore Oriole BAOR (Icterus galbula)

with a choke cherry

 

[ fruit of Choke Cherry (Prunus virginiana)]

 

Carmichael,

Saskatchewan, Canada

 

Mom & Dad's

Afternoon

Yardbird

 

DSCN9605

This berry is quite bitter and not typically consumed as is by humans but used in jellies and syrups etc.(or wine:)

  

Within the village of Carmichael my Mom & Dad planted many trees and shrubs around their property upon retiring there in the 80's.It is now an obvious sanctuary for many birds and other wildlife species.

  

Dad with the help of Alvin Metts and others, also planted many around the village.

Over the decades this has transformed the wildlife profile, providing cover and food during breeding season for some species & food & cover during migration for others.

 

The first day of autumn at Lake Tahoe has felt like a glorious late summer day, with sunny skies and high temperature in the mid seventies. The Canada Red Cherry trees in the back yard have turned scarlet and glow in the right light. See the next image for a sunlit leaf.

 

Thanks, as always, for stopping by and for all of your kind comments -- I appreciate them all.

 

© Melissa Post 2015

 

All rights reserved. Please respect my copyright and do not copy, modify or download this image to blogs or other websites without obtaining my explicit written permission.

The first day of autumn at Lake Tahoe has felt like a glorious late summer day, with sunny skies and high temperature in the mid seventies. The Canada Red Cherry trees in the back yard have turned scarlet and glow in the right light. See the previous image for the full effect.

 

Thanks, as always, for stopping by and for all of your kind comments -- I appreciate them all.

 

© Melissa Post 2015

 

All rights reserved. Please respect my copyright and do not copy, modify or download this image to blogs or other websites without obtaining my explicit written permission.

Baltimore Oriole BAOR (Icterus galbula)

with a choke cherry

 

[ fruit of Choke Cherry (Prunus virginiana)]

 

Carmichael,

Saskatchewan, Canada

 

Mom & Dad's

Afternoon

Yardbird

 

DSCN9610

 

This manipulation and holding of an item to facilitate feeding is a behaviour I am used to seeing with a chickadee or a crow, not an icterid.

Fascinating -- to see this for the 1st time for species.

 

Why not just swallow the berry whole as many species such as robins do.

Hmmm..we wonders,,,aye we wonders

  

Perhaps this is something Orioles do when they are down in the tropics etc.

?

 

Overhanging Gordon Road, Kelowna, BC.

 

Thanks to mtndust for the ID!

This is the cherry that the birds have been going crazy for on Hirschdale Rd, Nevada Co, California on 6 September 2017.

A 1/3 inch across flower. The flowers form a cylindrical racemes 2 to 4 inches long. Plant height: 4 to 25 feet.

 

Native, perennial shrub/tree.

 

Likes a part shade, shade to sun in open woods, along forest edges and openings, fencerows, riverbanks and roadsides.

 

Blooms May - June

 

www.minnesotawildflowers.info/tree/chokecherry

Prunus virginiana

Species

Prunus virginiana, commonly called bitter-berry, chokecherry, Virginia bird cherry and western chokecherry, is a species of bird cherry native to North America; the natural historic range of P. virginiana includes most of Canada, most of the United States and northern Mexico.

Wikipedia

Scientific name: Prunus virginiana

Biological rank: Species

Higher classification: Prunus

Scarlet Tanager male

 

For bird photography I set my camera to reduced saturation and very low contrast, but even with those measures and heavily overcast conditions, the brilliance of this bird was a challenge.

Young Camponotus pennsylvanicus ant excavating a Prunus virginiana. Colony was at an early stage and producing a lot of minor workers.

The Chokecherry is full of clusters of berries hanging from the branches. A great source of food for the birds. You have to taste one to see why there called chokecherries. Gillies Lake Conservation Area in the City of Timmins Northeastern Ontario Canada

This is another shot I took the morning after the bad storms several days ago.

 

Here's more information about choke cherry trees.

 

Remember, no photos in comments and no notes, please.

 

And forgive me for not being able to visit much. It will be a while before I can resume spending as much time on Flickr as I used to and want to.

 

Blogged at charliebrown8989.wordpress.

 

© All rights reserved. No usage allowed in any form without the written consent of Mim Eisenberg.

 

Wild shrubs that bloom fragrantly in late May and early June. Later in the year they produce berries that provide food for birds in fall and early winter. This one is growing in our meadow near the roadside and catches the last light of the day.

Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana) can be found growing along the Bridge to Bridge Trail in Timmins Ontario Canada.

 

These decidious shrubs are found in Eastern Canada and produce edible berries. The plant is used for medicinal, food and an ornamental plant.

Chokecherry leaves (Prunus virginiana) show the beauty of Montana in the fall.

Nectaring on Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana). Dog Valley Road, Sierra County, California. June 11, 2018. D810_44581

Spring Blossom - Prunus Virginiana v Melanocarpa (Choke Berry) At least that's what it says on the label, I photographed it to be sure! Westonbirt Arboretum. I really like the apple green new shoots with the pink petals.

Chokecherry in the rain

Long treated as Prunus virginiana var. melanocarpa in all of our local/regional floras to date, however, FNA includes it within P. virginiana var. demissa. Shrub to small tree.

 

April 1, 2017, Salt Lake County, Utah open space/foothills, 4880 ft. (~1490 m).

  

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