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From yet another game called "The Vanishing of Ethan Carter". Kinda an adventure/mystery/puzzle game... this uses photogrammetry. In essence it obtains its realistic looking images from real photographs. Google the word to get the full definition. I have been told that this may be made into a VR format. The accompanying music is peaceful, evocative, mysterious... All I can say is WOW, what a gorgeous place to visit... possibly with a nice glass of wine. I could lose myself here as a great escape. :)

A seasonless staple that every stylish woman should have in her closet. The Frasha heels are a special collaboration between Frasha Boa (Abiss design) and Thalia Heckroth. First of its kind, fully done in 3D photogrammetry.

 

Available in 5 separate colours + Fatpack (includes 2 bonus colours: gold and silver)

 

Maitreya Lara exclusive.

Materials enabled.

 

@

TP to Thalia Heckroth

  

SL marketplace

  

Click here to enter our Fb giveaway (Winners to be randomly selected on Tuesday, October 15th!)

 

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Runa Photography, Daniel © 2018

© All rights reserved, don´t use this image without my permission

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Nevado Illimani lost 9.49 1.09 km2 of its glacier

area from 1963 to 2009. This reduction occurred in two

phases: 12% from 1963 to 1983, and a further 26% in the

following 26 years (up to 2009). The number of glacier

basins has also reduced since 1963, from 26 to 22. Eastslope/north-face glaciers have shown a greater retreat thanthose set on the west/south face of the mountain.

 

By comparing these results with accumulation rates,

determined from a local ice core, we identified a marked

reduction from 1983 onwards that may be the main factor in

the increasing glacier retreat at the Nevado Illimani site.

 

Source: Ribeiro et.al 46 years of environmental records from the Nevado Illimaniglacier group, Bolivia, using digital photogrammetry

Rooting : Infrastructure

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2610

www.seditionart.com/francois-quevillon/rooting-infrastruc...

 

Alternating between gravitating around an abyss and discovering the proliferation of roots on a fractured sidewalk and a heaving pavement, Rooting : Infrastructure invites the viewer to delve into intertwined natural and urban elements that are turned inside out and upside down. The work follows an artist residency and an exhibition that François Quévillon made in Mexico City at the end of 2019 for Connecting the Dots.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2347

 

The Athena temple of Syracuse, ca. 470 BC, encased within the Byzantine church of the Theotokos, now the Duomo of Siracusa.

 

Photogrammetric elevation of the north flank. Full version 4 pixels per cm.

Météores - La Collecte. Rencontres internationales de la photographie en Gaspésie – CHAOS at Miguasha National Park (QC), Canada. July 15 – September 30, 2018.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=1473

 

Météores - La Collecte. Rencontres internationales de la photographie en Gaspésie – CHAOS au parc national de Miguasha (QC), Canada. Du 15 juillet au 30 septembre, 2018.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=1477&lang=fr

 

Video : vimeo.com/466541438

 

Located in the Pedregal de San Ángel ecological reserve, Espacio Escultórico is a collective monumental work by Federico Silva, Helen Escobedo, Hersúa, Manuel Felguérez, Mathias Goeritz and Sebastián that was inaugurated in 1979. Its concrete structure that surrounds and is surrounded by a petrified lava field, as well as the flora and fauna of this unique environment, draw my attention during my Connecting the Dots 2019 residency when I was collaborating with UNAM’s Instituto de Geografía.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2347

 

Située dans la réserve écologique du Pedregal de San Ángel, Espacio Escultórico est une œuvre monumentale collective des artistes Federico Silva, Helen Escobedo, Hersúa, Manuel Felguérez, Mathias Goeritz et Sebastián qui a été inaugurée en 1979. La structure de béton qui encercle et qui est encerclée par un champ de lave pétrifiée, de même que la faune et la flore de cet environnement singulier, ont captés mon attention lors de ma résidence pour Connecting the Dots alors que je collaborais avec l'Instituto de Geografía de l’UNAM.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2344&lang=fr

ESA's 35-metre radio antenna in Malargüe, Argentina, has had a major refurbishment. Extenstive modifications made will now allow the ESTRACK network to support future mission like Euclid, launching in 2022, and to transfer data at much higher rates.

 

Upgrades to the ESA Malargüe station, and similar upgrades carried out in the Cebreros station located in Spain in 2017, make a big difference to deep space missions.

 

Currently missions like Gaia are able to send back data at a channel rate of 10Mb/s. Euclid will send back data at a rate of 149Mb/s – a similar increase in speed as we have experienced in our internet browsing in the last 10 years.

 

Euclid, which will orbit at the Lagrange point L2, will be fitted with the 26 GHz band radio giving it a higher bandwidth for transferring data to and from Earth, significantly increasing the scientific information returned over time.

 

The refurbishment of Cebreros and Malargue stations, will allow ESA deep space antennas to receive broadband signals at 26GHz as well as the conventional X-band frequency.

 

Highlights of the upgrade

 

The core of the Malargüe Ground Station antenna optical system is the beamwaveguide. This is a set of mirrors that redirect the signal from the spacecraft to the antenna feeding system.

 

The central mirror in the set plays a key role in the upgrade. By rotating the mirror in the centre, you can redirect the signal to different receivers with different frequencies.

 

When the central mirror is rotated to the deep space position, operators will be able to simultaneously use X-band and Ka-band waves – the kind of signal sent by deep space missions like BepiColombo.

 

When the central mirror is rotated to the near earth position, a newly developed multiband feed system will enable simultaneous X-band and K-band communications.

 

There is a placeholder position for exclusive communication at X-band using the new 80 kW high power amplifier. The 80kW amplifier is currently being developed and is expected to be deployed to ESTRACK by 2024.

 

In addition, a new generation of low-maintenance cryogenic amplifiers for improved performance have been installed, as has the latest portable satellite simulator – which will be compatible with Euclid’s high data rates.

 

Challenges to upgrade

 

This upgrade has provided unique challenges for the teams charged with seeing it through. The mirrors must be very precisely aligned, with a maximum of 3.5 millidegrees of angular tolerance. To achieve this precision, photogrammetry was used.

 

ESTRACK antennas also support a very wide range of flying missions, with a high operational load. To minimise the impact on operations, the complete refurbishment had to be completed in only five weeks.

 

Teamwork is key

 

The success of the upgrade relied on the dedication and expertise of each individual and their capability to work together effectively as a team.

 

Coordination between more than twenty people carrying out the upgrades has been paramount – and it has been achieved by keeping the team motivation high and ensuring communication and information flowed among the five industrial partner companies who worked together on the refurbishment.

 

Credit: ESA / Filippo Concaro

Field trip at Valle del Tezontle during my Connecting the Dots residency in collaboration with UNAM's Instituto de Geografía.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2347

 

Expédition à Valle del Tezontle lors de ma résidence pour Connecting the Dots en collaboration avec l'Instituto de Geografía de l'UNAM.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2344&lang=fr

 

Video: vimeo.com/392754676

 

Pyroclastic Trails. Gravity exhibition at Centro de Cultura Digital (Mexico City) during Connecting the Dots 2019. Curator : Carmen Salas.

 

The work shows volcanic rocks rising from the ground that create trails of pixels. The layering of tezontle is generated by a software by modifying the size, speed, trajectory and selection of rocks from a database of photogrammetric 3D scans. Made in November 2019 in collaboration with UNAM’s Instituto de Geografía during a residency for Connecting the Dots, the work is related to research on the impact of mining activities in extinct volcanoes of Sierra de Santa Catarina located south of Mexico City.

 

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2347

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=1473

 

Traînées pyroclastiques, exposition Gravity au Centro de Cultura Digital (Mexico) dans le cadre de Connecting the Dots 2019. Commissaire : Carmen Salas.

 

L’œuvre montre des roches volcaniques jaillissant du sol en produisant des traînées de pixels. Leur stratification est générée par un logiciel qui assemble des roches de tézontle numérisées en 3D par photogrammétrie. Il crée un flux audiovisuel continu en modifiant la dimension, la vitesse, la trajectoire et la sélection de roches dans une banque de numérisations 3D. Réalisée en novembre 2019 en collaboration avec l’Instituto de Geografía de l’UNAM dans le cadre de Connecting the Dots, l’œuvre est issue de recherches liées aux phénomènes causés par les opérations minières dans des volcans éteints de la Sierra de Santa Catarina au sud de la ville de Mexico.

 

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2344&lang=fr

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=1477&lang=fr

A seasonless staple that every stylish woman should have in her closet. The Frasha heels are a special collaboration between Frasha Boa (Abiss design) and Thalia Heckroth. First of its kind, fully done in 3D photogrammetry.

 

@

TP

  

SL marketplace

 

Available in 5 separate colours + Fatpack (includes 2 bonus colours: gold and silver)

 

Maitreya Lara exclusive.

 

Materials enabled.

Click here to enter our Fb giveaway (Winners to be randomly selected on Tuesday, October 15th!)

  

Météores - La Collecte. Rencontres internationales de la photographie en Gaspésie – CHAOS at Miguasha National Park (QC), Canada. July 15 – September 30, 2018.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=1473

 

Météores - La Collecte. Rencontres internationales de la photographie en Gaspésie – CHAOS au parc national de Miguasha (QC), Canada. Du 15 juillet au 30 septembre, 2018.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=1477&lang=fr

 

Fotografías y Montaje: Fco. Racero. 2018.

Photographs and Assembly: Fco. Racero. 2018

 

Música: El vuelo del moscardón - The Silhouets.

The Flight of the Bumblebee - The Silhouets

 

Aerotécnica Ac-12 "Pepo"

  

A finales de 1951 fue fundada en Madrid la empresa Aerotécnica por Juan Lerma, Jaime lllera y Ultano Kindelan. A partir de 1952 contaría con la financiación del Marques del Merito que seria el presidente y una sección de fotogrametría bajo la dirección de Manuel Kindelan.

Contrataron al técnico y proyectista francés Jean Cantinieau quien había

desarrollado en su país el helicóptero MC-100. Primero construyo el prototipo AC-11 "Madrid". Después realizo el mucho mas completo AC-12 de configuración en góndola con un larguero en la parte superior dotado de un motor Lycoming 0-360 de cuatro cilindros y rotor principal ENHASA (Empresa Nacional de Hélices). El tren era de tipo patín.

Se construyeron dos prototipos y una serie de diez.

Hizo su primer vuelo el 20 de julio 1954 en Barajas. Después de su evaluación en el INTA, el 1 de noviembre de 1958 el Ejercito del Aire adquirió los diez de serie matriculándolos Z-2-3 a Z-2-12.

La estructura fue fabricada por AISA de Cuatro Vientos (antes Loring) y los rotores en ENHASA, ensamblándose en Barajas de 1961 a 1968.

Estuvieron en servicio en la Escuela de Helicópteros del 28 de febrero de 1961 hasta el 6 de marzo de 1964, donde volaron 2.500 horas hasta que fueron sustituidos por los Bell-470, excedentes de la guerra de Corea, cuyo precio era tres veces inferior.

Después pasaron al grupo de experimentación de vuelo.

El 30 de octubre de 1967 causaron baja y el 4 de octubre de 1972 fueron entregados al museo en Cuatro Vientos el Z-2-11, que se exhibe hoy en préstamo en el Museo de Ciencia de Barcelona, y el Z-2-7 que se expone en el Museo del Aire.

  

FICHA TÉCNICA.

 

PRIMER VUELO20-VII-1954

VELOCIDAD MÁXIMA125 km/h.

VELOCIDAD DE CRUCERO100 km/h.

TECHO3.000 m.

ALCANCE340 Km.

PESO EN VACÍO480 kg.

PESO MÁXIMO780 kg.

DIÁMETRO DEL ROTOR8,50 m.

LONGITUD7,35 m.

ALTURA2,75 m.

MOTORLycoming 0-320-B2A de 150 CV.

 

At the end of 1951 the Aerotécnica company was founded in Madrid by Juan Lerma, Jaime lllera and Ultano Kindelan. As of 1952 it would count on the financing of the Marques del Merito that would be the president and a section of photogrammetry under the direction of Manuel Kindelan.

They hired the French technician and designer Jean Cantinieau who had

developed in his country the MC-100 helicopter. First, I build the prototype AC-11 "Madrid". Then I do the much more complete AC-12 gondola configuration with a stringer on the upper part equipped with a Lycoming 0-360 four-cylinder engine and main rotor ENHASA (National Company of Propellers). The train was skate-type.

Two prototypes and a series of ten were built.

He made his first flight on July 20, 1954 at Barajas. After its evaluation in the INTA, on November 1, 1958, the Air Force acquired the ten series, registering them Z-2-3 to Z-2-12.

The structure was manufactured by AISA of Cuatro Vientos (formerly Loring) and the rotors in ENHASA, assembling in Barajas from 1961 to 1968.

They were in service at the Helicopter School from February 28, 1961 until March 6, 1964, where they flew 2,500 hours until they were replaced by the Bell-470, surplus of the Korean War, whose price was three times lower.

Then they moved on to the flight experimentation group.

On October 30, 1967, they were discharged and on October 4, 1972 they were handed over to the museum in Cuatro Vientos, Z-2-11, which is on loan today at the Science Museum of Barcelona, and the Z-2-7. which is exhibited at the Air Museum.

 

DATA SHEET.FIRST FLIGHT 20-VII-1954

MAXIMUM SPEED 125 km / h.

CRUISE SPEED 100 km / h.

ROOF 3,000 m.

REACH 340 Km.

WEIGHT IN VACUUM 480 kg.

MAXIMUM WEIGHT 780 kg.

ROTOR DIAMETER 8.50 m.

LENGTH 7.35 m.

HEIGHT 2.75 m.

ENGINE: Lycoming 0-320-B2A 150 HP.

  

Video: vimeo.com/392754676

 

Pyroclastic Trails. Gravity exhibition at Centro de Cultura Digital (Mexico City) during Connecting the Dots 2019. Curator : Carmen Salas.

 

The work shows volcanic rocks rising from the ground that create trails of pixels. The layering of tezontle is generated by a software by modifying the size, speed, trajectory and selection of rocks from a database of photogrammetric 3D scans. Made in November 2019 in collaboration with UNAM’s Instituto de Geografía during a residency for Connecting the Dots, the work is related to research on the impact of mining activities in extinct volcanoes of Sierra de Santa Catarina located south of Mexico City.

 

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2347

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=1473

 

Traînées pyroclastiques, exposition Gravity au Centro de Cultura Digital (Mexico) dans le cadre de Connecting the Dots 2019. Commissaire : Carmen Salas.

 

L’œuvre montre des roches volcaniques jaillissant du sol en produisant des traînées de pixels. Leur stratification est générée par un logiciel qui assemble des roches de tézontle numérisées en 3D par photogrammétrie. Il crée un flux audiovisuel continu en modifiant la dimension, la vitesse, la trajectoire et la sélection de roches dans une banque de numérisations 3D. Réalisée en novembre 2019 en collaboration avec l’Instituto de Geografía de l’UNAM dans le cadre de Connecting the Dots, l’œuvre est issue de recherches liées aux phénomènes causés par les opérations minières dans des volcans éteints de la Sierra de Santa Catarina au sud de la ville de Mexico.

 

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2344&lang=fr

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=1477&lang=fr

Field trip at Valle del Tezontle during my Connecting the Dots residency in collaboration with UNAM's Instituto de Geografía.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2347

 

Expédition à Valle del Tezontle lors de ma résidence pour Connecting the Dots en collaboration avec l'Instituto de Geografía de l'UNAM.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2344&lang=fr

 

Gravity exhibition at Centro de Cultura Digital.

Connecting the Dots 2019 residency in Mexico City.

Curator : Carmen Salas.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2347

I had this sci-fi scene/image in my head for quite a while. During my stay in Japan I met Yuka who looked perfectly fitting for what I had in mind. I asked her if she was interested in posing for the composition and I'm very grateful to her that she agreed. Also a big Thank You to Takashi who provided the right outfit and assisted me with the lighting. The Holoscan device and the background were modeled and rendered in 3D's Max & Vray. The holographic projection is based on a 3D scan of Yuka's face... I achieved that through photogrammetry.

 

Photography & CGI: Andreas Mass

Model: Miura Yuka

Light Assistent: Hakoshima Takashi

Météores - La Collecte. Rencontres internationales de la photographie en Gaspésie – CHAOS at Miguasha National Park (QC), Canada. July 15 – September 30, 2018.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=1473

 

Météores - La Collecte. Rencontres internationales de la photographie en Gaspésie – CHAOS au parc national de Miguasha (QC), Canada. Du 15 juillet au 30 septembre, 2018.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=1477&lang=fr

 

#NASASLS solid rocket boosters are on target at Orbital ATK's facilities to be ready for our first flight! The black-and-white photogrammetric markings on the outside of the rocket will serve as "targets" for cameras located strategically on and around the vehicle to use photography to help measure distances between objects.

 

Image credit: OrbitalATK

 

Read more

 

NASA Media Usage Guidelines

The Library of Parliament (French: Bibliothèque du Parlement) is the main information repository and research resource for the Parliament of Canada. The main branch of the library sits at the rear of the Centre Block on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, and is the last untouched part of that larger building's original incarnation after it burned down in 1916. The library has been augmented and renovated a number of times since its construction in 1876, the last between 2002 and 2006, though the form and decor remain essentially authentic. The building today serves as a Canadian icon, and appears on the obverse of the Canadian ten-dollar bill.

 

The library is overseen by the Parliamentary Librarian of Canada and an associate or assistant librarian. The Canadian Parliamentary Poet Laureate and the Parliamentary Budget Officer are also considered to be officers of the library.

Designed by Thomas Fuller and Chilion Jones, and inspired by the British Museum Reading Room, the building is formed as a chapter house, separated from the main body of the Centre Block by a corridor; this arrangement, as well as many other details of the design, was reached with the input of the then parliamentary librarian, Alpheus Todd. The walls, supported by a ring of 16 flying buttresses, are load bearing, double-wythe masonry, consisting of a hydraulic lime rubble fill core between an interior layer of dressed stone and rustic Nepean sandstone on the exterior. Around the windows and along other edges is dressed stone trim, along with a multitude of stone carvings, including floral patterns and friezes, keeping with the Victorian High Gothic style of the rest of the parliamentary complex. The roof, set in three tiers topped by a cupola, used to be a timber frame structure covered with slate tiles, but has been rebuilt with steel framing and deck covered with copper. The initial overall combination of colours—grey Gloucester limestone and grey Nepean, red Potsdam and buff Ohio sandstones, as well as purple and green slate banding—conformed to the picturesque style known as structural polychromy.

 

The main reading room of the Library of Parliament

The main reading room rises to a vaulted ceiling and the walls and stacks are lined with white pine panelling carved into a variety of textures, flowers, masks, and mythical creatures. In the galleries are displayed the coats of arms of the seven provinces that existed in 1876, as well as that of the Dominion of Canada, and standing directly in the centre of the room is a white marble statue of Queen Victoria, sculpted by Marchall Wood in 1871. The northern galleries are also flanked with the white marble busts of Sir John Sandfield Macdonald; Prince Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII); Alexandra, Princess of Wales (later Queen Alexandra); and Sir Étienne-Paschal Taché.

 

The library's collection comprises 600,000 items, covering hundreds of years of history and tended by a staff of 300.[3] Access to the facility is generally restricted to those on parliamentary business, but research publications are produced by the library and are available to the public. The main branch on Parliament Hill is only the central hub of a larger complex that spreads to other parliamentary buildings, where services are offered in a number of branch libraries and reading rooms.

 

The Library of Parliament's roots lie in the 1790s, when the legislative libraries of Upper and Lower Canada were created; these operated separately until the creation of the Province of Canada in 1841 and the collections were amalgamated and followed the provincial capital as it moved between Kingston, Montreal, Toronto, and Quebec City. The library was to be established in Ottawa after, in 1867, Queen Victoria chose Bytown as the new seat for her crown in the Dominion of Canada, and the Library of Parliament Act formed the institution in 1871.

 

Though construction of the present library began in 1859 and the collection arrived in Ottawa in 1866, work was halted in 1861 and was not completed until 1876, when the 47,000 volumes—including several donated by Queen Victoria—were installed. Around 1869, the builders discovered that they didn't have the technical knowledge to build the domed roof, meaning that Thomas Fairbairn Engineering Co. Ltd. of Manchester had to be contracted to provide a pre-fabricated dome within a few weeks; this gave the Library of Parliament the distinction of being the first building in North America to have a state-of-the-art wrought iron roof. Further, in 1883, the library's 300 gas lights were converted to electricity.However, such additional costs brought the library's price to $301,812, a sum added on top of the total cost for all the parliament buildings, which had already gone far above the original allotted budget. Within only 12 years, the entire roof was stripped of its slate shingles in a tornado that hit Parliament Hill in 1888, since then the roof has been clad in copper.

 

A drafted architectural section of the original Centre Block, showing the Victoria Tower at the far left, and the Library of Parliament to the right

 

The Library of Parliament standing unharmed the day following the fire of 1916

The library's contents grew over the next five decades and were saved from the 1916 fire that destroyed the majority of the Centre Block; the building was only connected to the main complex by a single corridor and the library clerk at the time, Michael MacCormac, secured the library's iron doors before the fire could spread into that area. Fire eventually broke out in 1952, in the library's cupola, and caused extensive damage through smoke and water. It was then necessary to perform structural work, as well as to install a replica of the inlaid parquet floor and dismantle the wood panelling and ship it to Montreal for cleaning and partial fireproofing. The Centre, East, and West Blocks subsequently received extensive climate control and electrical upgrades, but the library was largely overlooked.

 

The deficiencies, plus conservation, rehabilitation, and upgrading, were addressed when a major, $52 million renovation was researched in 1996 and undertaken between 2002 and 2006. Public Works and Government Services Canada contracted the Thomas Fuller Construction Company (operated by the building designer's great-grandsons) to manage a project that fixed leaks in the roof and crumbling mortar in the walls on the exterior, as well as extensive repairs to the wood and plaster work and the installation of climate control systems on the interior. Also done at the time was a nine metre deep excavation of the bedrock beneath the library building, in order to provide more storage space, mechanical areas, and a link to an existing loading dock. The project used precision survey, laser measurement, photogrammetry, and the then fledgling technology of Computer Aided Three Dimensional Interactive Application. After four years of work, the library was opened to the public, with tours of the library resuming on 5 June 2006, though Thomas Fuller Construction filed a $21 million lawsuit against the Crown for cost overruns. (Wikipedia)

 

La Biblioteca del Parlamento en Ottawa (Canadá) es un hito en su país, tanto así que adorna la parte posterior de un billete de dólar canadiense. El edificio se inspiró en la sala de lectura del Museo Británico. La sala de lectura principal tiene un techo abovedado que complementa las paredes y las columnas de pino blanco con tallas de gran detalle de flores, máscaras, texturas y criaturas míticas. La colección de la Biblioteca se compone de más de 600.000 artículos y está a cargo de 300 empleados. El acceso a la instalación se restringe generalmente por la actividad parlamentaria de Canadá, pero los tours son a menudo disponibles.

 

Biblioteca do Parlamento Canadense em Ottawa, Canada.

  

The Library of Parliament (French: Bibliothèque du Parlement) is the main information repository and research resource for the Parliament of Canada. The main branch of the library sits at the rear of the Centre Block on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, and is the last untouched part of that larger building's original incarnation after it burned down in 1916. The library has been augmented and renovated a number of times since its construction in 1876, the last between 2002 and 2006, though the form and decor remain essentially authentic. The building today serves as a Canadian icon, and appears on the obverse of the Canadian ten-dollar bill.

 

The library is overseen by the Parliamentary Librarian of Canada and an associate or assistant librarian. The Canadian Parliamentary Poet Laureate and the Parliamentary Budget Officer are also considered to be officers of the library.

Designed by Thomas Fuller and Chilion Jones, and inspired by the British Museum Reading Room, the building is formed as a chapter house, separated from the main body of the Centre Block by a corridor; this arrangement, as well as many other details of the design, was reached with the input of the then parliamentary librarian, Alpheus Todd. The walls, supported by a ring of 16 flying buttresses, are load bearing, double-wythe masonry, consisting of a hydraulic lime rubble fill core between an interior layer of dressed stone and rustic Nepean sandstone on the exterior. Around the windows and along other edges is dressed stone trim, along with a multitude of stone carvings, including floral patterns and friezes, keeping with the Victorian High Gothic style of the rest of the parliamentary complex. The roof, set in three tiers topped by a cupola, used to be a timber frame structure covered with slate tiles, but has been rebuilt with steel framing and deck covered with copper. The initial overall combination of colours—grey Gloucester limestone and grey Nepean, red Potsdam and buff Ohio sandstones, as well as purple and green slate banding—conformed to the picturesque style known as structural polychromy.

 

The main reading room of the Library of Parliament

The main reading room rises to a vaulted ceiling and the walls and stacks are lined with white pine panelling carved into a variety of textures, flowers, masks, and mythical creatures. In the galleries are displayed the coats of arms of the seven provinces that existed in 1876, as well as that of the Dominion of Canada, and standing directly in the centre of the room is a white marble statue of Queen Victoria, sculpted by Marchall Wood in 1871. The northern galleries are also flanked with the white marble busts of Sir John Sandfield Macdonald; Prince Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII); Alexandra, Princess of Wales (later Queen Alexandra); and Sir Étienne-Paschal Taché.

 

The library's collection comprises 600,000 items, covering hundreds of years of history and tended by a staff of 300.[3] Access to the facility is generally restricted to those on parliamentary business, but research publications are produced by the library and are available to the public. The main branch on Parliament Hill is only the central hub of a larger complex that spreads to other parliamentary buildings, where services are offered in a number of branch libraries and reading rooms.

 

The Library of Parliament's roots lie in the 1790s, when the legislative libraries of Upper and Lower Canada were created; these operated separately until the creation of the Province of Canada in 1841 and the collections were amalgamated and followed the provincial capital as it moved between Kingston, Montreal, Toronto, and Quebec City. The library was to be established in Ottawa after, in 1867, Queen Victoria chose Bytown as the new seat for her crown in the Dominion of Canada, and the Library of Parliament Act formed the institution in 1871.

 

Though construction of the present library began in 1859 and the collection arrived in Ottawa in 1866, work was halted in 1861 and was not completed until 1876, when the 47,000 volumes—including several donated by Queen Victoria—were installed. Around 1869, the builders discovered that they didn't have the technical knowledge to build the domed roof, meaning that Thomas Fairbairn Engineering Co. Ltd. of Manchester had to be contracted to provide a pre-fabricated dome within a few weeks; this gave the Library of Parliament the distinction of being the first building in North America to have a state-of-the-art wrought iron roof. Further, in 1883, the library's 300 gas lights were converted to electricity.However, such additional costs brought the library's price to $301,812, a sum added on top of the total cost for all the parliament buildings, which had already gone far above the original allotted budget. Within only 12 years, the entire roof was stripped of its slate shingles in a tornado that hit Parliament Hill in 1888, since then the roof has been clad in copper.

 

A drafted architectural section of the original Centre Block, showing the Victoria Tower at the far left, and the Library of Parliament to the right

 

The Library of Parliament standing unharmed the day following the fire of 1916

The library's contents grew over the next five decades and were saved from the 1916 fire that destroyed the majority of the Centre Block; the building was only connected to the main complex by a single corridor and the library clerk at the time, Michael MacCormac, secured the library's iron doors before the fire could spread into that area. Fire eventually broke out in 1952, in the library's cupola, and caused extensive damage through smoke and water. It was then necessary to perform structural work, as well as to install a replica of the inlaid parquet floor and dismantle the wood panelling and ship it to Montreal for cleaning and partial fireproofing. The Centre, East, and West Blocks subsequently received extensive climate control and electrical upgrades, but the library was largely overlooked.

 

The deficiencies, plus conservation, rehabilitation, and upgrading, were addressed when a major, $52 million renovation was researched in 1996 and undertaken between 2002 and 2006. Public Works and Government Services Canada contracted the Thomas Fuller Construction Company (operated by the building designer's great-grandsons) to manage a project that fixed leaks in the roof and crumbling mortar in the walls on the exterior, as well as extensive repairs to the wood and plaster work and the installation of climate control systems on the interior. Also done at the time was a nine metre deep excavation of the bedrock beneath the library building, in order to provide more storage space, mechanical areas, and a link to an existing loading dock. The project used precision survey, laser measurement, photogrammetry, and the then fledgling technology of Computer Aided Three Dimensional Interactive Application. After four years of work, the library was opened to the public, with tours of the library resuming on 5 June 2006, though Thomas Fuller Construction filed a $21 million lawsuit against the Crown for cost overruns. (Wikipedia)

 

La Biblioteca del Parlamento en Ottawa (Canadá) es un hito en su país, tanto así que adorna la parte posterior de un billete de dólar canadiense. El edificio se inspiró en la sala de lectura del Museo Británico. La sala de lectura principal tiene un techo abovedado que complementa las paredes y las columnas de pino blanco con tallas de gran detalle de flores, máscaras, texturas y criaturas míticas. La colección de la Biblioteca se compone de más de 600.000 artículos y está a cargo de 300 empleados. El acceso a la instalación se restringe generalmente por la actividad parlamentaria de Canadá, pero los tours son a menudo disponibles.

 

Biblioteca do Parlamento Canadense em Ottawa, Canada.

CALTRANS_PHOTOGRAMMETRY DISTRICT 7 Room 200

Projet photogrammetry

2004-12-01_CALTRANS_PHOTOGRAMMETRY DISTRICT 7

photogrammetry and volumetric light

Photogrammetry uses standard 2D digital photographs from a regular camera that are overlapped at high percentages while surrounding the object in question. It then incorporates software to stitch control points together that are blended into a highly detailed, 3D polygonal mesh.

 

I've created a video example of a photogrammetry study I recently completed here.

 

As stated in the video ...in my robotic voiceover...

 

I took (54) 24.2 megapixel photos for this model. The original model had over 4.5 million polygons! After using Autodesk ReMake (Autodesk Memento Beta, at time of production) to compile the model, I also used it to clean it up. Hence, the model in the video has been reduced to only 1.9 million polygons.

 

Special thanks to Autodesk for creating the powerful software to pull this off, Autodesk ReMake.

Gravity exhibition at Centro de Cultura Digital.

Connecting the Dots 2019 residency in Mexico City.

Curator : Carmen Salas.

francois-quevillon.com/w/?p=2347

CALTRANS_PHOTOGRAMMETRY DISTRICT 7 Room 200

A photogrammetry model of a part of the Devon coast here in the UK. Images taken with a DJI Mavic pro.

Denali is the highest mountain peak in North America, with a summit elevation of 20,237 feet (6,168 m) above sea level. At some 18,000 feet (5,500 m), the base-to-peak rise is considered the largest of any mountain situated entirely above sea level. Measured by topographic prominence, it is the third most prominent peak after Mount Everest and Aconcagua. Located in the Alaska Range in the interior of the U.S. state of Alaska, McKinley is the centerpiece of Denali National Park and Preserve.

 

The first European to document sighting the mountain was George Vancouver in 1794. In 1903, James Wickersham recorded the first attempt at climbing McKinley, which was unsuccessful. In 1906, Frederick Cook claimed the first ascent, which was later proven to be false. The first verifiable ascent to McKinley's summit was achieved on June 7, 1913 by climbers Hudson Stuck, Harry Karstens, Walter Harper, and Robert Tatum, who went by the South Summit. In 1951, Bradford Washburn pioneered the West Buttress route, considered to be the safest and easiest route and therefore the most popular currently in use.

 

In September 2013, Alaska's government announced Mount McKinley is 20,237 feet (6,168 m) tall and not 20,320 feet (6,194 m) as measured in 1952 using photogrammetry. The Statewide Digital Mapping Initiative, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, said the more accurate height was 83 feet (25 m) lower using measurements from a 2012 survey that used Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar. The new height was accepted by the U.S. Geological Survey and is now part of its National Elevation Dataset.

Rathra multivallate enclosure, near Castlerea, County Roscommon, Ireland.

 

This is one of only a handful of quadri-vallate (four banks) enclosures in the whole of Ireland and probably the most spectacular. This type of site could date to any time from the Iron-Age to Medieval period. Sites like this are thought to have been used for ceremonial purposes with large gatherings of people. Rathra Enclosure lies near a dense group of archaeological monuments known as the Rathcroghan Complex and the enclosure is sometimes considered to be part of this group. The site remains unexcavated although it has been extensively studied by non-invasive means such as geophysical survey and aerial photography/photogrammetry.

 

Strong low evening light casting shadows helps to show both the large earthworks and some of the slight undulations in the ground.

 

Kite Aerial Photograph

 

15 April 2016

The Vanishing of Ethan Carter is a first-person story-driven mystery game focused on exploration and discovery. As occult-minded private detective Paul Prospero communicate with the dead to discover the fate of a missing boy and the mystery behind a dark ancient force lurking in Red Creek Valley.

 

store.steampowered.com/app/258520/?

A 3D tree base. numerous images taken around the base of a tree with Iphone 7+ and then using photogrammetry techniques merged into a 3D model.

A 3D photogrammetric recording of the whole cycle: Soviet-era WWII memorial recording the enormous losses of the residents of Sighnaghi and nearby villages. Best to zoom in, but download full size to read it.

My new set for Shiny Shabby this month.

maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Shiny%20Shabby/…/90/22

 

Here is some information about the items :

 

1. Consoling angel

 

Some time ago I opened a book about the cultural heritage of my area. It had been buried under a pile of things at the bottom of a cabinet. It happened to open on a page describing the consoling angel statue made by Sacha Martinoff at the end of the 19th century. One Bronze version is in a town not too distant, and another version is in a cemetery only a few kilometers from home.

I instantly decided this would be my first 3d scan.

 

For the past few months I had very much enjoyed working with 3d scans of statues, repairing them, tweaking them and adapting them so that they could be used in SL and Sansar.

 

So the next day I was amazed to actually find the statue, and took many pictures from all angles that enabled me to recreate the statue in 3d with photogrammetry software.

 

After that, I started visiting more cemeteries and churches, gathering pictures of statues and monuments.

Here is a video showing one of the treasures I found in my exploration of the area :

www.youtube.com/watch?v=I9sjxIBM-Q4

There is still a lot of work on those and they are not for this set, because I wanted to concentrate on marble statues this time.

 

Next, I went to the Museum of Fine Arts in Quimper, an hour drive, where I found the five following statues :

 

2. Cupid (Léon-Charles Fourquet - Cupidon 1881)

 

It turns out white marble is incredibly difficult to capture with photogrammetry, especially in a museum with white walls.

I have been having conversations with other people who are experimenting with photogrammetry and 3d scanning in general, and the question often arises as to how to go about optimizing them for virtual worlds. There was talk of an automated process, which prompted me to make this short video explaining why I am opposed to such methods : www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YENa7jjCfo

 

3. The Wrestlers

 

This is an anonymous 19th century copy of the famous antique sculpture kept at the Ufizzi gallery in Florence, Italy.

 

4. Young huntress at rest. 1830 by James Pradier (Geneva, 1790 - Paris; 1852)

 

5. Scythian slave sharpening a knife

 

This is an anonymous 19th century copy of the roman statue kept at the Ufizzi gallery, itself a copy of an hellenistic original (or perhaps from Pergamum).

 

6. Psyche (Eugène Aizelin - 1863)

 

7. Bathers

 

This one is not a scan, I reconstructed it entirely based on one photo and an existing scan of a statue of unknown origin. Probably 19th century.

 

8. Angel with skull

 

This is inspired by an actual statue of an angel, but my version bears very little resemblance to it. I wanted an angel holding a skull. Maybe the soul is out of reach, even for the angel, for some reason. Or it is contemplating something else entirely, from a perspective that we can not comprehend.

 

9. Fountain

 

A fountain designed to display the statues. its footprint is 40x40 meters. 43 Land impact is the lowest impact, it will rise whether you make the fountain bigger or smaller.

 

******************************

 

All the items are mod/transfer, feel free to contact me should you wish to trade for mod/copy.

In the contents tab of each item, you will find full perm textures that you can export and tweak, tint, brighten, darken or what suits you best, and import back. The original textures will remain there in the contents should you wish to revert back to the original.

The "original size" file contains the parameters to restore original size and ratio of the object, in case it become distorted by resizing.

Czech Air Force; NATO Days 2016; sunday

Carrara, 13th June 2017, photogrammetry of the Great David (artwork by Kobra). Angela and Carmen at the end of the survey operations..

.

Original shot taken with a Polaroid SX-70 Land Camera, Supercolor Autofocus Model 2 camera, loaded with Impossible Project Color SX-70 instant film, almost no post processing, just scanned..

 

You can check the result of the photogrammetry on Sketchfab_com

 

A photogrammetric projection of the Mayan plaster reliefs buried inside Structure I at Balamku

CALTRANS ROOM 200, PHOTOGRAMMETRY

Old CALTRANS Building - Window of Photogrammetry Office

( Now demolished and site of new LAPD Building )

The northern half of the soviet relief behind the abandoned WWII memorial at Sioni. Growth of cities, great scientific discoveries, space exploration, athletic prowess, and (of course) balloons are promised as the consequence of the ensuing peace. These subjects are repeated with little variation in the many mosaics and reliefs from the Communist period found decaying throughout Georgia, though every region has its own style.

 

Photogrammetric pastiche of several dozen images reprojected in orthographic view. The full resolution image is available for download.

Bellini's Pirata (photogrammetry as art)

Launching a fixed wing drone for a photogrammetry mission.

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