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Meet Brian – the oldest Lar Gibbon in Europe.You can’t help but love the Lar Gibbons. First thing in the morning you can hear them singing from the top branches of the Oak tree in their enclosure.

 

Brian is caramel in colour and is very much the Daddy on the park. He is certainly the oldest Lar Gibbon in Europe. His records go back to 1963 when he arrived at London Zoo having been rescued by HM Customs.

 

Lar Gibbons are strictly monogamous and form a tight family unit. Brian’s lifetime partner is a black gibbon called Sooty. They have successfully reared several youngsters, three of which (Robin, Sally and Nobby) still live at the park, and two more are now at Coombe Martin Wildlife Park.

 

Lar Gibbon, Both males and females can be all color variants, and the sexes also hardly differ in size. Gibbons are true brachiators, propelling themselves through the forest by swinging under the branches by their arms. They are also very noisy and can be heard calling first thing in the morning. They love swinging in their large oak tree.

 

Gibbons are the smallest member of the ape family. They use their elongated arms and hands to help them move quickly through the forest canopy. This arm over arm movement is described as brachiation. Our playful gibbons spend a lot of time swinging in the trees and playing on the swings we created for them.

 

Fond of a diet full of leaves, fruit, nuts and seeds, they also have a taste for insects.

 

Classed as endangered, they can be found in Thailand, Malaysia, and Myanmar. We are not sure just how old Brian is, but he may have originated in one of these countries before being rescued by Customs.

 

www.lakedistrictwildlifepark.co.uk/

Copyright :copyright: PRH Photography. All Rights Reserved.

 

This work is protected under international copyright laws and agreements. No part of this photostream may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without my prior permission.

 

The harbor mouth faces north east and is bounded to the north by Saint Elmo Point and further sheltered by an isolated breakwater and is bounded to the south by Ricasoli Point. Its north west shore is formed by the Sciberras peninsula, which is largely covered by the city of Valletta and its suburb Floriana. This peninsula also divides Grand Harbor from a second parallel natural harbor, Marsamxett Harbor. The main waterway of Grand Harbor continues inland almost to Marsa. The south eastern shore of the harbour is formed by a number of inlets and headlands, principally Rinella Creek, Kalkara Creek, Dockyard Creek, and French Creek, which are covered by Kalkara and the Three Cities: Cospicua, Vittoriosa, and Senglea. The harbor has been described as Malta's greatest geographic asset.

 

With its partner harbor of Marsamxett, Grand Harbor lies at the centre of gently rising ground. Development has grown up all around the twin harbors and up the slopes so that the whole bowl is effectively one large conurbation. Much of Malta's population lives within a three kilometer radius of Floriana. This is now one of the most densely populated areas in Europe. The harbours and the surrounding areas make up Malta's Northern and Southern Harbor Districts. Together, these districts contain 27 of 68 local councils. They have a population of 213,722 which make up over 47% of the total population of the Maltese islands.

David Bowie - "Station To Station" - Play this track here.

 

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Station to Station is the tenth studio album by English musician David Bowie, released by RCA Records in 1976. Commonly regarded as one of his most significant works, Station to Station is also notable as the vehicle for Bowie's last great 'character', The Thin White Duke.

 

The album was recorded after he completed shooting Nicolas Roeg's The Man Who Fell to Earth, and the cover featured a still from the movie. During the sessions Bowie was heavily dependent on drugs, especially cocaine, and recalls almost nothing of the production.

 

Musically, Station to Station was a transitional album for Bowie, developing the funk and soul music of his previous release, Young Americans, while presenting a new direction towards synthesisers and motorik rhythms that was influenced by German electronic bands such as Kraftwerk and Neu!.

 

This trend would culminate in some of his most acclaimed work, the so-called Berlin Trilogy, recorded with Brian Eno in 1977–79. Bowie himself has said that Station to Station was "a plea to come back to Europe for me". The album’s lyrics, meanwhile, reflected his preoccupations with Nietzsche, Aleister Crowley, mythology and religion.

 

With its blend of funk and Krautrock, romantic balladry and occultism, Station to Station has been described as "simultaneously one of Bowie's most accessible albums and his most impenetrable". Featuring the single "Golden Years", it made the Top 5 in both the UK and US charts. In 2003, the album was ranked number 323 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

 

In the early days of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway (L&MR), the Liverpool terminus was located at Crown Street, in Edge Hill, officially opened in 1830. Construction of a purpose-built station began in October 1833, the land being purchased from Liverpool Corporation for £9000. A tunnel was constructed between Edge Hill and the new station (starting in 1832, prior to station construction), and the station was opened to the public in August 1836, although construction was not completed until the following year.

 

Because of the steep incline between Lime Street and Edge Hill, trains were stopped at Edge Hill, their locomotives removed, and the passenger carriages taken down by gravity, descent controlled by brakemen. The return journey was achieved by using a stationary engine to haul the carriages up with rope.

 

Within six years, the rapid growth of the railways meant that the original station needed to be extended, and a plan was made to erect an iron roof similar to that found at Euston station in London, ridge roofs supported by iron columns; however, Richard Turner and William Fairburn submitted a design for a single curved roof, which won the approval of the station committee. The work cost £15,000, and was completed in 1849. A second roof was added in the 1880s.

 

In 1845 the L&MR was absorbed by its principal business partner, the Grand Junction Railway (GJR); the following year the GJR formed part of the London and North Western Railway. The station was one of the first to send mail by train. The North Western Hotel designed by Alfred Waterhouse, was built in front of the station - this still stands, having been converted to accommodation for students of Liverpool John Moores University. At 'the grouping' in 1923, the station passed to the ownership of the London, Midland and Scottish (LMS) railway, and, in 1948, the London Midland Region of British Railways.

 

Lime Street was part of the first stage of electrification of the West Coast Main Line in 1959. In 1966, the station saw the launch of the first InterCity service.

 

Lime Street was voted the equal worst of the 20 busiest UK railway stations in a 2007 poll but was voted "Station of the Year 2010" at the National Rail Awards thanks in part to a recent reburbishment

 

Checkout more ipod music from my photostream.

 

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Marc Bolan and Trex - By The Light Of The Magical Moon - Play this track here.

 

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This classic track can be found on 'A Beard of Stars'. Its the fourth album by Tyrannosaurus Rex (Trex), comprising Marc Bolan (vocals, guitar, organ, bass) and the first with new partner Mickey Finn (percussion). It was released in March 1970. It is notable for the beginning of Bolan using electric instruments on the T.Rex albums.

 

Early Tyrannosaurus Rex released four albums and four singles, flirting with the charts, reaching as high as number fifteen and supported with airplay by legendary Radio 1 DJ John Peel. One of the highlights of this era was when the duo played at the first free Hyde Park concert in 1968.

 

Although the free-spirited, drug-taking Steve Took was fired from the group after their first American tour, they were a force to be reckoned within the hippy underground scene while they lasted. Their music was filled with Marc's otherworldly poetry, a book of which he published in 1969, 'The Warlock Of Love'. In keeping with his early rock and roll interests, Bolan began bringing amplified guitar lines into the duo's music, buying a vintage Gibson Les Paul guitar (later featured on the cover of the album T. Rex in 1970).

 

After replacing Took with Mickey Finn, he let the electric influences come forward even further on A Beard of Stars, the final album to be credited to Tyrannosaurus Rex. It closed with the song "Elemental Child," featuring a long electric guitar break influenced by Jimi Hendrix.

 

Bolan, by now married to his girlfriend June Child (a former secretary to the manager of another of his heroes, Syd Barrett), shortened the group's name to T. Rex and wrote and recorded "Ride a White Swan", dominated by a rolling, hand clapping back-beat, Bolan's electric guitar and Finn's percussion.

 

Bolan and his producer Tony Visconti oversaw the session for "Ride a White Swan", the single that changed Bolan's career. Recorded on 1 July 1970 and released later that year, it made slow progress in the UK Top 40, until it finally peaked in early 1971 at number two.

 

Bolan took to wearing top hats and feather boas on stage as well as putting drops of glitter on each of his cheekbones. Stories are conflicting about his inspiration for this—some say it was introduced by his personal assistant, Chelita Secunda, although Bolan told John Pidgeon in a 1974 interview on Radio 1 that he noticed the glitter on his wife's dressing table prior to a photo session and casually daubed some on his face there and then. Other performers—and their fans—soon took up variations on the idea. Glam rock was born.

 

This infra-red image almost swaps night for day here. A Hoya R72 filter was used.

 

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()

Shot in Oct 2014 during a full moon morning. Security is tight on the Nevada side. Security prohibits anyone walking around the dam during the dark hours, and all the parking areas are closed.

Here's a link to the Video of this photo shoot:

youtu.be/hKPAkpg9QUk

Music by Silent Partner, Subscribe and thanks for viewing.

 

If you want to see my photo record of the water levels at the Hoover Dam from 2003 to 2013, here's the link:

youtu.be/rnSEhKBxXiI

Music by DJ Morhpiziz. Thanks for viewing.

On what I think is its first outing since being repainted at Toton a couple of weeks ago, the first proper DB Schenker 'skip' 67027 was turned out on Tuesday the 11th of March for a spot of test train work. Partnered with 67020, it is seen here at Wilmorton almost home with the 1Q19 05:55 Derby to Derby test train. This was supposed to reach London Kings Cross but in the end due to signalling problems only made it as far as Peterborough. The light is a little head on here but still worth the record shot whilst it is looking so nice and clean I reckon.

END VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN NOW!

 

Giornata internazionale contro la violenza sulle donne.

 

Una vittima ogni due giorni, 179 donne uccise: un anno nero per i femminicidi in Italia, il 2013, secondo il rapporto Eures. Aumentano al Sud (+27 per cento nel 2013) e raddoppiano al Centro, mentre il Nord detiene il record di uccisione di donne in famiglia.

Nel 2014 sono già più di cento i femminicidi dall'inizio dell'anno.

Il 25 novembre è la data scelta nel 1999 dalle Nazioni Unite come Giornata internazionale per l'eliminazione della violenza contro le donne. Si ricorda l'assassinio delle tre sorelle Mirabal avvenuto nel 1960 nella Repubblica Dominicana durante il regime di Rafael Leonidas Trujillo.

Secondo uno studio del 2013 della World Health Organization, la violenza fisica o sessuale colpisce più di un terzo delle donne nel mondo (35%), e quella domestica, inflitta dal partner, è la forma più comune (30%). Il Paese dove le donne sono più a rischio è il Sud-est asiatico, dove più della metà (58,8%) degli omicidi avviene per mano di mariti, fidanzati o compagni. A seguire, i Paesi ad elevato reddito (41,2%), tra questi vi è anche l'Italia, le Americhe (40,5%) e infine l'Africa (40,1%).

"Oporto" redirects here. For other uses of Porto and Oporto, see Porto (disambiguation).

 

Coordinates: 41°9′43.71″N 8°37′19.03″W

 

Porto

Municipality (Concelho)

 

Porto collage.png

 

From the top left corner clockwise: Avenida dos Aliados; Casa da Música; Igreja do Carmo; Old town at night with Luiz I Bridge; Estádio do Dragão; Panoramic view from Vila Nova de Gaia; Arrábida Bridge; Casa de Serralves; Clérigos Tower

 

Flag

 

Coat of arms

 

Official name: Concelho do Porto

Name origin: Portuguese: "port" (or O porto "the port")

Nickname: A Cidade Invicta (The Unvanquished City)

 

Country

Portugal

 

Region

Norte

 

Subregion

Grande Porto

 

District

Porto

 

Civil parishes

7

 

River

Douro

 

Center

Cedofeita

- elevation 104 m (341 ft)

- coordinates 41°9′43.71″N 8°37′19.03″W

 

Highest point

Monte Tadeu

- elevation 149 m (489 ft)

- coordinates 41°9′22″N 8°36′4″W

 

Lowest point

Sea level

- location Atlantic Ocean, Foz do Douro, Porto

- elevation 0 m (0 ft)

 

Length

11.57 km (7 mi), Northwest-Southeast

 

Width

5.31 km (3 mi), North-South

 

Area

41.42 km2 (16 sq mi)

- urban 389 km2 (150 sq mi)

- metro 1,883.61 km2 (727 sq mi)

 

Population

237,584 (2011)

- urban 1,401,805

- metro 1,762,524

 

Density

5,736 / km2 (14,856 / sq mi)

 

Settlement

275 BC

- Municipality 868

 

LAU

Concelho/Câmara Municipal

- location Praça General Humberto Delgado, Santo Ildefonso, Porto

- elevation 120 m (394 ft)

- coordinates 41°9′0″N 8°36′39″W

 

Mayor

Rui Moreira (Independent, supported by CDS-PP)

 

Municipal Chair

Miguel Pereira Leite (CDS-PP)

 

Timezone

WET (UTC0)

- summer (DST) WEST (UTC+1)

 

ISO 3166-2 code

PT-

 

Postal Zone

4000-286 Porto

 

Area Code & Prefix

(+351) 22[1]

 

UNESCO World Heritage Site

 

Name

Historic Centre of Porto

 

Year

1996 (#20)

 

Number

755

 

Region

Europe and North America

 

Criteria

iv

 

Demonym

Portuense

 

Patron Saint

Nossa Senhora de Vandoma

 

Municipal Holidays

24 June (São João)

 

Location of the municipality of Porto in continental Portugal

 

Wikimedia Commons: Porto

Statistics: Instituto Nacional de Estatística[2]

Website: www.cm-porto.pt

 

Geographic detail from CAOP (2010)[3] produced by Instituto Geográfico Português (IGP)

 

Porto (Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈpoɾtu]), also known as Oporto in English,[4] is the second-largest city in Portugal, after Lisbon, and one of the major urban areas in Southwestern Europe. The urban area of Porto, which extends beyond the administrative limits of the city, has a population of 1,4 million (2011)[5] in an area of 389 km2 (150 sq mi),[6] making it the second-largest urban area in Portugal. Porto Metropolitan Area, on the other hand, includes an estimated 1,8 million people.[7][8][9] It is recognized as a Gamma-level global city by the Globalization and World Cities (GaWC) Study Group,[10] being one of five cities in the Iberian Peninsula with global city status, along with Madrid, Barcelona, Lisbon and Valencia.

 

Located along the Douro river estuary in Northern Portugal, Porto is one of the oldest European centres, and its historical core was proclaimed a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996. Its settlement dates back many centuries, when it was an outpost of the Roman Empire. Its Latin name, Portus Cale,[11] has been referred to as the origin of the name "Portugal", based on transliteration and oral evolution from Latin. In Portuguese the name of the city is spelled with a definite article ("o Porto"; English: the port). Consequently, its English name evolved from a misinterpretation of the oral pronunciation and referred to as Oporto in modern literature and by many speakers.

 

One of Portugal's internationally famous exports, port wine, is named for Porto, since the metropolitan area, and in particular the adegas of Vila Nova de Gaia, were responsible for the production and export of the fortified wine.[12]

 

The history of Porto dates back to the 4th century, to the Roman occupation of the Iberian Peninsula. Celtic and Proto-Celtic ruins have been discovered in several areas, and their occupation has been dated to about 275 BC. During the Roman occupation, the city developed as an important commercial port, primarily in the trade between Olissipona (the modern Lisbon) and Bracara Augusta (the modern Braga).[13]

 

Porto fell under the control of the Moors during the invasion of the Iberian Peninsula in 711. In 868, Vímara Peres, a Christian warlord from Gallaecia, and a vassal of the King of Asturias, Léon and Galicia, Alfonso III, was sent to reconquer and secure the lands from the Moors. This included the area from the Minho to the Douro River: the settlement of Portus Cale and the area that is known as Vila Nova de Gaia. Portus Cale, later[when?] referred to as Portucale, was the origin for the modern name of Portugal. In 868, Count Vímara Peres established the County of Portugal, or (Portuguese: Condado de Portucale), usually known as Condado Portucalense after reconquering the region north of Douro.[13]

 

In 1387, Porto was the site of the marriage of John I of Portugal and Philippa of Lancaster, daughter of John of Gaunt; this symbolized a long-standing military alliance between Portugal and England. The Portuguese-English alliance, (see the Treaty of Windsor) is the world's oldest recorded military alliance.

 

In the 14th and the 15th centuries, Porto's shipyards contributed to the development of Portuguese shipbuilding. It was also from the port of Porto that, in 1415, Prince Henry the Navigator (son of John I of Portugal) embarked on the conquest of the Moorish port of Ceuta, in northern Morocco. This expedition by the King and his fleet, which counted among others Prince Henry, was followed by navigation and exploration along the western coast of Africa, initiating the Portuguese Age of Discovery. The nickname given to the people of Porto began in those days; Portuenses are to this day, colloquially, referred to as tripeiros (English: tripe peoples), referring to this period of history, when higher-quality cuts of meat were shipped from Porto with their sailors, while off-cuts and by-products, such as tripe, were left behind for the citizens of Porto: tripe remains a culturally important dish in modern day Porto.

 

18th century[edit]

 

The invasion of the Napoleonic troops in Portugal under Marshal Soult also brought war to the city of Porto. On 29 March 1809, as the population fled from the advancing French troops and tried to cross the river Douro over the Ponte das Barcas (a pontoon bridge), the bridge collapsed under the weight. This event is still remembered by a plate at the Ponte D. Luis I. The French army was rooted out of Porto by Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, when his Anglo-Portuguese Army crossed the Douro river from the Mosteiro da Serra do Pilar (a former convent) in a brilliant daylight coup de main, using wine barges to transport the troops, so outflanking the French Army.

 

In 24 August 1820, a liberal revolution occurred, quickly spreading without resistance to the rest of the country. In 1822, a liberal constitution was accepted, partly through the efforts of the liberal assembly of Porto (Junta do Porto). When Miguel I of Portugal took the Portuguese throne in 1828, he rejected this constitution and reigned as an absolutist monarch. A Civil War was then fought from 1828 to 1834 between those supporting Constitutionalism, and those opposed to this change, keen on near-absolutism and led by D. Miguel. Porto rebelled again and had to undergo a siege of eighteen months between 1832 and 1833 by the absolutist army. Porto is also called "Cidade Invicta" (English: Unvanquished City) after successfully resisting the Miguelist siege. After the abdication of King Miguel, the liberal constitution was re-established.

 

Known as the city of bridges, Porto built its first permanent bridge, the Ponte das Barcas (a pontoon bridge), in 1806. Three years later, it collapsed under the weight of thousands of fugitives from the French Invasions during the Peninsular War, causing thousands of deaths.[14] It was replaced by the Ponte D. Maria II, popularised under the name Ponte Pênsil (suspended bridge) and built between 1841–43; only its supporting pylons have remained.

 

The Ponte D. Maria, a railway bridge, was inaugurated on 4 November of that same year; it was considered a feat of wrought iron engineering and was designed by Gustave Eiffel, notable for his Parisian tower. The later Ponte Dom Luís I replaced the aforementioned Ponte Pênsil. This last bridge was made by Teophile Seyrig, a former partner of Eiffel. Seyrig won a governmental competition that took place in 1879. Building began in 1881 and the bridge was opened to the public on 31 October 1886.[citation needed]

 

A higher learning institution in nautical sciences (Aula de Náutica, 1762) and a stock exchange (Bolsa do Porto, 1834) were established in the city, but were discontinued later.[when?]

 

Unrest by Republicans led to the first revolt against the monarchy in Porto on 31 January 1891. This resulted ultimately in the overthrow of the monarchy and proclamation of the republic by the 5 October 1910 revolution.

 

20th century[edit]

 

On 19 January 1919, forces favorable to the restoration of the Monarchy launched in Porto a counter-revolution known as Monarchy of the North. During this time, Porto was the capital of the restored kingdom, as the movement was contained to the north. The monarchy was deposed less than a month later and no other monarchist revolution in Portugal happened again.

 

In 1958 and 1960, Porto's streets hosted the Formula One Portuguese Grand Prix.[citation needed]

 

The historic centre of Porto was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1996. The World Heritage site is defined in two concentric zones; the "Protected area", and within it the "Classified area". The Classified area comprises the medieval borough located inside the 14th-century Romanesque wall

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(Redirected from Oporto)

  

Bosphorus Bridge

 

The Bosphorus Bridge, also called the First Bosphorus Bridge or simply the First Bridge (Turkish: Boğaziçi Köprüsü, 1. Boğaziçi Köprüsü or Birinci Köprü) is one of two suspension bridges spanning the Bosphorus strait (Turkish: Boğaziçi) in Istanbul, Turkey; thus connecting Europe and Asia (the other one is the Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge, which is called the Second Bosphorus Bridge.) The bridge is located between Ortaköy (on the European side) and Beylerbeyi (on the Asian side).

 

The Bosphorus Bridge had the 4th longest suspension bridge span in the world when it was completed in 1973, and the longest outside the United States. At present, it is the 21st longest suspension bridge span in the world.

 

The idea of a bridge crossing the Bosphorus dates back to antiquity. For Emperor Darius I The Great of Persia (522 BC - 485 BC), as recorded by the Greek writer Herodotus in his Histories, Mandrocles of Samos once engineered a pontoon bridge that stretched across the Bosphorus, linking Asia to Europe, so that Darius could pursue the fleeing Scythians as well as move his army into position in the Balkans to overwhelm Macedon.[3] The first project for a permanent bridge across the Bosphorus was proposed to Ottoman Sultan Abdul Hamid II by the Bosphorus Railroad Company in 1900, which included a rail link between the continents.[4]

The decision to build a bridge across the Bosphorus was taken in 1957 by Prime Minister Adnan Menderes. For the structural engineering work, a contract was signed with the British firm Freeman Fox & Partners in 1968. The bridge was designed by the renowned British civil engineers Sir Gilbert Roberts and William Brown who also designed the Humber Bridge, Severn Bridge, Forth Road Bridge, Auckland Harbour Bridge and the Volta River Bridge. The construction started in February 1970, the ceremonies were attended by President Cevdet Sunay and Prime Minister Süleyman Demirel and was carried out by the Turkish firm Enka Construction & Industry Co. along with the co-contractors Cleveland Bridge & Engineering Company. (England) and Hochtief AG (Germany). Thirty-five engineers and 400 men worked on the project.

The bridge was completed on 30 October 1973, one day after the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Republic of Turkey, and opened by President Fahri Korutürk and Prime Minister Naim Talu. The cost of the bridge amounted to US$200 million ($1.05 billion in 2013 dollars[5]).

At the time the bridge was opened, much was made of its being the first bridge between Europe and Asia since the pontoon bridge of Xerxes in 480 BCE. That bridge, however, spanned the Hellespont (Dardanelles), some distance away from the Bosphorus.

  

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Three day weekend (well, my third one in a row, but I'm not complaining.)

 

Since he wasn't happy with any of the attempts at the Milky Way in Joshua Tree from two weeks earlier, my friend Steve called and asked if I wanted to try some shots of it over the ocean.

 

Since we live in LA, the capital of light pollution, (well maybe second to Vegas) I thought that might be easier said than done. But after doing a little research, it looked as though Leo Carrillo State Beach, which is north of Malibu and faces south, might be an ideal candidate.

 

And with the best 99 cents I've spent lately, my new app SKY GUIDE, I confirmed it -- but of course the proof was in the pudding.

 

The moon was at 17% illumination, and was to set at 10:19pm, so we decided to meet and drive up there and see what we could get.

 

We got to the beach just before sunset, which was coincidentally around low tide. We figured out a couple of set ups that might work, then drove up to the parking lot right beside the beach to wait for the moon to set.

 

After pulling the camp chairs he brought out of the back of the car, we set them up in the parking lot, and just relaxed and shot the breeze while waiting for the magic hour.

 

We set out for the beach and a location we had shot a couple of years before, but the tide had started coming back in, and the surf was pretty heavy; remnants of Tropical Storm Marie, which lead to huge record setting waves in SOCAL this week. We decided we'd try and shoot from rom the cliffs and not risk something we'd later regret, because we are, after all, geezers.

 

Our first set up was a above little cove bounded by a huge sea stack that's home to hundreds of cormorants, and has the smell to prove it. After firing off a few frames and trying different light painting techniques, we decided to move to the Life Guard tower, which was just a bit east.

 

As we were walking, we saw two silhouetted figures coming toward us with flashlights. As they got closer, I only saw one figure; who ended up being a State Park Ranger -- and asked me, if I had caught anything. I'm guessing that he thought my tripod was a fishing rod -- but I said, yeah, I think we caught some cool shots of the Milky Way. He then called his partner over, and I showed them both a shot that I had taken earlier.

 

I asked them what they were doing out at that time of night and they were looking for people with illegal campfires on the beach.

 

They headed back to their truck, we shot at a couple of more places, and then wrapped it up about 11:45 hopeful from what we had seen on our screens that we had something.

 

I got home about 12:45 and imported my card, praying that any of my images were in focus.

 

This one was even if it needed some severe straightening in post, because I couldn't see the horizon in the viewfinder when I was trying to compose the shot.

 

Reached Explore #268 on Monday, September 1, 2014. Thank you all!

Cypress Cross-Country Ski trails with Howe Sound in the background.

 

I set the point-and-shoot camera on my pack and set the timer for 10 seconds and 10 rapid shots. After that, the trick was to stay lined up so the camera stayed in the shadow. There are several in the series, including a few where one of us fell through the crust and became trapped in the melting snow.

  

Copyright Dex Horton 2015

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Don Henley, Donald Hugh "Don" Henley (born July 22, 1947) is an American singer, songwriter and drummer, best known as a founding member of the Eagles before launching a successful solo career. Henley was the drummer and lead vocalist for the Eagles from 1971–1980, when the band broke up. Henley sings lead vocals on Eagles hits such as "Witchy Woman", "Desperado", "Best of My Love", "One of These Nights", "Hotel California", "Life in the Fast Lane", and "The Long Run".

  

Last night I went to fantastic concert at the Amway Center here in Orlando where "The Eagles" their HISTORY OF THE EAGLES TOUR performed!

It was a sold-out concert where 20,000 people were rocking to the band's 27 hits spanning over 42 years for three hours.

 

Performing were the original group members Glenn Frey, Don Henley and Bernie Leadon with Joe Walsh and Timothy B. Schmit .

 

This concert was the last one for the year :)

 

It was on a "Saturday Night" with a "Peaceful Easy Feeling" while living "Life in the Fast Lane" and "One of These Nights" we are going to "Take it to the Limit" "In the City" with the "New Kid on the Block" and you know "Life's Been Good" at the "Hotel California" ~

 

This is an American Eagle from the Owl Fest in Apopka..... notice the tie -in... lol

 

The Eagles ~

 

Wikipedia

  

The Eagles are an American rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1971 by Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Bernie Leadon, and Randy Meisner.

 

The name of the band was first suggested by Leadon during a peyote and tequila-influenced group outing in the Mojave Desert, when he recalled reading about the Hopis' reverence for the eagle. Steve Martin, a friend of the band from their early days at The Troubadour, recounts in his autobiography that he suggested that they should be referred to as "the Eagles," but Frey insists that the group's name is simply "Eagles". Geffen and partner Elliot Roberts initially managed the band; they were later replaced by Irving Azoff.

 

With seven number-one singles, six Grammys, five American Music Awards, and six number one albums, the Eagles were one of the most successful musical acts of the 1970s. At the end of the 20th century, two of their albums, Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and Hotel California, ranked among the 20 best-selling albums in the U.S. according to the Recording Industry Association of America. Hotel California is ranked 37th in Rolling Stone's list of "The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time", and the band was ranked No. 75 on the magazine's 2004 list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.

 

They are one of the world’s best-selling bands of all time, having sold over 150 million records—100 million in the U.S. alone—including 42 million copies of Their Greatest Hits (1971–1975) and 32 million copies of Hotel California. They are the fifth-highest-selling music act and highest-selling American band in US history. No American band sold more records than the Eagles during the 1970s.

 

The Eagles released their self-titled debut album in 1972, which spawned three Top 40 singles: "Take It Easy", "Witchy Woman", and "Peaceful Easy Feeling". Their next album, Desperado (1973), was less successful than the first, reaching only No. 41 on the charts; neither of its singles reached the Top 40. However, the album contained two of the band's most popular tracks: "Desperado" and "Tequila Sunrise". They released On the Border in 1974, adding guitarist Don Felder midway through the recording of the album. The album generated two Top 40 singles: "Already Gone" and their first Number One, "Best of My Love".

 

It was not until 1975's One of These Nights that the Eagles became arguably America's biggest band. The album included three Top 5 singles: "One of These Nights", "Lyin' Eyes", and "Take It to the Limit", the first of which hitting the top of the charts. They continued that success and hit their commercial peak in late 1976 with the release of Hotel California, which would go on to sell over 16 million copies in the U.S. alone and over 32 million copies worldwide. The album yielded two number-one singles, "New Kid in Town" and "Hotel California". They released their last studio album for nearly 28 years in 1979 with The Long Run, which spawned three Top 10 singles: "Heartache Tonight", "The Long Run", and "I Can't Tell You Why", the lead single being another chart-topping hit.

 

The Eagles disbanded in July 1980 but reunited in 1994 for the album Hell Freezes Over, a mix of live and new studio tracks. They have toured intermittently since then and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. In 2007, the Eagles released Long Road Out of Eden, their first full studio album in 28 years. The album would top the album charts, release five singles to the Adult Contemporary Charts, and win the band two Grammys. The next year they launched the Long Road Out of Eden Tour in support of the album. The band members have discussed the possibility of making another album.

On April 1, 2013, during a concert at Casino Rama in Rama, Ontario, Don Henley announced a tour in support of the band's documentary release, History of the Eagles.

 

History of The Eagles Tour 2013

 

In February 2013 the Eagles released a career spanning documentary called History of the Eagles and kicked off the supporting tour with an 77-date series from July 6, 2013 to June 26, 2014. Henley said that the tour, which would continue until 2015, "could very well be our last...we’re gonna include at least one former band member in this tour and kinda go back to the roots, and how we created some of these songs. We’re gonna break it down to the fundamentals and then take it up to where it is now.” Original Eagles guitarist Bernie Leadon also appeared on the tour. Walsh stated, “Bernie’s brilliant, I never really got a chance to play with him, but we’ve been in contact. We see him from time to time, and I’m really glad he’s coming because it’s going to take the show up a notch, and I’m really looking forward to playing with him, finally.” However it has been reported that former members Randy Meisner and Don Felder will not appear. Meisner had been invited but could not participate due to health problems, while Felder was never asked due to ongoing legal disputes with the band.

 

SETLIST:

 

1. Saturday Night

2. Train Leaves Here This Morning

3. Peaceful Easy Feeling

4. Witchy Woman

5. Doolin-Dalton

6. Tequila Sunrise

7. Doolin'-Dalton/Desperado (Reprise)

8. Already Gone

9. The Best of My Love

10. Lyin' Eyes

11. One of These Nights

12. Take It to the Limit

13. Pretty Maids All in a Row

14. I Can't Tell You Why

15. New Kid in Town

16. Love Will Keep Us Alive

17. Heartache Tonight

18. Those Shoes

19. In the City (Joe Walsh song)

20. Life's Been Good (Joe Walsh song)

21. The Long Run

22. Funk #49 (James Gang cover)

23. Life in the Fast Lane

 

24. Encore:

25. Take It Easy

 

26. Encore 2:

27. Hotel California

28. Rocky Mountain Way (Joe Walsh song)

29. Desperado

 

Model - Rosie

Year Taken - May 2014

Camera - Sony A7R

Lens - Carl Zeiss 85mm f/1.4

Location - Her House

 

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Image Info

 

I love lazy Sunday morning just got out of bed looking like the subject is looking up at her boyfriend kinda photography and that was the inspiration for the image. Whenever I photograph someone, I try and make the viewer view the image as if the girl was looking at her lover, her partner. It makes the viewer engage with the image and more importantly, the girl. They feel part of the image, they feel involved; as if at any moment the image could jump into life and speak.

 

Rosie

 

So by now, you all know Rosie - at least in the two dimensional world of photography anyway. So I won't bore you with paragraph after paragraph of how beautiful she is, what an incredible model she is, how wonderful it is to work with her. As I said after my first shoot with her, she is the most beautiful girl Ive met, the best model Ive ever worked with and such wonderful company. For each and every image of her from now on, every statement in the previous statement is implied.

 

So I got in my car this morning, and after the habitual stop at Costa's to wake myself up, I arrived at a set of wooden security gates at the entrance to Rosie's house. As they opened and I drove in, I parked the little Mini Cooper between the Ferrari and the Porsche and was greeted by a pair of dogs who were both bigger than the car I was too nervous to get out of. They are, for the record, named Panther and Bear; which did little to quell my worries about them eating me, or even worse, my camera. But I do them an injustice, as they are two of the sweetest and funniest dogs you are ever likely to meet. One, the aforementioned Panther, is a labrador the colour of milk chocolate and the other, Bear, a Rottweiler with a head larger than my camera bag. Luckily for me, they seemed to like me and I was allowed to proceed towards the converted barn with an furry escort on either side. However, I digress, as it was not them I was here to work with.

 

Rosie makes a mean cup of coffee (even if it did expire around the time of the Russian revolution (1917 for anyone who cares). And it was over this cup of coffee that we spent at least the first two hours of hour shoot doing nothing else but sitting there talking. See this is the problem when a model and a photographer get on so well - they never take any bloody photos. I arrived at 11am and it was at least 1pm before I even fired off a test frame. We talked about everything, from the size of the universe to the problems with contemporary music. She listened, I spoke, I listened, she spoke. We talked about the big things, the little things, and the big things. I read her some of my book (Im an author too), we sat, we joked, we got sat on by dogs. The only thing we didn't do, was take photos.

 

As the hour arrived somewhere around 2pm, we finally decided to take some photos and even though the light was incredibly erratic, we managed to capture some fairly authentic looking images in the various rooms in her house. Actually, its not so much of a house, rather a villa. Its a huge barn conversion with original beams littering the ceilings and a light and airy feel with allows an enormous amount of light to perforate the windows and cut its way across the room. We worked in her lounge, her landing, her hallway, her bathroom - everywhere. We got about 400 photos in all and in my opinion, they are better than the previous set we did the other day. They are more real, more believable and I think the viewer will feel part of the image. I think you will feel like her boyfriend. And speaking of her boyfriend...

 

I met Carl at first in the morning, and finally as I was about to leave. What a great guy he is and he is Rosie's perfect match. Normally in life, people gravitate towards their opposite but with Rosie and Carl, they have found in each other someone who is both their twin and reverse. They are poles apart but on flanking pages and they are two of the loveliest people Ive met. Carl is a fascinating guy who, in some ways, is similar to myself (though I don't own a Ferrari and Im not 6ft 4). He's great guy to talk to and before I left, he, Rosie and I resumed the subject of absolutely anything and continued to talk until the sun disappeared. They are an amazing couple and Im glad I got the chance to spend a little bit of time with them in their amazing home. For once, as this doesn't happen very often in the world of photography, I think Ive gained a pair of friends. Thank you both!

 

If you want to follow Rosie on Twitter - you can find her here

TODAAAAAAAAY WAS SOOOOOOOOOOOOO MUCHH FUNNNNNNN GIRLZZ='DD

WALLA WANASTOOOOOOOOONAAAA =')))

i wont EVER forget thiss daayy ='DD

 

THNXXXXXXXXXXXX to ÇâŔäMéŁ for this AMAZINGG trip w Ms.[ Orangeya ] our teacher ='D we had a blassssssssst <3

 

™¾ॡ~ßéŭTΐҒǔL ŠσυL~ॡ⅞™ my singer partner XD LOOL we were singin the whole time =|..w the time when ana winty w kook re7na elsupermarket w haz2ooooona XD LOOL!! yummy i want the chips that we shared XD thaloona 3leih (o_o)

w singin bilBus XD LOOL we'r so crazy xD

 

[ ĸ ο ο ĸ ] LOOL YOOOOOOOU CAMERA SHYYYY :@ Lool but i still caught u mwahaha XD ..omg i lovvvvvvvve u kooook u were so mucch funnnn XD

my partner in crime (supermarket.. welSwings) LOL ..

dont forget to fasten ur seatbelts bilcar LOOOOOOOOOOOOOL XDXD =**

 

『〖hard◦to◦get〗』™ :hardooooooooooooooooooo ur one speciaal pinkieeee frnd lool ;Dwithout u the trip wud have SUCKED =| walla u were WANASA 7add ummaaah XD.. i've always enjoyed seeing u there first bilma3had x'D Lool

LUVV UUUUUUUUUU =*

 

m y s e l f & [ Miss Cool ] Lool yoou pretty bimbooz with ur heeels LOOOOLL

as i said u twwoo r as gorgeous as ur flickr accounts LOL XD !!!

myself ill record u my voice afa 3leich ;PP LOOOL

 

tommy girl & • ĢĩVέηςĦγ ™ [ Qtr ] !!

u guyz r soooo pro in takin shots ='D elyoum when i saw u takin shots i was like

"gossh i wish im patient as they r @.@ " u looked soo pro 7tta X'D

LOOOOVVVVVE U =** .. made the trip sooo speciaal walla ='D

 

girls dont forget

* el9a3ayda waving goodbye XDD

*orangeya : ":O :O :O UBEEEEEEEIH STOP THE BUS NSEINA EL9'3EIRA =|"

*video clip "jaay el7a2ee2a" XD LOL

*The playground =X

*(8) HEY HEY YOU YOU I DUN LIKE UR GIRLFRIENDDD (8) xDD

*walking like '3anam XDXD

*the old indian guy posing for Orangeya XD elhnood ymotooon lein chafo cam =|

 

MKAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAANKM MBAYEN [M!ss D!or], Klygror, Fajir~Qatar, FatoOoma^_^Qatar, ÚooǾoołα!!!

Chaan zein jeitoo V_V

 

The south-west face of Everest is regarded as one of the most difficult challenges in mountaineering because of its height and exposure to high-level winds. In 1975 the route had not been climbed and had repulsed five other attempts.

 

Haston and Scott began their climb at 3:30am with sunrise still hours away. At 6pm, after fighting a balky oxygen unit, and waist deep powdery snow, the two men finally stepped side-by-side onto the summit.

 

The question soon became how to get down off the mountain alive and live to tell of their ascent.

 

With night fast approaching the men trekked toward the South Summit. It was a full-on moonless night and they decided it was simply too dangerous to continue down in darkness.

 

There was no choice but to bivouac at 28,750 feet – the highest bivouac ever, and wait for morning. They had run out of oxygen and the temperature was -40 degrees.

 

"Inside their snow cave, the men rubbed their extremities, had conversations with imaginary partners, and drifted into a psychological netherworld of hypoxia."

 

After the rough night they emerged from the ice cave and stumbled into camp at 9am.

 

The team set a record for the fastest time up the peak.

 

"These are climbers worthy of being spoken about in the same sentence as Buhl, and his 1953 bivouac on his solo descent of Nanga Parbat. This is mountaineering of the first order." - Jeff Connor

 

How they made it up and then survived hypoxia overnight and were coherent enough to make it back alive is almost impossible.

 

A conversation with legendary climber Doug Scott:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCL83Ox3DAs

www.youtube.com/watch?v=74B41eAXLiM

Actually that's just a small part of it. The new skyline of Pudong will be fully visible once the development and construction of the "Lujiazui Central Financial District Phase II" has ended. This is a part of the future skyline with the already finished buildings. See where this picture was taken. [?]

 

The distinctive twin tower complex in the left foreground is called "CITIC Pacific Group Headquarters", but will actually be occupied by CITIC Pacific Group and the Agricultural Bank of China. The shape is intended to form a gateway from the river towards Lujiazui.

 

The towers stand on the site of the former Shanghai No.1 Shipyard. A plaza between the towers leads towards a newly constructed steel bridge, the shape of the plaza resembles the former slipway.

 

Design Architect:

Arquitectonica

Architect of Record:

East China Architectural Design & Research Institute

Structural Engineering, Curtainwall:

Ove Arup & Partners Hong Kong / Arup International Consultants Shanghai

 

Height: 218m

Floors: 49

 

Apart from cropping no PP, exposure and colors are SOOTC. View larger on a black background

  

© All Rights Reserved - you may not use this image in any form without my prior permission.

The Abandoned Pennhurst Asylum

May 25th, 2014

 

Some info on this historic location:

 

“Pennhurst is the scariest place I have ever seen. Period. I have traveled all over the country visiting haunted places and attractions and nothing compares to this incredible, dilapidated campus. Last October, I was approached by the owners of Pennhurst Associates, and asked if I would like to be a partner in their haunted attraction. At first I was skeptical because everyone thinks this industry is easy, with a “get rich quick” attitude, and we all know how much work is involved and how hard it is to be successful. I was really skeptical…until I visited Pennhurst. The day I drove into this huge complex of brick structures, I was hooked. I knew this place had the potential to be the greatest haunted attraction ever. With a ton of money, corporate sponsors, the right build crew, and a great plan, Pennhurst Asylum could come to life and entertain the hard core haunters. Not only does this place have an incredible ambiance, a built in cult following, and a treasure trove of unique props, it has a history; a history riddled with accusations of torture, abuse and neglect. A history of mental patients chained to the walls in dark tunnels, children left for years in cribs, sexual abuse by the staff and even murder. All this happened behind the walls of Pennhurst State School, Spring City, Pennsylvania.

 

Pennhurst was constructed and opened in 1908 as a state school for the mentally and physically disabled. Pennhurst's property was vast, covering 120 acres. Created to house over 10,000 patients at a point in time, Pennhurst was one of the largest institutions of its kind in Pennsylvania. Half of Pennhurst's residents were committed by court order and the other half were brought by a parent or other guardian. It was devoted strictly to the care, treatment and education of the disabled. Originally named Pennhurst Home for the Feeble Minded and Epileptic, it finally was just called Pennhurst State School. Pennhurst employed a large number of staff to help assist in maintaining the facility. This staff included a board of trustees, medical staff, dental staff, and specialists in psychology, social services, accounting, and various fields of education. The grounds of Pennhurst included a 300-bed hospital, which had a full nursing staff and two surgeons on call at all times. Others at Pennhurst included members of the clergy and farming experts who grew most of Pennhurst's food . Pennhurst was an essentially self-sufficient community, its 1,400-acre site containing a firehouse, general store, barber shop, movie theatre, auditorium and even a greenhouse. The buildings of Pennhurst were named after towns in Pennsylvania such as Chester and Devon. The original buildings were designed by architect Phillip H. Johnson. All of Pennhurst's electricity was generated by an on-site power plant. A cemetery lay on the property, as well as baseball and recreational fields for the residents. Many of Pennhurst's buildings were strictly for storage; however, the majority were dormitory and hospital-style living quarters for the residents. Many of the buildings had security screens that were accessed on the inside, to prevent patients from escaping, or jumping to their deaths. Most of the stairwells had security fences to keep patients from jumping over the railings. Many of the buildings are linked by an underground tunnel system designed for transportation of handicapped patients to and from the dormitory, recreational buildings and dietary.

 

Pennhurst was often accused of dehuminazitation and was said to have provided no help to the mentally challenged. The institution had a long history of staff difficulties and negative public image, for example, a 1968 report by NBC called "Suffer the Little Children". Pennhurst State School was closed in 1986 following several allegations of abuse. These allegations led to the first lawsuit of its kind in the United States, Pennhurst State School and Hospital vs. Halderman, which asserted that the mentally retarded have a constitutional right to living quarters and an education. Terry Lee Halderman had been a resident of the school, and upon release she filed suit in the district court on behalf of herself and all other residents of Pennhurst. The complaint alleged that conditions at Pennhurst were unsanitary, inhumane and dangerous, that these living conditions violated the fourteenth amendment, and that Pennhurst used cruel and unusual punishment in violation of the eighth and fourteenth amendments. After a 32-day trial and an immense investigation, prosecutors concluded that the conditions at Pennhurst were not only dangerous, with physical and mental abuse of its patients, but also inadequate for the care and habilitation for the mentally retarded. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania also concluded that the physical, mental, and intellectual skills of most patients had deteriorated while in Pennhurst.

 

In 1986, Pennhurst was ordered closed, and began a program of de-institutionalism that lasted several years. Once the buildings were closed, they began to rapidly deteriorate from lack of heating, moisture invasion and vandalism. Thousands of people began to illegally tour the property spray painting everything in sight and breaking all the glass in the place. Theft was rampant and the destruction of the property was in full swing. Patients were thrown out and a large homeless contingent developed in the area.

 

Pennhurst fell into complete ruin as the complex was shut down. Buildings were abandoned as they were, with patient’s clothes and belonging strewn about. Furniture, cabinets and medical equipment were left to decay as if someone had just got up and walked out the front door. This is the place that will eventually resurrect into one of the most studied properties in the ghost hunter media, and will become an amazing haunted attraction.

 

As I research the history of this place, I begin to realize the potential of Pennhurst as an intriguing location for a haunted attraction. This place is really haunted. Several reputable Ghost Hunter groups have documented audible recordings, temperature changes, and unexplained movement of objects in the buildings of Pennhurst. This is the kind of environment I want to build the next generation of haunted house; a proven haunted location.

 

My team, headed by John Brady, Shawn Sieger, Jim Souflous, Todd Beringer, Rob Sieger and others search the complex for valuable props. We wander deep into the tunnels that stitch the complex. We move into the basements of maintenance buildings, storage areas, dormitories and dietary in search of unique items that will set this haunt apart from all other. We find a huge electro-mechanical device that has to be the control for the electrotherapy department. It is so old that it used electrical tube circuits developed in the 30’s. Insulators and other unrecognizable devices are strewn about the room. This is a huge find. As we cruise through the old abandoned hospital, we harvest giant 48” surgical lights that are suspended from the rotting ceilings. They are mounted on tracks that allow the lights to be moved to focus on the unsuspecting patients. These will be perfect in the rooms for our haunt. We find medical cabinets, drawers, storage lockers, operating tables are everywhere. This is a veritable treasure trove of props for our attraction. As we move through the dark corridors, with flashlights moving side to side, I can’t keep the feelings of growing anticipation from my mind. I know there is something out there but can’t put my finger on it. I come around the corner and enter a small room to the right, and there it is; the morgue. I recognize it because it has two drawer slides and a refrigeration unit on top. This is what we came here to find. This will be one of the most unique features of our attraction; a real morgue scene. Stainless steel tables with large drains, stainless steel cabinets, lab equipment and a real, 1930’s autopsy table! I am blown away by this scene. I can picture the thousands of customers coming through our attraction knowing that everything in here is REAL. My arms have gooseflesh!

 

Back at the Administration building, construction is moving forward. All the asbestos has been abated, the floors have been repaired, roof repaired, windows replaced, and structural inspections have been completed. The building is safe for use as an amusement building. Now the hard work of turning this into one of the most complex haunted houses is under way. A full electrical upgrade needs to be completed. Smart lighting, imbedded audio systems and fiber optical controls will be installed. Pneumatic infrastructure will be run throughout the building so props can be installed in any room. A lot of work must be completed in a few short months in preparation for the 2010 season.

 

We want this attraction to be a full experience of Pennhurst, but we need to work the audience up slowly so they won’t chicken out right away. This place is so creepy, that we need to get the ticket sales completed before they see the complex. A state of the art POS system will be installed by Interactive Ticketing, and can handle the thousands of expected customers. This system will track every ticket sold, and with the aid of digital scanners that are integrated with the internet, and keep track of each customer. Once the customer has bought their ticket, they will be guided to the walkway that surrounds the complex. This walkway will act as a huge queue line to the main entrance of the haunt, but will take them on a tour around several other buildings before entering the Administration building. As the customers walk the 800’ long walkway, they will experience the vastness of Pennhurst. With over 10 buildings in view, most in bad condition, they will be able to witness the downfall of this once beautiful campus. The once beautiful courtyards are now overgrown and the children’s playground equipment lay rotting all around. As the people approach the Admin building, they will be diverted to the side and then around to the front and into the main entrance. A large stone portico greets the crowd as they are ushered into the attraction. A unique feature of Pennhurst will be the museum. Many local residents have a strong feeling that the memories of the atrocities that occurred here should be preserved in some way so that they will not re-occur in the future. With this in mind, we felt that the construction of a Pennhurst Museum was in order. We have reconstructed four rooms on the first floor that will act as an indoor queue line and, at the same time, teach the public about the history of this magnificent place. With high tech videos, historical photos and artifacts from the past, the customers will be able to go back in time and witness the rise and fall of Pennhurst, as it happened. As they move slowly through the museum, they will notice that the rooms are beginning to decay. By the time they enter the great corridor the building has fallen into disrepair. This is when they will enter the scariest haunted house imaginable.

 

With an asylum theme in mind, and real, antique hospital equipment on hand, we began to build our attraction. We painted the entire interior with a special barrier sealant that encapsulates any lead paint and is also 100% flameproof. Rotted flooring has been replaced, and roof leaks have been plugged. We install MDF board as a wainscote and paint it to look like the marble that was part of the original building, but stolen long ago. We want an old time feeling to envelope the customers; a feeling of going back in time. The first room you enter is the intake office, complete with a psychiatrist giving you the Rorschach test, otherwise known as the ink blot test. As the Dr. engages the crowd, slides flip by on a large screen. After the intake, you enter the de-lousing showers, where shower heads spew out a combination of fog, air and CO2, giving it a cold feel. Other rooms include the dietary unit with copious use of existing cafeteria items like tray holders, rolling carts, plastic ware, cups, plates, tables and ovens. Pneumatic and actor scares abound in this haunt as there are a large number of great setups and hiding spots throughout the building. Moving upstairs, we have a large room with the ceiling removed. It shows the expansive architecture of the building, and the roofline looms over 35’ above your head. The focus in this room is the old, female actor in the corner, who is sitting in a vintage wheelchair. She is spot lighted with down lighting that also shows beds, furniture and other belongings. As she distracts the crowd, a switch is flipped and flood lights reveal the height of the ceiling, filled with another animatronic surprise.

 

Another part of the building is an area that has suffered a moderate fire. Door frames and headers are charred, and the smell of burnt wood is still perceptible. The area that was burned housed two sound proof cells; small rooms where patients could be locked away and their screams could be totally muffled. The floors, walls and ceilings are 6” thick with heavy insulation stuffed between the studs. The interiors are lined with sound proof tiles, and the exterior is sheathed in another layer of sound proofing. Even the doors are 8” thick and insulated. As you walk into these rooms, you can feel the air get heavy, the sounds deaden and you can imagine how the patients felt being locked up in the pitch dark with no one hearing your screams.

 

As you can imagine, the really cool rooms are left for last. With tons of great, original props, we build out sets that appear to be real operating rooms. One room is set up to be themed as a lobotomy operating room. Steel tables, medical cabinets and surgical equipment are everywhere. Actors bring off the scare and make this scene believable. The next room is our autopsy chamber. This room is decorated with the original equipment we found in the old hospital. The cabinets mounted to the walls are stainless steel, and look brand new, even after 50 or more years. The large sink structure, with an industrial size in-sinkerator, and long overflow drain, is up against the far wall. On the right is the original two drawer morgue unit, moved here from the hospital basement, and restored to its original form. The drawers roll out as easily as they did when first installed, and the refrigeration unit above the drawers adds to the realism of the scene. To top it off, an antique autopsy table stands in the center of the room. I bought the table at a funeral home auction 15 years ago and it has now found a new home. Overhead is a huge surgical style lamp, measuring over 40” across, and fitted with a friction gear that allows one to direct the light in any direction.

 

Another great room design we are using is the shock therapy room. This room has tile walls and floor, large overhead lights (harvested from the depths of building c) and the original electroconvulsive shock therapy machine retrieved from the hospital. Most modern ECT machines deliver a brief-pulse current, which is thought to cause fewer cognitive effects than the sine-wave currents which were originally used in ECT. Our machine is of the sine wave type, and caused unconsciousness and convulsions for 15 to 30 seconds. It is a large stainless steel console with dials and meters, and long electrode leads still attached. Our shock table is hinged in the center, and can tilt down for easy loading and unloading of the patient. The table has a latch where the actor can drop the foot of the table and attack the audience. This coupled with bang sticks, strobe lights, fog machines and a blistering 400 watt soundtrack make this one of the premier rooms at Pennhurst. In all, Pennhurst Asylum will have 18 complete rooms, not including the 4 room used in the museum. All of these rooms are highly detailed to be realistic in every way.

 

We have really strived to mix fact with fiction, folklore with fear, to come up with some of our unique room designs. There have been accounts of an old dentist chair that was located in the deep recesses of Mayflower, one of the more notorious dorms at Pennhurst. This chair is a little different than the ones you and I are used too; it has restraining straps attached to the arms, legs and headrest. This chair was reportedly used to remove the teeth of patients that were prone to biting the staff here. Imagine yourself being strapped into this device and having all your teeth ripped out without any kind of medication. This is just one more example of how unique this location is.

 

The most intriguing part of Pennhurst is their tunnel complex. All of the buildings on the campus are connected by above ground walkways with tunnels under them. These tunnels are 10 feet high, 8 feet wide and thousands of feet long. Concrete floors, tile walls and concrete ceilings create an incredible echo effect at certain intersections. In fact, I have looked behind myself several times to see if there is someone following me a few feet back. The echoes are so distinct you can hear whispers from hundreds of feet away.

 

As the guests are scared out of the last room in the Asylum, they find themselves in a large foyer with paintings and photographs on the walls. This is the queue line for the tunnels. Once through the lines, the guests are ushered down a long set of stairs and into the basement. Once there, with a temperature drop of at least 20 degrees, they are let through the double doors that lead to the exit…900 feet away. Scenes and actors appear at intersections along the way. Glass jars with cages around them contain the only lighting down here, and they are all connected to commercial lighting controls that are programmed to flicker, dim and occasionally go completely dark. We also added several subsonic bass tubes that cannot be heard, only felt. This will induce an uneasy feeling in all who enter the tunnels. Special chicken exits have been designed into the tunnel system and I’m sure will be used many times. This will be the scariest part of this attraction. The best part of the tunnel system is that it will contain our guests on their way back to the main entrance. People coming into the show along the walkways above will hear the screams emanating from the tunnels below them. They will hear the reactions to our show before they even enter the walkways leading to our haunt. What better way to elevate the anticipation and fear level than to hear, first hand, how scary this place is. If this place is scary to seasoned haunters, imagine how the general public will feel.

 

Another unique feature of Pennhurst is that it is really haunted. Featured on the Travel Channel, the Ghost Adventures crew have recorded many strange voices, noises and unexplained movement and documented this in their shows. The Pennhurst Ghost Tours, open to professional and amateur ghost hunters, has been a huge success, with recordings, photos and accounts of physical contact throughout the Pennhurst complex. So, if you want to get scared, come to Pennhurst Asylum. You may even witness the supernatural… whether you want to or not.”

 

SOURCE: www.pennhurstasylum.com/index2.html#/history

Bosphorus Bridge

 

The Bosphorus Bridge, also called the First Bosphorus Bridge or simply the First Bridge (Turkish: Boğaziçi Köprüsü, 1. Boğaziçi Köprüsü or Birinci Köprü) is one of two suspension bridges spanning the Bosphorus strait (Turkish: Boğaziçi) in Istanbul, Turkey; thus connecting Europe and Asia (the other one is the Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge, which is called the Second Bosphorus Bridge.) The bridge is located between Ortaköy (on the European side) and Beylerbeyi (on the Asian side).

 

The Bosphorus Bridge had the 4th longest suspension bridge span in the world when it was completed in 1973, and the longest outside the United States. At present, it is the 21st longest suspension bridge span in the world.

 

The idea of a bridge crossing the Bosphorus dates back to antiquity. For Emperor Darius I The Great of Persia (522 BC - 485 BC), as recorded by the Greek writer Herodotus in his Histories, Mandrocles of Samos once engineered a pontoon bridge that stretched across the Bosphorus, linking Asia to Europe, so that Darius could pursue the fleeing Scythians as well as move his army into position in the Balkans to overwhelm Macedon.[3] The first project for a permanent bridge across the Bosphorus was proposed to Ottoman Sultan Abdul Hamid II by the Bosphorus Railroad Company in 1900, which included a rail link between the continents.[4]

The decision to build a bridge across the Bosphorus was taken in 1957 by Prime Minister Adnan Menderes. For the structural engineering work, a contract was signed with the British firm Freeman Fox & Partners in 1968. The bridge was designed by the renowned British civil engineers Sir Gilbert Roberts and William Brown who also designed the Humber Bridge, Severn Bridge, Forth Road Bridge, Auckland Harbour Bridge and the Volta River Bridge. The construction started in February 1970, the ceremonies were attended by President Cevdet Sunay and Prime Minister Süleyman Demirel and was carried out by the Turkish firm Enka Construction & Industry Co. along with the co-contractors Cleveland Bridge & Engineering Company. (England) and Hochtief AG (Germany). Thirty-five engineers and 400 men worked on the project.

The bridge was completed on 30 October 1973, one day after the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Republic of Turkey, and opened by President Fahri Korutürk and Prime Minister Naim Talu. The cost of the bridge amounted to US$200 million ($1.05 billion in 2013 dollars[5]).

At the time the bridge was opened, much was made of its being the first bridge between Europe and Asia since the pontoon bridge of Xerxes in 480 BCE. That bridge, however, spanned the Hellespont (Dardanelles), some distance away from the Bosphorus.

  

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Since moving here, I have always been attracted and fascinated by the scope and variety of these remarkable entities. The plant-like appearance of lichens hides their true identity. A lichen is not a single organism, but the result of a partnership (mutualistic symbiosis) between a fungus and an alga or cyanobacteria. Some lichens are formed of three or more partners. The body of a lichen consists of fungal filaments (hyphae) surrounding cells of green algae and/or blue-green cyanobacteria.

 

The complexity of lichen partnerships has caused lichens to be described as "small ecosystems". They are classified as members of the Fungus Kingdom by systematists because the fungus partner is always the major partner. After a lichen symbiosis is established, the fungus has the greatest influence on the final form of the lichen body’s shape, and whether it is tough or flexible. The algal and bacterial partner(s) each have their own scientific names, but the lichen symbiosis is known only by the name of its fungus.

 

The great majority of the 13,500-18,000 species of lichenized fungi grow very slowly, often less than a millimeter per year, and some lichens are thought to be among the oldest living things on Earth. Lichens are a major component of biological diversity. They are, however, extremely vulnerable to habitat alteration, so it comes as no surprise that the habitats with the highest lichen species diversity are the remnants of ancient forests and other undisturbed ecosystems. The association between high diversity of lichens and pristine habitats is so clear that scientists use lichens as indicators of ecosystem continuity.

 

Most lichens are extremely vulnerable to air pollution. When lichens disappear, they give early warning of harmful conditions. Scientists using lichens to monitor air quality often compare current lichen inventories with past records. For example, nearly 80% of the original lichen species were found to be missing from the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, an area I know quite well, undoubtedly due to the extensive pollution once symptomatic of the entire south shore of Lake Michigan.

 

Happily, lichens abound on every tree in my vicinity in many appealing varieties, yet another indication of the quality of the environment in which I'm fortunate to reside, and adding another area of study previously unexplored...

 

Colours Fly and Catherine Wheel - "Simple Minds" - Play this track here.

 

¿Whats this iPod Shuffle set all about? Read about it here

 

After a Welsh track as my last upload, I have had some comments that Scotland has not had a fair crack of the whip. So in the spirit of the 'United' Kingdom, completing the tradition of 'an Englishman, Scotsman, Irishman and Welshman' in a good joke or story, heres a Simple Minds track.

 

New Gold Dream is the fifth studio album by Scottish rock band Simple Minds. The album was released in 1982 and was a breakthrough point for the band.

 

Simple Minds are Jim Kerr on vox, Charlie Burchill on guitars, Michael MacNeil keyboards and effects and Derek Forbes on bass. A mixture of session drummers were recruited for the album.

 

A mistaken origin of the name "Catherine Wheel" is often assumed to come from David Byrne or Twyla Tharp. In 1981, Byrne partnered with choreographer Twyla Tharp, scoring 'The Catherine Wheel,' a ballet prominently featuring unusual rhythms and lyrics. Productions of "The Catherine Wheel" appeared on Broadway that same year." Although interesting, this is wrong. The Byrne/Tharpe catherine wheel refers to the medieval torture instrument of the same name. The Simple Minds track refers to a type of firework (see the catherine wheel disambiguation page for more).

 

For more Simple Minds, checkout the "Live - in the City of Light" album recorded at the Paris Olympia during the 1986 'Once upon a time" tour. Oh, and tell 'em I sent you :-)

 

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Liverpool Cathedral is the Church of England cathedral of the Anglican Diocese of Liverpool, built on St James' Mount in the city centre of Liverpool, England and is the seat of the Bishop of Liverpool. Its official name is the Cathedral Church of Christ in Liverpool but it is dedicated to Christ and the Blessed Virgin. It is the largest cathedral in Britain and the fifth largest in the world which ultimately makes it the largest Anglican cathedral in the world, although this title is disputed with the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, New York USA.

 

At 67 metres (220 ft) above floor level, the bells of Liverpool Cathedral are the highest and heaviest ringing peal in the world. The bourdon bell "Great George" was cast by Taylors of Loughborough. At 14.5 tons, Great George is the second most massive bell in the British Isles. (Only the 16.5 ton "Great Paul" of St Paul's Cathedral in London is heavier.)

 

It is connected to the Catholic cathedral (often referred to as Paddys Wigwam by the cities comedians) in the city by 'Hope St'. It takes its name from William Hope, a local merchant whose house stood on the site now occupied by the Philharmonic Hall, and was named long before either cathedral was built.

 

NB: Like all the images on this stream, full size images are available, Check my profile for how to contact me.

 

Checkout more Liverpool from my photostream.

 

Keep in touch, add me as a contact www.flickr.com/relationship.gne?id=33062170@N08 so I can follow all your new uploads.

 

(c) TonySmith Hotpix / HotpixUK

 

( )

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SHIELD Base, Unknown Location - 5:43AM

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"Seriously, what is up with you guys and doing everything so early in the morning?"

 

We turn a corner and walk into a hallway. SHIELD agents rush by us on every side.

 

"We don't enjoy wasting time, Mr. Stark."

 

"Sure thing, Mister!" I say sarcastically.

 

An agent walks by and bumps into my shoulder by accident, dropping some of his papers. I try to help him pick them up, but he crumples them into his hand and scrambles away.

 

"You people sure seem scared of something."

 

"Nothing to worry about. Here -- this way."

 

We turn another corner and arrive in a spacious corridor. At the end is a room, presumably my new home.

 

"Oh, Mr. Stark, we did leave one thing out of our deal?"

 

Of course.

 

"We're giving you a partner."

 

"Excuse me!? For what?"

 

"We've seen your track record. You've worked with Pepper Potts, and have an impressive tendency to get yourself into situations you can't get yourself out of."

 

"Like?"

 

Fury gestures to my robotic hand. I shrug.

 

We approach the door, which, upon further inspection, looks like something out of the Star Wars Prequels.

 

"Here, place your hand on this scanner. We scanned your biometrics on the way over, so the door should be coded to you and only you."

 

Typical SHIELD.

 

I place my hand on the scanner, and after a few seconds, the door slides open. Inside is a carpet, a table, and a woman sitting on a bed.

 

"Pleasure to make your acquaintance, Mr. Stark." She says, in a heavy Russian accent.

 

"Woah, Fury, you didn't say she was a....well....She.

 

"Is there a problem with this?"

 

She looks at me dead in the eyes. Her stare is cold. Looks like she's done this before.

 

"Not at all, Ms..."

 

"Romanoff. Natalia Romanoff. You may call me Black Widow."

 

"Cool. Code names are all the fad these days."

 

She gets up off of my bed and walks out of the room. I spot two pistols holstered to her back.

 

"Guess I shouldn't mess with her, huh?"

 

Fury disregards my comment and walks into the room, introducing me to what I have. Turns out I have a wardrobe that comes out of the wall, a place to store my suit(s), and a TV.

 

"Ms. Romanoff requested that you get a PS4 in the room. To suit your....personality."

 

That's rude.

 

"Eh. I'm more of an Xbox guy."

 

Fury walks out of the room, the door shutting behind him.

 

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Extremely sorry that I haven't been pumping out issues as much as I'd like to. The school year is nearly over, so the tests and the workload are really beginning to pile up. I'll try to post more!

 

~ Zach

Editor's Note: the NanoSail-D solar sail has deployed in low Earth orbit! NASA has partnered with spaceweather.com for an amateur astronomy contest. This image is an entry into the contest, but inclusion in this NASA Flickr gallery in no way denotes partiality in the final judging! We're just taking a selection of the best images and adding them to our Solar Sails photoset. For more information about the contest, visit: www.nanosail.org/

__________________________________________________________________________

  

NanoSail-D satellite was imaged low on the Northern sky in Finland. Image was taken by the robotic Canon 350D allsky camera of Nyrola observatory on Jan 30, 2011 with 30 second exposure staring at 17:31:50 UTC. The camera takes images every 5 minutes through a fish eye lens. On the previous night the satellite was not seen during a similar pass. The satellite must have been quite bright to record such a bright trail.

 

Image credit: Arto Oksanen,Jyväskylä, Finland

 

View original image/caption:

spaceweather.com/submissions/large_image_popup.php?image_...

 

View our NanoSail-D/Solar Sails photoset:

www.flickr.com/groups/stationscience/

 

More about NanoSail-D:

www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/smallsats/nanosaild.html

Model - Rosie

Year Taken - May 2014

Camera - Sony A7R

Lens - Carl Zeiss 85mm f/1.4

Location - Her House

 

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Image Info

 

I love lazy Sunday morning just got out of bed looking like the subject is looking up at her boyfriend kinda photography and that was the inspiration for the image. Whenever I photograph someone, I try and make the viewer view the image as if the girl was looking at her lover, her partner. It makes the viewer engage with the image and more importantly, the girl. They feel part of the image, they feel involved; as if at any moment the image could jump into life and speak.

 

Rosie

 

So by now, you all know Rosie - at least in the two dimensional world of photography anyway. So I won't bore you with paragraph after paragraph of how beautiful she is, what an incredible model she is, how wonderful it is to work with her. As I said after my first shoot with her, she is the most beautiful girl Ive met, the best model Ive ever worked with and such wonderful company. For each and every image of her from now on, every statement in the previous statement is implied.

 

So I got in my car this morning, and after the habitual stop at Costa's to wake myself up, I arrived at a set of wooden security gates at the entrance to Rosie's house. As they opened and I drove in, I parked the little Mini Cooper between the Ferrari and the Porsche and was greeted by a pair of dogs who were both bigger than the car I was too nervous to get out of. They are, for the record, named Panther and Bear; which did little to quell my worries about them eating me, or even worse, my camera. But I do them an injustice, as they are two of the sweetest and funniest dogs you are ever likely to meet. One, the aforementioned Panther, is a labrador the colour of milk chocolate and the other, Bear, a Rottweiler with a head larger than my camera bag. Luckily for me, they seemed to like me and I was allowed to proceed towards the converted barn with an furry escort on either side. However, I digress, as it was not them I was here to work with.

 

Rosie makes a mean cup of coffee (even if it did expire around the time of the Russian revolution (1917 for anyone who cares). And it was over this cup of coffee that we spent at least the first two hours of hour shoot doing nothing else but sitting there talking. See this is the problem when a model and a photographer get on so well - they never take any bloody photos. I arrived at 11am and it was at least 1pm before I even fired off a test frame. We talked about everything, from the size of the universe to the problems with contemporary music. She listened, I spoke, I listened, she spoke. We talked about the big things, the little things, and the big things. I read her some of my book (Im an author too), we sat, we joked, we got sat on by dogs. The only thing we didn't do, was take photos.

 

As the hour arrived somewhere around 2pm, we finally decided to take some photos and even though the light was incredibly erratic, we managed to capture some fairly authentic looking images in the various rooms in her house. Actually, its not so much of a house, rather a villa. Its a huge barn conversion with original beams littering the ceilings and a light and airy feel with allows an enormous amount of light to perforate the windows and cut its way across the room. We worked in her lounge, her landing, her hallway, her bathroom - everywhere. We got about 400 photos in all and in my opinion, they are better than the previous set we did the other day. They are more real, more believable and I think the viewer will feel part of the image. I think you will feel like her boyfriend. And speaking of her boyfriend...

 

I met Carl at first in the morning, and finally as I was about to leave. What a great guy he is and he is Rosie's perfect match. Normally in life, people gravitate towards their opposite but with Rosie and Carl, they have found in each other someone who is both their twin and reverse. They are poles apart but on flanking pages and they are two of the loveliest people Ive met. Carl is a fascinating guy who, in some ways, is similar to myself (though I don't own a Ferrari and Im not 6ft 4). He's great guy to talk to and before I left, he, Rosie and I resumed the subject of absolutely anything and continued to talk until the sun disappeared. They are an amazing couple and Im glad I got the chance to spend a little bit of time with them in their amazing home. For once, as this doesn't happen very often in the world of photography, I think Ive gained a pair of friends. Thank you both!

 

If you want to follow Rosie on Twitter - you can find her here

...or how Honky Tonk and Sister Bill got their nicknames. If it happened in the Hill Country, it probably happened at Mamacitas.

 

This is an essay about the Texas Hill Country, but it's going to take me a long way around to get to the Hill Country. I'll add a paragraph here and there as the spirit moves me. Nicknames are easy to come by in the Texas Hill Country. Any naming incident that sparks a full two minutes of laughter is apt to create a life long nick name.

 

I got mine early on when Sherry began her career as a Methodist minister. Churches she was assigned to by the Bishop had never or seldom had female pastors and for the most part the pastor was called Brother Smith, Brother John, Brother Ralph or Brother Bubba, maybe even Brother Slim or Brother whatever. At Sherry's first church one of the men was speaking to Sherry in front of a crowd and referred to her as Brother Sherry. The crowd erupted in laughter and that sparked me to ad lib, "Well I guess that makes me Sister Bill." It stuck, and from then on everywhere we've gone I've become Sister Bill. Strangly enough, the Brother Sherry didn't stick and she's always been Pastor Sherry. It's funny how that works. This system makes a good litmus test as to who you can trust too. Those who use it in derision are easy to pick up on and you can depend on it, they will become your enemies. It's always good to know who your enmies are. Next time I'm in the mood to post, I'll tell you who Honky Tonk is and how she got her nickname.

 

Joy got her name from British author,Ruth Hamilton. Joy is the pianist at the First United Methodist Church in Johnson City, Texas where Sherry and I spent nine exciting years before we moved to Kerrville five years ago. Joy is my age (80+-) and grew up in a series of Methodist churches. Her father was a Methodist preacher. When she was junior high age she was so good on piano, she started playing the church organ where her father preached. Joy became famous with her junior high school peers by playing the country-western/pop hit "Pistol Packing Mama" to a slow hymn cadence in church during certain parts of the service. Her father never was able to hear the plaintive admonition, "Laaaaaaay thaaaaaat pistooooool dooooown, baaaaabe, laaaaaay thaaaaaat pistoooooool doooooown; Pistooooooool Paaaaaaacking Maaaaaaama puuuuuut thaaaaaaat guuuuuuun awaaaaaaaaay." Of one thing you can be sure, every junior high kid in the Methodist church heard the message and nobody ever figured out why the kids would often become so giggly and out of control, especially when they heard the tune telling them, "Oh, she kicked out my windshield, she hit me over the head. She cussed and cried and said I'd lied and wished that I was dead. Lay that pistol down, babe, lay that pistol down, Pistol Packing Mama, put that gun away!"

 

Naturally Joy grew into a natural musician and could improvise without even having to consciously think about it. During the nine years we were rewarded with her weekly concerts, I noticed that she would often spontaneously begin the add character to the hymns. Some came out with the feel of honky tonk country western and some even took on a boogie beat. She did this naturally, but seemed not to be able to do it on demand. Perhaps demand made her self conscious. For that reason when Ruth Hamilton begged me to tape "Honky Tonk" (that's the name Ruth began to call her because she could never remember the name Joy Feuge) and send her the tape, I made a noble effort. I was never able to get a tape, but Ruth's name "Honky Tonk" stuck and that's what we call Joy to this day. Next, I'll tell you something about a Texas Hill Country institution, Mamacita's Mexican Restaurant, serving Mexican food, but owned and operated by an American Muslim Iranian. That gets him in trouble with the area's fundamentalist cowboy Christians from time to time, to which he pays no attention and simply continues to oeprate a superb small chain of Mexican restaurants. He operates one in San Antonio, one in San Marcos, one in Fredericksburg and one in Kerrville. It just goes to show, you can't hold a good man down.

 

I've been eating at Mamacita's restaurants for years now and when I began writing this piece couldn't even remember the owner and founder's name. Sherry found this link on the internet and it is so interesting and complete I'm going to post it word for word:

 

*********************

 

Mamacita’s Mexican Restaurant: Oh Mama!

Profile

By Kathryn Jones

Thursday, 24 January 2008

 

There are four Mamacita’s Mexican Restaurants in Texas, the largest of which seats 400 people.

Premier Business Partners:

DeCoty Coffee Co.

   

Known to most as simply “Hagi,” Hossein Hagigholam left Iran for the United States in 1976 with a dream to make it big in the land of opportunity.

 

His initial plan was to study civil engineering. But, as fate should have it, he now owns and operates four Mamacita’s Mexican Restaurants in Kerrville, Texas, with four other locations in Fredericksburg, New Braunfels, San Marcos and San Antonio, Texas. The smallest location seats 250 people and the largest seats 400 people.

 

In an interview with Food and Drink, Hagi reveals how he transitioned from a lonely dishwasher who could barely speak English to a successful entrepreneur with plans to turn his Tex-Mex restaurant into a nationally recognized franchise.

 

The ride has not been an easy one, he adds, but with a little faith and hard work, dreams really can come true.

 

Food and Drink: What brought you to the United States?

Hossein Hagigholam: From the time I was a boy, I wanted to come to America. Before the revolution in Iran, lots of Iranians came to the United States to become engineers and doctors, and then they went back home.

 

Without any knowledge of English, my first place to go was Houston. There was a school for English as a second language called ESL Houston.

 

If there were 40 students, 35 of them were Iranians, so the teachers learned how to speak our language instead of us learning English.

 

I knew in order to make it in the United States I had to learn the language, so I researched which college in Texas had less Iranians. Shreiner College had only one Iranian student, so that’s how I ended up in Kerrville. While I studied, I found a job in the restaurants.

 

If you are a foreigner and don’t know any English, the only job you have is washing dishes. I later became a bus boy and then a waiter.

 

As a waiter, that’s when you really make it big. I was so happy about how much money I was making as a waiter that I took three jobs: the breakfast shift in one restaurant, the lunch shift in another and the dinner shift in the third.

 

I remember one time a customer asked me if we took Visa, and I thought they were asking me if I had a visa. I thought I was in trouble somehow, so I ran home as fast as I could.

 

My manager called me the next day and asked, “What happened?” I said, “Someone wanted me to show him my visa.” He said, “No, you idiot! They were asking you if we accept Visa – the credit card.”

 

FAD: I can see how you would feel anxious about that. In 1979, American hostages were taken at the embassy in Tehran and President Jimmy Carter called for all Iranian students in the U.S. whose visas had expired to leave the country by the spring of 1980. You must have been devastated.

HH: The world just shattered on me, because now I had to go back. I had learned English, started earning money and I was dating Ruth.

 

The only way I could stay in the country was if she married me, and she wouldn’t marry me. She said, “Look, I’m 20 and you’re 21. We’re young and you come from another country and my parents won’t let me.”

 

I finally talked Ruth into marrying me. You talk about begging! Her parents gave their permission because of the difficult situation, but it was on the condition that we live apart for six months.

 

I tell people I really got married for the green card, but we’re still married after 25 years and we adopted two wonderful children. I think that says a lot.

 

FAD: Is it true you named the restaurant after Ruth?

HH: She is Spanish and I used to call her “Mamacita” when I was a waiter. I decided to name the restaurant Mamacita’s because it means grandmother, good-looking lady – all the goodies.

 

FAD: In 1985, you and a business partner opened the first Mamacita’s in Kerrville. Was it challenging to get it off the ground?

HH: Not really. We opened the second restaurant in Fredericksburg in 1988, followed by one in San Marcos in 1996, and then the biggest location, which is in San Antonio, in 2003.

 

And then, in 2005, we tore our original restaurant down and built a new restaurant. If there were a place in the Guinness Book of World Records for most expensive restaurant ever built per capita, it would be this restaurant, because we spent $10 million in a city with a population of only 25,000 people.

 

It is very tough to make money when you open a $10 million restaurant, but because of our confidence and if you treat people the way you want to be treated, anything can work. In fact, Kerrville is a German town. People say, “How could an Iranian come to the United States and build a Mexican restaurant in a German community and make it?” My answer to that is, “Only in America, of course.”

 

FAD: Can you share some tips in how to run a successful restaurant?

HH: If a restaurant has five elements, the owner will hit the jackpot in this business. If he has four out of five, he will make a living out of it. And if he has less than that, it is better not to mess with the restaurant business.

 

These elements are quality, service, location, atmosphere and reasonable prices.

 

Of course quality and service are always important, but I wanted to give an atmosphere that not every causal restaurant can do. In our Kerrville location, we have a third of the actual size of the Alamo inside of our restaurant.

 

A mechanical Davy Crockett sits on top of the roof that plays the music like the movie “Alamo.” Also, in our San Antonio location, we created a village that makes you feel like you are outside even though you are inside. It has fiber-optic stars and village shops and bakeries in it.

 

FAD: Having worked in restaurants when you were in college, would you say that makes you a more empathetic boss?

HH: Many casual restaurants have just one general manager that takes care of the quality of the food and the service.

 

When I used to work in the bottom line myself, I found that it was difficult to put all of this work on the shoulder of one person and expect him to control costs and increase sales.

 

So, this is why each of our locations has two general managers – one for back of house and one for front of house. We also took away any administrative work for them. Each of our locations has at least six managers.

 

This is what makes us different. I believe in spending money to make money when it comes to [hiring good employees.] We have a good 4 percent budgeted to training at all times.

 

We talk to them about the golden rule [of the restaurant business.] If you treat someone the way you want to be treated, it will increase the sales.

 

FAD: What is Mamacita’s perspective on providing customers with exceptional service?

HH: All of our customers can testify that no customer can walk out unless a manager has visited their table. We believe if a customer is unhappy, they will tell us when they leave.

 

Usually, if they are unhappy, they don’t say anything and just don’t come back.

 

But by having a manager shake hands and talk to them, they will feel comfortable enough to tell us what we did wrong.

 

We appreciate the compliments, but what we really want to hear is if there are any complaints.

 

I tell my management that when people go out to eat, they are in a good mood.

 

You never see a husband tell his wife, “Let’s go out to eat,” and the wife gets upset about it. Everybody is happy when they go out to eat, and if they choose your restaurant, you should feel honored. So, do whatever it takes to please them. They like attention.

 

You know, lots of Middle Eastern people that have businesses complain because they say we lost business because of the 9/11 terrorist action.

 

I disagree on that because my business has been doing well and I think it is because of how we treat people.

 

I make a lot of speeches about America, the land of opportunity. What I always emphasize at the end is this: Whoever doesn’t make it in this country, it is their own fault. I am one of those guys that really appreciate the country for what it has done for me.

 

FAD: What’s next for Mamacita’s?

HH: We would like to open locations in Austin, Houston and Dallas in the near future. We’ll do it one at a time. I don’t open a restaurant until I have its general managers ready. I have no plan after that yet.

 

You never know. Maybe a successful, nationally recognized chain will discover us and we could make a deal to take this nationwide.

 

********************

 

When Hagi shut down the Kerrville Mamacita's Restaurant to build that ten million dollar culinary mansion, some of the Shiite Christians in Kerrville became very upset because the architect had put a small, simple dome on the structure and it reminded them of a Muslim Mosque for some reason. They demanded the dome be removed, despite the fact the State Capitol in Austin has a dome, some churches have domes and the dome, while a Moorish design, is commonplace in Spain and Mexico AND this is a MEXICAN food restaurant, OK? My friend Frank Clark says Hagi told him, "I don't have the kind of money to buy this quality of advertising." As expected, the dome remained, the new reataurant opened and the furror subsided.

 

Second to the mechanical Davy Crockett who from time to time activates and play the fiddle on the ramparts of the similated Alamo in Mamacita's in Kerrville are the murals painted by Haigi's brother whose name I have never heard and can't find on the internet. Hagi's brother is a truly outstanding artist and at some time in the future I'm going to photograph some of the interior and post it here. Mexican restaurants around the Southwest are famous for their absolutely crude murals, but Mamacita's redeems them all. Hagi's brother is a wonderful muralist.

 

For almost fifteen years now, Mamacita's has been a part of Hill Country living for Sherry and me and the good people of the First Methodist Church in Johnson City Texas. We meet there to celebrate birthdays and for a long time after Sherry and I moved to Kerrville we met regularily at Mamacita's in Fredericksburg. Same driving distance from Kerrville and from Johnson City.

 

I recommend Mamacita's to anyone as being the best eating experience you'll ever have. Their New York strip is flawless and substitute the baked potatoe for guacamole salad and you'll have a low carb meal to die for. The Mamacita's salad is perfect weight control meal IF you'll skip the taco shell. If you're not on a diet the Mexican food is delicious, the tortillas are always hot and honey with butter is always available on request.

 

As Kathryn Jones described in her profile, I can't remember ever eating at Mamacita's without someone from management stopping by the table and asking if everything is alright, which reminds me of the only negative experience I've ever had at a Mamacita's restaurant.

 

Several years ago Sherry and I met seven or eight of the Johnson City folks at the Fredericksburg Mamacita's for one of our monthly reunions. As always I was low-carb dieting and ordered a Mamacita's Salad to get some healthy carbs as opposed to sugar laden carbs. Unlike any other Mamacita's salad I'd ever eaten this one was very short on vegetables. I mentioned it to the person next to me and when the waiter came around asking if everything was ok, that person told him my complaint. It has always been my policy NOT to complain at a restaurant, but I've worked too many police cases concerned with what a cook can do to a customer in way of retaliation. Spit in the food is the least of the possibilities. Whatever the revenge, there's always someone in the kitchen who wants to get even with the cook and so the retaliation gets reported. So, there I sit, not wanting to complain but really disappointed in the amount of vegetables I was served. My friend from Johnson City has spilled the beans and I'm forced to admit I thought the salad was skimpy. The waiter went to the kitchen and returned witha such a large plate of vegetables AND chicken which I hadn't complained about that it was obvious the cook was angered and this amount of food was his way of retaliating and an attempt to make me look foolish for daring to complain. I did eat some more vegetables and the shared the rest of the extra food with everyone at the table. Johnson City folks are not short on appetite, so nothing went to waste. I can see the cook's point of view. He or she probably sees tons of salad thrown out by customers who eat the grilled chicken, pick around on the vegetables and then send the remainder back to the kitchen to be disposed of. I was still disappointed in the arrogance of the cook and the attempt to make me look ridiculous. Maybe the cook was having trouble their spouse, who knows? In fifteen years that's the only negative experience I've had at a Mamacita's.

 

The Texas Hill Country is full of anomaly, so it's no wonder that an Iranian man can become a millionaire with Mexican restaurants in German communities. Fredericksburg is even more German than Kerrville. San Marcos and San Antonio have strong German influences too. Go figure. Now I want to tell you about a mystery writer who writes murder mysteries in and around Blanco County, yep, Blanco county where I was a reserve deputy for several years after I retired from SWT Police Dept. as an investigator.

 

At all those birthday parties at Mamacitas there was the "viewing of the presents and cards" ritual which I've described in the narrative of another ritual. Sherry always shops for certain people on our list and I shop for others, we've never discussed it, it just seemed to fall into place. One of the people I always bought the present for was "Honky Tonk" who is the pianist at the First Methodist Church in Johnson City and a very close friend as well. I always bought her music CDs and usually gospel music. She found out I collected author-signed books and so that's what she always gave me for my birthday.

 

My eyes were really bad for a long time and so I collected a bunch of those books without seriosly reading them. One set of books were by a young mystery writer named Ben Rehder. Joy (Honky-Tonk) went to several book signings and so I built up a collection Ben's novels. All of his novels take place in Blanco County of which Johnson City is not only the County Seat, but is the home town of former president, Lyndon B. Johnson.

 

When I retired in 1998 I was seventy-one years old and had never written anything more than a police report, but upon retiring I began to write essays and short stories and had so much fun I completely lost my identity as a police sketch artist and watercolorist. I've read a lot of the local Blanco county writing generated by the Blanco County Historical Society and others and I'm here to testify this stuff will put you to sleep quicker than prescription drugs. So you have the picture; there I was with faulty glasses, a collection of novels obviously done by a local guy...nothing here I can't wait a while for...right?

 

So, several years later and a new pair of glasses, this time prescribed by an optometrist and NOT a opthomologist...HURRAY, I can read again. So, I picked up a Ben Rehder novel and VIOLA' this guy is really good. This is really just like Blanco County. He's talking about the Sherrif's Office and I rode for several years as a reserve deputy with one of the full time deputies and we had experiences very similar to the ones Ben tells about in his novels.

 

I did feel like Ben's tales were a little tame though. Like in "Murder, She Wrote" it seemed like Blanco County might begin to compete with Cabot Cove for the title, Murder Capital of the World. I was tempted to write Ben and tell him to let go a little bit and make the cases really as bizarre as the ones we actually worked. There was the guy who carried female garments in his car and when he came up on a dead deer along the road, he'd dress the remains in the female attire and have his carnal way with them. A combination the density of cell phones and Baptists got the guy arrested pretty quickly and his case was investigated and taken to the district attorney.

 

Another case I wanted to tell Ben about was the one involving some young men who had small explosives used on coyote bait. They began a campaign to blow up all the rural mail boxes in the north part of the county. In this case the volume of the explosion plus the denisty of ranchers, pickup trucks and deer rifles brought about arrests before too many mail boxes had to be replaced or before someone was killed or injured getting their mail or before the county has to investigate the strange deaths of two young men blown up in a pickuptruck sitting in front of a rural mailbox. It would have probably been written up as a double suicide.

 

I had three of Ben's autographed books and read all three nonstop and was amazed at the quality of his writing and the universal appeal these books would have. When he spoke of eating at Ronny's Barbeque, it was like being home. I have eaten at Ronny's many times and it's just like Ben tells it.

 

When I finished each novel I passed them on to my best bud, Frank Clark, who wanted to read them because although he doesn't come from a law-enforcement background, he comes from a Central Texas deer hunting background. His wife called me and complained; she said she wasn't getting her sleep. He wakes her up all through the night laughing his ass off, so I decided I gotta get online and order everything this guy has written.

 

Online at Ben's website I was amazed to find out that Ben is writing these in a vein of HUMOR. It even cites the genre as being humorous mystery novels. What humor? These are serious law enforcement novels of Blanco County, just the way she is! Damn! Did I ever feel like a hick. I ordered everything he's written and Holy Moly which isn't even off the press yet.

 

As of today Holy Moly is the only one I haven't read. "Gun Shy" is my favorite, but there's not one in the set that isn't a fantastic read. In my case, I can't put them down and it's a good thing I'm retired, otherwise I'd have used up all my sick leave for the next two decades. Frank is still reading and Michele is beginning to look a little "red in the eye" but otherwise we'll just have to wait for "Holy Moly" to come out and hope Ben is presently working on a new novel. The main man is a game warden who helps with the Sherrif's Department's criminal cases. That's the truth or at least very close to reality, we had a game warden in Hays County who was skilled and certified in Forensic Hypnosis and worked with police sketch artists on all kinds of cases.

 

This ends my little essay on the 'Life in the Texas Hill Country" and I apologize for it being a lot longer than I intended it to be. In closing, I'll simply say, "If you're not already living in the Hill Country, start now making your plans to move here; the life you save may be your own."

 

I'm a terrible proof reader and it may be weeks before I get around to the first tip toe back through....be patient, I'm old...ok?

 

www.benrehder.com/

 

This is Ben Rehder's website and you'll be relieved to know Ben doesn't have to rely on the likes of me for his publicity. Kinky Friendman of Texas Monthly fame recommends Ben highly.

 

The first rays of sunlight hit the upper portion of Longs Peak (14,259 ft, 4,346 m), the highest peak in Rocky Mountain National Park, as seen from Chasm Lake. The prominent east-facing wall is the "Diamond," one of the classic climbs in North America. Climbing the route was first proposed in 1954, but forbidden by the Park Service. The wall was opened in 1960, and the first ascent was made in August of that year by Dave Rearick and Bob Kamps. The route is nearly 1000 vertical feet (300 m), part of it overhung. The standard non-technical route ascends from the north side (to the right) and circles around the west and south slopes to the summit.

 

Longs Peak is a magnet for hikers and climbers, but it is also probably the most deadly peak in Colorado. My closest brush with death came on Longs (in June 1980) when a thunderstorm formed rapidly after my climbing partner and I had reached the summit. Our hair stood on end, our foreheads buzzed, and my ice axe hummed as electrons passed through us and into the sky above. We stupidly stayed on the summit, flat on the ground (not a good idea: best way to share in discharge from any lightning strike), until the storm blew over. We were really lucky- not everyone is- 6 people have died from lightning strikes on the peak. Most of the 60 recorded deaths associated with Longs are from falls.

His perch is a Wild Cherry tree beside my window. He was so active & noisy during the summer and had a female spotted Koel as partner. I used to wake up in the mornings hearing his calls.

 

Now he is all alone, silent & shy.

------------------------------------------------------

© 2007 Anuj Nair. All rights reserved.

-------------------------------------------------------

Contact : www.anujnair.net

______________________________________________________________________

 

© 2007 Anuj Nair. All rights reserved.

All images are the property of Anuj Nair.

Using these images without permission is in violation of

international copyright laws (633/41 DPR19/78-Disg 154/97-L.248/2000)

All materials may not be copied, reproduced, distributed, republished,

downloaded, displayed, posted or transmitted in any forms or by

any means, including electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording

without written permission of Anuj Nair.

Every violation will be pursued penally.

(Wikipedia)

 

The Bosphorus Bridge, also called the First Bosphorus Bridge or simply the First Bridge (Turkish: Boğaziçi Köprüsü, 1. Boğaziçi Köprüsü or Birinci Köprü) is one of two suspension bridges spanning the Bosphorus strait (Turkish: Boğaziçi) in Istanbul, Turkey; thus connecting Europe and Asia (the other one is the Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge, which is called the Second Bosphorus Bridge.) The bridge is located between Ortaköy (on the European side) and Beylerbeyi (on the Asian side).

It is a gravity anchored suspension bridge with steel towers and inclined hangers. The aerodynamic deck hangs on zigzag steel cables. It is 1,560 m (5,118 ft) long with a deck width of 33.40 m (110 ft). The distance between the towers (main span) is 1,074 m (3,524 ft) and the total height of the towers is 165 m (541 ft). The clearance of the bridge from sea level is 64 m (210 ft).

The Bosphorus Bridge was the 4th longest suspension bridge span in the world when it was completed in 1973. At present, it is the 21st longest suspension bridge span in the world.

 

The idea of a bridge crossing the Bosphorus dates back to antiquity. For Emperor Darius I The Great of Persia (522 BC - 485 BC), as recorded by the Greek writer Herodotus in his Histories, Mandrocles of Samos once engineered a pontoon bridge that stretched across the Bosphorus, linking Asia to Europe, so that Darius could pursue the fleeing Scythians as well as move his army into position in the Balkans to overwhelm Macedon. The first project for a permanent bridge across the Bosphorus was proposed to Ottoman Sultan Abdul Hamid II by the Bosphorus Railroad Company in 1900, which included a rail link between the continents.

The decision to build a bridge across the Bosphorus was taken in 1957 by Prime Minister Adnan Menderes. For the structural engineering work, a contract was signed with the British firm Freeman Fox & Partners in 1968. The bridge was designed by the renowned British civil engineers Sir Gilbert Roberts and William Brown who also designed the Humber Bridge, Severn Bridge, Forth Road Bridge, Auckland Harbour Bridge and the Volta River Bridge. The construction started in February 1970, the ceremonies were attended by President Cevdet Sunay and Prime Minister Süleyman Demirel and was carried out by the Turkish firm Enka Construction & Industry Co. along with the co-contractors Cleveland Bridge & Engineering Company. (England) and Hochtief AG (Germany). Thirty-five engineers and 400 men worked on the project.

The bridge was completed on 30 October 1973, one day after the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Republic of Turkey, and opened by President Fahri Korutürk and Prime Minister Naim Talu. The cost of the bridge was US$200 million ($1.05 billion in 2013 dollars).

At the time the bridge was opened, much was made of its being the first bridge between Europe and Asia since the pontoon bridge of Xerxes in 480 BCE. That bridge, however, spanned the Hellespont (Dardanelles), some distance away from the Bosphorus.

  

Model - Rosie

Year Taken - May 2014

Camera - Sony A7R

Lens - Carl Zeiss 85mm f/1.4

Location - Her House

 

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Image Info

 

I love lazy Sunday morning just got out of bed looking like the subject is looking up at her boyfriend kinda photography and that was the inspiration for the image. Whenever I photograph someone, I try and make the viewer view the image as if the girl was looking at her lover, her partner. It makes the viewer engage with the image and more importantly, the girl. They feel part of the image, they feel involved; as if at any moment the image could jump into life and speak.

 

Rosie

 

So by now, you all know Rosie - at least in the two dimensional world of photography anyway. So I won't bore you with paragraph after paragraph of how beautiful she is, what an incredible model she is, how wonderful it is to work with her. As I said after my first shoot with her, she is the most beautiful girl Ive met, the best model Ive ever worked with and such wonderful company. For each and every image of her from now on, every statement in the previous statement is implied.

 

So I got in my car this morning, and after the habitual stop at Costa's to wake myself up, I arrived at a set of wooden security gates at the entrance to Rosie's house. As they opened and I drove in, I parked the little Mini Cooper between the Ferrari and the Porsche and was greeted by a pair of dogs who were both bigger than the car I was too nervous to get out of. They are, for the record, named Panther and Bear; which did little to quell my worries about them eating me, or even worse, my camera. But I do them an injustice, as they are two of the sweetest and funniest dogs you are ever likely to meet. One, the aforementioned Panther, is a labrador the colour of milk chocolate and the other, Bear, a Rottweiler with a head larger than my camera bag. Luckily for me, they seemed to like me and I was allowed to proceed towards the converted barn with an furry escort on either side. However, I digress, as it was not them I was here to work with.

 

Rosie makes a mean cup of coffee (even if it did expire around the time of the Russian revolution (1917 for anyone who cares). And it was over this cup of coffee that we spent at least the first two hours of hour shoot doing nothing else but sitting there talking. See this is the problem when a model and a photographer get on so well - they never take any bloody photos. I arrived at 11am and it was at least 1pm before I even fired off a test frame. We talked about everything, from the size of the universe to the problems with contemporary music. She listened, I spoke, I listened, she spoke. We talked about the big things, the little things, and the big things. I read her some of my book (Im an author too), we sat, we joked, we got sat on by dogs. The only thing we didn't do, was take photos.

 

As the hour arrived somewhere around 2pm, we finally decided to take some photos and even though the light was incredibly erratic, we managed to capture some fairly authentic looking images in the various rooms in her house. Actually, its not so much of a house, rather a villa. Its a huge barn conversion with original beams littering the ceilings and a light and airy feel with allows an enormous amount of light to perforate the windows and cut its way across the room. We worked in her lounge, her landing, her hallway, her bathroom - everywhere. We got about 400 photos in all and in my opinion, they are better than the previous set we did the other day. They are more real, more believable and I think the viewer will feel part of the image. I think you will feel like her boyfriend. And speaking of her boyfriend...

 

I met Carl at first in the morning, and finally as I was about to leave. What a great guy he is and he is Rosie's perfect match. Normally in life, people gravitate towards their opposite but with Rosie and Carl, they have found in each other someone who is both their twin and reverse. They are poles apart but on flanking pages and they are two of the loveliest people Ive met. Carl is a fascinating guy who, in some ways, is similar to myself (though I don't own a Ferrari and Im not 6ft 4). He's great guy to talk to and before I left, he, Rosie and I resumed the subject of absolutely anything and continued to talk until the sun disappeared. They are an amazing couple and Im glad I got the chance to spend a little bit of time with them in their amazing home. For once, as this doesn't happen very often in the world of photography, I think Ive gained a pair of friends. Thank you both!

 

If you want to follow Rosie on Twitter - you can find her here

Canary Wharf Tube Station

 

I bit of a revisited photo, was sorting out my photos in LR3 and started messing around with an old photo and finally came up with this one. The B&W version is already uploaded

 

www.flickr.com/photos/turnipfarmer/4361613321/

 

but I am not sure which I like best so what do you think?

 

Information

 

Canary Wharf tube station is a London Underground station on the Jubilee Line, between Canada Water and North Greenwich. It is in Travelcard Zone 2 and was opened by Ken Livingstone setting an escalator in motion on 17 September 1999 as part of the Jubilee Line Extension. It is maintained by Tube Lines. Over 40 million people pass through the station each year, making it the busiest station on the London Underground outside Central London, and also the busiest which only serves a single line (the DLR station is completely separate).

 

Before the arrival of the Jubilee Line, London's Docklands had suffered from relatively poor public transport. Although the Docklands Light Railway station at Canary Wharf had been operating since 1987, by 1990 it was already obvious that the DLR's capacity would soon be reached. The Jubilee Line's routing through Canary Wharf was intended to relieve some of this pressure.

 

The tube station was intended from the start to be the showpiece of the Jubilee Line Extension, and its design was awarded in 1990 to the renowned architect Sir Norman Foster. It was constructed, by a Tarmac Construction / Bachy UK Joint Venture, in a drained arm of the former dock, using a simple "cut and cover" method to excavate an enormous pit 24 metres (78 ft) deep and 265 metres (869 ft) long. The resulting large volume of the interior has led to it being compared to a cathedral, and it has even been used to celebrate a wedding. However, the main reason for the station's enormous proportions was the great number of passengers predicted — as many as 50,000 daily. These predictions have been outgrown, with as many as 69,759 on weekdays recorded in 2006.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canary_Wharf_tube_station

Dave Sharpe doubling Clayton Moore in the first-chapter swordfight sequence.

youtu.be/FUyO6avspnc

Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942). Starring Kay Aldridge, Clayton Moore, Lorna Gray, Charles Middleton, William Benedict. Directed by William Witney. Wonderful Republic-style artwork of Aldridge

From 1942, this is still another great Republic classic. (I suppose I could have started these reviews with tired, lifeless serials like PANTHER GIRL OF THE KONGO, but why not have fun first?) It has a terrific cast with a half dozen of my all-time favorite actors, a credible storyline, some really impressive sets and imaginative 'Perils', and finally, an epic-sounding main theme by Mort Glickman. This would go in the top dozen serials on my list.

 

PERILS OF NYOKA deals with the struggle for possession of another hot potato that everyone covets-- in this case, the Golden Tablets of Hippocrates, on which the ancient physician recorded his great medical secrets (including a cure for cancer). Not only are gold tablets valuable for their knowledge and the metal itself, they were hidden with a treasure. So it's not surprising to find the sinister Vultura and her gang of renegade Arbabs trying to seize the darn things. Vultura is played by the exotic Lorna Gray, who is a bit ripe looking for my taste but her sneering performance and long long legs have must have gotten many young boys in the audience a bit hot and bothered. (There's something about a Bad Girl...)

 

Vultura's main henchman is Cassib, played by the same Charles Middleton who made life interesting for Flash Gordon and Dick Tracy. Middleton has that sour, unhappy expression that makes his villainy as believable as the sort of old man who chases kids off his lawn. As if that's not enough, there's also the treacherous Torrini who poses as an ally of Nyoka. Tristram Coffin as Torrini gives an okay performance, just showing enough shiftiness to make his loyalty obviously doubtful to the kids in the audience. As good as Coffin was as a villain, I always wished he had done more heroic roles like his Jeff King in KING OF THE ROCKETMEN.

 

And as if THAT wasn't enough trouble for Nyoka to deal with, Vultura has a pet ape named Satan, who had never heard Diane Fossey's findings that gorillas are peaceful, gentle vegetarians. Satan was played by Emil Van Horn in a rather weak portrayal that doesn't seem to give much effort into moving like a real gorilla. And although you have to give 1940s film makers some slack with their robot and apes costumes, the way Satan's chest skin looks like shiny black rubber detracts from its credibility. This is where you have to crank your

suspension of disbelief up a few notches.

 

Whew! What a crew. Luckily, not only can Nyoka handle herself perfectly well, she has a partner in Dr Larry Grayson who is (for a physician) an astonishingly tough two-fisted sword-fighting gunslinger. My doctor's not like that. Clayton Moore is always convincing as hero or thug, and he seems agile and energetic enough to have been a stunt man himself. (At first, it seems a bit odd to hear that wonderful, familiar Lone Ranger voice coming from this character.) Moore goes through the serial in the classic Doc Savage outfit of riding boots, jodphurs and heavy white shirt, although this does not end up torn into tatters with the right cuff still attached.

 

Finally, Nyoka herself is completely likeable as a cliffhanger heroine. ("That Nyoka gal's got plenty of moxie.." one character explains.) Daughter of the missing Professor Gordon, she is well educated (one of the few who can translate the Tablets) but also completely at home in the saddle or jumping on a gorilla's back with a knife in her hand. I love Kay Aldridge's performance as Nyoka. She's serious when in danger, taking the 'perils' straight-faced but at the same time, she's obviously having a lot of fun when things are going well. It's very believable, not a grim warrior-woman sort of portrayal. Aldridge herself is appealing and gorgeous in her 1940s pin-up girl way-- her clunky culottes are not flattering at all (although admittedly practical for the situation) and she seems to be notably gifted under that big-game hunter blouse. Nyoka also seems to have two different accents going on, for some reason.

 

My copy of PERILS OF NYOKA is a re-issue titled NYOKA AND THE TIGERMEN, apparently because some of the Arab raiders wear striped robes. C'mon, that's stretching things a bit, Republic.Nyoka Gordon (Kay Aldridge) leads an expedition into the most remote part of the Libyan desert in search of her father, Professor Henry Gordon (Robert Strange), who disappeared while seeking out the long-lost golden tablets of Hippocrates. The tablets, among other attributes, are reputed to contain the cures for any number of deadly diseases that still plague mankind. Nyoka and her father are the only two people in the world who can translate the papyrus giving directions to the hiding place of the tablets. Her allies in her search include: Dr. Larry Grayson (Clayton Moore), a young physician; Torrini (Tristram Coffin), an Italian adventurer; Professor Campbell (Forbes Murray), a colleague of her father's; and Red Davis (Billy Benedict), their driver. Opposing them is Vultura (Lorna Gray), the leader of a deadly desert cult, who regard the tablets as sacred and will do anything -- including committing murder -- to prevent their discovery and removal. Aided by her ally, Cassib (Charles B. Middleton), and the Taureg tribesmen, Vultura and her cultists lay all manner of deadly traps, involving everything from burning pits of fire and tunnels filled with hurricane-like winds to just plain getting crushed by the embrace of Vultura's trained gorilla, Satan (Emil Van Horn). Meanwhile, Nyoka and her expedition also face the danger of treachery from within. Nyoka must first secure the papyrus and avenge the murder of Major Reynolds in the opening chapter, and then get past the opposing Taureg tribesmen -- and little does she realize that the leader of the Tauregs is far closer to her than she ever could have guessed.

The action in Nyoka and the Tigermen moves at a breakneck pace across 15 chapters, most of which are as exciting as anything in Raiders of the Lost Ark and its sequels (each of which drew a lot of their inspiration from this and one other Republic serial, Secret Service in Darkest Africa). Beyond its genuinely exciting plot, which intersects with reality just enough to keep even adults interested (there really are a North African people called the Tauregs), Nyoka and the Tigermen contains some delightful twists in its casting, production, and writing. Nyoka Gordon, as played by Kay Aldridge, is no typical movie heroine. She's beautiful, athletic, and resourceful, enough so that in the first chapter, she rides down Arab horsemen. She's perfectly capable of fighting, climbing, or diving her way out of trouble, a kind of 1940s American precursor to Emma Peel. Additionally, Lorna Gray's Vultura was, if anything, even more beautiful, and they make an enchanting pair of antagonists, especially when they mix it up physically. Both put 100 percent effort into their work here, assisted by one of the best directors and some of the best stuntmen in the business. Clayton Moore looked, if anything, better here than he did as the Lone Ranger at the other end of the decade and he made a dashing hero in his own right. Watch him in action here and see if he doesn't look like he would've been the perfect Bruce Wayne/Batman of his era. Even Emil Van Horn, in the silliest role in the movie -- as the gorilla Satan -- has a kind of visceral impact as this constantly menacing beast. Working from one of the best scripts that the studio ever devised for one of its serials, director William Witney and a crew of top stuntmen (including David Sharpe and a young Jay Silverheels), made this one of the most exciting serials ever to come out of Hollywood. More than that, the resulting chapterplay has an appeal that cuts

across the ages, as demonstrated by the debt owed to it by the Indiana Jones movies.

 

Another take on Nyoka and additional back ground info.

Perils of Nyoka aka Nyoka and the Tigermen

 

Republic, 15 Chapters, 1942. Starring Kay Aldridge, Clayton Moore, Billy Benedict, Lorna Gray, Charles Middleton, Tristram Coffin, Robert Strange, Forbes Murray, George Pembroke.

 

As Perils of Nyoka opens, Prof. Douglas Campbell (Forbes Murray) and his expedition arrive in the small North African town of Wadi Bartha; they are seeking an ancient treasure trove that contains–among other priceless artifacts–the Tablets of Hippocrates, on which are inscribed ”the only cure for cancer the world has ever known.” Campbell and his colleagues, including Dr. Larry Grayson (Clayton Moore), are principally interested in the Tablets’ value to humanity, but Count Benito Torrini (Tristram Coffin), the Italian colonial official attached to the expedition, has more mercenary ideas in mind and is conspiring with the devious Arab queen Vultura (Lorna Gray) to seize the treasure. After being joined by Nyoka Gordon (Kay Aldridge), the daughter of an archeologist who vanished years ago looking for the Tablets, the expedition sets out in search of the Tablets and Nyoka’s missing father, journeying into the hidden valley of the sun-worshipping Tuareg tribe while fighting Vultura and her ally Cassib (Charles Middleton) every step of the way.

Well-written, well-directed, and well-cast, Perils of Nyoka represents Republic serial-making at its absolute peak. Writers Ronald Davidson, Norman Hall, William Lively, Joseph O’Donnell, and Joseph Poland utilize a “quest” structure for their screenplay, one which keeps the characters on the move from one location to the next. The heroes must first translate an important papyrus before beginning their journey to the Tuaregs’ valley, where, upon arrival, they have to deal with the hostile natives and their chief–Nyoka’s amnesic father Professor Gordon (Robert Strange). Then, they must rescue Gordon from Vultura and restore his memory, unmask Torrini’s treachery, return to the Tuaregs’ valley for another important clue, locate the treasure, and recover it in a final showdown after it’s stolen by Vultura. This storyline not only provides plenty of opportunities for action scenes, but also gives the serial a strong sense of steadily focused progression towards a definite goal, making its overall narrative much more interesting than the loosely connected plots of many other Republic serials.

This well-paced narrative plays out in an impressive variety of indoor sets and outdoor locations–the honeycomb of tunnels in the Tuareg valley, Vultura’s mammoth palace and the cliffs nearby, numerous caverns, and various rocky hillsides. Of all Republic’s serials set in foreign realms, Nyoka manages to be the most successful in creating a believably exotic atmosphere; it helps that arid Californian locales like Iverson’s Movie Ranch and Corriganville can more convincingly double for the North African hills than they could for other African locales, like the sub-equatorial jungles or the Sahara desert.

  

The serial’s action scenes are handled with gusto by William Witney and his star stuntman David Sharpe. One of the many action highlights is Nyoka and Larry’s invasion of Vultura’s palace in Chapter One, which has Clayton Moore’s Larry (doubled by Sharpe) practically flying around the throne room in a combination swordfight/fistfight and eventually being attacked by Vultura’s pet gorilla Satan (Emil Van Horn), who pulls down several stone pillars on our hero and heroine. The pursuit of Nyoka by Cassib’s horsemen in Chapter Two is another memorable action sequence, as is her subsequent chariot escape from Vultura’s camp following a fight with the evil queen. There are far too many additional standout scenes for me to describe them all, but among them are the fight in the lava caves, Larry’s battle with hostile Tuaregs in their cavern temple, Nyoka trying to escape down a cliff on a rope while Satan tugs on the other end, the Tuaregs’ primitive hand-grenade attack on the expedition, and the final showdown in which Larry fights Cassib and his men while Nyoka grapples with Vultura.

  

The cliffhanger sequences are consistently imaginative and include one of the best-known chapter endings in the Republic canon, the sequence that has Kay Aldridge dangling over a Tuareg fire pit. Equally memorable chapter endings have Aldridge and Forbes Murray being forced towards a ceiling of spikes by an ascending floor, Aldridge about to be sliced in two by a lethal pendulum, and Aldridge being inexorably blown towards the edge of a cliff in an impressive wind tunnel.

  

Dave Sharpe not only doubles Clayton Moore, but also fills in for Kay Aldridge on all the really dangerous stunts. Stuntwoman Babe DeFreest doubles the heroine in other sequences, with Helen Thurston filling in for Lorna Gray; Tom Steele performs most of Charles Middleton’s stunts, while Ken Terrell, Duke Green, Duke Taylor, Henry Wills, Bud Wolfe, and Johnny Daheim make many contributions as well. Most of these stuntmen, of course, also do acting duty as various Arabs throughout the serial.

  

Perils of Nyoka’s action is complemented beautifully by Mort Glickman’s score, which is distinctive, memorable, and very well-suited to the setting, with a persistent but not overdone “Arabian” motif dominating both its fast-paced “action” theme and its slower opening-credits music.

The serial’s cast is filled with appealing performers, although its ostensible star, Kay Aldridge, is probably the weakest thespian in the group. Her line delivery is very energetic but awkward at times, and her face is frequently expressionless during dialogue scenes–although she does a fine job registering alarm in cliffhanger sequences. Still, Aldridge is so beautiful, and so likable despite her stiffness, that her presence really has no negative impact on the serial.

  

Clayton Moore contributes an enormous amount of energy to his part, continually taking the lead in both dialogue and action scenes. He delivers his lines with both seriousness and a certain swashbuckling enthusiasm, and rides and runs with an admirable athleticism that matches well with the dynamism of his double Dave Sharpe in the fight scenes. He, far more than Aldridge, comes off as the actual star of the serial.

Lorna Gray is haughty, viciously bad-tempered, and gleefully evil by turns, but never hammy or over-the-top. Her good looks contrast so startlingly with her convincingly appalling behavior that she commands attention when on-screen; her Vultura is probably the most memorable of all female serial heavies.

  

Charles Middleton has less time in the spotlight than in his 1930s serials, but his Cassib is still an intimidating figure, glowering grimly at Vultura’s enemies and infusing his Arabian-Nights-style dialogue with both menace (“If you let her escape, you will find death a pleasant relief from your punishment”) and dignity (“What brings you to this humble huddle of tents, Gracious One?”)

Billy Benedict, as the Campbell expedition’s driver and mechanic Red, provides low-key but amusing comic relief, stealing scenes with a single facial expression or a bit of incongruous slang. His scenes with his pet Capuchin monkey Jitters (played by “Professor”) are much more appealing than most such animal-sidekick interchanges; the monkey is not only cute but genuinely helpful to the good guys more than once, and Benedict seems to have a genuine rapport with the little creature.

  

One of the additional joys of Perils of Nyoka is the unusually large cast of interesting supporting characters; in sharp contrast to many Republic outings, Nyoka features meaty speaking parts for characters besides the hero, heroine, villain, action heavy, and sidekick. Robert Strange, as Nyoka’s amnesic father, has the most important supporting role and does an excellent job in both aspects of his part, dropping his grim, slow-talking, and crafty Tuareg-chieftain personality for a more kindly, upright, and brisk manner when his character’s memory is restored.

Forbes Murray is authoritative but genially avuncular as Campbell, the expedition head, and surprisingly gets in on quite a bit of action. George Pembroke, as a British expedition named Spencer, also takes part in many fights and shootouts, and provides some mild but entertaining comic relief through his verbal interchanges with Billy Benedict’s Red, in which the English scientist and the American mechanic confuse each other with their very different approaches to their common language.

  

Tristram Coffin, as the treacherous Torrini, is given high billing but has relatively little screen time; however, he handles his interactions with the unsuspecting heroes with the same slickness and smoothness he displayed in his similar part in Spy Smasher. Distinguished Herbert Rawlinson is killed off far too early as Major Reynolds, another expedition member, while the enjoyably hammy John Davidson has a much larger role as Lobar, the fanatical Tuareg sub-chief. Davidson rolls out each line in his inimitably resonant voice and manages to look positively pop-eyed with rage at times, particularly when defying the recovered Professor Gordon as the latter vainly tries to exercise his old authority over the Tuaregs.

Kenne Duncan has a good role as Nyoka’s tough and loyal follower Abou, while George Lewis is noticeably sinister in his small role as Cassib’s lieutenant Batan. George Renavent is enjoyably hammy in his few scenes as Vultura’s oily major-domo, Forrest Taylor pops up as a translator in Chapter Fourteen, John Bagni plays another one of Nyoka’s Bedouin friends, and John Bleifer has a brief but vivid turn as a villainous Arab street merchant in the first chapter. Jay Silverheels, star Clayton Moore’s eventual companion on the Lone Ranger show, is frequently credited as playing one of the Tuaregs, but I’ve never been able to spot him under the tribe’s burnouses and face-paint.

Ace the Wonder Dog, who also played Devil in Columbia’s The Phantom, adds a nice touch to the serial as Nyoka’s faithful dog Fang, going through some clever paces as he assists the heroine–particularly in Chapter One, when he tips over a basket, barks at two Arab guards, and then ducks inside the basket while the guards run past. Vultura’s gorilla Satan, played as an unruly and barely controllable beast by Emil Van Horn, also brings additional color to the proceedings; Van Horn’s rowdy anthropoid antics are great fun to watch.

  

Just as William Witney’s Spy Smasher–made the same year–represented the acme of Republic’s crime-fighting serials, so does Witney’s Perils of Nyoka represent the acme of Republic’s far-flung adventure serials. Later chapterplays like Secret Service in Darkest Africa or The Tiger Woman would try to recapture some of Perils of Nyoka’s glory, but few of them could match Nyoka’s large and interesting cast of players or its varied assortment of action scenes–and none of them boasted a story that could compete with the appeal of Nyoka‘s archetypal but enthralling treasure hunt.

Nine Stones Close is the remains of a 45ft diameter unbanked stone circle that most probably dates back to the Bronze Age. It is located approximately 5 miles north-west of the Derbyshire town of Matlock (“oak tree where meetings are held”), where it stands in a farmer’s field on Harthill ("Deer Hill") Moor, adjacent to the narrow road that runs between Alport (“old town”) and Elton (“farmstead where eels are got”). The circle is overtopped by an imposing rock outcrop known as Robin Hood’s Stride, which rises up from the moor a short distance away to the south-west. The outcrop may be the reason why the circle was constructed here. It is capped by two large stone pillars and when these were viewed from the centre of the circle during the Bronze Age, the moon would have been seen to set between them at midsummer.

 

Opinion is divided regarding the number of stones that originally constituted the circle, but there may once have been as many as eleven. The site was excavated in 1847 by Thomas Bateman who uncovered some imperfectly fired pottery sherds and a worked flint and he recorded that there were seven stones still standing back then. The four stones that remain today are the tallest in Derbyshire and range in height from 4ft to 7ft. Prior to its re-erection in 1936, the 7ft stone measured 11ft 6" long. Both it and its northern partner are now set in concrete. One of the missing stones now stands embedded within a nearby dry stone wall. It was apparently removed to serve as a gate post but the gate has subsequently been walled up.

 

Nine Stones Close stone circle is sometimes also referred to as “The Grey Ladies”. The name is based on a local tradition that the stones are transformed to dancing women at midnight. Others, however, claim that the transformation occurred the other way around and that the unfortunate ladies were transformed into the stones as they danced here at some late hour. Dancing and transformation are two myths commonly associated with prehistoric stone circles and just a mile away to the east on Stanton (“Farmstead on stony ground”) Moor there is another circle called Nine Ladies stone circle (www.flickr.com/photos/67668518@N08/11344032074/in/photost...) which is associated with a similar creation myth. In addition to all the dancing shenanigans Nine Stones Close stone circle is also said to be a place where the fairies sometimes meet and local folklore relates how fairy music has been heard and hundreds of mystical shapes have been seen dancing around the stones. A tale from the 19th century even tells of a farm labourer who found a clay pipe at the stones and when he smoked it he was able to peer through the surface of the earth near one of the stones and see a subterranean land inhabited by fairy folk.

 

The picture was taken looking northwards across Nine Stones Close stone circle. The four insets show each of the stones in slightly more detail, starting from the left southern stone and working around the circle in an anti-clockwise direction.

 

Taken on the Isle of May

The Razorbill, Alca torda is the only living member of the genus Alca (member of the auk family).These birds forage for food by swimming underwater. They can stay underwater for about one minute before surfacing. Razorbills catch their prey and eat them underwater. They mainly eat fish, like sandeels, herring and capelin, also some crustaceans and marine worms.

 

They lay their eggs on bare rock or ground.Each partner will forage, then come home to take over with caring for the egg or young. When feeding their young, they will hold several fish in their bill and fly back to the nesting cliff. They may well fly more than 100 km out to sea to feed when during egg incubation, but when feeding young, they forage closer to the nesting grounds, some dozen kilometers away, and often in shallower water.

 

Though the Razorbill's average lifespan is roughly 13 years, a bird ringed in the UK in 1967 has survived for at least 41 years—a record for the species. (Wikipedia)

Larry Talbot, guest writer on this flickr site, has given me permission to use some of the images I've taken of him.

 

Here he is, kicking back in his palatial open air living room. He has a mansion now, tucked away in a sheltered spot somewhere on cliffs overlooking the Black Sea. I have never asked him where he made his fortune, although I have heard rumors it involved Crazy Glue, chickens and vast quantities of mattress ticking. (Frankly, I'm not sure I want to know any of the details.) Anyway, Larry tells me that in this image the breezes were blowing and the guitars were rocking as he listened through his prized Bose earphones.

 

"My manservant, Olaf took it," Larry told me. "I was listening to ZZ Top's Tush."

 

Then he told me "This is EXACTLY what my face looks like."

 

I told him "Well...yeah, Larry. it's a PHOTOGRAPH of your face."

 

He just shook his head like he'd known all along I would never, indeed could never, understand. "No...no...no...Mr. Dorky Von Dweebermeister. This is a depiction of what good music feels like as it washes over the male spirit. The processing: the selective blur, the blend of drawing and photograph...the intensity on the face! It's all part and parcel of the same FEELING."

 

Larry illustrated his words by waving quivering fingers in a dramatic fashion a few inches away from his body, like there was a life sized vertical harp there. Since he was wearing a voluminous crimson robe at the time, it looked a little silly to me. Larry paused to take a sip of a deep red liquid from an exquisitely crafted goblet before settling back into his chair with a satisfied sigh.

 

I was still smarting over that 'Mr. Dorky Von Dweebermeister' shot, so I fixed him with my very blankest stare. (Larry hates the whole passive aggressive trip...which is why I do it. Grant me the small pleasures, will you?)

 

But Larry just rolled his eyes and passed me a disc with this mini-essay on it. He told me he wrote this opus some years ago, as you can tell by the historical reference to Dancing With The Stars.

 

Today's stupid Helium topic is...

 

WHY MEN SECRETLY LOVE TO DANCE

 

by L. Talbot

 

Nothing stirs a male soul (okay...THIS male soul) like a great guitar riff or a smoking drum solo. As long it's just you and me here and you PROMISE not to tell anyone...let me tell you a secret. Men LOVE to dance...as long as we're alone and better than 50% convinced there are no security cameras watching and/or recording us.

 

But when we're in public it's a different proposition altogether.

 

Yikes!

 

In public people can SEE us.

 

While on the inside we may feel like John O'Hurley on Dancing With The Stars we’re convinced we look more like Jerry Lewis. We are watching our dance partner carefully in case she is either embarrassed or trying to contain gales of laughter.

 

Every guy remembers being twelve…

 

(This is where I need you, dear reader, to envision pages of a calendar spinning and ripping off in a "time tunnel" wind while violins play an ethereal tune to show that we are going back...back in time.) Are you with me?

 

Okay.

 

I am standing beside all the other 12 year old guys, dutifully supporting my portion of the gym wall, looking at the girls on the other side of the gym who are doing much the same thing.

 

A few of the popular kids are dancing along with a handful of brave souls who just don't care what anyone thinks. I am standing there beside Brad Dennison and Dean Thorpe (who my friends and I call Dean "Throw-Up" cause some gags just never get old). My eyes are fixed on Jennifer Patterson.

 

There's an angelic light shining on her from above. It highlights her golden hair, her soft blue eyes and those two coma shaped dimples that appear only when she smiles.

 

Jennifer Patterson sits two seats in front of me in Mrs. Hall's third period math class and well - Jennifer Patterson just smells SO good.

 

"Go on," Brad dares me. "Ask her."

 

I have confided the secret ache in my heart to both Brad and Dean Throw-Up against my better judgment.

 

"Yeah," urges Dean. "She's just, like, standing there."

 

My heart starts to pound and my vision blurs. My cheeks are burning and I begin desperately hoping they can't see it.

 

Brad gives me a little push and what amounts to an encouraging nod.

 

I step backward, grasping desperately for my safe patch of wall, which Dean Throw-Up moves quickly to occupy.

 

I shoot him a venomous look. What are they doing to me?

 

Brad shoves me again and hisses "GO!"

 

My feet are carrying me across the gym and I can feel hundreds of eyes burning into my back as the guys note one of their own breaking away from the herd. I can only see the girls on the other side of the gym looking at me with the beginnings of smiles forming in their eyes.

 

I am considering planes crashing into the ground trailing black smoke. I am thinking about car crashes complete and public humiliation. The end of my life. I can hear the blood pounding in my ears and my knees are a little weaker than I'd like.

 

I briefly consider walking right by Jennifer and continuing on to the bathroom, where I will very likely throw up.

 

But a madness seizes me.

 

Suddenly I am standing in front of Jennifer with a bowling ball in my throat.

 

The DJ starts to play "Albert Flasher" by the Guess Who.

 

My lips move wordlessly.

 

Jennifer Patterson cocks an eyebrow.

 

All of her friends are looking at me. I can feel my friends looking at me.

 

I croak...something.

 

I put out my hand and Jennifer takes it and we go out to the dance floor together. (God bless Jennifer.)

 

Every man's life has a Jennifer Patterson in it somewhere.

 

We dance secretly because we suspect that if we did it in public we'd be accused of having standing seizures. We are 79.44567% certain that there are hundreds of critical eyes fixed on us. We fear looking stupid in front of the women and dread giving ridicule ammo to our fellow men.

 

Does that mean that we won't do the happy Snoopy dance when Golden Earring's Radar Love comes on and we're CERTAIN we are alone? Of course not. We will. It’s just like that ‘tree falling in the forest when there’s no one there to see it.’ You’ll never know for sure because you'll never be there when it happens. Not ever.

 

We're also likely to throw in a little air guitar and even a few air drums to demonstrate to our own souls that we do indeed, have the music in us, and no – we’re not as old as that little snot bag packer at the grocery store seems to think we are.

 

So yeah. We dance. Sometimes we do it in the shower…sometimes we do in in the office…sometimes we do it in our minds.

 

Now you know.

 

Just don’t tell anyone. Or I WILL find you.

 

Ha.

Ha.

  

Ha.

The Abandoned Pennhurst Asylum

May 25th, 2014

 

Some info on this historic location:

 

“Pennhurst is the scariest place I have ever seen. Period. I have traveled all over the country visiting haunted places and attractions and nothing compares to this incredible, dilapidated campus. Last October, I was approached by the owners of Pennhurst Associates, and asked if I would like to be a partner in their haunted attraction. At first I was skeptical because everyone thinks this industry is easy, with a “get rich quick” attitude, and we all know how much work is involved and how hard it is to be successful. I was really skeptical…until I visited Pennhurst. The day I drove into this huge complex of brick structures, I was hooked. I knew this place had the potential to be the greatest haunted attraction ever. With a ton of money, corporate sponsors, the right build crew, and a great plan, Pennhurst Asylum could come to life and entertain the hard core haunters. Not only does this place have an incredible ambiance, a built in cult following, and a treasure trove of unique props, it has a history; a history riddled with accusations of torture, abuse and neglect. A history of mental patients chained to the walls in dark tunnels, children left for years in cribs, sexual abuse by the staff and even murder. All this happened behind the walls of Pennhurst State School, Spring City, Pennsylvania.

 

Pennhurst was constructed and opened in 1908 as a state school for the mentally and physically disabled. Pennhurst's property was vast, covering 120 acres. Created to house over 10,000 patients at a point in time, Pennhurst was one of the largest institutions of its kind in Pennsylvania. Half of Pennhurst's residents were committed by court order and the other half were brought by a parent or other guardian. It was devoted strictly to the care, treatment and education of the disabled. Originally named Pennhurst Home for the Feeble Minded and Epileptic, it finally was just called Pennhurst State School. Pennhurst employed a large number of staff to help assist in maintaining the facility. This staff included a board of trustees, medical staff, dental staff, and specialists in psychology, social services, accounting, and various fields of education. The grounds of Pennhurst included a 300-bed hospital, which had a full nursing staff and two surgeons on call at all times. Others at Pennhurst included members of the clergy and farming experts who grew most of Pennhurst's food . Pennhurst was an essentially self-sufficient community, its 1,400-acre site containing a firehouse, general store, barber shop, movie theatre, auditorium and even a greenhouse. The buildings of Pennhurst were named after towns in Pennsylvania such as Chester and Devon. The original buildings were designed by architect Phillip H. Johnson. All of Pennhurst's electricity was generated by an on-site power plant. A cemetery lay on the property, as well as baseball and recreational fields for the residents. Many of Pennhurst's buildings were strictly for storage; however, the majority were dormitory and hospital-style living quarters for the residents. Many of the buildings had security screens that were accessed on the inside, to prevent patients from escaping, or jumping to their deaths. Most of the stairwells had security fences to keep patients from jumping over the railings. Many of the buildings are linked by an underground tunnel system designed for transportation of handicapped patients to and from the dormitory, recreational buildings and dietary.

 

Pennhurst was often accused of dehuminazitation and was said to have provided no help to the mentally challenged. The institution had a long history of staff difficulties and negative public image, for example, a 1968 report by NBC called "Suffer the Little Children". Pennhurst State School was closed in 1986 following several allegations of abuse. These allegations led to the first lawsuit of its kind in the United States, Pennhurst State School and Hospital vs. Halderman, which asserted that the mentally retarded have a constitutional right to living quarters and an education. Terry Lee Halderman had been a resident of the school, and upon release she filed suit in the district court on behalf of herself and all other residents of Pennhurst. The complaint alleged that conditions at Pennhurst were unsanitary, inhumane and dangerous, that these living conditions violated the fourteenth amendment, and that Pennhurst used cruel and unusual punishment in violation of the eighth and fourteenth amendments. After a 32-day trial and an immense investigation, prosecutors concluded that the conditions at Pennhurst were not only dangerous, with physical and mental abuse of its patients, but also inadequate for the care and habilitation for the mentally retarded. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania also concluded that the physical, mental, and intellectual skills of most patients had deteriorated while in Pennhurst.

 

In 1986, Pennhurst was ordered closed, and began a program of de-institutionalism that lasted several years. Once the buildings were closed, they began to rapidly deteriorate from lack of heating, moisture invasion and vandalism. Thousands of people began to illegally tour the property spray painting everything in sight and breaking all the glass in the place. Theft was rampant and the destruction of the property was in full swing. Patients were thrown out and a large homeless contingent developed in the area.

 

Pennhurst fell into complete ruin as the complex was shut down. Buildings were abandoned as they were, with patient’s clothes and belonging strewn about. Furniture, cabinets and medical equipment were left to decay as if someone had just got up and walked out the front door. This is the place that will eventually resurrect into one of the most studied properties in the ghost hunter media, and will become an amazing haunted attraction.

 

As I research the history of this place, I begin to realize the potential of Pennhurst as an intriguing location for a haunted attraction. This place is really haunted. Several reputable Ghost Hunter groups have documented audible recordings, temperature changes, and unexplained movement of objects in the buildings of Pennhurst. This is the kind of environment I want to build the next generation of haunted house; a proven haunted location.

 

My team, headed by John Brady, Shawn Sieger, Jim Souflous, Todd Beringer, Rob Sieger and others search the complex for valuable props. We wander deep into the tunnels that stitch the complex. We move into the basements of maintenance buildings, storage areas, dormitories and dietary in search of unique items that will set this haunt apart from all other. We find a huge electro-mechanical device that has to be the control for the electrotherapy department. It is so old that it used electrical tube circuits developed in the 30’s. Insulators and other unrecognizable devices are strewn about the room. This is a huge find. As we cruise through the old abandoned hospital, we harvest giant 48” surgical lights that are suspended from the rotting ceilings. They are mounted on tracks that allow the lights to be moved to focus on the unsuspecting patients. These will be perfect in the rooms for our haunt. We find medical cabinets, drawers, storage lockers, operating tables are everywhere. This is a veritable treasure trove of props for our attraction. As we move through the dark corridors, with flashlights moving side to side, I can’t keep the feelings of growing anticipation from my mind. I know there is something out there but can’t put my finger on it. I come around the corner and enter a small room to the right, and there it is; the morgue. I recognize it because it has two drawer slides and a refrigeration unit on top. This is what we came here to find. This will be one of the most unique features of our attraction; a real morgue scene. Stainless steel tables with large drains, stainless steel cabinets, lab equipment and a real, 1930’s autopsy table! I am blown away by this scene. I can picture the thousands of customers coming through our attraction knowing that everything in here is REAL. My arms have gooseflesh!

 

Back at the Administration building, construction is moving forward. All the asbestos has been abated, the floors have been repaired, roof repaired, windows replaced, and structural inspections have been completed. The building is safe for use as an amusement building. Now the hard work of turning this into one of the most complex haunted houses is under way. A full electrical upgrade needs to be completed. Smart lighting, imbedded audio systems and fiber optical controls will be installed. Pneumatic infrastructure will be run throughout the building so props can be installed in any room. A lot of work must be completed in a few short months in preparation for the 2010 season.

 

We want this attraction to be a full experience of Pennhurst, but we need to work the audience up slowly so they won’t chicken out right away. This place is so creepy, that we need to get the ticket sales completed before they see the complex. A state of the art POS system will be installed by Interactive Ticketing, and can handle the thousands of expected customers. This system will track every ticket sold, and with the aid of digital scanners that are integrated with the internet, and keep track of each customer. Once the customer has bought their ticket, they will be guided to the walkway that surrounds the complex. This walkway will act as a huge queue line to the main entrance of the haunt, but will take them on a tour around several other buildings before entering the Administration building. As the customers walk the 800’ long walkway, they will experience the vastness of Pennhurst. With over 10 buildings in view, most in bad condition, they will be able to witness the downfall of this once beautiful campus. The once beautiful courtyards are now overgrown and the children’s playground equipment lay rotting all around. As the people approach the Admin building, they will be diverted to the side and then around to the front and into the main entrance. A large stone portico greets the crowd as they are ushered into the attraction. A unique feature of Pennhurst will be the museum. Many local residents have a strong feeling that the memories of the atrocities that occurred here should be preserved in some way so that they will not re-occur in the future. With this in mind, we felt that the construction of a Pennhurst Museum was in order. We have reconstructed four rooms on the first floor that will act as an indoor queue line and, at the same time, teach the public about the history of this magnificent place. With high tech videos, historical photos and artifacts from the past, the customers will be able to go back in time and witness the rise and fall of Pennhurst, as it happened. As they move slowly through the museum, they will notice that the rooms are beginning to decay. By the time they enter the great corridor the building has fallen into disrepair. This is when they will enter the scariest haunted house imaginable.

 

With an asylum theme in mind, and real, antique hospital equipment on hand, we began to build our attraction. We painted the entire interior with a special barrier sealant that encapsulates any lead paint and is also 100% flameproof. Rotted flooring has been replaced, and roof leaks have been plugged. We install MDF board as a wainscote and paint it to look like the marble that was part of the original building, but stolen long ago. We want an old time feeling to envelope the customers; a feeling of going back in time. The first room you enter is the intake office, complete with a psychiatrist giving you the Rorschach test, otherwise known as the ink blot test. As the Dr. engages the crowd, slides flip by on a large screen. After the intake, you enter the de-lousing showers, where shower heads spew out a combination of fog, air and CO2, giving it a cold feel. Other rooms include the dietary unit with copious use of existing cafeteria items like tray holders, rolling carts, plastic ware, cups, plates, tables and ovens. Pneumatic and actor scares abound in this haunt as there are a large number of great setups and hiding spots throughout the building. Moving upstairs, we have a large room with the ceiling removed. It shows the expansive architecture of the building, and the roofline looms over 35’ above your head. The focus in this room is the old, female actor in the corner, who is sitting in a vintage wheelchair. She is spot lighted with down lighting that also shows beds, furniture and other belongings. As she distracts the crowd, a switch is flipped and flood lights reveal the height of the ceiling, filled with another animatronic surprise.

 

Another part of the building is an area that has suffered a moderate fire. Door frames and headers are charred, and the smell of burnt wood is still perceptible. The area that was burned housed two sound proof cells; small rooms where patients could be locked away and their screams could be totally muffled. The floors, walls and ceilings are 6” thick with heavy insulation stuffed between the studs. The interiors are lined with sound proof tiles, and the exterior is sheathed in another layer of sound proofing. Even the doors are 8” thick and insulated. As you walk into these rooms, you can feel the air get heavy, the sounds deaden and you can imagine how the patients felt being locked up in the pitch dark with no one hearing your screams.

 

As you can imagine, the really cool rooms are left for last. With tons of great, original props, we build out sets that appear to be real operating rooms. One room is set up to be themed as a lobotomy operating room. Steel tables, medical cabinets and surgical equipment are everywhere. Actors bring off the scare and make this scene believable. The next room is our autopsy chamber. This room is decorated with the original equipment we found in the old hospital. The cabinets mounted to the walls are stainless steel, and look brand new, even after 50 or more years. The large sink structure, with an industrial size in-sinkerator, and long overflow drain, is up against the far wall. On the right is the original two drawer morgue unit, moved here from the hospital basement, and restored to its original form. The drawers roll out as easily as they did when first installed, and the refrigeration unit above the drawers adds to the realism of the scene. To top it off, an antique autopsy table stands in the center of the room. I bought the table at a funeral home auction 15 years ago and it has now found a new home. Overhead is a huge surgical style lamp, measuring over 40” across, and fitted with a friction gear that allows one to direct the light in any direction.

 

Another great room design we are using is the shock therapy room. This room has tile walls and floor, large overhead lights (harvested from the depths of building c) and the original electroconvulsive shock therapy machine retrieved from the hospital. Most modern ECT machines deliver a brief-pulse current, which is thought to cause fewer cognitive effects than the sine-wave currents which were originally used in ECT. Our machine is of the sine wave type, and caused unconsciousness and convulsions for 15 to 30 seconds. It is a large stainless steel console with dials and meters, and long electrode leads still attached. Our shock table is hinged in the center, and can tilt down for easy loading and unloading of the patient. The table has a latch where the actor can drop the foot of the table and attack the audience. This coupled with bang sticks, strobe lights, fog machines and a blistering 400 watt soundtrack make this one of the premier rooms at Pennhurst. In all, Pennhurst Asylum will have 18 complete rooms, not including the 4 room used in the museum. All of these rooms are highly detailed to be realistic in every way.

 

We have really strived to mix fact with fiction, folklore with fear, to come up with some of our unique room designs. There have been accounts of an old dentist chair that was located in the deep recesses of Mayflower, one of the more notorious dorms at Pennhurst. This chair is a little different than the ones you and I are used too; it has restraining straps attached to the arms, legs and headrest. This chair was reportedly used to remove the teeth of patients that were prone to biting the staff here. Imagine yourself being strapped into this device and having all your teeth ripped out without any kind of medication. This is just one more example of how unique this location is.

 

The most intriguing part of Pennhurst is their tunnel complex. All of the buildings on the campus are connected by above ground walkways with tunnels under them. These tunnels are 10 feet high, 8 feet wide and thousands of feet long. Concrete floors, tile walls and concrete ceilings create an incredible echo effect at certain intersections. In fact, I have looked behind myself several times to see if there is someone following me a few feet back. The echoes are so distinct you can hear whispers from hundreds of feet away.

 

As the guests are scared out of the last room in the Asylum, they find themselves in a large foyer with paintings and photographs on the walls. This is the queue line for the tunnels. Once through the lines, the guests are ushered down a long set of stairs and into the basement. Once there, with a temperature drop of at least 20 degrees, they are let through the double doors that lead to the exit…900 feet away. Scenes and actors appear at intersections along the way. Glass jars with cages around them contain the only lighting down here, and they are all connected to commercial lighting controls that are programmed to flicker, dim and occasionally go completely dark. We also added several subsonic bass tubes that cannot be heard, only felt. This will induce an uneasy feeling in all who enter the tunnels. Special chicken exits have been designed into the tunnel system and I’m sure will be used many times. This will be the scariest part of this attraction. The best part of the tunnel system is that it will contain our guests on their way back to the main entrance. People coming into the show along the walkways above will hear the screams emanating from the tunnels below them. They will hear the reactions to our show before they even enter the walkways leading to our haunt. What better way to elevate the anticipation and fear level than to hear, first hand, how scary this place is. If this place is scary to seasoned haunters, imagine how the general public will feel.

 

Another unique feature of Pennhurst is that it is really haunted. Featured on the Travel Channel, the Ghost Adventures crew have recorded many strange voices, noises and unexplained movement and documented this in their shows. The Pennhurst Ghost Tours, open to professional and amateur ghost hunters, has been a huge success, with recordings, photos and accounts of physical contact throughout the Pennhurst complex. So, if you want to get scared, come to Pennhurst Asylum. You may even witness the supernatural… whether you want to or not.”

 

SOURCE: www.pennhurstasylum.com/index2.html#/history

 

• JIMMY THACKERY •

www.goear.com/listen/afe6966/empty-arms-hotel-jimmy-thackery

 

• Jimmy Thackery (born May 19, 1953, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) is an American blues singer and guitarist. He's one of the few blues guitarists who learned first hand from the masters of the blues, not off a blues record or DVD. Though most associate Jimmy with his 15 years as the co-founder of the Nighthawks, he ended his time with them in 1987. Since then, Jimmy has been on the road as a solo musician for 15 years doing nearly 300 shows a year proving each night that he is still the guitar powerhouse in the blues.

 

• Thackery has lived the life of a true road warrior; he's absorbed the artistic lessons of life and filtered them into his guitar playing and song writing. To get where he is today, Jimmy has journeyed a highway of life filled with a series of twists and turns. He met all the right people and they have had a permanent influence on him.

It was Thackery's time on stage with Muddy Waters that is branded deep within his musical soul. "Muddy was one of those guys who was constantly encouraging. He never told you what to do, but he always told you what you were doing wrong. He never minced words about that.

 

• "The first time on stage with Muddy, I was in such awe of him that I just kept my eyes and ears open and just picked up on everything he did. It was the dynamics they had that became so ingrained in us. We heard it on the records and then stood on stage and saw how it worked."

 

• To make the best record possible, Jimmy hired some of the best musicians Nashville had to offer. It's no coincidence that many of these names also work with fellow blues rocker, Delbert McClinton. Jimmy notes that even though it has a Delbert feel, it still has all of his integrity. "Maybe because of the way it's laid out and the common musicians, it will strike a chord with fans who don't normally buy my records."

To support his newest project, Thackery's ready to do the road time. "I started thinking that I missed the days when I was just a full blown, kick ass trio. I thought it would be fun to go back to that. I did keep Mark Stutso, my drummer of 15 years. He knows what direction I'm going in before I do."

 

• Between constant road work with his own band, producing the latest record by his Arkansas friends, the Cate Brothers, recording Whiskey Store with Tab Benoit and touring in support and playing various Nighthawks reunions, Thackery's plate is overflowing, and that's exactly how Thackery likes life - Overflowing.

 

• Thackery spent fourteen years as part of The Nighthawks, the Washington, D.C. based blues and roots rock ensemble. After leaving the Nighthawks in 1986, Thackery toured under his own name.

 

• Born in Pittsburgh and raised in Washington, Thackery joined The Nighthawks in 1972 and went on to record over twenty albums with them. In 1986 he began touring with The Assassins, a six-piece original blues, rock and R&B ensemble which he had previously helped start as a vacation band when The Nighthawks took one of their rare breaks. Originally billed as Jimmy Thackery and The Assassins, the band toured the U.S. Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, South, and Texas regions. The Assassins released a variety of recordings on the Seymour record label, two on vinyl (No Previous Record and Partners in Crime) and the 1989 CD Cut Me Loose.

 

• In the wake of the Assassins 1991 break-up, Theckery has been leading a trio, Jimmy Thackery and the Drivers, whose early recordings were for the San Francisco, California based Blind Pig Records. In 2002 Thackery released, We Got It, his first album on Telarc and in 2006, In the Natural State with Earl and Ernie Cate on Rykodisc. In 2007, he released Solid Ice again with The Drivers.

 

Photo © by Artamia

 

• JIMMY THACKERY:

www.goear.com/listen/afe6966/empty-arms-hotel-jimmy-thackery

www.goear.com/listen/06c5361/xxx-wife-jimmy-thackery

www.goear.com/listen/7c31b48/crazy-bout-a-saxophone-jimmy...

www.goear.com/search.php?q=Jimmy+Thackery

 

"It was an old 45 record that had the Beatles song “someting". I used to listen to it all the time when I was little and thinking about grown up things. I would go to my bedroom window and stare at my reflection in the glass and the trees behind it and just listen to the song for hours, I decided then that when I met someone I thought was as beautiful as the song, I should give it to that person, And I didn't mean beautiful on the outside. I meant beautiful in all ways."

- the perks of being a wallflower

  

this is from the first day i had my new(old) film camera.

 

i kind of really adore this.

 

2 more in comments.

 

hey, everyone on flickr. you all make me extremely happy, everyday. honestly. you all have too sweet of comments. you're all beautiful people and i love your streams. i don't know why i'm saying this. but i felt like i needed to let you all know.

  

one more thing. i am maybe possibly going to try to start up some sort of music webzine thing (is that even what it's called?). it will probably just be photographs of live shows, qwerky interviews, and maybe a small bit on 1 or 2 unknown bands, because i hate reading the same facts on upcoming tours/cds/whos in the studio/other junk BUT that's just me.

if you're interested in maybe partnering up with me on this, flickrmail me.

 

I got the chance to explore around the east coast a bit last month while attending Canon and Ron Howard's Project Imaginat10n premiere in New York. While I was in Boston for a day I had the pleasure of being able to meet up with Zev here of Fiddle Oak and his sister/partner in crime Aliza .

 

If you care to know about the rest of my adventures east coast with Flickr friends I recorded them over on the

YouTube vlog.

  

Facebook. Website. Tumblr. Twitter & Instagram @iambradical

Santa Elena Augusta

Flavia Julia Helena Augusta

 

Diocesan Shrine of Our Lady on Thorns (Aranzazu)

Municipality of San Mateo

Province of Rizal

Philippines

 

SantaCruzang Bayan 2008

May 25, 2008

    

About SAINT HELENA

 

Venerated in:

Roman Catholicism

Eastern Orthodoxy

Oriental Orthodoxy

Lutheran

Anglicanism

 

Canonized:

Her canonization precedes the practice of formal Canonization by the Pope or the relevant Orthodox and Lutheran churches.

 

Feast:

Roman Catholic: August 18

Lutheran: May 21

Orthodox: May 19

Coptic Orthodox: 9 Pashons

 

**Finding of the True Cross: May 03

  

Symbol: Cross

 

Derivatives: St. Helena of Constantinople, St. Helen, St. Eleanor

 

Patronage: archeologists, converts, difficult marriages, divorced people, empresses

 

Flavia Julia Helena Augusta, also known as Saint Helena, Saint Helen, Helena Augusta or Helena of Constantinople (ca. 250 – ca. 330) was consort of Constantius Chlorus, and the mother of Emperor Constantine I. She is traditionally credited with finding the relics of the True Cross.

 

Family Life: Helena's birthplace is not known with certainty. The sixth-century historian Procopius is the earliest authority for the statement that Helena was a native of Drepanum, in the province of Bithynia in Asia Minor. Her son Constantine renamed the city "Helenopolis" after her death in 328, giving rise to the belief that the city was her birthplace. Although he might have done so in honor of her birthplace, Constantine probably had other reasons for doing so. The Byzantinist Cyril Mango has argued that Helenopolis was refounded to strengthen the communication network around his new capital in Constantinople, and was renamed to honor Helena, not to mark her birthplace. There is another Helenopolis, in Palestine, but its exact location is unknown. This city, and the province of Helenopontus in the Diocese of Pontus, were probably both named after Constantine's mother.

 

The bishop and historian Eusebius of Caesarea states that she was about 80 on her return from Palestine. Since that journey has been dated to 326–28, Helena was probably born in 248 or 250. Little is known of her early life. Fourth-century sources, following Eutropius' Breviarium, record that she came from a low background. Ambrose was the first to call her a stabularia, a term translated as "stable-maid" or "inn-keeper". He makes this fact a virtue, calling Helena a bona stabularia, a "good stable-maid". Other sources, especially those written after Constantine's proclamation as emperor, gloss over or ignore her background.

 

It is unknown where she first met her future partner Constantius. The historian Timothy Barnes has suggested that Constantius, while serving under Emperor Aurelian, could have met her while stationed in Asia Minor for the campaign against Zenobia. Barnes calls attention to an epitaph at Nicomedia of one of Aurelian's protectors, which could indicate the emperor's presence in the Bithynian region soon after 270. The precise legal nature of the relationship between Helena and Constantius is unknown: the sources are equivocal on the point, sometimes calling Helena Constantius' "wife", and sometimes calling her his "concubine". Jerome, perhaps confused by the vague terminology of his own sources, manages to do both. Some scholars, such as the historian Jan Drijvers, assert that Constantius and Helena were joined in a common-law marriage, a cohabitation recognized in fact but not in law. Others, like Timothy Barnes, assert that Constantius and Helena were joined in an official marriage, on the grounds that the sources claiming an official marriage are more reliable.

 

Helena gave birth to Constantine I in 272. In 293, Constantius was ordered by emperor Diocletian to divorce her in order to qualify as Caesar of the Western Roman Empire, and he was married to the step-daughter of Maximian, Theodora. Helena never remarried and lived in obscurity, though close to her only son, who had a deep regard and affection for her.

 

Constantine was proclaimed Augustus of the Roman Empire in 306 by Constantius' troops after the

latter had died, and following his elevation his mother was brought back to the public life and the imperial court, and received the title of Augusta in 325. Helena died in 330 with her son at her side. Her sarcophagus is on display in the Pio-Clementino Vatican Museum. During her life, she gave many presents to the poor, released prisoners and mingled with the ordinary worshippers in modest attire, exhibiting a true Christian spirit.

 

Sainthood: She is considered by the Orthodox and Catholic churches as a saint, famed for her piety. Her feast day as a saint of the Orthodox Christian Church is celebrated with her son on May 21, the Feast of the Holy Great Sovereigns Constantine and Helen, Equal to the Apostles. Her feast day in the Roman Catholic Church falls on August 18. Her feast day in the Coptic Orthodox Church is on 9 Pashons. Eusebius records the details of her pilgrimage to Palestine and other eastern provinces (though not her discovery of the True Cross). She is the patron saint of archaeologists. The names "Saint Eleanor" and "Saint Eleanora" are usually synonymous for Saint Helen.

 

Relic Discoveries: In 325, Helena was in charge of a journey to Jerusalem to gather Christian relics, by her son Emperor Constantine I, who had recently declared Rome as a Christian city. Jerusalem was still rebuilding from the destruction of Hadrian, a previous emperor, who had built a temple to Venus over the site of Jesus's tomb, near Calvary.

 

According to legend, Helena entered the temple with Bishop Macarius, ordered the temple torn down and chose a site to begin excavating, which led to the recovery of three different crosses. Refused to be swayed by anything but solid proof, a woman from Jerusalem, who was already at the point of death from a certain disease, was brought; when the woman touched a cross suddenly recovered and Helena declared the cross with which the woman had been touched to be the True Cross. On the site of discovery, she built the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, while she continued building churches on every Holy site.

 

She also found the nails of the crucifixion. To use their miraculous power to aid her son, Helena allegedly had one placed in Constantine's helmet, and another in the bridle of his horse. Helena left Jerusalem and the eastern provinces in 327 to return to Rome, bringing with her large parts of the True Cross and other relics, which were then stored in her palace's private chapel, where they can be still seen today. Her palace was later converted into the Santa Croce in Gerusalemme.

 

The reliquary of Jerusalem was committed to the care of Saint Macarius and kept with singular care and respect in the magnificent church which Saint Helen and her son built there. Saint Paulinus relates that, though chips were almost daily cut off from it and given to devout persons, yet the sacred wood suffered thereby no diminution. It is affirmed by Saint Cyril of Jerusalem, twenty-five years after the discovery, that pieces of the cross were spread all over the earth; he compares this wonder to the miraculous feeding of five thousand men, as recorded in the Gospel. The discovery of the cross would have happened in the spring, after navigation began on the Mediterranean Sea, for Saint Helen went the same year to Constantinople and from there to Rome, where she died in the arms of her son on the 18th of August of the same year, 326.

   

Reference:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helena_of_Constantinople

magnificat.ca/cal/engl/05-03.htm

 

Sony Center (Berlin, Germany).

 

Shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Sony began planning a large development at Potsdamer Platz, in the historical center of Berlin, Germany. In recognition of a shifting geography within Europe, Sony decided to establish its European headquarters at this location. In 1994, Tishman Speyer was selected by Sony from several international groups to be its developer and partner on this landmark project. Based on its global reputation and track record in Germany, Tishman Speyer was asked by Sony to undertake a re-evaluation of the project from the ground up, its concept, design, and cost. Designed by architect Helmut Jahn, the Sony Center is an elegant and modern vision of glass, stainless steel, and natural stone. Tishman Speyer analyzed the Sony plan and reconfigured the buildings as well as their uses to create a variety of space types that would be appropriate for the evolving Berlin market. The result is a program

that includes eight different buildings with separate identities and varied sizes which house a mix of cinema, retail, dining, office, residential and cultural uses. In the center is a dramatic roofed space, the "Forum," which serves as a public space and entertainment complex. In addition, Tishman Speyer was responsible for coordinating the project's tie-ins to area infrastructure projects, which include two tunnels constructed for rail, subway and automobile traffic. The residential component at Sony Center is comprised of 60 rental units and 134 Condominium apartments. The rental units range from 409 square feet to 1,610 square feet and include Poggenpohl kitchens, below floor heating and dramatic views of the Sony Forum and the City. The 134 condominium units are constructed above the former historic Esplanade Hotel, which was restored as part of the overall development. Several of the hotel’s landmarked rooms were integrated in the complex and its entry was redesigned to create an exciting lobby to serve the apartments. Built to the highest standards of luxury and design, the units range from 665 square feet to 2,520 square feet. The complex incorporates a fully integrated living environment based on modern technologies and advancements in sustainable design. One of its most innovative and unique features is the Forum. This area’s environment is maintained through the majority of the year, solely on its embodiment with the surrounding buildings. This makes a usable space without the consumption of additional energy that an enclosed building would have required. Rain water is collected within the Forum and held in tanks below the largest office tower and used for toilet flushing. Additionally, the buildings share mechanical systems and incorporate a highly efficient façade allowing for the right sizing of equipment and lower first costs along with reduced energy consumption and operating costs. At construction completion the project achieved the highest rents in Berlin and was fully leased. The Sony Center is now a landmark destination visited by locals and tourists alike. The Urban Land Institute’s Awards program, which recognizes excellence in the full development process of a project, selected Sony Center to receive

the organization’s 2000 International Award for Large Scale Mixed Use. The Sony Center was selected for this award out of 27 worldwide finalists, once again highlighting Tishman Speyer’s innovative use of space and design.

  

Stoat - British Wildlife Centre, Surrey, England - Sunday August 17th 2008.

Click here to see the Larger image

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ~ The Ermine (Mustela erminea) is a small mammal of the family Mustelidae. It is also known as the stoat and the short-tailed weasel.

 

Natural history ~ The Ermine can be found almost everywhere throughout the northern temperate, subarctic and Arctic regions, of Europe, Asia, and North America. In an unsuccessful attempt to control the rabbit population, it was introduced into New Zealand. Ermines are largely nocturnal or crepuscular but will sometimes come out during the day.

 

Physical description ~ The Ermine is a member of the family Mustelidae, which also includes other weasels, mink, otters, ferret, badgers, polecats, the wolverine, martens, the tayra, the fisher and in some taxonomical classifications skunks. This is one of the most species-rich families in order Carnivora. The Ermine moves in a sinuous manner when pursuing its prey extremely quick over the ground considering its small size, and is also a strong swimmer that is able to colonize offshore islands. Although it inhabits northern latitudes, the Ermine is built long and thin, leading to an increased surface area-to-volume ratio and increased dissipation of heat from its body. The advantage of this shape is that it is one of the few species able to follow burrowing animals into their own homes. It partly compensates for this shape by having short legs, small ears, a fast metabolism and, in winter, thick fur. Ermines may grow up to 30 cm long, with males much larger than the females. In most areas it coexists with the weasel (Mustela nivalis, also known as the Least Weasel), the smallest member of order Carnivora. Where the weasel is absent the Ermine is smaller (~70 g).

 

The Ermine's coat is a rich medium brown with an off-white belly. In winter, the coat is thicker and in regions that experience an inch or more of snow for at least forty days of the year (such as in Armenia[1]), the color changes to clean white. This white fur is known as "ermine", a term originating either from the Latin phrase "Armenius mūs" ("Armenian rat") or from a word common to the Germanic and Baltic languages, hence the scientific name. At this stage, where the animal is known as a "stoat", it may be referred to as ermine, or as being "in ermine". The winter Ermine has been used in art as a symbol of purity or virginity. The white fur was highly prized, and used in the robes of the Lord Chief Justice of England. Both the animal and the heraldic tincture are symbols of Brittany. The furs would be sewn together making a pattern of black dots. A version of this pattern is used in heraldry as ermine tincture.

 

In all seasons the Ermine has a black tip to its tail. The black tip probably serves as a decoy to predators, which would include almost any carnivore large enough to eat a Ermine (e.g. wolves, foxes, wolverines, and some birds of prey). This kind of coat is very similar to the coat of the long-tailed weasel (Mustela frenata), a related animal of about the same size which also moults into white in the northern part of its range, and it is easy to confuse these kinds of weasels. The North American name for the Ermine, the "Short-tailed weasel" arose because its tail length distinguishes it from the long-tailed weasel. In general it is found farther north. Both species can be distinguished from the weasel because the weasel lacks a black tip on its tail.

 

Geographical range ~ The Ermine is native to the area between the 40th parallel (north) and the beginning of the Arctic Circle, which encompasses most of northern Eurasia and North America.

 

They have been introduced to New Zealand and Australia to control a rabbit overpopulation but found an alternative source of food easier to catch thus leaving the rabbit problem unsolved. They were also brought to Terschelling Island to control water voles (Arvicola terrestris). Ermines can swim up to 1.5 kilometers across seawater and have already reached several New Zealand offshore islands unaided. Maud Island which is 900 meters offshore has been colonised multiple times in the past 20 years.

 

Diet ~ The Ermine is a carnivore. It eats insects, rabbits; rodents such as the mouse, vole and rat; other small mammals; birds and their eggs and young; and sometimes fish, reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates. It is a very skillful tree climber and can descend a trunk headfirst, like a squirrel. The Ermine is capable of killing animals much larger than itself. When it is able to obtain more meat than it can eat it will engage in "surplus killing" and often stores the extra food for later. When this is the case, it will often kill by breaking the prey's neck without marking the body, presumably so its cache does not spoil easily.

 

There are several recorded instances of Ermines 'transfixing' rabbits by exhibiting a tumbling routine akin to a dance. Rabbits appear hypnotised by this activity and fail to notice the Ermine approach within striking distance. Once close enough, the rabbit falls easy prey to the Ermine.

 

Like other mustelids it typically dispatches its prey by biting into the base of the skull to get at the centers of the brain responsible for such important biological functions as breathing. Sometimes it will also make preliminary bites to other areas of the body. In most areas in which Ermines and least weasels co-exist, the weasel generally takes smaller prey and the Ermine slightly larger prey. The larger male Ermines generally take larger prey than females. Commonly, the Ermine falls prey to animals such as the wolf, fox, cat or badger.

 

Reproduction ~ Young Mustela ermineaThe Ermine is territorial and intolerant of others in its range, especially others of the same sex. Within its range, it typically uses several dens, often taken from prey species. It usually travels alone, except when it is mating or is a mother with older offspring. It breeds once a year, producing several young kits (or kittens) per litter, and its mating system is promiscuous. Copulation occurs during the mating season with multiple partners and is often forced by the male, who does not help raise the offspring. Sometimes it occurs when the female is so young she has not even left the den. In spite of being such a small animal, the Ermine's gestation is among the longest reported for mammals (11 months) because of the adaptation of delayed implantation, or embryonic diapause, in which a fertilized egg is not implanted in the uterus until months later. The animal's "real" gestation is much shorter. This is presumably an adaptation to the highly seasonal environment in which the Ermine lives.

 

Senses and behavior ~ Communication (and also location of prey) occurs largely by scent, since the Ermine as typical of mammals has a sensitive olfactory system. As a result much of this communication is missed by human observers. However, Ermines are believed to identify females in estrus by scent, and also the sex, health and age of prey. Some kinds of rodents such as voles have counter-adapted by being able to shut down reproduction (which makes females slower and easier to catch) if they smell the odor of mustelids. The Ermine's visual resolution is lower than that of humans and color vision is poor, although night vision is superior. Like most other non-primate mammals they have dichromatic colour vision (they can distinguish long from short wavelengths of light, but cannot make distinctions of hue within those bands). Tactile information is conferred by the vibrissae, or whiskers. When alarmed, a Ermine can release a powerful musky smell from glands near its anus.

Obstructive sleep apnea may be the cause of your difficulties during sleep. Specific sleeping disorders can be difficult to identify and treat. Certain treatments and changes in lifestyle can, fortunately, reduce the impact of obstructive sleep apnea. Read this article to learn some basic information about recognizing and treating obstructive sleep apnea.

 

Quit smoking and drinking. These habits can cause airways to relax too much, which can worsen obstructive sleep apnea and snoring. Unlike having expensive surgical treatment or other surgical procedures, eliminating these harmful habits actually saves money for you.

 

Be sure to eat well and maintain a proper weight to help control your obstructive sleep apnea. Many people may be surprised how much a poor diet plays in the symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea. People who don't eat healthy food have the worst obstructive sleep apnea conditions.

 

Dealing with obstructive sleep apnea is normally something that is very serious. Talk with your doctor immediately if you see any of the warning symptoms. After diagnosis, you may be referred to a sleep specialist who may order a home study using a portable monitor. In this way, the specialist can assess your problem accurately.

 

If you aren't sleeping with a partner each night who can let you know of any irregularities in your sleeping patterns, it can be hard to know if you have this condition. One way to see is to set up a youtube video camera to record yourself as you sleep. The video should be equipped with sound so that doctors can also hear any noises that occur during your sleep.

 

Many doctors ask patients to keep sleep logs to help diagnose obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep logs are records where patients write down the length and excellence of their sleep. Ask others in your home to let you know if you snored, awakened without realizing it due to your snoring or if you moved a lot in your sleep. This will allow your doctor to see if you're suffering from obstructive sleep apnea.

 

Now, after looking at the above article, you are aware of many treatment methods to help with obstructive sleep apnea. Try them one at a time until you find one that works best for you. The use of your newfound knowledge is a great next step towards better rest. Obstructive sleep apnea doesn't have to run your life you can seize control back today. treatmentforsleepapnea.org/sleep-apnea-dangerous/

2 x Lynx HAS.3 Black Cats of 702 NAS RN

 

Westland Lynx

 

Jump to: navigation, search

AgustaWestland Lynx

Lynx HAS3 of the Black Cats (Royal Navy) display team

Type Helicopter

Manufacturer Westland/AgustaWestland

Maiden flight 21 March 1971

Introduced 1978

Status Active service

Primary users Army Air Corps (British Army)

Fleet Air Arm (Royal Navy)

 

French Navy

German Navy

Produced 1968-date

 

The Westland Lynx is a helicopter designed by Westland and built at Westland's factory in Yeovil, first flying on 21 March 1971 as the Westland WG.13. Originally intended as a utility craft for both civil and naval usage, military interest led to the development of the Army and Navy Lynx, which went into operational usage in 1977 and was later adopted by the armed forces of over a dozen nations. The helicopter is now produced and marketed by AgustaWestland.

 

Several aircraft were built under licence by French company Aerospatiale for French usage.

 

When piloted by Roy Moxam in 1972, it broke the world record over 15 and 25 km by flying at 321.74 km/h. It also set a new 100 km closed circuit record shortly afterwards, flying at 318.504 km/h. In 1986, a specially modified Westland Lynx piloted by John Egginton set an absolute speed record for helicopters over a 15 and 25 km course by reaching 400.87 km/h (249.09 mp/h). The Lynx is one of the most agile helicopters in the world, capable of performing backflips, among other things.

 

The British Army ordered 100 Lynx AH (Army Helicopter) Mk.1 for various roles, including tactical transport, armed escort, anti-tank warfare (with eight TOW missiles), reconnaissance and evacuation. The Army has fitted a Marconi Elliot AFCS system onto the Lynx for automatic stabilisation on three axis.

Contents

[hide]

 

* 1 Service history

* 2 Future Lynx

* 3 Versions

* 4 Users

* 5 Specifications (Super Lynx Series 100)

* 6 External links

* 7 Gallery

* 8 Related content

 

[edit]

 

Service history

 

In British service it equips the Army Air Corps (AAC) and the Fleet Air Arm (FAA). For the AAC the Lynx AH.7 and AH.9 operate as attack helicopters. The Lynx AH.7 is service with the FAA where it operates as an attack/utility helicopter in support of the Royal Marines, and the Lynx HMA.8 as anti-submarine warfare helicopter equipped with the Sea Skua anti-ship missile for Royal Navy warships.

 

The Lynx most prominent combat role was operating the Sea Skua, to devastating effect against the Iraqi Navy during the 1991 Gulf War. The Lynx also saw service with British Army forces during that conflict. It had already made its first combat operations in British service during the Falklands War in the 80s. None were shot down, but three were lost aboard vessels hit by Argentine bombs or Exocets, one on the MV Atlantic Conveyor and one each on board HMS Coventry and HMS Ardent.

 

It was used during Operation Barras to rescue 11 British soldiers in Sierra Leone on 10 September 2000.

 

The most recent wartime mission for the Lynx was during the invasion of Iraq in 2003. It has also seen extensive service during peacekeeping operations and exercises, and it is standard equipment for most Royal Navy surface combatants when they deploy.

 

A British Lynx from No. 847 Naval Air Squadron was shot down over Basra, Iraq on May 6, 2006. The helicopter is believed to have been downed by either a missile or more likely, a Rocket Propelled Grenade (RPG). The Lynx crashed into a house and burst into flames, killing all five on board, including the Commanding Officer of 847 NAS. Something of a riot occurred with locals celebrating the downing of the helicopter and surrounding the crash site as British troops rushed to the scene. This was the first British helicopter and only the second British aircraft downed (the first was an RAF Hercules) due to enemy fire in the war.

 

Despite being well liked by the services the Lynx does not have a good safety record. The aircraft has been grounded on a number of occations. For example in 2000 fatigue problems with the rotor head led to a Dutch aircraft crash and subsequent grounding. In early 2004 three Lynx crashed in a matter of weeks and again some aircraft were grounded. One of the reasons for the Future Lynx programme is to cure some of the known problems with the airframe and rotor systems.

[edit]

 

Future Lynx

 

On 22 June 2006 the UK Ministry of Defence awarded Westland a £1 billion contract for 70 Future Lynx helicopters under a strategic partnering agreement with AgustaWestland[1]. The programme will provide the British Army and Royal Navy with 40 and 30 aircraft respectively, with an option for a further 10, split equally between Army and Navy.

 

Future Lynx is described as a new aircraft that builds on the dynamic and vehicle systems of the existing design, incorporating advanced technology and providing increased capability. The fatigue problems with the exisiting airframe and rotor system are to be corrected. Future Lynx will utilise some systems developed for the Super Lynx 300 and will feature a redesigned nose and rear fuselage to give greater space and easier access to avionic units. Future Lynx will be powered by two LHTEC CTS800 engines, offering increased power and endurance over existing Lynx powerplants, while retaining economy.

 

The first Future Lynx is programmed to make its maiden flight in 2009, with initial deliveries in 2011. The Army variant will enter operational service in 2014, with the RN variant following in 2015.

[edit]

 

Versions

A Lynx of the Royal Malaysian Navy

Enlarge

A Lynx of the Royal Malaysian Navy

 

* Westland WG.13: prototype that first flew on 21 March 1971.

* Lynx AH.1: Initial production version for the Army Air Corps, with over 100 examples built. Used for a variety of tasks, including tactical transport, armed escort, anti-tank warfare (equipped with eight TOW missiles), reconnaissance and casualty evacuation.

* Lynx AH.1GT: Interim conversion of the AH.Mk 1 for the British Army.

* Lynx HAS.2: Initial production version for the Royal Navy and the French Aeronavale. When it is used in the anti-submarine role, it is equipped with two torpedoes or depth charges and a dipping sonar. For anti-surface warfare, it is equipped with either four Sea Skua missiles (Royal Navy) or four AS.12 missiles (Aeronavale).

o Lynx HAS.2(FN): French version of the HAS.Mk 2 for the Aeronavale.

* Lynx HAS.3

o HAS.3(S): Improved version of the HAS.Mk 3 for the Royal Navy fitted with secure radio systems.

o HAS.3(GM(S)): Nineteen modified helicopters for the Royal Navy, for service in the Persian Gulf (GM denotes Gulf Modification).

o HAS.3(ICE(S)) : Two helicopters for the Royal Navy for use in the Arctic.

o HT.3: Proposed training version for the RAF, not built.

* Lynx HAS.4(FN): Upgraded version for the Aeronavale.

* Lynx AH.5: Experimental version for the British Army. Only 4 were ever built.

* Lynx AH.6: Proposed version for the Royal Marines, not built.

* Lynx AH.7: Attack version for the Army Air Corps and Royal Marines.

* Lynx HMA.8 ("Super Lynx"): Upgraded maritime attack version.

o HMA.8DSP: Digital Signal Processor.

o HMA.8DAS: Defensive Aids Subsystem

* Lynx AH.9 ("Battlefield Lynx"): British Army version of the Super Lynx (AH.7 with wheeled undercarriage).

* Lynx Mk.21: Export version of the HAS.2 for the Brazilian navy. Brazilian navy designation 'SAH-11".

* Super Lynx Mk.21A: Export version of the Super Lynx for the Brazilian navy.

* Lynx Mk.22: Unbuilt export version for the Egyptian navy.

* Lynx Mk.23: Export version of the HAS.2 for the Argentine navy. Later sold to Brazil and Denmark.

* Lynx Mk.24: Unbuilt export version for the Iraqi army.

* Lynx Mk.25: Export version of the HAS.2 for the Royal Netherlands Navy, also designated "UH-14A" in Dutch service.

* Lynx Mk.26: Unbuilt export version for the Iraqi army.

* Lynx Mk.27: Export version for the Royal Netherlands Navy, also designated "SH-14B" in Dutch service.

* Lynx Mk.28: Export version of the AH.Mk 1 for the Qatar Police.

* Lynx Mk.64: Export version of the Super Lynx for the South African Air Force.

* Lynx Mk.80: Export version of the HAS.Mk 2 for the Royal Danish Navy.

* Lynx Mk.81: Export version for the Royal Netherlands Navy, designated "SH-14C" in Dutch service.

* SH-14D: Upgraded helicopters for the Royal Netherlands Navy.

* Lynx Mk.82: Unbuilt export version for the Egyptian army.

* Lynx Mk.83: Unbuilt export version for the Saudi Arabian army.

* Lynx Mk 84: Unbuilt export version for the Qatar army.

* Lynx Mk 85: Unbuilt export version for the United Arab Emirates army.

* Lynx Mk.86: Export version of the HAS Mk 2 for the Royal Norwegian Air Force.

* Lynx Mk.87: Embargoed export version of the Argentine navy.

* Lynx Mk.88: Export version for the German Navy.

* Super Lynx Mk.88A: Upgraded version of the Lynx Mk.88 for the German Navy.

* Lynx Mk.89: Export version for the Nigerian navy.

* Lynx Mk.90: Export version for the Royal Danish Navy.

* Super Lynx Mk.90B: Upgraded versions of the Lynx Mk.80 and Lynx Mk.90 for the Royal Danish Navy.

* Lynx Mk.95: Export version of the HAS.8 for the Portuguese Navy.

* Lynx Mk.99: Export version of the HAS.8 for the South Korean Navy.

* Super Lynx 300: Export version of the Super Lynx.

* Battlefield Lynx: Proposed export version.

* Battlefield 800: Proposed export version, the project was abandoned in 1992.

* Lynx ACH: Experimental version

 

Notes:

 

* AH: Attack Helicopter

* HAS: Helicopter, Anti-Submarine

* HMA: Helicopter, Maritime Attack

* (GM): Gulf Modification

* (S): Secure speech radio

 

[edit]

 

Users

 

* Argentine Navy

* Brazilian Navy

* British Army

* British Royal Navy

* Royal Danish Navy

* French Navy

* German Navy (Twelve ordered in 1981 for use on navy frigates.)

* South Korean Navy

* Royal Malaysian Navy

* Netherlands Royal Navy (Six search and rescue and 18 anti-submarine warfare models.)

* Nigerian Navy

* Norway (Six operated on behalf of the Coast Guard by 337 Skvadron of the The Air Force from the Nordkapp Class cutters.)

* Royal Air Force of Oman

* Portuguese Navy (Used on "Vasco da Gama class frigates".)

* South African Air Force (Four of the Super Lynx 300 version for use on the SAN's Valour class patrol corvettes.)

* Qatar State Police

* Pakistan Navy(Westland Lynx Anti-Ship/Anti-Submarine/Transport Helicopters )

 

[edit]

 

Specifications (Super Lynx Series 100)

 

Data from Flight International World Aircraft and Systems Directory (3rd ed.)

General characteristics

 

* Crew: 2 or 3

* Length: 15.24 m (50 ft)

* Rotor diameter: 12.80 m (42 ft)

* Height: 3.67 m (12 ft 0.5 in)

* Disc area: 1,385.4 m (128.71 sq ft)

* Empty weight: 3,291 kg (7,255 lb)

* Max takeoff weight: 5,330 kg (11,750 lb)

* Powerplant: 2× Rolls-Royce Gem, 835 kW (1,120 shp) each

 

Performance

 

* Cruise speed: 254 km/h (158 mph)

* Range: 528 km (328 miles [standard tanks])

 

Armament

 

* Naval: 2 x torpedoes or 4x Sea Skua missiles or 2 x depth charges.

* Attack: 8 x TOW ATGM

* General: GPMGs

 

Wikipedia

August Horch began his own car company A. Horch and Cei, in 1899. He left the company in 1909 due to managerial differences with board members. He returned to the auto industry in 1932 when four companies Audi, DKW, Horch and Wanderer merged into Auto Union, beginning the four rings which symbolized the individual partners and which Audi is presently known for. The 853 model cars were built during this last tenure.

 

Horch 853's and 853A's were built on straight 8's with 5 liters of displacement, yielding 100hp, the 853A had 120hp. Production numbers of Horch 853's and 853A's together total just under 1,000.

 

This Horch 853 appears to be the second only Horch ever to have been bodied by coachbuilder Volt and Rubrbeck. Volt and Rubrbeck was a German coachbuilder in business from 1920 until 1939. It bodied many of the best chassis from prestigious automobile firms such as Bugatti, Maybach, Mercedes Benz and Rolls Royce. The firm was destroyed during WWII from allied bombing raids and records were also lost.

Exhaustive efforts were made to restore this 853 to original standards, no part went un-researched as to authenticity or originality by the restoration team.

 

This was the "Best in Show Concours d'Elegance" winner in 2014 at Amelia Island.

www.facebook.com/Claude.Monet.MiaFeigelson.Gallery

"Poplars on the banks of the River Epte, evening effect" (1891)

By Claude Monet, from Paris (1840 - 1926)

- oil on canvas; 100 x 65 cm -

[Impressionism]

Place of creation: near Giverny, France [Giverny is located 75 km west from Paris]

Private Collection

"In the summer of 1891, Monet began to paint a row of poplar trees that lined the river Epte near his house at Giverny. The trees were auctioned off for timber shortly thereafter, but Monet made a deal with the purchaser to delay cutting them so that he could continue to paint the trees through the autumn. Using a shallow rowboat that had slots in the bottom capable of holding several canvases at once, Monet painted twenty-four pictures of the poplars from his floating studio. The resulting paintings reflect the view at different seasons and times of day and were known as the Poplar Series when they were exhibited in February 1892. Monet's efforts to record the scene were so exacting, one friend reported, that the artist sometimes had only seven minutes to work on a particular canvas before the sunlight shifted on the leaves.

When he learned that the poplars were in danger of destruction, he and a wood seller bought the trees, his partner agreeing to spare them until Monet had completed his work. Moving up and down the river, the artist chose certain groups of trees, capturing them and their shimmering reflections in the water under changing intensities of sunlight and shadow; this painting is one of several, full of the golden light of autumn, that focus on three poplars in the foreground and a great arc of trees curving away beyond. Monet's second great series exploring motifs in the French countryside--his "Grainstacks" had come a year before--some fifteen "Poplars" were first exhibited to rapturous acclaim at the Galerie Durand-Ruel in Paris in February 1892. Christopher Riopelle, from Philadelphia Museum of Art: Handbook of the Collections (1995), p. 209."

www.philamuseum.org/

I never realized that Expedition Everest is on record (with Guiness) as the most expensive roller coaster ever made. Regardless, it is a thematic gem and possibly the pinnacle of Joe Rohde's 30 year career at WDI.

 

Rohde is a brilliant, talented, and award winning designer, and one of the greats of WDI, like Eddie Sotto, Marty Skylar and Tony Baxter.

 

While I am in clearly in the category of those who would have rather had his original concept of Beastly Kingdom, that ship has long sailed and I am excited to see what he can do with Cameron's Avatar ... I think we are in for a real treat ... I have many friends in film who have worked alongside Cameron, they say he is a tyrant, cruel, a screamer, a narcissist, selfish and a nightmare on set.

 

He is also known for being a visionary, a perfectionist, uncompromising, and raising the bar ... all things Disney has prided itself on at one point in time ... I truly think, love Avatar or hate Avatar, we are going to be in for something special ... because he will hold their feet to the fire, throw value engineering out the door, and raise the bar yet again.

  

You can follow me on Pinterest, Instagram, Tumblr, and Twitter now.

 

Or just check out the site, its had a facelift: Studio2719

 

At the depot in Columbia, TN on May 16, 1992. Pay no attention to Arthur Goodman III, as he has happily just recorded some frame numbers, has his "data buzz", and is completely oblivious to his travel partner's photographic efforts!

"Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. Love never fails.

 

- 1 Corinthians 13:4-8

 

This picture is cordially dedicated to my dear friend Steve.

 

The Black-tailed Godwit, Limosa limosa, is a large, long-legged, long-billed shorebird first described by Carolus Linnaeus in 1758. It is a member of the Limosa genus, the godwits. There are three subspecies, all with orange head, neck and chest in breeding plumage and dull grey-brown winter coloration, and distinctive black and white wingbar at all times.

 

Its breeding range stretches from Iceland through Europe and areas of central Asia. Black-tailed Godwits spend winter in areas as diverse as the Indian Subcontinent, Australia, western Europe and west Africa. The world population is estimated to be 634,000 to 805,000 birds and is classified as Near Threatened.

 

Black-tailed Godwits are mostly monogamous; although it was not recorded in a four-year study of 50-60 pairs, bigamy was considered "probably frequent". A study of the Icelandic population showed that despite spending winter apart, pairs are reunited on their breeding grounds within an average of three days of each other. If one partner does not arrive on time, 'divorce' occurs.

 

They mainly eat invertebrates, but also aquatic plants in winter and on migration. In the breeding season, prey includes include beetles, flies, grasshoppers, dragonflies, mayflies, caterpillars, annelid worms and molluscs.

It is possible to gain control over your lifestyle should you pursue good personal development goals. You need to know some ways to keep energized in order to successfully achieve your goals. Put the following tips to utilize to help you begin your journey.

 

Find personal development books that happen to be ideal for your real age and situation. Personal development books that happen to be well written, insightful and instructive can provide the important information to significantly increase your outlook plus your life. Go with a self improvement book that may be well reviewed because some books are merely not good.

 

Identify the most significant obstacle that may be preventing you succeeding. A lot of people possess a problem using this type of. After you can pinpoint your own personal weaknesses, it can be quicker to accept them, act about them, and alter them. Through the elimination of problems, you will discover your future path easier.

 

Have a journal along so whenever ideas hit, it is possible to record them. Carry paper along everywhere. Whenever a perception strikes, jot it down, and whenever your creative juices start flowing later, it is possible to act upon it.

 

Compose a pep talk for your self. List your entire great attributes by using an index card. Accept it along wherever you go, and talk about each quality once you want. Much better, record your qualities on video or audio and hear many times, it. What good would this do?

 

When thinking about your own personal development, center on leadership. The majority of people assume that leadership and influence are synonymous. Carefully assess your own personal ideas on leadership. Which events in your lifetime have most impacted that you are getting to be? How have those events changed you? What sometimes you may feel making you an effective team player? Thinking deeply about these problems could bring understanding of the quantity of your leadership and team member skills.

 

Utilize one or every one of these ideas to accelerate your own personal development goals. Working on your character takes plenty of effort, but as you now know what type of effort is essential, you can find involved with it with gusto. www.myselfimprovementdaily.com/find-perfect-partner-strat...

ZD265 306 Lynx HMA.8DAS of 815 HQ Flt.

 

Westland Lynx

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

AgustaWestland Lynx

Lynx HAS3 of the Black Cats (Royal Navy) display team

Type Helicopter

Manufacturer Westland/AgustaWestland

Maiden flight 21 March 1971

Introduced 1978

Status Active service

Primary users Army Air Corps (British Army)

Fleet Air Arm (Royal Navy)

 

French Navy

German Navy

Produced 1968-date

 

The Westland Lynx is a helicopter designed by Westland and built at Westland's factory in Yeovil, first flying on 21 March 1971 as the Westland WG.13. Originally intended as a utility craft for both civil and naval usage, military interest led to the development of the Army and Navy Lynx, which went into operational usage in 1977 and was later adopted by the armed forces of over a dozen nations. The helicopter is now produced and marketed by AgustaWestland.

 

Several aircraft were built under licence by French company Aerospatiale for French usage.

 

When piloted by Roy Moxam in 1972, it broke the world record over 15 and 25 km by flying at 321.74 km/h. It also set a new 100 km closed circuit record shortly afterwards, flying at 318.504 km/h. In 1986, a specially modified Westland Lynx piloted by John Egginton set an absolute speed record for helicopters over a 15 and 25 km course by reaching 400.87 km/h (249.09 mp/h). The Lynx is one of the most agile helicopters in the world, capable of performing backflips, among other things.

 

The British Army ordered 100 Lynx AH (Army Helicopter) Mk.1 for various roles, including tactical transport, armed escort, anti-tank warfare (with eight TOW missiles), reconnaissance and evacuation. The Army has fitted a Marconi Elliot AFCS system onto the Lynx for automatic stabilisation on three axis.

Contents

[hide]

 

* 1 Service history

* 2 Future Lynx

* 3 Versions

* 4 Users

* 5 Specifications (Super Lynx Series 100)

* 6 External links

* 7 Gallery

* 8 Related content

 

Service history

 

In British service it equips the Army Air Corps (AAC) and the Fleet Air Arm (FAA). For the AAC the Lynx AH.7 and AH.9 operate as attack helicopters. The Lynx AH.7 is service with the FAA where it operates as an attack/utility helicopter in support of the Royal Marines, and the Lynx HMA.8 as anti-submarine warfare helicopter equipped with the Sea Skua anti-ship missile for Royal Navy warships.

 

The Lynx most prominent combat role was operating the Sea Skua, to devastating effect against the Iraqi Navy during the 1991 Gulf War. The Lynx also saw service with British Army forces during that conflict. It had already made its first combat operations in British service during the Falklands War in the 80s. None were shot down, but three were lost aboard vessels hit by Argentine bombs or Exocets, one on the MV Atlantic Conveyor and one each on board HMS Coventry and HMS Ardent.

 

It was used during Operation Barras to rescue 11 British soldiers in Sierra Leone on 10 September 2000.

 

The most recent wartime mission for the Lynx was during the invasion of Iraq in 2003. It has also seen extensive service during peacekeeping operations and exercises, and it is standard equipment for most Royal Navy surface combatants when they deploy.

 

A British Lynx from No. 847 Naval Air Squadron was shot down over Basra, Iraq on May 6, 2006. The helicopter is believed to have been downed by either a missile or more likely, a Rocket Propelled Grenade (RPG). The Lynx crashed into a house and burst into flames, killing all five on board, including the Commanding Officer of 847 NAS. Something of a riot occurred with locals celebrating the downing of the helicopter and surrounding the crash site as British troops rushed to the scene. This was the first British helicopter and only the second British aircraft downed (the first was an RAF Hercules) due to enemy fire in the war.

 

Despite being well liked by the services the Lynx does not have a good safety record. The aircraft has been grounded on a number of occations. For example in 2000 fatigue problems with the rotor head led to a Dutch aircraft crash and subsequent grounding. In early 2004 three Lynx crashed in a matter of weeks and again some aircraft were grounded. One of the reasons for the Future Lynx programme is to cure some of the known problems with the airframe and rotor systems.

[edit]

 

Future Lynx

 

On 22 June 2006 the UK Ministry of Defence awarded Westland a £1 billion contract for 70 Future Lynx helicopters under a strategic partnering agreement with AgustaWestland[1]. The programme will provide the British Army and Royal Navy with 40 and 30 aircraft respectively, with an option for a further 10, split equally between Army and Navy.

 

Future Lynx is described as a new aircraft that builds on the dynamic and vehicle systems of the existing design, incorporating advanced technology and providing increased capability. The fatigue problems with the exisiting airframe and rotor system are to be corrected. Future Lynx will utilise some systems developed for the Super Lynx 300 and will feature a redesigned nose and rear fuselage to give greater space and easier access to avionic units. Future Lynx will be powered by two LHTEC CTS800 engines, offering increased power and endurance over existing Lynx powerplants, while retaining economy.

 

The first Future Lynx is programmed to make its maiden flight in 2009, with initial deliveries in 2011. The Army variant will enter operational service in 2014, with the RN variant following in 2015.

[edit]

 

* Westland WG.13: prototype that first flew on 21 March 1971.

* Lynx AH.1: Initial production version for the Army Air Corps, with over 100 examples built. Used for a variety of tasks, including tactical transport, armed escort, anti-tank warfare (equipped with eight TOW missiles), reconnaissance and casualty evacuation.

* Lynx AH.1GT: Interim conversion of the AH.Mk 1 for the British Army.

* Lynx HAS.2: Initial production version for the Royal Navy and the French Aeronavale. When it is used in the anti-submarine role, it is equipped with two torpedoes or depth charges and a dipping sonar. For anti-surface warfare, it is equipped with either four Sea Skua missiles (Royal Navy) or four AS.12 missiles (Aeronavale).

o Lynx HAS.2(FN): French version of the HAS.Mk 2 for the Aeronavale.

* Lynx HAS.3

o HAS.3(S): Improved version of the HAS.Mk 3 for the Royal Navy fitted with secure radio systems.

o HAS.3(GM(S)): Nineteen modified helicopters for the Royal Navy, for service in the Persian Gulf (GM denotes Gulf Modification).

o HAS.3(ICE(S)) : Two helicopters for the Royal Navy for use in the Arctic.

o HT.3: Proposed training version for the RAF, not built.

* Lynx HAS.4(FN): Upgraded version for the Aeronavale.

* Lynx AH.5: Experimental version for the British Army. Only 4 were ever built.

* Lynx AH.6: Proposed version for the Royal Marines, not built.

* Lynx AH.7: Attack version for the Army Air Corps and Royal Marines.

* Lynx HMA.8 ("Super Lynx"): Upgraded maritime attack version.

o HMA.8DSP: Digital Signal Processor.

o HMA.8DAS: Defensive Aids Subsystem

* Lynx AH.9 ("Battlefield Lynx"): British Army version of the Super Lynx (AH.7 with wheeled undercarriage).

* Lynx Mk.21: Export version of the HAS.2 for the Brazilian navy. Brazilian navy designation 'SAH-11".

* Super Lynx Mk.21A: Export version of the Super Lynx for the Brazilian navy.

* Lynx Mk.22: Unbuilt export version for the Egyptian navy.

* Lynx Mk.23: Export version of the HAS.2 for the Argentine navy. Later sold to Brazil and Denmark.

* Lynx Mk.24: Unbuilt export version for the Iraqi army.

* Lynx Mk.25: Export version of the HAS.2 for the Royal Netherlands Navy, also designated "UH-14A" in Dutch service.

* Lynx Mk.26: Unbuilt export version for the Iraqi army.

* Lynx Mk.27: Export version for the Royal Netherlands Navy, also designated "SH-14B" in Dutch service.

* Lynx Mk.28: Export version of the AH.Mk 1 for the Qatar Police.

* Lynx Mk.64: Export version of the Super Lynx for the South African Air Force.

* Lynx Mk.80: Export version of the HAS.Mk 2 for the Royal Danish Navy.

* Lynx Mk.81: Export version for the Royal Netherlands Navy, designated "SH-14C" in Dutch service.

* SH-14D: Upgraded helicopters for the Royal Netherlands Navy.

* Lynx Mk.82: Unbuilt export version for the Egyptian army.

* Lynx Mk.83: Unbuilt export version for the Saudi Arabian army.

* Lynx Mk 84: Unbuilt export version for the Qatar army.

* Lynx Mk 85: Unbuilt export version for the United Arab Emirates army.

* Lynx Mk.86: Export version of the HAS Mk 2 for the Royal Norwegian Air Force.

* Lynx Mk.87: Embargoed export version of the Argentine navy.

* Lynx Mk.88: Export version for the German Navy.

* Super Lynx Mk.88A: Upgraded version of the Lynx Mk.88 for the German Navy.

* Lynx Mk.89: Export version for the Nigerian navy.

* Lynx Mk.90: Export version for the Royal Danish Navy.

* Super Lynx Mk.90B: Upgraded versions of the Lynx Mk.80 and Lynx Mk.90 for the Royal Danish Navy.

* Lynx Mk.95: Export version of the HAS.8 for the Portuguese Navy.

* Lynx Mk.99: Export version of the HAS.8 for the South Korean Navy.

* Super Lynx 300: Export version of the Super Lynx.

* Battlefield Lynx: Proposed export version.

* Battlefield 800: Proposed export version, the project was abandoned in 1992.

* Lynx ACH: Experimental version

 

Notes:

 

* AH: Attack Helicopter

* HAS: Helicopter, Anti-Submarine

* HMA: Helicopter, Maritime Attack

* (GM): Gulf Modification

* (S): Secure speech radio

 

Users

 

* Argentine Navy

* Brazilian Navy

* British Army

* British Royal Navy

* Royal Danish Navy

* French Navy

* German Navy (Twelve ordered in 1981 for use on navy frigates.)

* South Korean Navy

* Royal Malaysian Navy

* Netherlands Royal Navy (Six search and rescue and 18 anti-submarine warfare models.)

* Nigerian Navy

* Norway (Six operated on behalf of the Coast Guard by 337 Skvadron of the The Air Force from the Nordkapp Class cutters.)

* Royal Air Force of Oman

* Portuguese Navy (Used on "Vasco da Gama class frigates".)

* South African Air Force (Four of the Super Lynx 300 version for use on the SAN's Valour class patrol corvettes.)

* Qatar State Police

* Pakistan Navy(Westland Lynx Anti-Ship/Anti-Submarine/Transport Helicopters )

 

Specifications (Super Lynx Series 100)

 

Data from Flight International World Aircraft and Systems Directory (3rd ed.)

General characteristics

 

* Crew: 2 or 3

* Length: 15.24 m (50 ft)

* Rotor diameter: 12.80 m (42 ft)

* Height: 3.67 m (12 ft 0.5 in)

* Disc area: 1,385.4 m (128.71 sq ft)

* Empty weight: 3,291 kg (7,255 lb)

* Max takeoff weight: 5,330 kg (11,750 lb)

* Powerplant: 2× Rolls-Royce Gem, 835 kW (1,120 shp) each

 

Performance

 

* Cruise speed: 254 km/h (158 mph)

* Range: 528 km (328 miles [standard tanks])

 

Armament

 

* Naval: 2 x torpedoes or 4x Sea Skua missiles or 2 x depth charges.

* Attack: 8 x TOW ATGM

* General: GPMGs

 

Comparable aircraft

 

* SH-60 Sea Hawk

* SH-2 Sea Sprite

 

Designation sequence

 

Westland Dragonfly - Westland Whirlwind - Westland Wessex- Westland Scout - Westland Wasp - Westland Lynx

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 79 80