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View allAll Photos Tagged Onobrychis viciifolia

Ich konnte mich nicht entscheiden welche Variante schöner ist - deshalb 2 Versionen !

 

20 Aufnahmen - Helicon Focus Pro

2019-04-26 15-16-28 (C)

Hauhechelbläuling auf Saat-Esparsette

Polyommatus icarus on Onobrychis viciifolia

common blue on common sainfoin

 

At the dyke near Biebesheim Rhine river

 

Zoom in for details

 

2019-04-26 15-02-37 (B,Radius8,Smoothing4)

Hauhechelbläuling auf Saat-Esparsette

Polyommatus icarus on Onobrychis viciifolia

common blue on common sainfoin

 

At the dyke near Biebesheim Rhine river

 

Polyommatus thersites (Kleiner Esparsetten-Bläuling) Ölberg, Klosterneuburg, Niederösterreich, Austria in an Onobrychis viciifolia (Esparsette) meadow.

Saat-Esparsette - Onobrychis viciifolia - common sainfoin

mit Hummel und Fliege

with bumblebee and fly

Zeitraffer - hier kann man an eine Blüte den kompletten Verlauf der Blüte sehen - geschlossen - volle Blüte - verblüht

P5071125.jpg

common sainfoin

Saat-Esparsette

[Onobrychis viciifolia]

 

Cupido osiris (Meigen 1829)

Duende mayor

Sobre la floración de Onobrychis viciifolia (Esparceta, pipirigallo).

 

Osiris blue

On the flowering of Onobrychis viciifolia

 

Azuré de la chevrette, Azuré osiris.

Perché en fleur d'Onobrychis viciifolia.

Azuré des cytises / Green-underside blue / Glaucopsyche alexis

Sainfoin / common sainfoin / Onobrychis viciifolia

 

pascalechevest.com/

Onobrychis, the sainfoins, are Eurasian plants of the legume family (Fabaceae). The main centre of diversity extends from Central Asia to Iran. Onobrychis means "devoured by donkeys", from Ancient Greek. Sainfoin is derived from Old French sain foin ("healthy hay"). The Mountain Sainfoin's native range is from the Alps to Croatia, North & Central Appennini and the Carpathians.

Onobrychis Viciifolia - Sainfoin Of The Meadow - Pentax K 3 + HD Pentax-DA 1,4x AF AW RC + SMC Pentax-A 50mm f/1,4 -

This morning, I have added 10 images taken at Carburn Park, on 2 July 2019. As keeps happening, I have fallen way behind with editing and posting my photos.

 

This was an evening walk with a group of friends. Though I rarely go on any evening walks, I knew this one would finally get me over to Carburn Park.

 

It's always a delight to see a gathering of American White Pelicans on the Bow River. They like to rest on the gravel bars and either sleep or preen. Such exotic looking birds and they almost look like they don't belong here.

 

Two other things I was happy to see were a scattering of beautiful, pink Sainfoin flowers. This is the only location where I have seen them.

 

The other thrill was when a huge American Beaver swam past us when we were walking along the trail at the edge of the river. We were able to see just how huge it really was when it climbed up on to the bank not many feet away from us, and began eating the tall grass.

 

Sainfoin has been grown in parts of Europe and Asia for hundreds of years. Various strains have been introduced to North America as a forage crop since about 1900. I think Carburn Park is the only location in the city where it grows. Belongs to the Pea family and blooms June-August. It is considered a weed, but, as usual, a very beautiful weed. I love the deep pink stripes on the petals.

 

"Like many plants with a long period of human use, it is known by many common names. In English, it is commonly called sainfoin from the French for "healthy hay". Sometimes it is called holy hay--a confusion of "saint" for "sain".

 

Healthy hay is a fitting moniker. It is nutritionally comparable to alfalfa and equally, if not more, palatable to livestock. In addition, research has shown that it inhibits nematode parasitism in ruminants due to its high tannin content. A good report on the use of sainfoin as a feed crop is available on Feedipedia: Onobrychis viciifolia, while images of the species growing as a field crop are available via the Alberta Native Plant Council. As a crop, the plant is considered a good environmental choice: it forms a deep tap root that helps soil stabilization, its roots house nitrogen-fixing bacteria that improve the soil, and its melliferous flowers attract bees and birds. A fine, clear honey has been produced in areas where the plant is cultivated. Lastly, it is more tolerant of drought and cold than other forage crops like alfalfa and clover.

 

Despite its many benefits, it has largely been replaced by alfalfa and clover in the past century. The main drawback is its poor regrowth after cutting and resultant lower production." From UBC Botany Photo of the Day website.

 

botanyphoto.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/2013/04/onobrychis-vic...

This morning, I have added 10 images taken at Carburn Park, on 2 July 2019. As keeps happening, I have fallen way behind with editing and posting my photos.

 

This was an evening walk with a group of friends. Though I rarely go on any evening walks, I knew this one would finally get me over to Carburn Park.

 

It's always a delight to see a gathering of American White Pelicans on the Bow River. They like to rest on the gravel bars and either sleep or preen. Such exotic looking birds and they almost look like they don't belong here.

 

Two other things I was happy to see were a scattering of beautiful, pink Sainfoin flowers. This is the only location where I have seen them.

 

The other thrill was when a huge American Beaver swam past us when we were walking along the trail at the edge of the river. We were able to see just how huge it really was when it climbed up on to the bank not many feet away from us, and began eating the tall grass.

 

Sainfoin has been grown in parts of Europe and Asia for hundreds of years. Various strains have been introduced to North America as a forage crop since about 1900. I think Carburn Park is the only location in the city where it grows. Belongs to the Pea family and blooms June-August. It is considered a weed, but, as usual, a very beautiful weed. I love the deep pink stripes on the petals.

 

"Like many plants with a long period of human use, it is known by many common names. In English, it is commonly called sainfoin from the French for "healthy hay". Sometimes it is called holy hay--a confusion of "saint" for "sain".

 

Healthy hay is a fitting moniker. It is nutritionally comparable to alfalfa and equally, if not more, palatable to livestock. In addition, research has shown that it inhibits nematode parasitism in ruminants due to its high tannin content. A good report on the use of sainfoin as a feed crop is available on Feedipedia: Onobrychis viciifolia, while images of the species growing as a field crop are available via the Alberta Native Plant Council. As a crop, the plant is considered a good environmental choice: it forms a deep tap root that helps soil stabilization, its roots house nitrogen-fixing bacteria that improve the soil, and its melliferous flowers attract bees and birds. A fine, clear honey has been produced in areas where the plant is cultivated. Lastly, it is more tolerant of drought and cold than other forage crops like alfalfa and clover.

 

Despite its many benefits, it has largely been replaced by alfalfa and clover in the past century. The main drawback is its poor regrowth after cutting and resultant lower production." From UBC Botany Photo of the Day website.

 

botanyphoto.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/2013/04/onobrychis-vic...

I have only seen this once before, several years ago. The colour is so wonderful. Once used as a fodder crop and soil improver as it is a Nitrogen fixer. One of the loveliest of wild flowers.

I took a lot of pictures yesterday, it was another magical afternoon. Half of the picnic by a pond surrounded by dozens of Blue Damselflys, then on to sit in a country churchyard for the rest of the picnic. Then on to unexpected flowers and birdsong echoing through the trees.

Near Church Eaton Staffordshire UK 8th June 2019

Onobrychis Viciifolia - Sainfoin Of The Meadow - Pentax K 5 + HD Pentax-DA 1,4x AF AW RC + SMC Pentax-DA*300mm f/4 ED IF SDM -

Pyramiden-Orchidee (Anacamptis pyramidalis) und Futter-Esparsette (Onobrychis viciifolia) im Nüsttal.

Rhön, 03.06.2005

Onobrychis Viciifolia - Sainfoin Of The Meadow - Pentax K 3 + HD Pentax-DA 1,4x AF AW RC + SMC Pentax-DA*300mm f/4 ED IF SDM -

Oberschwaben ... Äcker und sattgrüne Wiesen wechseln mit Wäldern und fruchtbaren Obstgärten, da und dort blitzt ein Weiher oder ein kleiner See, Hügel reiht sich sanft an Hügel. Dazwischen schmucke Dörfer und kleine Städte eingestreut, Burgen und Schlösser, Klöster und Kapellen und die fernen Alpen, bei Föhn zum Greifen nahe.

 

Upper Swabia ... fields and lush green meadows alternate with forests and fertile orchards, here and there flashes a pond or a small lake, hill joins hill gently. In between, pretty villages and small towns interspersed, castles, monasteries and chapels and the distant Alps, with hair dryer at your fingertips.

>Translation with Translator<

 

Visione Di Farfalla - Onobrychis Viciifolia - Sony DSC QX10 - Sony Lens G 4.5mm f/8 -

Taken 18th June 2011 not seen it again 2013

Near The Toft Staffordshire

This is a first for me.

The name means Wholesome Hay and it was once used a a fodder crop.

Onobrychis viciifolia (Fabaceae) 143 20

 

Onobrychis viciifolia (Common Name Sainfoin) is a herbaceous plant belonging to the genus Onobrychis of the family Fabaceae.

This species is of uncertain origin, probably it is native to the limestone and arid regions of western Asia and central and southern Europe.uncertain

It is in flower from June to August.

Onobrychis Viciifolia , Wild Flower - Pentax K 3 + HD Pentax-DA 1,4x AF AW RC + SMC Pentax-DA* 300mm f/4 ED IF SDM -

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