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As an architecture buff, I take no small pride in knowing a thing or two about the architecture in and around Los Feliz, so it came as a great surprise when I stumbled upon the John Lautner-inspired Leiberman House on Prospect Avenue, originally designed by Glen Howard Small in 1989. Perhaps one of the least known mastermind's of contemporary architecture, the architect demonstrated early promise while an undergraduate at the University of Oregon, where he was awarded the Eliel Saarinen Scholarship for the Masters of Architecture program at the Cranbrook Academy of Arts and Institute of Sciences. After graduation (1967) he worked for various architectural firms including John Lautner and Smith and Williams. After a three year stint as assistant professor at Cal Poly Pomona School of Environmental Design, he joined a group of fellow architects to co-found the Southern California Institute of Architects (SCI-Arc) in 1972 where he taught for the next 18 years.

 

In the Leiberman House the original owners commissioned a creative addition to their home, described by the architect as a "a dingbat Spanish house that had no character." The resultant "face lift" consists of "a series of quarter curves in two different directions", the architect's attempt at bringing "sensuous, flowing curves to life" in a residential setting. The wall of the house have been sculpted in such a way as to eliminate the need for a roof, leaving the interiors open to the heavens and "exalted by its light." The house was purchased by Estela Mara Bensimon and Agapito Diaz in 1995. Dr. Bensimon who is co-director of the Center for Urban Education at the USC Rossier School of Education states that "when we purchased the house in 1995 from the Liebermans, the house was kind of half finished, i.e. nothing had been done beyond the living room. Over time, with the help of Los Feliz-based architect Anthony Eckelberry, we remodeled the rest of the house, tore down some walls, changed all the windows to take advantage of the openness of the design. As fate would have it, Eckelberry was a student of Glen Howard Small at SCI-Arc, so the remodel was faithful to the original vision."

 

Small currently lives in Managua, Nicaragua where he has recently completed three projects of national importance, the Concha Acustica, the centerpiece of the Nicaraguan national cultural plaza; the Journalist Rotunda, a monument to the journalists of the Sandinistan Revolution, and the Colon Rotunda, a fountain in the city's civic center. In 2002, Glen Small's daughter Lucia Small made an award-winning documentary film on his work, "My Father the Genius".

The Leiberman House is located at 3995 Prospect Avenue in the Franklin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles.

  

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The Martyring of Che Guevara

 

By Robert Scheer

 

The 40th anniversary of the death of Che Guevara elicited considerable media attention, mostly about his iconic image captured on T-shirts throughout the world. There were the standard snarky asides that many young people wearing those T-shirts have scant notion of who Che was, but the journalists reporting the story seemed equally ignorant. Little was reported about Che's life and what led him to shun the comforts of a physician's lifestyle in Argentina to fight as a revolutionary in the rugged terrains of Cuba, the Congo and finally in Bolivia - or why someone who claimed to be obsessed with helping the world's poor was executed, gangland style, on the order of a CIA agent.

 

One exception was the BBC, which bothered to send a reporter to Florida to interview Felix Rodriguez, the Cuban-born CIA agent who was part of a team of CIA operatives and Bolivian soldiers who captured Che. "Mr. Rodriguez ordered the soldier who pulled the trigger to aim carefully, to remain consistent with the Bolivian government's story that Che had been killed in action in a clash with the Bolivian army," said the BBC report. Che's hands were then cut off and put in formaldehyde to preserve his fingerprints.

 

In his interview with the BBC, Rodriguez claimed that the order to kill Che came from the Bolivian government, and that he went along: "I could have tried to falsify the command to the troops, and got Che to Panama as the U.S. government said they wanted," he recalled, but he didn't. Clearly, the U.S. government was not unhappy with Rodriguez's role in the bloody affair, for he went on, as he boasts, to train the Nicaraguan Contras and advise the repressive Argentine military government in the 1980s. He showed the BBC reporter his CIA medal for exceptional service along with a picture of him with the first President Bush in the White House. George H. W. Bush, it should be remembered, had been the head of the CIA during some of the years that Rodriguez worked there and was not put off by the man's past deeds, including his part in Che's assassination.

 

So, what's the big deal? Che was a Cuban Communist, and it's a good thing that folks like Bush and Rodriguez were able to defeat him before he spread his evil message further - right? False, on every count.

 

First off, he was either an Argentine Trotskyite or an anarchist but Che was not a Communist in what we think of as the heavily entrenched, bureaucratized Cuban mold. Che was restless in post-revolutionary Cuba because his anarchist temperament caused him to bristle at the emerging bureaucracy. He was, like Trotsky in his dispute with Stalin, skeptical that the kind of socialism that truly served the poor could survive in just one country; hence, he died attempting to internationalize the struggle.

 

It also turned out that killing Che was a big mistake, as his message was spread more effectively by his execution than by his guerrilla activities, which were, after he left Cuba, quite pathetic. This is the case in Latin America, where political leaders he helped inspire are faring better than those coddled by the CIA. Daniel Ortega, whom the CIA worked so doggedly to overthrow, is the elected president of Nicaragua. Almost all of Latin America's leaders are leftists, some more moderate (as in Brazil), and others as fiery as Che (in Venezuela), but all determinedly independent of yanqui control. Fortunately, they differ from Che in preferring the ballot to the gun. But all recognize that poverty remains the region's No. 1 problem and that the free-market model imposed by the United States hardly contains all the answers. Recall that the U.S. break with the Cuban revolution came before the Castro's turn toward the Soviets, and that it was over his nationalization of American-owned business assets in Cuba ranging from Mafia-run casinos to the electric power grid.

 

These days, few politicians in the United States even seem to care about the subversive Cuban influences in our own backyard that once haunted them. The embargo on Cuba remains to mollify Florida's aging Cuban community, but the prize is Mideast oil, not protecting the peasants of Bolivia from the likes of Che Guevara. On Monday, Che's death was marked, in the Bolivian village where he was killed, by Bolivian President Evo Morales, who proclaimed his movement "100 percent Guevarist and socialist," which hardly registers as a propaganda success story for those favoring CIA assassinations. They turned a failed - and flawed - guerrilla fighter into an enduring symbol of resistance to oppression.

 

------------------------

 

The article appeared on www.sfgate.com/

 

Six subtitled captures: Cumbre Iberoamericana XVII: Santiago de Chile: Nov.10, 2007

1-2 The Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez replies to the Spanish President Zapatero : "Podra ser español, el presidente Aznar, pero es un fascista, y eso es una falta de respeto." ("Maybe he is spanish, the president Aznar, but he is a fascist, and that's a default(er) of respect.")

3 Spanish subtitle: "Dígale a el que respete la dignidad de nuestro pueblo." - Chávez had just interrupted the lecture which Zapatero was giving him by the subtitled english words: "Tell him {Aznar} that he shall respect the dignity of our people." - Having heard this tribulation the monarch abruptly bows forward to put his arm out shaking his fist showing his index-finger pointing a(gains)t Chávez while exclaiming the brusque admonition: “¡Tú!” - ("And you ! " ... as well are in default on respecting the dignity of the spanish people ...---> confer: Caesar's last words: "Et tu, Brute!" (William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar) / "καὶ σὺ τέκνον"}

4 In excess of ten seconds later the monarch is flaring up again phrasing his famed exclamation: “¡¡por qué no te callas!!”. (Dubbed by the spanish TV with: "Why don't you shut up ?" Conjectured by me: To that five-word-sentence was given an incorrect punctuation by our European Media Outlets: It is not meant interrogative, - not even rhetorically. Therefore it must not have any question marks. It sounds like a last admonition. Indeed it is an exclamatory imperative: "Shut up eventually !!")

5 With an irate face the monarch turns to arise. English subtitle: "It was at that point when King Juan Carlos rose from his seat and left the meeting."

6 English subtitle: "Even after the incident the criticism against the spanish government continued."

I have captured and collated each of the six images with their multicoloured, bilingual subtitles from a footage provided by TVCi "Televisió de Catalunya".

▼▐► V O C A B U L A R Y ◄▌▼

|_ ... ὁρῶν ὅτι_|_τραχὺς μόναρχος οὐδ' ὑπεύθυνος κρατεῖ_|

|_... viendo que_|_áspero monarca como si a ningún responsable tiene poder_|

{Prometeo encadenado de Esquilo, 325|6}.

For publically declaring the monarch to be a tyrant {|_τὸν τοῦ τυράννου τοῦ νέου διάκονον_| (942)} Prometheus gets imprisoned in the Hades for 30.000 years.

During the Great times of Greek Tragedy (temporarily halted in -432.) and French Revolution (temporarily halted in +1815.) some words that possess nowadays different meanings, were apparently applied absolutely synonymously. For instance: monarch and tyrant had just a stylistic difference, - but the connotations released by the twin-words were equally horrendous at those times. More specimens of this history-induced linguistic phenomenon:

│monarch.≡.tyrant│god.≡.demon│word.≡.myth│imitation.≡.counterfeit│

│μόναρχος.≡.τύραννος│θεός.≡.δαίμων│λόγος.≡.μῦθος│μίμησις.≡.ὑπόκρισις│

monarch a sovereign head of state, especially a king, queen or emperor ORIGIN late Middle English; from Greek μόναρχος 'sole ruler', gr:μόναρχος=dictator:lt,confer: Plutarchus in Camillus v18.

monarchism: support for the principle of having monarchs. ORIGIN: mid 19th cent.: from french monarchisme

tribune: noun (also tribune of the people) an official in ancient Rome chosen by the plebeians to protect their interests. also military tribune: a Roman legionary colonel. figurative: a popular leader; a champion of the people. DERIVATES: tribunate, tribuneship. ORIGIN: Latin tribûnus, literally 'head of tribe'. In ancient Rome there were 4 city-tribes (‘urbanae tribûs’), and 26 rural tribes (‘rusticae tribûs’). These numbers (4, 26: 4x26 = 8x13 = 104) remind of mexican arithmology: Tenochtitlan was divided into four districts. The number 13 divided the age groups (13,26,52,104).

default: failure to fulfil an obligation, especially to repay a loan or appear in a law court.

borborygmus: noun: a rumbling or gurgling noise by the movement of fluid and gas in the intestines. DERIVATES: borborygmic ORIGIN: Early 18th cent. modern Latin, from Greek borborygmós: intestinal rumbling (Hippocrates Prognostikón II); belching (Suidas Lexicographus).

frame-up informal, a conspiracy to falsely incriminate someone

▼▐► M E D I A - C O V E R A G E ◄▌▼

Chávez gives olé to Mr.King and gets «brusquement» lectured & heckled on Ibero-American Summit XVII.

Nov 9,10,11, ...

"... el Rey será Rey, pero no me puede hacer callar"

Chavez acusa Espanya de "genocidio" a Llatinomèrica

"El Rey es tan jefe de Estado como yo, con la diferencia de que yo soy electo. He sido electo tres veces, con el 63%; son tan jefes de Estado el índio Evo Morales como el rey Juan Carlos de Borbón", ha deixat clar Chávez. El president veneçolà ha deixat clar que "la verdad la diré delante de reyes, de imperialistas, de Bush. Allá los que se molesten".

"creo que se debe revisar la participación del rey" Alejandro Navarro (PS)

SANTIAGO, noviembre 13.- Navarro desestimó que haya sido Hugo Chávez el que incomodó a la Presidenta Bachelet, como moderadora de la sesión plenaria de mandatarios en Espacio Riesco, donde una acalorada discusión con el jefe del gobierno español, José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, terminó sacando de quicio al rey, quien le espetó al presidente venezolano un airado “¡por qué no te callas!”.

Al respecto, el senador PS estimó que “el exabrupto lo ha cometido el rey de España, es él el que ha increpado a un jefe de Estado y lo ha hecho callar. Quien conducía la reunión era la Presidenta Bachelet y lo que hace el rey Juan Carlos es pasar por encima de la Presidenta”.

"... es un verdadero fascista" EFE. 09.11.2007 - 19:33h

El mandatario venezolano citó a Aznar al denunciar el ALCA, el aérea de Libre Comercio impulsada por Estados Unidos. Le tildó de "fascista, es un verdadero fascista".

Chávez, tras calificar de "proyecto imperialista" esta iniciativa, señaló que fue en una "cumbre de esas, la primera" a la que asistió, hace casi 10 años, en que se presentaron las tesis en reuniones iberoamericanas de entonces que llamó de "canto general al neoliberalismo".

video.publico.es/videos/0/2410/1/recent Atlas 2007-11-10

El presidente venezolano, Hugo Chávez, calificó tres veces de "fascista" al ex presidente del Gobierno español, José María Aznar, en el discurso que pronunció en la Cumbre Iberoamericana en Santiago de Chile. Chávez dijo: "El entonces presidente de España, que es un fascista a toda carta," era quien "venía a vendernos aquí aquellas tesis".El presidente venezolano, Hugo Chávez, calificó tres veces de "fascista" al ex presidente del Gobierno español, José María Aznar, en el discurso que pronunció en la Cumbre Iberoamericana en Santiago de Chile. Chávez dijo: "El entonces presidente de España, que es un fascista a toda carta," era quien "venía a vendernos aquí aquellas tesis". (menos)

 

SRIPPS-News has a translation (2002): "A snake is more human than a fascist or a racist; a tiger is more human than a fascist or a racist."

el país - 10/11/2007 Desvelando algunas conversaciones que tuvo con él en la visita de Aznar a Venezuela en 2002, Chávez ha rematado su discurso diciendo que "una serpiente es más humana que un fascista o un racista; un tigre es más humano que un fascista o un racista".

 

ESCAMBRAY Digital, Periódico de la provincia de Sancti Spíritus.

Reflexiones del Comandante en Jefe

El silencio de Aznar

Le pido al señor Aznar que diga si es o no cierto que aconsejó al presidente Clinton el 13 de abril de 1999 bombardear la radio y la televisión serbias. 29 de septiembre del 2007

La respuesta de Milosevic

Hubo en realidad dos guerras, una de las cuales no ha concluido, y dos fatídicos encuentros de Aznar, uno con Clinton y otro con Bush. Dos recorridos idénticos del primero vía Ciudad México-Washington y vía Ciudad México-Texas con el mismo objetivo e igual falta de principios éticos, en los que Aznar se autoasigna el papel de coordinador bélico de los mutables presidentes de Estados Unidos. 2 de octubre del 2007

 

REUTERS-Madrid: Spanish king visits troops in Afghanistan Dec 31, 2007.

Spain's King Juan Carlos paid a surprise New Year's Eve visit to Spanish troops based in Afghanistan on Monday. The monarch, who will turn 70 on Saturday, posed with soldiers in his military uniform and was set to stay for lunch at the base in Herat in western Afghanistan, which he visited along with Defence Minister Jose Antonio Alonso, a spokeswoman for the royal household said.

The king, .... , spoke by radio from the base to troops who were elsewhere in the country: "I only want to wish you all the best for the New Year and I'm sorry I can't greet you," said Juan Carlos, who was due to return to Spain after his meal.

The king, .... , also paid a similar visit to Spanish troops in Bosnia around the date of his 60th birthday. Spain has around 700 troops based in Afghanistan, where at least 23 have been killed.

 

BBC: Chavez says: Spain's king is arrogant, impotent and imprudent

" disrespected me, and he was laid bare before the world in his arrogance and also his impotence," Mr Chavez told a news conference on Tuesday ... 14 Nov 2007

BBC: Chavez refuses to be silenced By Martin Murphy BBC Americas analyst

For a president whose role model is the Latin American independence hero Simon Bolivar it was particularly ignominious that a Spanish king treated him like a schoolboy.

Not only has Mr Chavez now told the king to shut up in return, he

suggested that perhaps he knew about the 2002 coup that briefly toppled him - the same accusation he threw at Mr Aznar.

In 2006, more than 50% of the foreign investment in Venezuela came from Spanish firms.

 

Summit on Track to Protect Migrants’ Social Rights

The Multilateral Convention on Social Security, to be signed at the 17th Ibero-American Summit in Chile, is an important step toward improving the quality of life of poor people in this community of nations, according to its governments.

Chávez was singing a "ranchera" song as he arrived, with lyrics saying that, unlike a gold coin, he would not be liked by everyone.

 

Chávez “leveled devastating criticisms at Europe” Fidel Castro broke two weeks of silence to applaud his close friend Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez for having “leveled devastating criticisms at Europe” during a summit of leaders from Latin America, Spain and Portugal. In a brief essay published yesterday on the front pages of state newspapers, he also praised speeches by the leftist presidents of Nicaragua of Bolivia during the Ibero-American summit. Castro blasted conservative leaders at the meeting, singling out El Salvador's President Tony Saca, a U.S. ally.

 

"If President Hugo Chavez says Aznar is a fascist, I'm with him all the way!" by Oscar Heck, Nov 13, 2007

Chavez had called Aznar a fascist, which Chavez says is true.

I don't know much about Aznar ... but I know that he did openly support the USA in its criminal invasion of Iraq ... and later, the Spanish people suffered attacks on their transport system which left lots of people dead and injured ... and, then Aznar had to basically step down from power.

However, having listened to Chavez speak many times, if he says that Aznar is a fascist, I'm with him all the way!

Now Chavez is saying, paraphrased, "Wait a minute. What I said about Aznar is true ... and they tell me to shut up? Why? What ... are we now going to stop talking against Hitler, because the German people might want us to shut up?" Chavez continues, reiterating that he has great respect for Zapatero and that he hopes this incident will not cause some kind of diplomatic or political dilemma.

Paraphrased: "There was a debate between Heads of State ... and the King stepped in to tell me to shut up ... but I did not hear him. We have to remind the King that we are free to speak, we are free, we are no longer under domination by Spain. Him telling me to shut up was certainly a show of frustration and desperation ... because we are free."

I just looked up Aznar and found the following: "Aznar's government posthumously granted a medal of Civil Merit to Meliton Manzanas, the head of the secret police in San Sebastian and the first high-profile member of the Franco-ist government killed by ETA in 1968. He was widely considered a torturer, and Amnesty International condemned the awarding ... After the 2004 elections it was revealed that Aznar and his government secretly channeled public funds to a US legal firm to lobby for the bestowment of the Congressional Gold Medal on Aznar ... Aznar also announced the sale early in 1997 of the nation's remaining minority stake (golden shares) in the Telefonica telecommunications company and the petroleum group Repsol. These golden shares in Telefonica and Repsol YPF, as well as in Endesa, Argentaria and Tabacalera, all presided over by people close to Aznar, have since been declared illegal by the European Union. This marked the beginning of a period of privatizations after the previous PSOE government had nationalized parts of the economy."

Chavez says that, even in college and university debates, when people are debating, someone doesn't just butt in to tell someone else to shut up ... but that is what the King did.

 

"Zapatero is wrong trying to denigrate Chavez for speaking the truth" Commentary by Oscar Heck, Nov 13, 2007

If Aznar did back the coup against Chavez ... or if he did openly back any attempt at ousting Chavez from power, Chavez should also be allowed to speak his mind against someone who so openly promoted his ousting ... without the opinion of the Spanish King ... and especially without the King telling Chavez to "shut up." What business is it of the King to tell someone to shut up because another (Chavez) says something that he (the King) doesn't like to hear? Like the truth! Who is this King anyway? What gives him the right to be superior to others? Is it because he is a King? A descendant of the same kingdom that invaded Latin America, killed, plundered, raped and enslaved millions of innocent people? Does that make him superior and more important that Chavez ... more important than the hundreds of millions of Latin Americans who have suffered mass abuses and exploitation at the hands of the Kings and Queens of Spain ... genocide? Sorry ... the King is wrong. Zapatero is wrong in trying to denigrate Chavez for speaking the truth. Chavez should not shut up because these Spaniards want him to ... Chavez speaks the truth ... something the Spaniards do not want the world to know. Genocide. Do we want to know the truth ... or lies and disinformation? Chavez speaks the truth. Aznar did support all efforts to oust Chavez from power. The Spaniards did in fact invade Latin America (like the USA is invading Iraq) and they did in fact plunder and rape and kill and enslave millions of innocent people. These are facts that can no longer be hidden behind false history books, diplomacy or royalty. The time has come to set things straight ... and only few world leaders, like Chavez, have the courage to speak up. I wonder if the King of Spain smells like cotton candy or fine wine when he sits at the toilet to do number two?

 

Nov 15

The Monarchy's clash with Socialism by Pablo Ouziel

This scene from the Ibero-American Summit has now travelled the globe through every mainstream news media channel, however it has been used once again as an opportunity to attack Hugo Chavez for his rudeness and out of line commentary, when in fact not only is it a fairly accurate statement, but it also should be used as an opportunity by political analysts worldwide to bring out the extent to which fascist factions are still very much alive in Spain's political reality.

Already earlier this year, Chavez called Aznar "a fascist who supported the coup (of April 2002) and who is of the same kind as Adolf Hitler, a disgusting and despicable person who you feel sorry for, a true servant of George W. Bush". This statement was made shortly after Aznar made a call "on the United States, Europe and the Latin American democracies, to close ranks and defeat Hugo Chavez's 21st century socialism."

In order for the whole incident to be put into perspective, it is also important to understand, first, Aznar's background as a supporter of fascism and second, the fact that the King only has his crown thanks to the father of fascism in Spain, Francisco Franco.

 

The winner in this controversy is NOT the King of Spain! Commentarist Kenneth T. Tellis writes:

If criticism of former Spanish Prime Minister Aznar by Hugo Chavez Frias, President of Venezuela, evoked such anger from Spanish king Juan Carlos at the Ibero-American Summit on November 9, 2007, what would have happened if the criticism had been of some other Spaniard?

One can only imagine what would have happened if someone had condemned Spain’s Inquisitor General Tomas de Torquemada, Hernan Cortez, King Ferdinand or Queen Isabella of Spain?

If the King was so foolish to let the world in on his weaknesses, then we must treat him like a court jester. If King Juan Carlos apologizes, then he may make up for his indiscretion at the XVII Ibero-American Summit in Santiago, Chile.

On the other hand if the King did this to ingratiate him to US president George W. Bush, by attempting to publicly humiliate President Hugo Chavez Frias of Venezuela, then no attempt of coaxing him will make a bit of difference now.

We must fully understand the power behind these attempts to humiliate President Hugo Chavez Frias, is not in Spain but in North America.

The King of Spain has made himself a patsy in carrying out this assignment, to make himself popular with the US and its allies, but given the North American press something to gloat about, which is not worth a damn.

Yes! It may be something that the US press wanted to make a big story out of, but it has now fizzled and there is egg spattered all over their own faces.

The winner in this controversy is NOT the King of Spain ... or the US-controlled world press.

 

Hugo Chavez lets off steam by Jose de la Isla, author of "The Rise of Hispanic Political Power," Writer of a weekly commentary for Hispanic Link News Service.

In 2003, Chavez had deemed Aznar imperious for saying Chavez ought to not duplicate Cuba's experience in Venezuela.

Then in May 2005, Aznar, who was out of office and visiting Brazil, criticized Venezuela's relationship with Cuba. Chavez compared Aznar to Hitler and called him a fascist and an "imbecile."

Two years ago, because of the Venezuelan's close association with Castro, Aznar called Chavez a threat to democracy in Latin America. He also attributed Chavez's brashness to domestic failures softened by $60-a-barrel oil revenues padding Venezuela's coffers.

In October 2006, Aznar again called Chavez-brand populism and radicalism a threat to Latin America. In April of this year, Chavez remarked that it's better to have nothing to do with people like Aznar, telling a group of students that Aznar had supported the attempted coup against him in 2002 and supported the U.S. invasion of Iraq.

Throughout the 1990s and to the present, Spanish corporations have been the leading European investors in Latin America. So much so their commercial interests are sometimes referred to as the re-conquest.

While he was at it, Chavez included Mexico's Vicente Fox and Peru's Alejandro Toledo as "lackeys and puppy dogs of the empire."

While Chavez was making his final remarks at the closing ceremony at the National Stadium in Santiago, Lage handed him his cell phone. Castro was calling.

Castro, Chavez told the audience, was remembering the Chilean combat volunteers who died fighting Nicaraguan dictator Anastasio Somoza. Chavez called on the crowd to send out a cheer to Castro. "Fidel, Fidel! What is it he has the imperialists can't handle."

Maybe it was their last hoorah.

But the multitudes -- the nerve endings of economic statistics and commercial strategies, the consumers and workers talked about at forums -- they are the ones just now finding a voice and who won't shut up.

 

Can Venezuela’s elite and the CIA contain their fury over Chavez, asks ALEXANDER COCKBURN

Castro saw the Spanish king’s intervention as an instant when the ‘hearts of all Latin America quivered’.

Chavez is trying to level the playing field in Venezuela, long dominated by a small, corrupt elite. So long as the Central Bank enjoyed independence, Venezuela's sovereignty was leased out to the international money markets.

Now ex-Minister of Defence Raul Baduel has launched a violent attack on the referendum, on Chavez and the Congress. Back in 2002, Baduel, an army general, refused the invitation to launch a Pinochet-type bloodbath. But he is a right-winger and at a press conference on November 5 he appeared to favour a military coup.

The Venezuelan elites and the US government see the next few weeks as the last opportunity they may have to reverse the tide. We may see a 'strategy of tension' script unwind, as it has done in the past with coups in which the CIA has had a role: bombs in public places, assassinations, dramatic marches. On the other hand, Chavez is popular, canny and a survivor. The stakes are very high.

 

Chavez seeks apology from Spanish king Copyright EL PAÍS, SL. 2007

"The king blew his top and the least he should do is to offer an apology and tell the world the truth," Chavez said Wednesday in an interview with a radio station in the southwestern city of Barquisimeto.

Exasperated by Chavez's attacks on a former Spanish premier during Saturday's final session of the meeting, King Juan Carlos at one point told Chavez to "shut up," though the latter said he did not hear the king shout.

The Venezuelan president accused the international press for "motivated" reporting on the incident and denounced "the existence of a campaign on the world level ... to make it appear that I was the aggressor, when I didn't say anything to him (the king)."

Chávez to take "hard look" at ties with Spain

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez announced Wednesday that he plans to "take a hard look at" relations with Spain and will also watch more closely the activities of Spanish businesses in his country.

"They're going to be called to account and I'm going to watch them to find out what they're doing here," Chávez warned.

 

Spain hopes spat with Venezuela will blow over Reuters Thursday Nov 15 2007, By Jason Webb.

"I think we have already made our point with great force, thanks to the head of state, which is what irritated the president of Venezuela," Moratinos said.

"Unless something else happens which forces us to revise our position, our attitude at the moment is to keep diplomatic channels open," he said.

The incident comes as Chavez campaigns for a referendum on Dec. 2, which he hopes will expand his powers and end presidential term limits.

Under Zapatero, a socialist, ties between Madrid and Caracas have been friendly. In 2006, Washington forced Madrid to call off a multi-million sale of military aircraft to Venezuela after banning a Spanish aerospace firm from using U.S. components.

 

US Ambassador hails Spain attitude before Chávez

US Ambassador to Spain Eduardo Aguirre Thursday hailed Spanish King Juan Carlos I's and the head of the Spanish government José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero's attitude during a verbal clash with Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez in the Ibero-American Summit in Chile, DPA reported.

The diplomat -whose country is a usual target of Chávez's criticisms- said "Spain has covered itself with glory in this issue," given its firm reply to the Venezuelan ruler's attacks.

"Spain has a de luxe king and a president who, in this case, was speaking up for Spanish institutions, including José María Aznar, who is also magnificent former president and had the courtesy of thanking Rodríguez Zapatero for his comments," said Aguirre following a meeting the Spanish Minister of Foreign Affairs Miguel Ángel Moratinos held Thursday with some 60 diplomats in Madrid.

 

Negotiating over Betancourt

Ingrid Betancourt, the Colombian-French citizen and former Colombian presidential candidate held hostage by the Colombian rebel group FARC for more than five years, will dominate a meeting between Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez and French President Nicolas Sarkozy on Tuesday.

The irrepressible Chavez, who wants play a major international role at a moment when his country is facing tensions due to constitutional reform, meets with Sarkozy as part of a "rapid but productive" tour, including the OPEC heads of state summit in Saudi Arabia at the weekend, Iran and Portugal.

On November 8, it was reported that Chavez had held the first of what may be a series of meetings with representatives of the FARC, after offering to mediate in order to gain the release of hostages. The FARC delegation involved in the talks may also meet a representative of Sarkozy. Chavez has said that, before arriving in Paris next week, he hopes to have evidence that Betancourt is alive -- something that has been promised by FARC 'foreign minister' Rodrigo Granda.

 

Nov 16

Reuters | Friday, 16 November 2007

'Hurricane Hugo' Chavez won't shut up on tour Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez will not keep quiet on a tour this week of the Middle East and Europe despite being deep into a diplomatic dispute with Spain after his diatribes against the ex-colonial power. "Nobody can expect us not to say who we are, not to say what we feel and not to say what we want," Chavez said. Chavez's hero is Simon Bolivar, the Venezuelan who ejected Spain from South America in the 19th century. A socialist who calls Cuban leader Fidel Castro his mentor, Chavez sees himself as a modern-day liberator ridding the region and beyond of "imperialism" and capitalism. Political analysts say his bark is worse than his bite.

"Mixing bilateral political issues with the local operations of private companies. . . establishes a very negative precedent," Alberto Ramos of Goldman Sachs said. "This contributes to deteriorate even further the already-challenging business environment," he added.

 

Nov 19

'Shut up' ringtone a hit in Spain Associate Press

About half a million people have downloaded a cellphone ringtone featuring the phrase "Por que no te callas?" or "Why don't you shut up?" leading Madrid daily El Pais reported on its Web site Monday.

T-shirts and mugs featuring the words are also becoming a profitable business, and videos of the confrontation have been a hit on YouTube.

Chavez's opponents in Venezuela are no less obsessed. Pirated copies of the quote have been popping up in the South American country. In Venezuela, T-shirts with the slogan in Spanish have the "NO" in uppercase — a call for voting against constitutional reforms that would significantly expand Chavez's power. The Venezuelan leader says the changes would empower neighborhood-based assemblies and advance the country's transition to socialism.

"The king said what Venezuelans have wanted to say to Chavez's face for a long time," said Jenny Romero, 21, a student sporting one of the T-shirts in Caracas. "I'm wearing this T-shirt to protest everything bad that has happened in the country."

 

Kenya: There And About - Chavez's Insults Know No Bounds The Nation (Nairobi), Chege Mbitiru Nairobi, Posted to the web 19 November 2007

Mr Chavez's insults of leaders are legendary. Some examples: In Mr Chavez's language, Mr Bush mutates - the Devil, terrorist, unholy, drunk, Hitler, ignoramus, coward, liar, immoral, Mr Danger, a donkey - ironically a very useful animal - et cetera.

Really, other words to describe Mr Bush and his policies accurately, convincingly and persuasively, exist. Similarly, Mexican President Vicente Fox deserves a more apt description than a US "puppy." Calling US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, a "little girl," even contemptuously, is silly; so is labelling the Organisation of American States Secretary General Jose Miguel Insulza "a true idiot."

Mr Chavez reserves best attributes to himself and friends. He has compared himself with Christ, referring to the latter's speech in the Book of Luke. If he stops talking, he has said, "All stones in South America would cry." He considers himself a latter day Simon Bolivar, a liberator of South Americans and beyond. He bestowed the honour to his friend, Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe, presumably for Africa. Luckily, Mr Mugabe's language benefits from occasional linguistic laundry.

The Venezuelan has some good ideas. He validly stands up to the United States and wealthy nations. At the summit, he hated its theme. He also suggested South American nations stop investing heavily in US Treasury bonds and put that cash in a proposed Bank of the South.

Mid-week, he said he planned to ask members of the Organization of Oil Exporting Countries, OPEC, to sell oil at reduced prices to poverty-stricken countries, which would help.

 

Nov 20

Latin America Does Not Shut Up Madrid, Nov 20 (Prensa Latina)

About 2,500 intellectuals from Latin America and Europe added their support to the campaign Latin America Does Not Shut Up, in defense of the sovereignty of the region, a support that grows at a constant rhythm.

Among new adhesion of intellectuals are the Brazilian poet, Thiago de Mello, the writer and journalist, Stella Calloni, the singer, Piero and lawyer, Beinusz Szmukler from Argentina as well as the Paraguayan Martin Almada and Spanish academic Carlos Fernandez Liria.

Released on November 15, the text criticizes the position of King Juan Carlos of Spain against Venezuelan president, Hugo Chavez during the recent Ibero American Summit in Santiago de Chile.

What happened there, the text points out, is proof that times have changed in Latin America. The Indians, the oppressed and forgotten have definitively entered the political scenario of Ibero America and neither monarchs or neo liberals cloaked as left wingers will shut them up.

The organizers of the campaign noted how the Summit intended to claim that poverty, exclusion and marginalization of the majority in Latin America are not the responsibility of the old colonial metropolises, nor of the continuity of that domination through European and US transnationals.

Personalities such as the Brazilians Fernando Morais and Emir Sadir, the Chilean Manuel Cabieses, the Venezuelan Andres Bizarra, Colombians Hernando Calvo Ospina and Fernando Rendon, the Ecuadorian Pablo Guayasamin and Puerto Rican Danny Rivera came out in support of the document.

The document critiques representatives of petty interests of bankers and stock holders and not the honor of the Spaniards.

It deplores that the leader of a party called "socialist and worker" and a non-elected monarch shared "in the defense of the war criminal, Jose Maria Aznar."

 

Nov 22

FACTBOX:Venezuela Chavez's loose lips spark diplomatic spats

* In 2005, Venezuela and Mexico withdrew their ambassadors after Chavez called Mexico's then president, Vicente Fox, a "lap dog of the empire," in reference to the conservative president's close ties to the Bush administration. The two countries only sent ambassadors back to each other's capitals earlier this year.

* Colombia's government on Wednesday ended Chavez's role as a mediator with leftist rebels aimed at freeing hostages after Colombian President Alvaro Uribe complained the Venezuelan overstepped his mandate. Colombia said Chavez had talked by telephone with a military chief about the hostages despite an agreement with Uribe not to do so. The Uribe government also said Chavez had publicly disclosed information he had learned in private conversations.

Comment by niko1605, Nov 22, 2007 2:56 PM

Colombia's president Uribe accusations against Chavez are probably under George Bush's request to undercut Chavez's political influence in Latin America. Uribe is Bush's close ally, and Colombia gets about 10 billion a year from the U.S., so Uribe is in a bind to oblige.

Chavez's calling the former Spanish prime minister Jose Maria Aznar, a "fascist" was justified. He used the Spanish navy to stop and inspect a foreign ship in the Arabian Sea on behalf of the U.S., and the Spanish ambassador in Venezuela was with the military officers who overthrew Chavez. And the commander of the Armored Division who refused to join the coup, send helicopters with commandos to free Chavez and restore him to power, told CBS "60 minutes" that he was offered a huge bribe to join the plotters - but he refused. There should be no doubt that the bribe was U.S. money, and the Spanish ambassador and the Spanish banks in Venezuela were probably the disbursing agents.

The current Spanish prime minister's, Louis Zapatero, argument that Jose Maria Aznar was an elected leader and deserved "respect" [not a "fascist" slur], was hypocritical. Mr. Chavez was elected by 63% of Venezuelans, and he deserved "respect" to serve his people. Hitler and Mussolini were proud fascists, and all they did was overthrowing governments and establishing puppet regimes.

As for King Juan Carlos, he was a hapless aristocratic youth until the Spanish fascist dictator, Francisco Franco, decided at his death-bed to make him a King of Spain and thus assure that Spain stays with a right wing government - no chance for Socialism, and no more "international brigades" supporting socialist causes around the globe.

There is no precedent in history in which any king told another head of state publicly to "shut up." It was certainly a bonanza for the comedians, and it will probably hurt more Juan Carlos than Chavez... - Nikos Retsos

 

Nov 23

France urges Colombia to reconsider on Chávez Hilversum, Friday 23 Nov 2007 11:34 UTC

Paris - France has urged Colombia to reconsider its decision to end Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez's efforts to negotiate with the FARC rebel movement. French president Nicolas Sarkozy said he believes President Chávez is the best man to secure the release of hostages being held by FARC. They include French-Colombian politician Ingrid Bétancourt, who was kidnapped over five years ago.

Colombia's President Alvaro Uribe withdrew his support for the Venezuelan president after he contacted a Colombian general in spite of agreements not to. President Chávez also revealed details about the progress of negotiations with the FARC, which focused on the exchange of rebel prisoners for FARC hostages.

The family of Ingrid Bétancourt is upset by the news. They say President Chávez had made a lot of progress. The Venezuelan president says he accepts Colombia's decision and has called on FARC to show that the hostages are still alive.

 

2014:

16May @22h: 226,786

17May @20h: 227,177

2015:

24Jan@16h: 394,078

25Jan@13h: 394,426

28Jan@16h: 396,854

3June@23h: 523,665

In the 13th century, King Frederick II (who spoke nine languages: Latin, Greek, Sicilian, Arabic, Norman, German, Hebrew, Yiddish and Slavonic) wanted to experiment with the "natural" language of mankind. He placed six babies in a nursery and ordered their nannies to feed them, put them to sleep, bathe them, but most of all, without ever talking to them.

 

Frédéric II hoped to discover what language these babies would naturally choose "without outside influence". He thought it would be Greek or Latin, the only original languages he could think of as pure.

 

However, the experiment did not produce the desired result. Not only did no baby begin to speak any language, but all six of them died and eventually died.

Ancient records suggest that this kind of experiment was carried out from time to time. An early record of an experiment of this kind can be found in Herodotus's Histories. According to Herodotus, the Egyptian pharaoh Psamtik I carried out such an experiment, and concluded the Phrygian race must antedate the Egyptians since the child had first spoken something similar to the Phrygian word bekos, meaning "bread". However, it is likely that this was a willful interpretation of their babbling.

An experiment allegedly carried out by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in the 13th century saw young infants raised without human interaction in an attempt to determine if there was a natural language that they might demonstrate once their voices matured. It is claimed he was seeking to discover what language would have been imparted unto Adam and Eve by God.

The experiments were recorded by the monk Salimbene di Adam in his Chronicles, who wrote that Frederick encouraged "foster-mothers and nurses to suckle and bathe and wash the children, but in no ways to prattle or speak with them; for he would have learnt whether they would speak the Hebrew language (which he took to have been the first), or Greek, or Latin, or Arabic, or perchance the tongue of their parents of whom they had been born. But he laboured in vain, for the children could not live without clappings of the hands, and gestures, and gladness of countenance, and blandishments."

Several centuries after Frederick II's experiment, James IV of Scotland was said to have sent two children to be raised by a mute woman isolated on the island of Inchkeith, to determine if language was learned or innate. The children were reported to have spoken good Hebrew, but historians were skeptical of these claims soon after they were made. This experiment was later repeated by the Mughal emperor Akbar, who held that speech arose from hearing, thus children raised without hearing human speech would become mute.Children learn the language(s) that they hear and see around them at a young age, but what happens if a child just never has any linguistic input, spoken or signed? Although a scientific study around this question would undoubtedly be fascinating, it would also be extremely unethical, so much so that the cultural historian Roger Shattuck has called it The Forbidden Experiment.In times less hampered by modern sensitivities and human rights, several rulers viewed such an experiment as less than verboten. The Egyptian pharaoh Psamtik I is reported by Herodotus around 600 B.C. to have isolated two newborns with a shepherd who was strictly instructed not to speak to them. Supposedly, the first word that these children uttered was becos, the word for "bread" in ancient Phrygian, but it seems quite likely that this was a willful interpretation of their babbling (think bababa).* A similar experiment was conducted by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in the 13th century, but the Chronicle of Salimbene reports that "he laboured in vain, for the children could not live without clappings of the hands, and gestures, and gladness of countenance, and blandishments."

 

In more recent centuries, we've discovered what happens when children are isolated from language through unfortunate circumstances. One example is "wild children," such as Victor and Genie, who have been abused or neglected, but as interesting as those cases are, it's hard to separate out the effects of language deprivation from other mistreatment.

 

Another way that children may be naturally isolated from language is if they're deaf children surrounded by people who don't speak a sign language. Although their families often manage a rudimentary form of communication with them, known as home sign, it resembles the ad hoc gestures that we'd do at a loud concert and lacks the full expressive powers of a complete sign language.

 

In Nicaragua in the 1980s, many such children were brought together in the country's first school for the deaf, where especially the younger children took the various home signs of their classmates and stitched them together into a full-fledged sign language, as you can see in the video below: A clip from the PBS documentary Evolution: The Mind's Big Bang. Nicaraguan Sign Language has been cited as evidence that although children require a certain amount of linguistic input at a young age in order to learn language, they're capable of generalizing from incomplete information to something far richer and more complex—a testament to the magnificent potential of the human brain.

 

Babies need communication to survive. Milk and sleep are not enough. Communication is also an essential element of life. The human being is a social being, it is not only the "biological" that allows him to live, but the "social" as well.

Frederick of Hohenstaufen1 (Federico II, as Emperor of the Romans), born on 26 December 1194 in Jesi near Ancona and died on 13 December 1250 in Fiorentino (near San Severo), reigned over the Holy Roman Empire from 1220 to 1250. He was king of Germania, king of Sicily and king of Jerusalem.

 

He experienced permanent conflicts with the Papacy and was excommunicated twice. Pope Gregory IX called it the Antichrist.

 

He spoke at least six languages: Latin, Greek, Sicilian, Greek, Arabic, Norman and German. He welcomed scholars from all over the world to his court, showed great interest in mathematics and the fine arts, carried out scientific experiments (sometimes on living beings) and built castles whose plans he sometimes drew up. Because of his good relations with the Muslim world, he led the sixth crusade - the only peaceful crusade - and was the second to reclaim the holy places of Christianity, after Godefroy de Bouillon.

 

The last emperor of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, he became a legend. From his contemporaries, he received the nicknames Stupor Mundi (the "Stupor of the world") and "prodigious transformers of things", so much so that they waited for his return after his death. In the collective consciousness, he became the "sleeping Emperor" in the depths of a cave, the one who could not have disappeared, the one who slept from a magical sleep in the crater of Etna. His personal myth later merged with that of his grandfather Frédéric Barberousse: the legend of the xiiie century moved from the Sicilian volcano to Kyffhäuser mountain in the xve century, and Frederick II was replaced by Frederic I Barberousse. His charisma was such that the day after his death, his son, the future king Manfred I of Sicily, wrote a letter to another of his sons, King Conrad IV, which began with the following words:"The sun of the world has set, which shone on the peoples, the sun of right, the asylum of peace...".

Frederick II carried out also a deprivation language experiment on young infants raised without human interaction in an attempt to determine if there was an innate natural language that they might demonstrate once their voices matured. It is claimed he was seeking to discover what language would have been imparted unto Adam and Eve by God. Salimbene di Adam wrote that Frederick encouraged “foster-mothers and nurses to suckle and bathe and wash the children, but in no ways to prattle or speak with them; for he would have learnt whether they would speak the Hebrew language (which had been the first), or Greek, or Latin, or Arabic, or perchance the tongue of their parents of whom they had been born. But he laboured in vain, for the children could not live without clappings of the hands, and gestures, and gladness of countenance, and blandishments.”

He was the son of Emperor Henry VI and Constance de Hauteville, daughter of Roger II de Hauteville, first Norman king of Sicily. When his mother was 40 years old6, his birth took place in public, in a tent on Jesi's main square7. The birth threatened to turn into a tragedy when two Arab doctors were called in to save the mother and child.

Frédéric-Roger was elected king of the Romans in 1196, at the request of his father, to ensure the dynastic continuity of the Hohenstaufen to the imperial throne. However, Henry VI died suddenly in 1197 and the Empress died in 1198 when Frederick II was still only a child of three years old. Constance did not claim the rights of the child in Germany, where the great ones, anxious to avoid a minority like Henry IV's, turned to the brother of the deceased: Philip of Swabia was elected king of the Romans in 1198, in place of his nephew. The Pope immediately elicited a competitor, the Welf Othon IV. Frédéric-Roger, on the other hand, was only king of Sicily, then including the island and most of southern Italy to the south of the papal states. Constance, when he died, entrusted the guardianship of the child and the kingdom to Pope Innocent III until his majority. Frédéric spent his youth in Palermo and at the age of fourteen he married Constance d' Aragon, eleven years older than him.

Othon IV was crowned Roman Emperor of Germany by Innocent III in 1209, but when Othon IV lost the favor of the Pope, he supported Frederick's election as King of Germany and excommunicated Othon IV in the Nuremberg Empire Diet of 1211. But this title of king of Germany, which was a prerequisite for the imperial crown, meant nothing as long as Othon IV remained emperor until his defeat at the battle of Bouvines in 1214.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Language_deprivation_experiments

"Coca Cola Bottle" after Warhol.

Linocut on BFK Paper. 2011-12

A group member of "Los Hijos del Maiz" dances solo for the crowd as a mermaid.

Built between 1747 and the early 19th century to the design of Guatemalan architect Diego José de Porres Esquivel, the monument expresses the transition from Baroque to Neoclassical architecture and its style can be considered to be eclectic. The Cathedral is characterized by the sobriety of its interior decoration and the abundance of natural light. The vault of the Sanctuary, however, presents rich ornamentation. The Cathedral houses important works of art including a wooden Flemish altarpiece, and paintings of the 14 stations of the Way of the Cross by Nicaraguan artist Antonio Sarria (late 19th and early 20th centuries).

This is a piece of art on display at the Community Center. They have art classes on a regular basis.

Linocut on Rives HW Paper.

Manuel Francisco dos Santos (October 28, 1933 – January 20, 1983), known by the nickname "Garrincha" ("little bird"), was a Brazilian football right winger and forward who helped the Brazil national team win the World Cups of 1958 and 1962, and played the majority of his professional career for Brazilian club Botafogo. FIFA considers him the best Brazilian player ever after Pelé,[4] and in 1999, many eminent football historians in Brazil have also referred to him being at least the equal of Pelé. Widely regarded as the best dribbler in football history, he was also an excellent crosser and free-kick taker.

The word garrincha itself means wren. Garrincha was also known as Mané (short for Manuel) by his friends, a name which in Brazil also means "fool" or "half wit".[6] It was possibly used in that sense at some point – or even as a double entendre due to Garrincha's child-like personality. The combined "Mané Garrincha" is common among fans in Brazil. Due to his immense popularity in Brazil, he was also called Alegria do Povo (Joy of the People) and Anjo de Pernas Tortas (Angel with Bent Legs)

 

Keith Jarrett (born May 8, 1945 in Allentown, Pennsylvania) is an American pianist, composer and jazz icon.

His career started with Art Blakey, Charles Lloyd and Miles Davis. Since the early 1970s he has enjoyed a great deal of success in both classical music and jazz, as a group leader and a solo performer. His improvisation technique combines not only jazz, but also other forms of music, especially classical, gospel, blues and ethnic folk music. One of Jarrett's trademarks is his frequent, highly audible vocalization (grunting, groaning, and tuneless singing), similar to that of Glenn Gould, Thelonious Monk, Erroll Garner, and Oscar Peterson. Jarrett is also physically active while playing, writhing, gyrating, and almost dancing on the piano bench. Jarrett is notoriously intolerant of audience noise, including coughing and other involuntary sounds, especially during solo improvised performances. He feels that extraneous noise affects his musical inspiration. As a result, cough drops are routinely supplied to Jarrett's audiences in cold weather, and he has even been known to stop playing and lead the crowd in a "group cough."

 

Nastassja Kinski (born Nastassja Aglaia Nakszynski, January 24, 1961) is a German actress, who appeared in more than 60 international movies. Her starring roles include her Golden Globe Award-winning portrayal of 'Tess Durbeyfield' in Roman Polanski's film Tess, her roles in two erotic films (Stay As You Are and Cat People), and her parts in Wim Wenders' films The Wrong Move, Paris, Texas, and Faraway, So Close!. During the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s, Kinski was widely regarded as an international sex symbol.

 

Woody Allen (born Allan Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is an American film director, writer, actor, comedian, and playwright.

Allen's distinctive films, which run the gamut from dramas to screwball sex comedies, have made him one of the most respected living American directors. He is also distinguished by his rapid rate of production and his very large body of work. Allen writes and directs his movies and has also acted in the majority of them. For inspiration, Allen draws heavily on literature, sexuality, philosophy, psychology, Jewish identity, European cinema, and New York City, where he was born and has lived his entire life.

Allen is also a jazz clarinetist. What began as a teenage avocation has led to regular public performances at various small venues in his Manhattan hometown, with occasional appearances at various jazz festivals.

 

Major Anya Amasova (aka Agent XXX) is a fictional character in the James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me, portrayed by Barbara Bach. In the film Amasova is an agent of the KGB. Barbara Bach (born August 27, 1947) is an American actress and model, best-known as the Bond girl from the James Bond movie The Spy Who Loved Me (1977). She is married to musician Ringo Starr, former drummer of The Beatles.

 

Max Zorin is a fictional character and the main antagonist in the James Bond film A View to a Kill. He was portrayed by Christopher Walken, (born March 31, 1943) is an American film and theatre actor.

Walken is a prolific actor who has spent more than 50 years on stage and screen. He has appeared in over 100 movie and television roles, including The Deer Hunter, The Dead Zone, A View to a Kill, At Close Range, King of New York, Batman Returns, True Romance, Pulp Fiction, The Funeral, and Catch Me If You Can, and in TV's Kojak and The Naked City. Walken gained a cult following in the 1990s[citation needed] as the Archangel Gabriel in the first three The Prophecy movies, as well as his frequent guest-host appearances on Saturday Night Live. In the United States, films featuring Walken have grossed over $1.8 billion. He has also played the main role in the Shakespeare plays Hamlet, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, and Coriolanus. His most famous film roles were Nikanor "Nick" Chevotarevich in The Deer Hunter and in Pulp Fiction, as Captain Koons, a Vietnam War veteran, which has since become a pop culture icon, despite his appearance being less than ten minutes at length.

 

John Steinbeck III (February 27, 1902—December 20, 1968) was an American writer. He wrote the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath, published in 1939 and the novella Of Mice and Men, published in 1937. In all, he wrote twenty-five books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books and several collections of short stories. In 1962 Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature. Seventeen of his works, including The Grapes of Wrath (1940), Cannery Row (1945), The Pearl (1947), and East of Eden (1952), went on to become Hollywood films (some appeared multiple times, i.e., as remakes), and Steinbeck also achieved success as a Hollywood writer, receiving an Academy Award nomination for Best Story in 1944 for Alfred Hitchcock's Lifeboat.

 

Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 — July 2, 1961) was a novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. He was part of the 1920s expatriate community in Paris, and one of the veterans of World War I later known as "the Lost Generation." He received the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 for The Old Man and the Sea, and the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954.

Hemingway's distinctive writing style is characterized by economy and understatement, and had a significant influence on the development of twentieth-century fiction writing. His protagonists are typically stoical men who exhibit an ideal described as "grace under pressure." Many of his works are now considered classics of American literature.The influence of Hemingway's writings on American literature was considerable and continues today. James Joyce called "A Clean, Well Lighted Place" "one of the best stories ever written". (The same story also influenced several of Edward Hopper's best known paintings, most notably "Nighthawks."[41] ) Pulp fiction and "hard boiled" crime fiction (which flourished from the 1920s to the 1950s) often owed a strong debt to Hemingway.

During World War II, J. D. Salinger met and corresponded with Hemingway, whom he acknowledged as an influence.[42] In one letter to Hemingway, Salinger wrote that their talks "had given him his only hopeful minutes of the entire war," and jokingly "named himself national chairman of the Hemingway Fan Clubs."[43]

Hunter S. Thompson often compared himself to Hemingway, and terse Hemingway-esque sentences can be found in his early novel, The Rum Diary. Thompson's later suicide by gunshot to the head mirrored Hemingway's.

Hemingway's terse prose style is known to have inspired Charles Bukowski, Chuck Palahniuk, Douglas Coupland and many Generation X writers. Hemingway's style also influenced Jack Kerouac and other Beat Generation writers. Hemingway also provided a role model to fellow author and hunter Robert Ruark, who is frequently referred to as "the poor man's Ernest Hemingway".

Popular novelist Elmore Leonard, who has authored scores of western- and crime-genre novels, cites Hemingway as his preeminent influence, and this is evident in his tightly written prose. Though Leonard has never claimed to write serious literature, he has said: "I learned by imitating Hemingway.... until I realized that I didn't share his attitude about life. I didn't take myself or anything as seriously as he did."

 

Salma Hayek Jiménez (born September 2, 1966) is a Mexican and American actress, director, television and film producer. Hayek has appeared in more than thirty films and performed as an actress outside of Hollywood in Mexico and Spain.

Hayek is the first Mexican national to be nominated for a Best Actress Oscar. She is one of the most prominent Mexican figures in Hollywood, since the legendary Dolores del Rio. She is also, after Fernanda Montenegro, the second of four Latin American actresses to achieve a Best Actress Oscar nomination.

 

Augusto Nicolás Calderón Sandino (May 18, 1895 – February 21, 1934) was a Nicaraguan revolutionary and leader of a rebellion against the U.S. military presence in Nicaragua between 1927 and 1933. He was labeled as a bandit by the U.S. government, and his exploits made him a hero throughout much of Latin America, where he became a symbol of resistance to U.S. domination. Drawing the United States Marines into an undeclared guerrilla war, his guerrilla organization suffered many defeats, but he successfully evaded capture. US troops withdrew from the country after overseeing the inauguration of President Juan Bautista Sacasa. Sandino was assassinated by General Anastasio Somoza García, who went on to seize power in a coup d'état two years later, establishing a family dynasty that would rule Nicaragua for over forty years. Sandino's legacy was claimed by the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN), which overthrew the Somoza government in 1979.

 

Roberto Boninsegna (born November 13, 1943 in Mantua) is an Italian former football player. He started his career in Serie B (Italian 2nd division) with Prato in 1963-64 season. He transferred to FC Potenza, who was Serie B team in 1964-65 season. He also played for Varese in 1965-66 and Cagliari between 1966-1969. Boninsegna gained a status as an efficient striker with Internazionale and Italy in the 1970s. In Series A he totaled 171 goals in 281 games, and was top goalscorer in Italy in 1971 and 1972. He transferred to Juventus F.C. in 1976 and played 3 seasons for them. He finished his career at Verona end of 1979-80 season.

Boninsegna scored Italy's only goal (though at the time it was an important equaliser) in the 1970 FIFA World Cup final against Brazil, which Italy ultimately lost 4–1.

 

Leighton Koizumi was and is the lead singer of Gravedigger V and the Morlocks, two seminal garage punk band of the 80's. After the third album in the 1991, Leighotn Koizumi haddisappeared; someone guessed the aids killed him in 1990 but two years later some rumours from San Diego gave him out clean and ready to start again, then nothing else… Till the beginning of 1998 when they spread the groundless piece of news that he left us forever…but finally in the 1999 Koizumi had reformed the Morlocks.

 

Alberto Juantorena Danger (born 3 December 1950) is a former Cuban track athlete. At the 1976 Summer Olympics, White Lightning became the first and so far only athlete to win both the 400 and 800 m Olympic titles.

Born in Santiago de Cuba, Juantorena first played basketball, until he was discovered by a Polish track coach, Zygmunt Zabierzowski, who convinced him to start running. Only a year later, Juantorena was eliminated in the semi-finals of the 400 m event at the Munich Olympics (1972).

Juantorena became better known in the next years, winning a gold medal at the World University Games (1973) and a silver at the 1975 Pan American Games, both in the 400 m. He only seriously took up running the 800 m in 1976, so few thought he was a serious candidate for the Olympic gold that year. However, Juantorena made it to the Olympic final, and led the field for most of the race, eventually winning in a world record time of 1:43.50. Three days later, he also won the 400 m final, setting a low-altitude world record of 44.26.

Juantorena, now known at home as El Caballo (the horse), continued his career, although he would never reach the same level as in Montreal. He just missed out on a medal in the 400 m at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow, placing fourth. At the 1983 World Championships, his last international appearance in a major event, he broke his foot when he stepped on the inside of the track after qualifying in the first round of the 800m. Juantorena later served as the Vice Minister of Sports for Cuba.

 

Chris Cornell (born Christopher John Boyle on July 20, 1964) is an American rock musician best known as the lead singer and songwriter for rock bands Soundgarden (1984–1997) and Audioslave (2001–2007). He was the founder and frontman for Temple of the Dog.

 

Philippe Leroy , of his true name Philippe Leroy-Beaulieu , is a Acteur French, born on October 15th 1930 in Paris. It is revealed by the Film the Hole (1960) of Jacques Becker. It is directed quickly towards the Italy, where he becomes a much in demand actor. It obtains a great success by holding the main role of the whodunnit Seven men out of gold (1965) of Mario Vicario, where it interprets the organizer of a daring holdup. It shares then its career between the France and Italy, with a very clear preference for Italy, where it resides.

 

Colonel Rosa Klebb is a fictional character and the antagonist from the James Bond film and novel From Russia with Love. She was played by Lotte Lenya in the film version. Her name punningly derives from the popular Soviet phrase for women's rights, khleb i rozy, which in turn was a direct Russian translation of the internationally used Labor slogan bread and roses. Lenya was born Karoline Wilhelmine Charlotte Blamauer (October 18, 1898 – November 27, 1981) to working class Roman Catholic parents in Vienna, Austria. She moved to study in Zürich, Switzerland in 1914, taking up her first job at the Schauspielhaus using the stage name Lotte Lenja.

 

Vladimir Pyotrovich Tkachenko (September 20, 1957 in Golovinka, USSR) is a retired Ukrainian basketball player. The 7'3" (2.21m), 243 lbs, (110 kg) center won two Olympic medals and three FIBA World Championship medals in a career that lasted 16 years. He was named Mr Europa player of the year in 1979.

A great defensive player, Tkachenko could block out 2-3 opponents to give teammates a chance to grab a rebound. His offensive ability was however important too: His post up moves were basic but effective and his shooting was good for a player his size, with a range of approximately 17 feet.

Tkachenko began playing for Stroitel Kiev in 1973-74, when he was 16 years old. He continued to play for them through the 1980-81 season. In 1983 he began playing for CSKA Moscow and he stayed there until his retirement after the 1988-89 season.

From 1976 to 1987 Tkachenko played on the Soviet national team, participating in many European and World competitions. Highlights would include the two bronze medals at the Olympics (1976 and 1980), the gold medal at the 1982 FIBA World Championship (also silver medals in 1978 and 1986) and three gold medals in the European Championship in 1979, 1981 and 1985 (and silvers in 1977 and 1987).

 

Emilio Largo is a fictional character and the main antagonist from the James Bond novel Thunderball. In the novel he is depicted according to the British stereotypes about Italians as a large, olive-skinned, powerful man exuding animal charm, with a profile of a Roman emperor and hairy hands which are likened to crawling tarantulas. He also appears in the 1965 film adaptation, with Italian actor Adolfo Celi filling the role. Born in Messina in the 1922, Sicily, Celi appeared in nearly 100 movies, specializing in international villains. He also appeared as a protagonist in some Italian comedies like Amici Miei and Brancaleone alle Crociate. Another well-known role of his was as camp commandant Battaglia opposite Frank Sinatra and Trevor Howard's Allied POWs in the 1965 World War II escape drama Von Ryan's Express.

Celi was fluent in several languages, but his thick Sicilian accent meant that he was usually dubbed when appearing in an English language film.

During his early career, Celi was also successful as a stage actor in Argentina and Brazil, where he owned an actors' company along with the Brazilian stage greats Paulo Autran and Tonia Carrero. He directed three films in South America in the 1950s, including the Brazilian hit Tico-Tico no Fubá in 1952.

 

Fabrizio De André (Genova, February 18, 1940 - Milano, January 11, 1999) was an Italian singer-songwriter and poet. In his works he often told stories of prostitutes, marginalized and rebellious people. In Italy he is considered as a poet because of the quality of his lyrics.

 

Alessandro (Sandro) Pertini (September 25, 1896 - February 24, 1990) was an Italian socialist, probably the most popular President of the Italian Republic.Born in Stella (Province of Savona) as the son of a well to do landowner, Alberto, he studied at a Salesian college in Varazze, and completed his schooling at the "Chiabrera" lyceum (high school) in Savona. His philosophy teacher was Adelchi Baratono, a reformist socialist who contributed to his approach to Socialism and probably introduced him to the inner circles of the Ligurian labour movements. Pertini obtained a Law degree from the University of Genoa. Sandro Pertini was against Italy's participation in World War I, but served as a lieutenant and was awarded several medals as for bravery. In 1918 he joined the United Socialist Party, PSU, then he settled in Florence where he also graduated in political science with a thesis entitled La Cooperazione ("Cooperation"; 1924). While in the city, Pertini also came into contact with people such as Gaetano Salvemini, the brothers Carlo and Nello Rosselli, and Ernesto Rossi. Pertini was physically beaten by Fascist squads on several occasions, but never lost faith in his ideals. In 1935 he was interned on Santo Stefano Island, Ventotene (LT), Pontine Islands, an island in the Tyrrhenian Sea, where he remained through Italy's entry into World War II and until 1943. There he saved the famous diaries of Antonio Gramsci. Although he had begun suffering from severe illness, Pertini never demanded pardon. He was released a month after Benito Mussolini's arrest, and joined the Italian resistance movement against the Nazi German occupiers and Mussolini's new regime - the Italian Social Republic. Arrested by the Germans, he was sentenced to death but freed by a partisan raid. After April 25, 1945 (the end of the war in Italy) he was elected to the first Parliament of the Italian Republic (the parliament which created the modern Italian Constitution, and thus was called La Costituente). In the postwar era he was a prominent member of the directive board of the Italian Socialist Party. He was appointed president of the Italian Chamber of Deputies in 1968, and in 1978 President of the Italian Republic, the highest office in the Republic. As President he succeeded in regaining the public's trust in the State and institutions. During the Brigate Rosse terrorism period of the Anni di piombo, Pertini was a defender of the institutions he represented. His death in Rome was viewed by many as a national tragedy, and he is arguably one of modern Italy's most accomplished politicians.

 

As an architecture buff, I take no small pride in knowing a thing or two about the architecture in and around Los Feliz, so it came as a great surprise when I stumbled upon the John Lautner-inspired Leiberman House on Prospect Avenue, originally designed by Glen Howard Small in 1989. Perhaps one of the least known mastermind's of contemporary architecture, the architect demonstrated early promise while an undergraduate at the University of Oregon, where he was awarded the Eliel Saarinen Scholarship for the Masters of Architecture program at the Cranbrook Academy of Arts and Institute of Sciences. After graduation (1967) he worked for various architectural firms including John Lautner and Smith and Williams. After a three year stint as assistant professor at Cal Poly Pomona School of Environmental Design, he joined a group of fellow architects to co-found the Southern California Institute of Architects (SCI-Arc) in 1972 where he taught for the next 18 years.

 

In the Leiberman House the original owners commissioned a creative addition to their home, described by the architect as a "a dingbat Spanish house that had no character." The resultant "face lift" consists of "a series of quarter curves in two different directions", the architect's attempt at bringing "sensuous, flowing curves to life" in a residential setting. The wall of the house have been sculpted in such a way as to eliminate the need for a roof, leaving the interiors open to the heavens and "exalted by its light." The house was purchased by Estela Mara Bensimon and Agapito Diaz in 1995. Dr. Bensimon who is co-director of the Center for Urban Education at the USC Rossier School of Education states that "when we purchased the house in 1995 from the Liebermans, the house was kind of half finished, i.e. nothing had been done beyond the living room. Over time, with the help of Los Feliz-based architect Anthony Eckelberry, we remodeled the rest of the house, tore down some walls, changed all the windows to take advantage of the openness of the design. As fate would have it, Eckelberry was a student of Glen Howard Small at SCI-Arc, so the remodel was faithful to the original vision."

 

Small currently lives in Managua, Nicaragua where he has recently completed three projects of national importance, the Concha Acustica, the centerpiece of the Nicaraguan national cultural plaza; the Journalist Rotunda, a monument to the journalists of the Sandinistan Revolution, and the Colon Rotunda, a fountain in the city's civic center. In 2002, Glen Small's daughter Lucia Small made an award-winning documentary film on his work, "My Father the Genius".

 

I missed it however the Assembly:registered: located at 2045 S. La Cienega Boulevard presented a retrospective of Small's contribution to green architecture entitled, "Glen Small: Recovery Room," a selection of earnest architectural proposals "yet to be realized" November 9-30, 2013. In describing the exhibition Archinect's own Orhan Ayyüce writes “When he saw the Green Machine, he said, ‘we're going to build this thing.’” – Glen Small quoting Los Angeles city planner Calvin Hamilton. Oregon and Nicaragua-based architect Glen Small’s mid-career proposals still inspire radical reconsideration of our notions of environmentalism, housing, and urban development. From the 1960s-1980s, a body of visionary designs placed Small at the center of key discussions of architectural experimentation and ecological consciousness in California, and studying alongside him was an assumed part of one’s education during the founding decades of the Southern California Institute of Architecture.

 

Thirty-plus years later, his proposals still exist - not as suggestions for monuments, nor as paper architecture, but as thoroughly worked out architecture. Projects like Green Machine (1977-80) and Turf Town (1983) are made all the more valid and relevant by comparison with contemporary development projects. Details of a work like Biomorphic Biosphere Megastructure (1969-77) may be elegant, but these qualities are never separate from a primary function as architectural program. Glen Small, and the flickering ethos of early SCI-Arc, still represent positions that are often considered too difficult in the current state of education and emerging practices. Through original models, drawings, published material, and a series of events, Assembly:registered: will join in the conversations Small has sustained throughout his practice".

 

The Leiberman House is located at 3995 Prospect Avenue in the Franklin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles.

  

Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.

:copyright: All rights reserved.

Linocut on Rives HW Paper.

6" x 6". 2008.

Años de Miedo / Time of Fear.

La McMona (after Duchamp)

Linocut on Rives Paper. 2009

Master Prints Series.

As an architecture buff, I take no small pride in knowing a thing or two about the architecture in and around Los Feliz, so it came as a great surprise when I stumbled upon the John Lautner-inspired Leiberman House on Prospect Avenue, originally designed by Glen Howard Small in 1989. Perhaps one of the least known mastermind's of contemporary architecture, the architect demonstrated early promise while an undergraduate at the University of Oregon, where he was awarded the Eliel Saarinen Scholarship for the Masters of Architecture program at the Cranbrook Academy of Arts and Institute of Sciences. After graduation (1967) he worked for various architectural firms including John Lautner and Smith and Williams. After a three year stint as assistant professor at Cal Poly Pomona School of Environmental Design, he joined a group of fellow architects to co-found the Southern California Institute of Architects (SCI-Arc) in 1972 where he taught for the next 18 years.

 

In the Leiberman House the original owners commissioned a creative addition to their home, described by the architect as a "a dingbat Spanish house that had no character." The resultant "face lift" consists of "a series of quarter curves in two different directions", the architect's attempt at bringing "sensuous, flowing curves to life" in a residential setting. The wall of the house have been sculpted in such a way as to eliminate the need for a roof, leaving the interiors open to the heavens and "exalted by its light." The house was purchased by Estela Mara Bensimon and Agapito Diaz in 1995. Dr. Bensimon who is co-director of the Center for Urban Education at the USC Rossier School of Education states that "when we purchased the house in 1995 from the Liebermans, the house was kind of half finished, i.e. nothing had been done beyond the living room. Over time, with the help of Los Feliz-based architect Anthony Eckelberry, we remodeled the rest of the house, tore down some walls, changed all the windows to take advantage of the openness of the design. As fate would have it, Eckelberry was a student of Glen Howard Small at SCI-Arc, so the remodel was faithful to the original vision."

 

Small currently lives in Managua, Nicaragua where he has recently completed three projects of national importance, the Concha Acustica, the centerpiece of the Nicaraguan national cultural plaza; the Journalist Rotunda, a monument to the journalists of the Sandinistan Revolution, and the Colon Rotunda, a fountain in the city's civic center. In 2002, Glen Small's daughter Lucia Small made an award-winning documentary film on his work, "My Father the Genius".

The Leiberman House is located at 3995 Prospect Avenue in the Franklin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles.

  

Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.

© All rights reserved.

As an architecture buff, I take no small pride in knowing a thing or two about the architecture in and around Los Feliz, so it came as a great surprise when I stumbled upon the John Lautner-inspired Leiberman House on Prospect Avenue, originally designed by Glen Howard Small in 1989. Perhaps one of the least known mastermind's of contemporary architecture, the architect demonstrated early promise while an undergraduate at the University of Oregon, where he was awarded the Eliel Saarinen Scholarship for the Masters of Architecture program at the Cranbrook Academy of Arts and Institute of Sciences. After graduation (1967) he worked for various architectural firms including John Lautner and Smith and Williams. After a three year stint as assistant professor at Cal Poly Pomona School of Environmental Design, he joined a group of fellow architects to co-found the Southern California Institute of Architects (SCI-Arc) in 1972 where he taught for the next 18 years.

 

In the Leiberman House the original owners commissioned a creative addition to their home, described by the architect as a "a dingbat Spanish house that had no character." The resultant "face lift" consists of "a series of quarter curves in two different directions", the architect's attempt at bringing "sensuous, flowing curves to life" in a residential setting. The wall of the house have been sculpted in such a way as to eliminate the need for a roof, leaving the interiors open to the heavens and "exalted by its light." The house was purchased by Estela Mara Bensimon and Agapito Diaz in 1995. Dr. Bensimon who is co-director of the Center for Urban Education at the USC Rossier School of Education states that "when we purchased the house in 1995 from the Liebermans, the house was kind of half finished, i.e. nothing had been done beyond the living room. Over time, with the help of Los Feliz-based architect Anthony Eckelberry, we remodeled the rest of the house, tore down some walls, changed all the windows to take advantage of the openness of the design. As fate would have it, Eckelberry was a student of Glen Howard Small at SCI-Arc, so the remodel was faithful to the original vision."

 

Small currently lives in Managua, Nicaragua where he has recently completed three projects of national importance, the Concha Acustica, the centerpiece of the Nicaraguan national cultural plaza; the Journalist Rotunda, a monument to the journalists of the Sandinistan Revolution, and the Colon Rotunda, a fountain in the city's civic center. In 2002, Glen Small's daughter Lucia Small made an award-winning documentary film on his work, "My Father the Genius".

The Leiberman House is located at 3995 Prospect Avenue in the Franklin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles.

  

Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.

:copyright: All rights reserved.

De que mal morira? (after Goya)

Linocut on HW Rives Paper. 2010.

Master Prints Series.

is a representative democratic republic. It is the largest country in Central America with an area of 130,373 km2. The country is bordered by Honduras to the north and Costa Rica to the south. The Pacific Ocean lies to the west of the country, the Caribbean Sea to the east. Falling within the tropics, Nicaragua sits between 11 degrees and 14 degrees north of the Equator in the Northern Hemisphere. Nicaragua's abundance of biologically significant and unique ecosystems contribute to Mesoamerica's designation as a biodiversity hotspot. The capital city of Nicaragua is Managua. Roughly one quarter of the nation's population lives in the Nicaraguan capital, making it the second largest city and metropolitan area in Central America.

 

The Spanish Empire conquered the region in the 16th century and the territory became associated with the Viceroyalty of New Spain and later the Captaincy General of Guatemala. Alongside the Spanish, the British established a protectorate on the eastern seaboard beginning in the middle of the 17th century, and ending roughly two centuries later. The eastern seaboard retains its colonial heritage; English is commonly spoken and the culture in Atlantic regions identify themselves as being more caribbean. In 1821, Nicaragua achieved its independence from Spain and joined the Federal Republic of Central America in 1823, later leaving the Federal Republic in 1838. Nicaragua increasingly became a subject of substantial interest because of its geographic position for a canal that would service the Windward Passage. Eighteen years after leaving the federal Republic, it also became the epicenter of William Walker's Golden Circle in Central America. Since its independence, Nicaragua has undergone periods of political unrest, military intervention, dictatorship and fiscal crisis—the most notable causes that lead to the Nicaraguan Revolution. Nicaragua's role in the Cold War influenced foreign policy on a global scale. Post-revolution Nicaragua has maintained democratic practices and has experienced economic growth and national stability.

 

The population in Nicaragua, reaching almost 6 million, is multiethnic. Segments of the population includes indigenous native tribes from the Mosquito Coast, Europeans, Africans, Asians and people of Middle Eastern origin. The main language is Spanish, although native tribes on the eastern coast speak their native languages. Nicaragua is widely considered the epicenter of the voseo pronoun form in Central America. Its location, along with the Nicaraguan Diaspora, has influenced Spanish among the other nations of Central America. The mixture of cultural traditions has cultivated a substantial amount of diversity in art, cuisine, literature, and music.

 

The Central American Volcanic Arc runs through the spine of the country, earning Nicaragua its colloquial name: La Tierra de Lagos y Volcanes, which in English translates to: The Land of Lakes and Volcanoes.

 

History

Please go to

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Nicaragua

 

Geography

Please go to

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geography_of_Nicaragua

 

Other info

Oficial name:

Republica de Nicaragua

 

Independence:

Declared September 15, 1821

- Recognized July 25, 1850

 

Area:

131.812 km2

 

Inhabitants:

6.500.000

 

Languages:

Garifuna [cab] A few speakers in Nicaragua (2001 Elias Velásquez). Ethnic population: 1,500 in Nicaragua (1982 Meso-America). Región Atlántica Autónoma del Sur, Orinoco village, far from speakers in other countries. Alternate names: Garífuna, Caribe, Black Carib, Central American Carib, "Moreno". Classification: Arawakan, Maipuran, Northern Maipuran, Caribbean

More information.

 

Mískito [miq] 154,400 in Nicaragua (1993 census). Population total all countries: 183,400. Ethnic population: 154,400 (1993). From Pearl Lagoon to Black River, coast and lowlands. Zalaya Department, North Atlantic Autonomous Region (RAAN) with a concentration in the city of Puerto Cabeza, and towns and villages of Prinzapolka, Tronquera, San Carlos (Río Coco), Waspam, Leimus, Bocana de Paiwas, Karawala, Sangnilaya, Wasla, Sisin, Rosita, Bonanza, Siuna, Bihmuna, and all along the Río Coco area. Also in South Atlantic Autonomous Region (RAAS). Also spoken in Honduras. Alternate names: Mísquito, Mískitu, Mosquito, Marquito. Dialects: Honduran Mískito (Mam), Tawira (Tauira), Baymuna (Baymunana, Baldam), Wanki (Wangki), Cabo (Kabo). The language is closest to Sumo Mayangna. Wangki is spoken around Puerto Cabeza. The other dialects are in settlements to the southwest. Classification: Misumalpan

More information.

 

Nicaragua Creole English [bzk] 30,000 (1986 Carrier Pidgin). Includes 625 speakers of Rama Cay Creole (1989 Holm). Bluefields Region including Rama Cay Island, Pearl Lagoon, Prinzapolka, Puerto Cabezas, Corn Islands. Alternate names: Mískito Coast Creole English. Dialects: Rama Cay Creole English, Bluefields Creole English. Classification: Creole, English based, Atlantic, Western

More information.

 

Nicaraguan Sign Language [ncs] 3,000 (1997 Asociación Nacional de Sordos de Nicaragua). Population includes hearing people. Managua and throughout the nation. Alternate names: Idioma de Senas de Nicaragua. Dialects: There are two sign languages in Nicaragua. Unrelated to El Salvadoran, Costa Rican, or other sign languages. Classification: Deaf sign language

More information.

 

Rama [rma] 24 (1989 J. Holm). Ethnic population: 900 (2000 C. Grinevald). Rama Cay, 30-mile radius. Classification: Chibchan, Rama Nearly extinct.

More information.

 

Spanish [spa] 4,347,000 in Nicaragua (1995). Alternate names: Español, Castellano. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Castilian

More information.

 

Sumo-Mayangna [sum] 6,700 in Nicaragua (1982 Mesoamerica). Population total all countries: 7,400. Upriver locations from Prinzapolka River in the south into Honduras in the north. Also spoken in Honduras. Alternate names: Sumo, Sumu, Soumo, Sumoo, Woolwa, Sumo Tawahka, Taguaca. Dialects: Panamahka, Nicaraguan Tawahka, Ulwa, Bawihka, Kukra. A distinct dialect is spoken in Honduras. Classification: Misumalpan

More information.

  

Extinct languages

Matagalpa [mtn] Extinct. Ethnic population: 18,000 to 20,000 (1981 MARC). The ethnic group is in the Central highlands, Matagalpa and Jinotega departments, and in Honduras, El Paraíso department. Alternate names: Pantasmas. Classification: Misumalpan

More information.

 

Monimbo [mom] Extinct. Ethnic population: 10,000 (1981 MARC). Classification: Unclassified

More information.

 

Subtiaba [sut] Extinct. Ethnic population: 5,000 (1981 MARC). Plains of León, Pacific slope. Classification: Subtiaba-Tlapanec

 

Meaning country name:

A merger coined by the Spanish explorer Gil González Dávila after Nicarao, a leader of an indigenous community inhabiting the shores of Lake Nicaragua and "agua," the Spanish word for "water"; subsequently, the ethnonym of that native community.

 

Description Flag:

The white stripe stands for the territory of our nation and represents the purity of our fatherland. The two blue stripes mean our territory is bathed by two oceans.

Blue-white-blue horizontal tricolour with the coat of arms in the middle. The coat of arms is that inherited from the Central-american union, five vulcanoes, two oceans, freedom hat, sun-rays, rainbow, all within a triangle and surrounded with the name of the state.

 

Coat of arms:

The Nicaraguan coat of arms was adopted first on 21 August 1823 (as the coat of arms of Central America), but underwent several changes during the course of history, until the last version (as of 1999) was introduced in 1971.

The triangle signifies equality, the rainbow signifies peace, the gorro frigio symbolizes liberty and the five volcanoes express the union and brotherhood of all five Central American countries.

 

Motto:

"Pro Mundi Beneficio"

 

National Anthem: Salve a ti, Nicaragua

 

¡Salve a ti, Nicaragua! En tu suelo

ya no ruge la voz del cañón,

ni se tiñe con sangre de hermanos

tu glorioso pendón bicolor.

 

Brille hermosa la paz en tu cielo,

nada empañe tu gloria inmortal,

¡que el trabajo es tu digno laurel

y el honor es tu enseña triunfal!

 

English

 

Hail to thee

Hail to thee, Nicaragua! On thy land

roars the voice of the cannon no more,

nor does the blood of brothers now stain

thy glorious bicolor banner.

 

Let peace shine beautiful in thy sky,

and nothing dim thine immortal glory,

¡for work is thy well earned laurel

and honor is thy triumphal emblem!

 

Internet Page: www.presidencia.gob.ni

www.intur.gob.ni

www.visitnicaragua.com

www.nicaragua.com

 

Nicaragua in diferent languages

 

eng | afr | arg | ast | bre | cat | dan | est | fin | fra | glg | hun | ina | ita | jnf | lld | nld | nor | oci | roh | ron | scn | sme | spa | swe | vor: Nicaragua

ces | dsb | eus | fao | hsb | ibo | jav | pol | slk | sqi | swa | tgl | tur | zza: Nikaragua

cor | hat | kin | mlt | run: Nikaragwa

crh | kaa | slo | tuk | uzb: Nikaragua / Никарагуа

hrv | lav | lit | slv: Nikaragva

deu | ltz | nds: Nikaragua / Nikaragua; Nicaragua / Nicaragua

cym | wln: Nicaragwa

aze: Nikaraqua / Никарагуа

bam: Nikaraguwa

bos: Nikaragva / Никарагва

epo: Nikaragvo

frp: Nicaragoa

fry: Nikaragûa

fur: Nicarague

gla: Niocaragua

gle: Nicearagua / Nicearagua

glv: Yn Nickeraag

ind: Nikaragua / نيكاراڬوا

isl: Níkaragva; Níkaragúa

kmr: Nîkaragûa / Никарагуа / نیکاراگووئا; Nîkarago / Никараго / نیکاراگۆ

kur: Nîkaragwa / نیکاراگوا; Nîkaragûa / نیکاراگووئا

lat: Nicaragua; Nicaraqua

lin: Nikalagwa

mlg: Nikaragoa

mol: Nicaragua / Никарагуа

msa: Nicaragua / نيكاراڬوا

nah: Nicanāhuac

nrm: Nicaragùa

por: Nicarágua

que: Nikarawa

rmy: Nikaragua / निकारागुआ

rup: Nicaragva

smg: Nėkaragva

smo: Nikarakua

som: Nikaraaguwa

srd: Nicaràgua

szl: Ńikaragua

tet: Nikarágua

vie: Ni-ca-ra-goa

vol: Nikaraguvän

wol: Nikaraaguwa

abq | alt | bul | che | chm | kir | kjh | kom | krc | kum | mon | rus | tyv | udm: Никарагуа (Nikaragua)

bak | tat: Никарагуа / Nikaragua

bel: Нікарагуа / Nikarahua

chv: Никарагуӑ (Nikaraguă)

kaz: Никарагуа / Nïkaragwa / نيكاراگۋا

kbd: Никарагуэ (Nikaraguă)

mkd: Никарагва (Nikaragva)

oss: Никарагуӕ (Nikaraguä)

srp: Никарагва / Nikaragva

tgk: Никарагуа / نیکرگوؤه / Nikaragua

ukr: Нікараґуа (Nikaragua)

ara: نيكاراغوا (Nīkārāġuwā); نيكارغوا (Nīkāraġwā); نيكاراجوا (Nīkārāguwā); نيكارجوا (Nīkāragwā)

fas: نیکاراگوآ / Nikârâguâ; نیکاراگوا / Nikârâguvâ

prs: نیکاراگوا (Nīkārāgvā)

pus: نيکاراګوا (Nīkārāgwā); نکاراګوا (Nikārāgwā)

uig: نىكاراگۇئا / Nikaragua / Никарагуа

urd: نکراگوا (Nikarāgūā)

div: ނިކަރާގުއާ (Nikarāgu'ā)

heb: ניקרגואה (Nîqaragûʾah); ניקאראגואה (Nîqârâgûʾah)

lad: ניקאראגואה / Nikaragua

yid: ניקאַראַגװאַ (Nikaragva)

amh: ኒካራጉዋ (Nikaraguwa)

ell: Νικαράγουα (Nikarágoya)

hye: Նիկարագուա (Nikaragoua)

kat: ნიკარაგუა (Nikaragua)

hin: निकारागुआ (Nikārāguā); निकारगुआ (Nikāraguā)

ben: নিকারাগুয়া (Nikārāguyā); নিকারাগোয়া (Nikārāgoyā)

pan: ਨਿਕਾਰਗੁਆ (Nikāraguā)

kan: ನಿಕರಾಗುವ (Nikarāguva)

mal: നിക്കരാഗ്വ (Nikkarāgva)

tam: நிக்கராகுவா (Nikkarākuvā); நிகராகுவா (Nikārakuvā)

tel: నికరాగ్వా (Nikarāgvā)

zho: 尼加拉瓜 (Níjiālāguā)

jpn: ニカラグア (Nikaragua)

kor: 니카라과 (Nikaragwa)

bod: ཉི་ཁ་ར་གྭ་ (Ñi.kʰa.ra.gwa.); ཉིས་ཅ་ལ་གྭ་ (Ñis.ča.la.gwa.)

mya: နီကာရာဂ္ဝာ (Nikaẏagwa)

tha: นิการากัว (Nikārākuā)

khm: នីការ៉ាហ្គ័រ (Nīkārāhkŏr)

 

AirCorps Aviation in Bemidji, Minnesota, confirmed that the P-51 Sierra Sue II will be among the slate of warbirds appearing at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2015. The airplane, which underwent a three-year restoration completed in 2014, was brought back to factory-fresh condition – “as she would look on the flightline in Belgium just after her nose art was painted,” noted AirCorps’ Chuck Cravens.

 

P-51s produced by North American’s Inglewood and Dallas factories were not flawless;

 

Production was rapid and mill-finish metal, paint, zinc chromate imperfections, and other blemishes happened to every Mustang that rolled off the line, including BuNo 44-63675. In addition, wartime nose art wasn’t always up to museum standards or the airbrushed beauty displayed on many beautiful warbirds today.

 

Cravens said the AirCorps’ craftsmen discovered that efforts to recreate that authentic “imperfection” were at least as challenging as creating a standard showpiece warbird.

 

Sierra Sue II’s interesting history began with its delivery to the United Stated Army Air Forces on November 27, 1944. The Mustang was shipped overseas on January 29, 1945, destined for Y-32 Ophoven, near Zwartburg, Belgium, the first week of April.

 

She was issued to 1st Lt. Robert Bohna of the Ninth Air Force, 370th Fighter Group, 402nd Squadron, on April 11, 1945. Sierra Sue II was flown in combat for the duration of the war, supporting the crossing of the Rheine and the push further into Germany until the Allied command ordered a halt at the Elbe. After that the plane was used as an escort to medium and heavy bomber missions until the last WWII mission on April 25, 1945.

 

Later in life, Sierra Sue II served in the Swedish and Nicaraguan air forces before being sold into private hands in 1971. Dave Allender, of Hayward, California, worked on modifications in a quest to break a low altitude closed course speed record, but the attempt was never made. Dr. Roger Christgau, a Minnesota physician, acquired BuNo 44-63675 in 1977 and owned it for 34 years until 2011.

 

It was sold to Paul Ehlen, who had the restoration done at AirCorps. Sierra Sue II is currently on loan to the Wings of the North Museum, Eden Prairie, Minnesota. Cravens says the airplane is one of the most original Mustangs in existence.

 

“She’s never had a back seat, her World War II tube radios are functional, her restorers took great pains to acquire (or duplicate where necessary) 1940s rivets, bolts, wiring, and countless other details,” he said.

 

Book: Combat Vet P-51, the History of Sierra Sue II, World War Two Survivor.

  

old design i did of famous Nicaraguan boxer, Alexis Arguello

Linocut on Rives HW Paper.

6" x 6". 2008.

Años de Miedo / Time of Fear.

The Solentiname Islands (Spanish pronunciation: [solentiˈname]) are an archipelago towards the southern end of Lake Nicaragua (also known as Lake Cocibolca) in the Nicaraguan department of Río San Juan. They are made up of four larger islands, each a few kilometres across, named, from west to east, Mancarroncito, Mancarrón, San Fernando and La Venada, along with some 32 smaller islands with rocky headlands which afford shelter to numerous aquatic birds. The islands’ origins are volcanic. The highest point in the islands is found on Mancarrón; it is 257 m above sea level. The Solentiname Islands are a National Monument. They constitute one of the 78 protected areas of Nicaragua.

The Solentiname Islands are tropical in every sense. They are covered in tropical tree species, transitional between wet and dry tropical, and are home to various colourful bird species, including various kinds of parrot and toucans; there are 76 species in all. The waters about the islands contain plentiful fish. There are about 46 species, including tarpon, freshwater sharks, sawfish, and swordfish. The island of La Venada is known for its deer, and also named for them (venado is Spanish for "deer").

The yearly rainfall in the islands measures between 1 400 and 1 800 mm, with most of it falling between May and December. Solentiname's mean yearly temperature is 26 °C.

The islands’ tranquility and colourfulness are likely what has attracted artists to their shores. Painters and woodcarvers share the islands with farmers and fishermen. The archipelago's population is less than 1000, and its land area is about 38 km². Modern amenities, including electricity and running water, are quite rare in the islands.

Mancarrón is Solentiname's largest island. It is here that the priest and poet Ernesto Cardenal’s historical parish is to be found. Father Cardenal arrived in the islands in 1966 and is known for establishing a communal society for artists in the early 1970s which persists to this day. The community developed its own naïve art movement based on existing folk forms, and with some help from painter Róger Pérez de la Rocha.

The Scream - Der Schrei der Natur - Skrik - El Grito. (after Munch)

Linocut on Rives Paper. 2009.

Master Prints Series.

Linocut on Rives HW Paper.

6" x 6". 2008.

Años de Miedo / Time of Fear.

El Dios de Los Pobres II.

Pro-Obras Benéficas Niños Costarricenses y Conservación de la Naturaleza.

San José, Costa Rica. 1996.

"Maestros del Arte Nicaraguense"/"Nicaraguan Art Masters"

Febrero 14, 4:00PM, Sala Asilia Guillén, Museo Antiguo Convento de San Francisco. Granada, Nicaragua. Febrero 14-28, 2011.

 

Miguel Angel Abarca/ Alberto Arguello/ Allan Arguello/ Alejandro Arostegui/ Aparicio Arthola/ Carlos Barberena/ Robert Barberena de la Rocha/ Guillermo Barraza/ Carlos Benard/ Silvio Bonilla/ Rafael Castellon/ Ernesto Cuadra/ Maria Gallo/ Celia Lacayo/ Carlos Montenegro/ Luis Morales Alonso/ Ricardo Morales/ Ilse Ortiz de Manzanares/ Roger Perez de la Rocha/ Sarah Lynn Pistorius/ Juan Rivas Alfaro/ Javier Sanchez/ Jose Trinidad Sandino/ Oscar Valladares/ Sergio Velasquez/ Alfonso Jimenez.

Woodcut on Handmade Paper.

2008.

Linocut on Rives HW Paper.

6" x 6". 2008.

Años de Miedo / Time of Fear.

"La Mort du Saltimbanque" after Doré.

Linocut on HW Rives Paper.

Image Size: 20" x 16"

Original Limited Edition / 25 Prints. 2012.

As an architecture buff, I take no small pride in knowing a thing or two about the architecture in and around Los Feliz, so it came as a great surprise when I stumbled upon the John Lautner-inspired Leiberman House on Prospect Avenue, originally designed by Glen Howard Small in 1989. Perhaps one of the least known mastermind's of contemporary architecture, the architect demonstrated early promise while an undergraduate at the University of Oregon, where he was awarded the Eliel Saarinen Scholarship for the Masters of Architecture program at the Cranbrook Academy of Arts and Institute of Sciences. After graduation (1967) he worked for various architectural firms including John Lautner and Smith and Williams. After a three year stint as assistant professor at Cal Poly Pomona School of Environmental Design, he joined a group of fellow architects to co-found the Southern California Institute of Architects (SCI-Arc) in 1972 where he taught for the next 18 years.

 

In the Leiberman House the original owners commissioned a creative addition to their home, described by the architect as a "a dingbat Spanish house that had no character." The resultant "face lift" consists of "a series of quarter curves in two different directions", the architect's attempt at bringing "sensuous, flowing curves to life" in a residential setting. The wall of the house have been sculpted in such a way as to eliminate the need for a roof, leaving the interiors open to the heavens and "exalted by its light." The house was purchased by Estela Mara Bensimon and Agapito Diaz in 1995. Dr. Bensimon who is co-director of the Center for Urban Education at the USC Rossier School of Education states that "when we purchased the house in 1995 from the Liebermans, the house was kind of half finished, i.e. nothing had been done beyond the living room. Over time, with the help of Los Feliz-based architect Anthony Eckelberry, we remodeled the rest of the house, tore down some walls, changed all the windows to take advantage of the openness of the design. As fate would have it, Eckelberry was a student of Glen Howard Small at SCI-Arc, so the remodel was faithful to the original vision."

 

Small currently lives in Managua, Nicaragua where he has recently completed three projects of national importance, the Concha Acustica, the centerpiece of the Nicaraguan national cultural plaza; the Journalist Rotunda, a monument to the journalists of the Sandinistan Revolution, and the Colon Rotunda, a fountain in the city's civic center. In 2002, Glen Small's daughter Lucia Small made an award-winning documentary film on his work, "My Father the Genius".

The Leiberman House is located at 3995 Prospect Avenue in the Franklin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles.

  

Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.

© All rights reserved.

Etching on Hahnemuhle Paper.

2002.

Linocut on Rives HW Paper.

8" x 6". 2009.

Años de Miedo / Time of Fear.

Ernesto "Che" Guevara with Carlos Fonseca (founder of the FSLN) and A.C. Sandino. Below them is Monseñor Romero (the woman with him is a particular person, also a martyr of some kind, but I can't remember who it is! shame on me!). At the top right is an anonymous compa (compañero=Sandinista soldier) helping women and children.

 

Despite the seriousness of the mural, I can't help thinking that Che looks like he's saying to Fonseca and Sandino, "c'mon guys, this is so not my scene--let's go get a beer."

 

Centro Cultural Batahola Norte, Managua, Nicaragua

 

info on the center in English

Artwork by Evan Hecox

Missing the Keenan Milton graphic.

Backstage the children that were all ready looked stunning with their traditional dress and showed off for the camera.

"Joy in the Journey: Nicaraguan School Bus" - 24x36" - oil on linen - Available at www.artworkbyannarose.com

Flor Diaz dances in a Carribbean style costume that added much energy to the show as the performance.

Sala de Exposiciones Marco Aurelio Aguilar Mata.

Colegio Universitario de Cartago, CUC. Cartago, Costa Rica. 2004.

Linocut on Rives HW Paper.

6" x 6". 2008.

Años de Miedo / Time of Fear.

As an architecture buff, I take no small pride in knowing a thing or two about the architecture in and around Los Feliz, so it came as a great surprise when I stumbled upon the John Lautner-inspired Leiberman House on Prospect Avenue, originally designed by Glen Howard Small in 1989. Perhaps one of the least known mastermind's of contemporary architecture, the architect demonstrated early promise while an undergraduate at the University of Oregon, where he was awarded the Eliel Saarinen Scholarship for the Masters of Architecture program at the Cranbrook Academy of Arts and Institute of Sciences. After graduation (1967) he worked for various architectural firms including John Lautner and Smith and Williams. After a three year stint as assistant professor at Cal Poly Pomona School of Environmental Design, he joined a group of fellow architects to co-found the Southern California Institute of Architects (SCI-Arc) in 1972 where he taught for the next 18 years.

 

In the Leiberman House the original owners commissioned a creative addition to their home, described by the architect as a "a dingbat Spanish house that had no character." The resultant "face lift" consists of "a series of quarter curves in two different directions", the architect's attempt at bringing "sensuous, flowing curves to life" in a residential setting. The wall of the house have been sculpted in such a way as to eliminate the need for a roof, leaving the interiors open to the heavens and "exalted by its light." The house was purchased by Estela Mara Bensimon and Agapito Diaz in 1995. Dr. Bensimon who is co-director of the Center for Urban Education at the USC Rossier School of Education states that "when we purchased the house in 1995 from the Liebermans, the house was kind of half finished, i.e. nothing had been done beyond the living room. Over time, with the help of Los Feliz-based architect Anthony Eckelberry, we remodeled the rest of the house, tore down some walls, changed all the windows to take advantage of the openness of the design. As fate would have it, Eckelberry was a student of Glen Howard Small at SCI-Arc, so the remodel was faithful to the original vision."

 

Small currently lives in Managua, Nicaragua where he has recently completed three projects of national importance, the Concha Acustica, the centerpiece of the Nicaraguan national cultural plaza; the Journalist Rotunda, a monument to the journalists of the Sandinistan Revolution, and the Colon Rotunda, a fountain in the city's civic center. In 2002, Glen Small's daughter Lucia Small made an award-winning documentary film on his work, "My Father the Genius".

The Leiberman House is located at 3995 Prospect Avenue in the Franklin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles.

  

Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.

© All rights reserved.

Built between 1747 and the early 19th century to the design of Guatemalan architect Diego José de Porres Esquivel, the monument expresses the transition from Baroque to Neoclassical architecture and its style is considered eclectic. The Cathedral is characterized by the sobriety of its interior decoration and the abundance of natural light. The vault of the Sanctuary, however, presents rich ornamentation. The Cathedral houses important works of art including a wooden Flemish altarpiece and paintings of the 14 stations of the Way of the Cross by Nicaraguan artist Antonio Sarria (late 19th and early 20th centuries).

Etching on Hahnemuhle Paper.

2002.

Linocut on Rives HW Paper.

6" x 6". 2008.

Años de Miedo / Time of Fear.

Linocut on Rives HW Paper.

6" x 6". 2008.

Años de Miedo / Time of Fear.

Venus 2.0 (after Botticelli)

Linocut on Hosho Paper.

12" x 11". 2009.

Master Prints Series.

Linocut on Hosho Paper.

6" x 6". 2006.

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