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Motu Kōkako, also known as Piercy Island or "The Hole In The Rock”, is located off the north coast of the North Island of New Zealand. The 18 m (60-foot) hole at sea level was created over centuries by wind and waves making it one of the most naturally beautiful sites in New Zealand.

 

On the day I visited the waters were calm and the tide right for our vessel to pass right through the hole. I took this shot from the stern looking back after we emerged from the hole.

The storm brought drama and atmosphere to an already awesome scene. Milford Sound on the West Coast of New Zealand's South Island is an amazing place, and we were lucky with this weather!

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Press F if you like it! Thanks for 4 million views, thousands of Faves and uncountable comments. I learn from looking at your photos!

I'm a train tragic, I admit it, and I know New Zealand's TranzAlpine Express is one of the world's great short train journeys. We caught the train at Arthur's Pass at the top of the mountain range for the ride down to Christchurch. For most of the time I rode in the observation car with its open sides for bracing fresh air and unimpeded views.

 

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New Zealand 2010/11

A very capable diving duck endemic to New Zealand. Lakefront, Queenstown, New Zealand.

View of Milford Sound

THIS IS NEW ZEALAND AT IT'S BEST. DRIVING THROUGH THIS PART OF THE COUNTRY IS SPECIAL. MT COOK = WOW !

Also known as the Australasian Shoveler (Anas rhynchotis) and in Maori language, Kuruwhengi. The male in picture is said to be the most handsome of New Zealand's ducks. The Shoveler uses a thin membrane extending along the top jaw to flush water through and filter out small plankton and seeds.

Franz Joseph Glacier

The Moeraki Boulders are a group of large spherical “stones” on Koekohe Beach near Moeraki on New Zealand’s Otago coast. These boulders are actually concretions that have been exposed through shoreline erosion from coastal cliffs. Even today, there are still boulders remaining in the mudstone that will, eventually, fall on to the beach as they come lose due to erosion!

The boulders are one of the most fascinating and popular attractions on the South Island.

They originally started forming in ancient sea floor sediments around 60 million years ago, and the largest boulders are estimated to have taken about 4 million years1 to get to their current size.

Maori legend tells that the boulders are remains of calabashes, kumaras and eel baskets that washed ashore after the legendary canoe, the Araiteuru was wrecked at nearby Shag Point (Matakaea).

 

New Zealand 2010/11

Paihia is a town on New Zealand’s North Island. It’s known as a gateway to the dive sites and sandy beaches of the Bay of Islands. At the Waitangi Treaty Grounds, a carved meeting house, a museum and a giant Maori canoe mark the site of the founding of modern New Zealand. A trail leads to the horseshoe-shaped Haruru Falls. Southwest of town, there are panoramic views from the Opua Forest Paihia Lookout Track. 13372

This large and distinctively-coloured pigeon is a familiar sight to many New Zealanders. This is because the New Zealand pigeon (or kereru) has a widespread distribution through the country, being present in extensive tracts of native forest, and rural and urban habitats, including most cities.

 

Foods include buds, leaves, flowers and fruit from a wide variety species, both native and exotic. In addition, they have been seen feeding on the fruiting bodies of the parasitic strawberry fungus Cyttaria gunnii found in beech forest.

 

Photographed Bushy Park Homestead, Kai Iwi, New Zealand.

 

Steve Hitchcock © All rights reserved

Franz Joseph Glacier

Aoraki or Mount Cook is New Zealand's highest peak. It's the mountain on the right hand end of this photo.

Milford Sound / Piopiotahi is a fiord in the south west of New Zealand's South Island within Fiordland National Park, Piopiotahi (Milford Sound) Marine Reserve, and the Te Wahipounamu World Heritage site. It has been judged the world's top travel destination in an international survey (the 2008 Travelers' Choice Destinations Awards by TripAdvisor) and is acclaimed as New Zealand's most famous tourist destination. Milford Sound runs 15 kilometres inland from the Tasman Sea at Dale Point (also named after a location close to Milford Haven in Wales)—the mouth of the fiord—and is surrounded by sheer rock faces that rise 1,200 metres or more on either side. Among the peaks are The Elephant at 1,517 metres, said to resemble an elephant's head, and The Lion, 1,302 metres, in the shape of a crouching lion. Milford Sound sports two permanent waterfalls, Lady Bowen Falls and Stirling Falls. After heavy rain temporary waterfalls can be seen running down the steep sided rock faces that line the fiord. They are fed by rain water drenched moss and will last a few days at most once the rain stops. 13764

Canterbury, New Zealand

Milford Sound / Piopiotahi is a fiord in the south west of New Zealand's South Island within Fiordland National Park, Piopiotahi (Milford Sound) Marine Reserve, and the Te Wahipounamu World Heritage site. It has been judged the world's top travel destination in an international survey (the 2008 Travelers' Choice Destinations Awards by TripAdvisor) and is acclaimed as New Zealand's most famous tourist destination. Milford Sound runs 15 kilometres inland from the Tasman Sea at Dale Point (also named after a location close to Milford Haven in Wales)—the mouth of the fiord—and is surrounded by sheer rock faces that rise 1,200 metres or more on either side. Among the peaks are The Elephant at 1,517 metres, said to resemble an elephant's head, and The Lion, 1,302 metres, in the shape of a crouching lion. Milford Sound sports two permanent waterfalls, Lady Bowen Falls and Stirling Falls. After heavy rain temporary waterfalls can be seen running down the steep sided rock faces that line the fiord. They are fed by rain water drenched moss and will last a few days at most once the rain stops. 13766

Lake Rotorua is the second largest lake in the North Island of New Zealand by surface area, and covers 79.8 km2. With a mean depth of only 10 metres it is considerably smaller than nearby Lake Tarawera in terms of volume of water. It is located in the Bay of Plenty region. The city of Rotorua is sited on its southern shore, and the town of Ngongotahā is at the western edge of the lake. The lake was formed from the crater of a large volcano in the Taupo Volcanic Zone. Its last major eruption was about 240,000 years ago. After the eruption, the magma chamber underneath the volcano collapsed. The circular depression left behind is the Rotorua Caldera, which is the site of the lake. Several other lakes of volcanic origin are located nearby to the east, around the base of the active volcano Mount Tarawera. Lake Rotorua is fed with water from a number of rivers and streams; some such as the Utuhina flow water of a water temperature warmer than the lake due to the thermal activity in the Rotorua area. Conversely streams on the northern shore such as the Hamurana Spring and the Awahou stream flow crystal clear water that has a constant temperature of 10 degrees Celsius. Other notable tributaries include the Ngongotahā stream, famous for trout fishing. 13542

Scenic south West coastline. The fiords of New Zealand are all located in the southwest of the South Island, in a mountainous area known as Fiordland. The spelling 'fiord' is used in New Zealand rather than 'fjord', although all the maritime fiords use the word Sound in their name instead. The Marlborough Sounds, a series of deep indentations in the coastline at the northern tip of the South Island, are in fact drowned river valleys, or rias. The deeply indented coastlines of Northland and Auckland also host many rias, such as the Hokianga and Waitematā Harbours. New Zealand has fifteen named maritime fiords, listed here from northernmost to southernmost. 13770

Milford Sound / Piopiotahi is a fiord in the south west of New Zealand's South Island within Fiordland National Park, Piopiotahi (Milford Sound) Marine Reserve, and the Te Wahipounamu World Heritage site. It has been judged the world's top travel destination in an international survey (the 2008 Travelers' Choice Destinations Awards by TripAdvisor) and is acclaimed as New Zealand's most famous tourist destination. Milford Sound runs 15 kilometres inland from the Tasman Sea at Dale Point (also named after a location close to Milford Haven in Wales)—the mouth of the fiord—and is surrounded by sheer rock faces that rise 1,200 metres or more on either side. Among the peaks are The Elephant at 1,517 metres, said to resemble an elephant's head, and The Lion, 1,302 metres, in the shape of a crouching lion. Milford Sound sports two permanent waterfalls, Lady Bowen Falls and Stirling Falls. After heavy rain temporary waterfalls can be seen running down the steep sided rock faces that line the fiord. They are fed by rain water drenched moss and will last a few days at most once the rain stops. 13758

Paihia is a town on New Zealand’s North Island. It’s known as a gateway to the dive sites and sandy beaches of the Bay of Islands. At the Waitangi Treaty Grounds, a carved meeting house, a museum and a giant Maori canoe mark the site of the founding of modern New Zealand. A trail leads to the horseshoe-shaped Haruru Falls. Southwest of town, there are panoramic views from the Opua Forest Paihia Lookout Track. 13361

Tauranga is the most populous city in the Bay of Plenty region of the North Island of New Zealand. It was settled by Māori late in the 13th century and by Europeans in the early 19th century and was constituted as a city in 1963. Tauranga City is the centre of the fifth largest urban area in New Zealand, with an urban population of 141,600 (June 2018). The city lies in the north-western corner of the Bay of Plenty, on the south-eastern edge of Tauranga Harbour. The city extends over an area of 168 square kilometres, and encompasses the communities of Bethlehem, on the south-western outskirts of the city; Greerton, on the southern outskirts of the city; Matua, west of the central city overlooking Tauranga Harbour; Maungatapu; Mount Maunganui, located north of the central city across the harbour facing the Bay of Plenty; Otumoetai; Papamoa, Tauranga's largest suburb, located on the Bay of Plenty; Tauranga City; Tauranga South; and Welcome Bay. 13519

Scenic south West coastline. The fiords of New Zealand are all located in the southwest of the South Island, in a mountainous area known as Fiordland. The spelling 'fiord' is used in New Zealand rather than 'fjord', although all the maritime fiords use the word Sound in their name instead. The Marlborough Sounds, a series of deep indentations in the coastline at the northern tip of the South Island, are in fact drowned river valleys, or rias. The deeply indented coastlines of Northland and Auckland also host many rias, such as the Hokianga and Waitematā Harbours. New Zealand has fifteen named maritime fiords, listed here from northernmost to southernmost. 13675

If you have the chance to visit New Zealand, I definitely recommend you to use the DOC campsites rather than the traditional ones. They are not only cheap, but really wild, especially on South Island. It's an amazing experience living in a still preserved nature. For exemple, I realized what europeans lakes would look like without any construction by their side.

 

What a misty vision I had this morning just outside my tent by Moke Lake !

 

This picture made a very very discrete apparition on Explore on the 25th of March 2015.

Paihia is a town on New Zealand’s North Island. It’s known as a gateway to the dive sites and sandy beaches of the Bay of Islands. At the Waitangi Treaty Grounds, a carved meeting house, a museum and a giant Maori canoe mark the site of the founding of modern New Zealand. A trail leads to the horseshoe-shaped Haruru Falls. Southwest of town, there are panoramic views from the Opua Forest Paihia Lookout Track. 13367

Karikari Peninsula

 

Lined with stunning beaches and glistening bays, the Karikari Peninsula is a long narrow piece of land located west of Doubtless Bay in the Northland Region of New Zealand. Here you can swim, dive, fish, walk or simply relax on a beautiful white-sand beach, surrounded by the glistening waters of the Pacific Ocean.

Attractions on the Karikari Peninsula include Maitai Bay, Tokerau Beach, historical Puwheke Beach, Karikari Beach, Waikato Bay, and Puwheke Scenic Reserve. Discover ancient kauri gum-digging remnants at Lake Ohia, sheltered swimming bays, great fishing and idyllic views at Maitai Bay, and a championship golf course and award winning vineyard at Carrington Resort and Karikari Estate.

Lake Matheson, near the Fox Glacier in South Westland, New Zealand, is famous for its reflected views of Aoraki/Mount Cook and Mount Tasman. A traditional mahinga kai (food gathering place) for Māori people, the lake contains long finned eel as well as being home to many water birds.

 

Lake Matheson was formed by glaciation ca. 14,000 years ago. It is situated on the valley floor about 12 km from the current Fox Glacier and Aoraki/Mount Cook, the highest peak in New Zealand, and Mount Tasman

 

The area around the lake is managed by the Department of Conservation (DOC) and is surrounded by native kahikatea (white pine) and rimu (red pine) trees, as well as flax and a variety of New Zealand fern species.

 

source: Wikipedia

New Zealand native Tui feeding on flax flowers

Lake Matheson, near the Fox Glacier in South Westland, New Zealand, is famous for its reflected views of Aoraki/Mount Cook and Mount Tasman. A traditional mahinga kai (food gathering place) for Māori people, the lake contains long finned eel as well as being home to many water birds.

 

Lake Matheson was formed by glaciation ca. 14,000 years ago. It is situated on the valley floor about 12 km from the current Fox Glacier and Aoraki/Mount Cook, the highest peak in New Zealand, and Mount Tasman

 

The area around the lake is managed by the Department of Conservation (DOC) and is surrounded by native kahikatea (white pine) and rimu (red pine) trees, as well as flax and a variety of New Zealand fern species.

 

source: Wikipedia

Tongariro National Park is the oldest national park in New Zealand, located in the central North Island. It has been acknowledged by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site of mixed cultural and natural values.

 

Tongariro National Park was the sixth national park established in the world. The active volcanic mountains Ruapehu, Ngauruhoe, and Tongariro are located in the centre of the park.

 

There are a number of Māori religious sites within the park, and many of the park's summits, including Ngauruhoe and Ruapehu, are tapu, or sacred.

  

Mirror Lakes - en route to Milford Sound from Te Anau, with Mount Eglinton, Fiordland National Park, New Zealand.

Night photography near lake in the South Island

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That Tree, which is what it is officially called (great name isn't it?), is perhaps one of New Zealand's most popular photographed views in the whole country. I would rank it in the top three most popular locations shot.

 

I can see why.

 

The tree is positioned on the edge of Lake Wanaka and only a two minute walk from the free car park. This location can also get quite busy, naturally so best to arrive early if you are wanting to photograph it at dawn. However on this particular occasion I arrived a couple of hours before dusk only to find some wonderful misty conditions which in part helped to obscure the mountains behind allowing for the tree to become so much more visible and enjoy its own time in the limelight.

 

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Nisi 10 Stop ND Filter

 

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Wharariki Beach is a beach west of Cape Farewell, the northernmost point of the South Island of New Zealand.

 

The north-facing sandy beach is accessible only via a 20-minute walking track from the end of Wharariki Road. The road end is approximately 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) from the nearest settlement, the small village of Puponga. A camping ground is located along Wharariki Road, but the area surrounding the beach is devoid of any development. Wharariki Beach is bordered by Puponga Farm Park, with the wider area more or less surrounded by the northern end of Kahurangi National Park.

 

The beach is flanked to the east and west by cliffs, but due to the flat topology of the area behind it, the beach area and the grassy dunes behind it are quite exposed to winds.

 

Wharariki Beach is perhaps best known for the Archway Islands, featured frequently in photos in New Zealand landscape calendars.

 

The Archway Islands are a group of four rock stacks or small islands, with even the largest one of them measuring only about 300 by 200 metres (980 ft × 660 ft).

 

The largest of the islands is closest to the mainland and adjoins Wharariki Beach; it is generally not cut off by the sea. The second island lies about 150 metres (490 ft) offshore and is relatively flat and vegetated. The remaining two islands are typical rock stacks, with the larger one 66 metres (217 ft) tall and containing two natural rock arches, giving rise to the naming of the group of islands.

 

source: Wikipedia

Milford Sound / Piopiotahi is a fiord in the south west of New Zealand's South Island within Fiordland National Park, Piopiotahi (Milford Sound) Marine Reserve, and the Te Wahipounamu World Heritage site. It has been judged the world's top travel destination in an international survey (the 2008 Travelers' Choice Destinations Awards by TripAdvisor) and is acclaimed as New Zealand's most famous tourist destination. Milford Sound runs 15 kilometres inland from the Tasman Sea at Dale Point (also named after a location close to Milford Haven in Wales)—the mouth of the fiord—and is surrounded by sheer rock faces that rise 1,200 metres or more on either side. Among the peaks are The Elephant at 1,517 metres, said to resemble an elephant's head, and The Lion, 1,302 metres, in the shape of a crouching lion. Milford Sound sports two permanent waterfalls, Lady Bowen Falls and Stirling Falls. After heavy rain temporary waterfalls can be seen running down the steep sided rock faces that line the fiord. They are fed by rain water drenched moss and will last a few days at most once the rain stops. 13857

New Zealand 2010/11

Taken after a trip to Doubtful Sound.

Reflexions on the Tekapo Lake, In New Zealand.

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