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UPDATE: last post till return NOW included..... I will be taking a short break from here starting tomorrow and will be pulling off one of those disappearing acts. Not sure how long. Ya'll be good though. Don't let me find out ....

 

Anyway, and so I leave you with this silly pic of naruto. He's got such a nice expression, ne? 88

Day 13 (13/365):

 

Been working on my post backlog for my series here on flicker. Last night, I was fortunate enough to do a photoshot with my lil' Naruto character toys which I bought months ago during the Toy Con '09 at Gaisano Mall.

 

Shown on this pic are two prominent characters in Naruto anime. The guy in green is Jiraiya, Naruto's teacher. He's the one who thought most of Naruto's killer techniques.

 

The other guy is simple known as the Third because he's actually the third Hokage, leader of the Hidden Leaf Ninja Society and also the teacher of Naruto's father who is the 4th Hokage and that of Naruto's nemises Orochimaru.

 

If you would like to be updated on the latest on Naruto's adventure, you can go to www.onemanga.com/Naruto to read its latest manga chapters

Heya guys and girls! Wats up?! Well, I just had this crazy idea! I saw an animation episode on Konoha High School. So I was thinking why not have a Anime High School of my friends on Flickr?! That's right! You can be one of these students!

 

All Artists!

If u wanna participate in making the comic, contact me @: ...

cherese.shaw@comcast.net

hikarikun.hime@yahoo.com

www.xxhikarikunxx.deviantart.com if u have a deviant account!

 

All Filmmakers/Video Creators!

(*coughs* Shinji/Kichiro *coughs* :D)

 

U can help with videos if you desire too!

contact me @: ...

cherese.shaw@comcast.net

hikarikun.hime@yahoo.com

 

All Voice Actresses/Actors

This includes evry1 who wants their character included! We need at least enough people so that the girls and boys are equal (includ. Naruto charas)

contact me @: ...

cherese.shaw@comcast.net

hikarikun.hime@yahoo.com

 

If u send an email to me, i'll tell u all rules and give u updates!

 

All Roles

Voice Actors:

will get Scripts to voice out on some sort of program as long as i can access them.

 

Artists:

will get info on the scenes and such so we can work on the episodes with the vid makers

 

Vid Makers:

will get the photos and audio so the episodes can be made.

 

Everyone will most likely will need to have these softwares (I'll tell u if u need 2 uninstall it) :

Photoshop CS3 Professional (artists only)

Paint Tool SAI (artists only)

Flash CS3 Professional (vidmakers only)

A Software to Record Yourself (voicers only)

Sony Vegas Pro 9 (vidmakers only)

 

Also a person can be a voice actor, an artist, AND a vidmaker!

Comment please if u want to participate!

The choice is YOURS!

times change, so does ones eyes. . . an update to my previous sharingan photo, can you notice the difference?

 

i do not have blue eyes, but a ninja is deceiving. . . o_z

 

[1 hour phoshop +resources, no tuts]

 

baka >_<

a place to download/watch/read online the popular manga, anime, korean and japanese drama and moview, for free. Will be updated regularly for your viewing pleasure.

Naruto Uzumaki (うずまき ナルト,) a ninja affiliated to Konohagakure from the manga series Naruto. A chalk pavement art illustration.

 

Part of a Set / Slideshow documenting some of the Brighton Japan Festival / Matsuri 祭 June 18-26th 2011.

 

A celebration of life, and impractical shoes...

 

The Brighton Japan Festival was also documented by Haikugirl - in pictures in her flickr sets here by day: June 18th, 19th, 25th and 26th - and in her blog entries: June 18th, 19th, Update 1, Update 2 and Weekend of 25/26th.

 

JRCS, or (from the UK) just donate.

This organization is now defunct. Updated version: www.flickr.com/photos/sonneokaku/4182335474/

 

Old description: The official logo of Naruto-fun-pack (NFP), the AMV-organization! Send me a message if you're interested in joining us or if you have other issues to discuss!

zauji.com/224097.

Im about half way through the story mode, Ive jumped online a few times now, and though I havent finished it Im too eager to review this game! *UPDATED AFTER COMPLETION ON THE BOTTOM* If you loved Ultimate Ninja 2 youll love 3. I didnt care for generations, though it has Generations character selection. I feel the dodge moves work better in this game compared to generations, though it still has the 4 log limit (I think it refills a little slower). I stopped reading the Manga after the Paine fight because of how well Ninja Storm 2 presented it. So Ninja Storm 3 is my only way to take in the story... and I am very satisfied with that. It has some dumb fights in the story mode, some of those "I cant let you do that" "Try to stop me!" fights, but for the most part everything feels relavent. There are 87 characters total I think. If you remove the AssistOnly characters (brought back from 1) and the doublestriples for character with multiple forms (even though each plays very uniquely) you have about 75 characters. Not a number to complain about. Everyone is here. The story mode is a combination of 1 and 2 the world is rendered in 3d and has more of an adventuring feel, but its not fully accessible like in 1 or the xbox games, lots of areas feel like the prerendered backgrounds of 2. There is a small beatemup style mode in some areas that works surprisingly well. The only thing I could really compare it to is Tekken 6s battle mode, and its definitely better than that. My only complaints are the camera angles are stupid. Early in the game youll do a scene transition by walking off camera, and the next angle you see there is a long path behind you with people doing things. So your natural reaction is to walk toward those people nope, that sends you back to the area you just came from. You have to walk toward the camera to continue on in the new area. I saw this 23 times so far in the game. Its a little silly, but something easily fixed with a patch. The 3d is horrible. It reminds me of Sly Cooper Thieves in Time (which is a game I loved). If you have a 3d TV dont be excited to play this game in 3d. It is the most subtle effect even if you max out depth. The game just has a general blur that doesnt justify the drop in contrast or resolution. Otherwise perfect. Online is the same as the other games most player like to stand still blocking the whole time, spam assists and grab moves, and hit you with an ultimate jutsu instead of actually moving and fighting. At least I didnt experience any lag ) I also feel the game makes that strategy a little less useful... *UPDATE* Just beat the game yesterday. Ill let it retain its 5 star review but I wasnt nearly as happy with the ending as I was with Ninja Storm 2. Without giving anything away I would simply argue that the presentation of these final fights becomes redundant instead of satisfying. They use much less quicktime style events which are generally the highlight of Ninja Storm bosses and instead have you doing up to 10 minute fights (due to the circumstances) followed by a 35 move quicktime event instead of having those strung throughout the fights. It feels more like a way for the game maximize its time than relevant combat, and it becomes a battle of being overly cautious because for the last 3040 minutes of the game they dont give you an opportunity to heal yourself between fights yet set the bar at "Keep your health above X" for each one. Aside from the final fight though I was pretty satisfied. this was sort of the Metal Gear solid 4 of Naruto games in terms of cutscenes, to the point that some felt silly. again, Ive never watched the Anime so I have no idea if they pulled those scenes straight from it or what. The game is massive though. After beating it the postgame begins and you realize how much is left. There is a Ninja Timeline you work on throughout the game. Most exceptional important battles will reword you with events from the previous 2 games which you can then go and play through. In addition there are epilogue events you can earn by collecting enough Chakra fragments (I havent unlocked them yet, but it sounds like itll be a chore). Great game. Im planning on getting a platinum in it but I guess thatll take me another 10 hours (the game is about 10 hours long at base) after Chapter 5 you start flying through them so dont let the length of those first few throw you off). And obviously Im excited for Ninja Storm 4, which Im guessing will be the last game. Maybe itll be a PS4 release so there can be better Antialiasing D

A Team fortress 2 sandvich I made. Any and all jokes akin to "BITCH MAKE ME A SANDWICH/SANDVICH" will be deleted.

This is an update of after i got the Tokyo ghoul keychains i ordered for a really great deal on ebay, and the Horo sticker i got from fanipack

Guess this is something like I originally wanted to draw. Naruto in Sage mode VS the 9 Tailed demon fox. Drawed by hand, in photoshop.

 

Maybe I update it more, but I doubt it. Probably I'll leave it as it is.

Page 23 of my webcomic, Not So Magical Girl.

 

This page was such a pain to do… In retrospect I think I should have made this into 2 pages instead of one. I like the composition but it’s quite cluttered. ^_^; oh well, create and learn right?

 

You can find my comic here: www.aliceinunderwear.net/manga/

 

Updates weekly! <3

Loli Naruto and Kakashi on Ice. Adorable cosplay really!

 

A-Kon 20, held at the Sheraton in Dallas, TX on May 28-31, 2009. A yearly tradition for us.

 

If you are in these or know who they are/what the costume is, please leave a note and I'll update it

Event: Japan Festival Revolution 08.

Loli Naruto and Kakashi

 

Jack and Abby took these photos.

 

A-Kon 20, held at the Sheraton in Dallas, TX on May 28-31, 2009. A yearly tradition for us.

 

If you are in these or know who they are/what the costume is, please leave a note and I'll update it :)

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ok..i..i knw this doesnt look like much. but my dogs, are super shedding dogs. an i keep em groomed an everything, like, really well, but like, it jus doesnt seem to end with the hair issue with them D: Its litterally, everywhere outside. Its not dair! D: I jus cleaned the place up too! D: Heh..yea...i was on a major cleaning spree yesterday. lolz hadta clean out the chicken coop tooz. not fun. specially wen idiot chickens wont stay outa the coop an in the garden. -__- Oh, an an update on Butter's beak, that have seen the..UCK....before..Its way better! :D The fungus gunk, is like, almost all off! :D

Naruchigo.com – Naruto Shippuden Episode 398 English Sub … –

Anime zones – grogol portal, Anime zones 3gp mp4 anime subtitle indonesia anime list lama – jadwal update – daftar translator—–papan informasi : – untuk list anime-anime...

 

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Manga

Main article: Dragon Ball (manga)

 

Dragon Ball debuted in Weekly Shōnen Jump No. 51, 1984.

Written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama, Dragon Ball was serialized in the manga anthology Weekly Shōnen Jump from November 20, 1984 to May 23, 1995, when Toriyama grew exhausted and felt he needed a break from drawing. The 519 individual chapters were published into 42 tankōbon volumes by Shueisha from September 10, 1985 through August 4, 1995.[13][14][15] Between December 4, 2002 and April 2, 2004, the chapters were re-released in a collection of 34 kanzenban volumes, which included a slightly rewritten ending, new covers, and color artwork from its Weekly Shōnen Jump run.[16][17] The February 2013 issue of V Jump, which was released in December 2012, announced that parts of the manga will be fully colored and re-released in 2013.[18] Twenty volumes, beginning from chapter 195 and grouped by story arcs, were released between February 4, 2013 and July 4, 2014.[19][20] Twelve volumes covering the first 194 chapters were published between January 4 and March 4, 2016.[21][22] A sōshūhen edition that aims to recreate the manga as it was originally serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump with color pages, promotional text, and next chapter previews, began being published on May 13, 2016.[23]

 

Spin-offs and crossovers

Toriyama also created a short series, Neko Majin (1999–2005), that became a self-parody of Dragon Ball.[24] In 2006, a crossover between Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo (or Kochikame) and Dragon Ball by Toriyama and Kochikame author Osamu Akimoto appeared in the Super Kochikame (超こち亀 Chō Kochikame) manga.[25] That same year, Toriyama teamed up with Eiichiro Oda to create a crossover chapter of Dragon Ball and One Piece entitled Cross Epoch.[26] The final chapter of Toriyama's 2013 manga series Jaco the Galactic Patrolman revealed that it is set before Dragon Ball, with several characters making appearances.[27] Jaco's collected volumes contain a bonus Dragon Ball chapter depicting Goku's mother.[28]

 

A colored spin-off manga titled Dragon Ball SD written by Naho Ōishi has been published in Shueisha's Saikyō Jump magazine since its debut issue in December 2010.[29] A condensed retelling of Goku's adventures in a super deformed art style, it has been collected into four volumes as of February 2016.[30][31][32][33] Another manga penned by Ōishi, the three-chapter Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock that revolves around Bardock, Goku's father, was published in the monthly magazine V Jump from August and October 2011.[34]

 

Anime series

Dragon Ball

Main articles: Dragon Ball (anime) and List of Dragon Ball episodes

Toei Animation produced an anime television series based on the first 194 manga chapters, also titled Dragon Ball. The series premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on February 26, 1986 and ran until April 12, 1989, lasting 153 episodes.[2]

 

Dragon Ball Z

Main articles: Dragon Ball Z and List of Dragon Ball Z episodes

Instead of continuing the anime as Dragon Ball, Toei Animation decided to carry on with their adaptation under a new name and asked Akira Toriyama to come up with the title. Dragon Ball Z (ドラゴンボールZ(ゼット) Doragon Bōru Zetto?, commonly abbreviated as DBZ) picks up five years after the first series left off and adapts the final 325 chapters of the manga. It premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on April 26, 1989, taking over its predecessor's time slot, and ran for 291 episodes until its conclusion on January 31, 1996.[2]

 

Dragon Ball GT

Main articles: Dragon Ball GT and List of Dragon Ball GT episodes

Dragon Ball GT (ドラゴンボールGT(ジーティー) Doragon Bōru Jī Tī?, G(rand) T(ouring)[35]) premiered on Fuji TV on February 2, 1996 and ran until November 19, 1997 for 64 episodes.[2] Unlike the first two anime series, it is not based on Akira Toriyama's original Dragon Ball manga,[36] being created by Toei Animation as a sequel to the series or as Toriyama called it, a "grand side story of the original Dragon Ball".[35] Toriyama designed the main cast, the spaceship used in the show, the design of three planets, and came up with the title and logo. In addition to this, Toriyama also oversaw production of the series, just as he had for the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime.

 

Dragon Ball Kai

Main articles: Dragon Ball Kai and List of Dragon Ball Z Kai episodes

In February 2009, Toei Animation announced that it would begin broadcasting a revised version of Dragon Ball Z as part of the series' 20th anniversary celebrations. The series premiered on Fuji TV in Japan on April 5, 2009, under the name Dragon Ball Kai (ドラゴンボール改 Doragon Bōru Kai?, lit. "Dragon Ball Revised"), with the episodes remastered for HDTV, featuring updated opening and ending sequences, and a rerecording of the vocal tracks by most of the original cast.[37][38] The footage was also re-edited to more closely follow the manga, resulting in a faster-moving story, and damaged frames removed.[39] As such, it is a new version of Dragon Ball Z created from the original footage. Some shots were also remade from scratch in order to fix cropping and continuity issues.[40] The majority of the international versions, including Funimation Entertainment's English dub, are titled Dragon Ball Z Kai.[41][42]

 

Dragon Ball Super

Main articles: Dragon Ball Super and List of Dragon Ball Super episodes

On April 28, 2015, Toei Animation announced Dragon Ball Super (ドラゴンボール超 Doragon Bōru Sūpā?), the first all-new Dragon Ball television series to be released in 18 years. It debuted on July 5 and will run as a weekly series at 9:00 am on Fuji TV on Sundays.[43] Masako Nozawa reprised her roles as Goku, Gohan, and Goten. Most of the original cast reprise their roles as well.[44][45] Kouichi Yamadera and Masakazu Morita also reprise their roles, as Beerus and Whis, respectively.[45] The story of the anime is set four years after the defeat of Majin Boo, when the Earth has become peaceful once again. Akira Toriyama is credited as the original creator, as well for "original story & character design concepts."[46] It is also being adapted into a companion manga.[47]

 

Films

Anime

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Nineteen animated theatrical films based on the Dragon Ball series have been released in Japan. The first three films are based on the original Dragon Ball anime series. The remaining films include fifteen based on Dragon Ball Z and one tenth anniversary special (also based on the first anime series). The first five films were shown at the Toei Manga Festival (東映まんがまつり Tōei Manga Matsuri), while the sixth through seventeenth films were shown at the Toei Anime Fair (東映アニメフェア Toei Anime Fea). They were mostly alternate re-tellings of certain story arcs involving new characters or extra side-stories that do not correlate with the same continuity as the series. Since these movies were originally shown as back-to-back presentations alongside other Toei film productions, they were usually below feature length (around 45-60 minutes each), making them only slightly longer than an episode of the TV series (the sole exception being 1996's The Path to Power, which has a running time of 80 minutes). The newest films, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods (2013) and Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection 'F' (2015), were produced as full-length feature films and were given stand-alone theatrical releases in Japan; these being the first movies to have original creator Akira Toriyama deeply involved in their production.[48][49]

 

Live-action

An unofficial live-action Mandarin Chinese film adaptation of the series, Dragon Ball: The Magic Begins, was released in Taiwan in 1989.[2] In December 1990, the unofficial live-action Korean film Dragon Ball: Ssawora Son Goku, Igyeora Son Goku was released. 20th Century Fox acquired feature film rights to the Dragon Ball franchise in March 2002 and began production on an American live-action film entitled Dragonball Evolution.[50][51] Directed by James Wong and produced by Stephen Chow, it was released in the United States on April 10, 2009.[51][52]

 

TV Specials and other animations

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Three television specials based on the series were aired on Fuji TV in Japan. The first, The One True Final Battle ~The Z Warrior Who Challenged Freeza -- Son Goku's Father~, renamed Bardock – The Father of Goku by Funimation, was shown on October 17, 1990. The second special, The Hopeless Resistance!! Gohan and Trunks -- The Two Remaining Super Warriors, renamed The History of Trunks by Funimation, is based on a special chapter of the original manga and aired on March 24, 1993. Goku Side Story! The Four Star Ball is a Badge of Courage, renamed A Hero's Legacy by Funimation, aired on March 26, 1997. A two-part hour-long crossover special between Dragon Ball Z, One Piece and Toriko, referred to as Dream 9 Toriko & One Piece & Dragon Ball Z Super Collaboration Special!! aired on April 7, 2013.[53]

 

A two-episode original video animation (OVA) titled Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans was created in 1993 as strategy guides for the Famicom video game of the same name.[54] A remake titled Dragon Ball: Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans was created as a bonus feature for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2, which was released on November 11, 2010.[55]

 

The short film Dragon Ball: Yo! Son Goku and His Friends Return!! was created for the Jump Super Anime Tour,[56] which celebrated Weekly Shōnen Jump's 40th anniversary, and debuted on November 24, 2008. A short animated adaptation of Naho Ōishi's Bardock spinoff manga, Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock, was shown on December 17–18, 2011 at the Jump Festa 2012 event.[57]

 

Theme Park Attraction

"Dragon Ball Z: The Real 4D" debuted at Universal Studios Japan during Summer 2016. It features a battle between Goku and Freeza. Unlike most Dragon Ball animation, the ride is animated with CGI.

 

Video games

See also: List of Dragon Ball video games

 

A Dragon Ball Z arcade conversion kit that includes the PCB, instructions and operator's manual.

The Dragon Ball franchise has spawned multiple video games across various genres and platforms. Earlier games of the series included a system of card battling and were released for the Famicom following the storyline of the series.[58] Starting with the Super Famicom and Mega Drive, most of the games were from the fighting genre or RPG (Role Playing Game), such as the Super Butoden series.[59] The first Dragon Ball game to be released in the United States was Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout for the PlayStation in 1997.[60] For the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable games the characters were redone in 3D cel-shaded graphics. These games included the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai series and the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi series.[61][62] Dragon Ball Z: Burst Limit was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[63] Dragon Ball Xenoverse was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.[64][65] A massively multiplayer online role-playing game called Dragon Ball Online was available in Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan until the servers were shut down in 2013.[66]

 

Soundtracks

See also: List of Dragon Ball soundtracks

Myriad soundtracks were released in the anime, movies and the games. The music for the first two anime Dragon Ball and Z and its films was composed by Shunsuke Kikuchi, while the music from GT was composed by Akihito Tokunaga and the music from Kai was composed by Kenji Yamamoto and Norihito Sumitomo. For the first anime, the soundtracks released were Dragon Ball: Music Collection in 1985 and Dragon Ball: Complete Song Collection in 1991, although they were reissued in 2007 and 2003, respectively.[67] For the second anime, the soundtrack series released were Dragon Ball Z Hit Song Collection Series. It was produced and released by Columbia Records of Japan from July 21, 1989 to March 20, 1996 the show's entire lifespan. On September 20, 2006 Columbia re-released the Hit Song Collection on their Animex 1300 series.[68][69] Other CDs released are compilations, video games and films soundtracks as well as music from the English versions.[70]

 

Companion books

 

Cover of Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations

There have been numerous companion books to the Dragon Ball franchise. Chief among these are the Daizenshuu (大全集?) series, comprising seven hardback main volumes and three supplemental softcover volumes, covering the manga and the first two anime series and their theatrical films. The first of these, Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations (Daizenshuu volume 1), first published in Japan in 1995, is the only one that was released in English, being printed in 2008 by Viz Media.[71] It contains all 264 colored illustrations Akira Toriyama drew for the Weekly Shōnen Jump magazines' covers, bonus giveaways and specials, and all the covers for the 42 tankōbon. It also includes an interview with Toriyama on his work process. The remainder have never been released in English, and all are now out of print in Japan. From February 4 to May 9, 2013, condensed versions of the Daizenshuu with some updated information were released as the four-volume Chōzenshū (超全集?) series.[18] For Dragon Ball GT, the Dragon Ball GT Perfect Files were released in May and December 1997 by Shueisha's Jump Comics Selection imprint. They include series information, illustration galleries, behind-the-scenes information, and more. They were out of print for many years, but were re-released in April 2006 (accompanying the Japanese DVD release of Dragon Ball GT) and this edition is still in print.[72][73]

 

Coinciding with the 34-volume kanzenban re-release of the manga, and the release of the entire series on DVD for the first time in Japan, four new guidebooks were released in 2003 and 2004. Dragon Ball Landmark and Dragon Ball Forever cover the manga, using volume numbers for story points that reference the kanzenban release,[74][75] while Dragon Ball: Tenkaichi Densetsu (ドラゴンボール 天下一伝説?) and Dragon Ball Z: Son Goku Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 孫悟空伝説?) cover the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime, respectively.[76][77] Much of the material in these books is reused from the earlier Daizenshuu volumes, but they include new textual material including substantial interviews with the creator, cast and production staff of the series. Son Goku Densetsu in particular showcases previously-unpublished design sketches of Goku's father Bardock, drawn by character designer Katsuyoshi Nakatsuru prior to creator Akira Toriyama's revisions that resulted in the final version.

 

Following the release of Dragon Ball Kai in Japan, four new guidebooks were released: the two-volume Dragon Ball: Super Exciting Guide (ドラゴンボール 超エキサイティングガイド?) in 2009, covering the manga,[78][79] and two-volume Dragon Ball: Extreme Battle Collection (ドラゴンボール 極限バトルコレクション?) in 2010, covering the anime series.[80][81] Despite the TV series airing during this time being Kai, the Extreme Battle Collection books reference the earlier Z series in content and episode numbers. These books also include new question-and-answer sessions with Akira Toriyama, revealing a few new details about the world and characters of the series. 2010 also saw the release of a new artbook, Dragon Ball: Anime Illustrations Guide - The Golden Warrior (ドラゴンボール アニメイラスト集 「黄金の戦士」?); a sort of anime-counterpart to the manga-oriented Complete Illustrations, it showcases anime-original illustrations and includes interviews with the three principal character designers for the anime. Each of the Japanese "Dragon Box" DVD releases of the series and movies, which were released from 2003 to 2006, as well as the Blu-ray boxed sets of Dragon Ball Kai, released 2009 to 2011, come with a Dragon Book guide that contains details about the content therein. Each also contains a new interview with a member of the cast or staff of the series. These books have been reproduced textually for Funimation's release of the Dragon Ball Z Dragon Box sets from 2009 to 2011.

 

Collectible cards

See also: Dragon Ball Collectible Card Game

Collectible cards based on the Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z, and Dragon Ball GT series have been released by Bandai. These cards feature various scenes from the manga and anime stills, plus exclusive artwork from all three series. Bandai released the first set in the United States in July 2008.[82]

 

Reception

Manga

Dragon Ball is one of the most popular manga series of all time, and it continues to enjoy high readership today. By 2000, more than 126 million copies of its tankōbon volumes had been sold in Japan alone.[83] By 2012, this number had grown to pass 156 million in Japan and 230 million worldwide, making it the second best-selling Weekly Shōnen Jump manga of all time.[84][85] Dragon Ball is credited as one of the main reasons for the period when manga circulation was at its highest in the mid-1980s and mid-1990s.[86][87] For the 10th anniversary of the Japan Media Arts Festival in 2006, Japanese fans voted Dragon Ball the third greatest manga of all time.[88]

 

In a survey conducted by Oricon in 2007 among 1,000 people, Son Goku, the main character of the franchise, ranked first place as the "Strongest Manga Character of All Time."[89] Goku's journey and his ever growing strength resulted in the character winning "the admiration of young boys everywhere".[1] Manga artists, such as One Piece creator Eiichiro Oda and Naruto creator Masashi Kishimoto, have stated that Goku inspired their series' main protagonists as well as series structure.[90][91]

 

Manga critic Jason Thompson stated in 2011 that "Dragon Ball is by far the most influential shonen manga of the last 30 years, and today, almost every Shonen Jump artist lists it as one of their favorites and lifts from it in various ways."[92] He says the series "turns from a gag/adventure manga to an nearly-pure fighting manga",[92] and its basic formula of "lots of martial arts, lots of training sequences, a few jokes" became the model for other shōnen series, such as Naruto.[93] Thompson also called Toriyama's art influential and cited it as a reason for the series' popularity.[92] James S. Yadao, author of The Rough Guide to Manga, claims that the first several chapters of Dragon Ball "play out much like Saiyuki with Dr. Slump-like humour built in" and that Dr. Slump, Toriyama's previous manga, has a clear early influence on the series.[94] He feels the series "established its unique identity" after the first occasion when Goku's group disbands and he trains under Kame-sen'nin, when the story develops "a far more action-packed, sinister tone" with "wilder" battles with aerial and spiritual elements and an increased death count, while humor still makes an occasional appearance.[94] Yadao claims that an art shift occurs when the characters "lose the rounded, innocent look that he established in Dr. Slump and gain sharper angles that leap off the page with their energy and intensity."[95]

 

Animerica felt the series had "worldwide appeal", using dramatic pacing and over-the-top martial arts action to "maintain tension levels and keep a crippler crossface hold on the audience's attention spans".[96] In Little Boy: The Art of Japan's Exploding Subculture, Takashi Murakami commented that Dragon Ball's "never-ending cyclical narrative moves forward plausibly, seamlessly, and with great finesse."[83] Ridwan Khan from Animefringe.com commented that the manga had a "chubby" art style, but as the series continued the characters got more refined, leaner, and more muscular. Khan prefers the manga over the slow pacing of the anime counterparts.[97] Allen Divers of Anime News Network praised the story and humor of the manga as being very good at conveying all of the characters' personalities. Divers also called Viz's translation one of the best of all the English editions of the series due to its faithfulness to the original Japanese.[98] D. Aviva Rothschild of Rationalmagic.com remarked the first manga volume as "a superior humor title". They praised Goku's innocence and Bulma's insistence as one of the funniest parts of the series.[99]

 

The content of the manga has been controversial in United States. In November 1999, Toys "R" Us removed Viz's Dragon Ball from their stores nationwide when a Dallas parent complained the series had "borderline soft porn" after he bought them for his four-year-old son.[100] Commenting on the issue, Susan J. Napier explained it as a difference in culture.[100] After the ban, Viz reluctantly began to censor the series to keep wide distribution.[101] However, in 2001, after releasing three volumes censored, Viz announced Dragon Ball would be uncensored and reprinted due to fan reactions.[101] In October 2009, Wicomico County Public Schools in Maryland banned the Dragon Ball manga from their school district because it "depicts nudity, sexual contact between children and sexual innuendo among adults and children."[100]

 

Anime

The anime adaptations have also been very well-received and are better known in the Western world than the manga, with Anime News Network saying "Few anime series have mainstreamed it the way Dragon Ball Z has. To a certain generation of television consumers its characters are as well known as any in the animated realm, and for many it was the first step into the wilderness of anime fandom."[102] In 2000, satellite TV channel Animax together with Brutus, a men's lifestyle magazine, and Tsutaya, Japan's largest video rental chain, conducted a poll among 200,000 fans on the top anime series, with Dragon Ball coming in fourth.[103] TV Asahi conducted two polls in 2005 on the Top 100 Anime, Dragon Ball came in second in the nationwide survey conducted with multiple age-groups and in third in the online poll.[104][105] On several occasions the Dragon Ball anime has topped Japan's DVD sales.[106][107]

 

Carl Kimlinger of Anime News Network summed up Dragon Ball as "an action-packed tale told with rare humor and something even rarer—a genuine sense of adventure."[108] Both Kimlinger and colleague Theron Martin noted Funimation's reputation for drastic alterations of the script, but praised the dub.[108][109] However, some critics and most fans of the Japanese version have been more critical with Funimation's English dub and script of Dragon Ball Z over the years. Jeffrey Harris IGN criticized the voices including how Freeza's appearance combined with the feminine English voice left fans confused about Freeza's gender.[110] Carlos Ross of T.H.E.M. Anime Reviews considered the series' characters to be different from stereotypical stock characters and noted that they undergo much more development.[111] Despite praising Dragon Ball Z for its cast of characters, they criticized it for having long and repetitive fights.[112]

 

Dragon Ball Z is well-known, and often criticized, for its long, repetitive, dragged-out fights that span several episodes, with Martin commenting "DBZ practically turned drawing out fights into an art form."[113] However, Jason Thompson of io9 explained that this comes from the fact that the anime was being created alongside the manga.[114] Dragon Ball Z was listed as the 78th best animated show in IGN's Top 100 Animated Series,[115] and was also listed as the 50th greatest cartoon in Wizard magazine's Top 100 Greatest Cartoons list.[116]

 

Harris commented that Dragon Ball GT "is downright repellent", mentioning that the material and characters had lost their novelty and fun. He also criticized the GT character designs of Trunks and Vegeta as being goofy.[110] Zac Bertschy of Anime News Network also gave negative comments about GT, mentioning that the fights from the series were "a very simple childish exercise" and that many other anime were superior. The plot of Dragon Ball GT has also been criticized for giving a formula that was already used in its predecessors.[117]

 

The first episode of Dragon Ball Z Kai earned a viewer ratings percentage of 11.3, ahead of One Piece and behind Crayon Shin-chan.[118] Although following episodes had lower ratings, Kai was among the top 10 anime in viewer ratings every week in Japan for most of its run.[119][120]

Vocês devem estar pensando: “O que uma coisa ter a ver com a outra?”. Bom, todos sabem que Dragon Ball, mais especificamente Goku, foi baseado em uma lenda Chinesa, a lenda do Rei Macaco ou a lenda de Saiyuki no Japão.

 

Mas o próprio Akira Toriyama, criador da saga, disse em entrevista à revista Shonen Jump dos EUA, “se não fosse por um filme de Jackie Chan, Dragon Ball nunca teria sido criado” e não teríamos Son Goku hoje.

 

Toriyama era um grande fã dos filmes de artes marciais e em especial do ator Jackie Chan. Para homenagea-lo ele introduziu as artes marciais dentro do mangá além de se inspirar no ator para criar o atrapalhado e poderoso Goku.

 

Dragon Boy?

11

 

O primeiro mangá do estilo artes marciais de Toriyama foi um mangá chamado Dragon Boy e conta a história de um menino com asas de dragão que treina artes marciais em um bosque e que um dia recebe de seu Sensei a missão de levar uma princesa à sua terra natal em segurança. O mangá foi tão bem aceito pelos leitores que Toriyama decidiu então que assim seria a sua nova história, já que estava à procura de uma.

 

A partir de Drunken Master, Akira Toriyama começa a planejar uma história e personagens para Dragon Ball mantendo as origens chinesas do filme e inspirando-se na lenda do Rei Macaco, ou a lenda de Saiyuki a Jornada ao Oeste no Japão.

 

Goku era cotado para ser um macaco

12

 

De inicio a ideia seria fazer de Goku um macaco de verdade, mas essa ideia foi logo descartada pois seria uma copia do Rei Macaco. Então Toriyama inspirou-se em Dragon Boy para criar Goku, o menino seria humano mas com um adicional, uma cauda de macaco.

 

Dragon Ball ia ser finalizado assim que Goku encontra-se as esferas do dragão

 

Ainda bem que isso não aconteceu não é mesmo? Toriyama adicionou também as esferas do dragão na história, que quando juntas, dariam o direito a realizar sonhos, assim como na lenda de Saiyuki que partem em sua jornada em busca dos escritos sagrados do Budismo.

 

Dragon Ball estava fadado a terminar quando as sete esferas fossem reunidas, mas o sucesso do mangá foi tão grande que optaram por continuar com a história, e então Toriyama foi meio que “obrigado” a continuar desenhando os mangás que eram publicados semanalmente.

 

Goku é uma mulher?

 

Calma, calma. No Japão uma senhora chamada Masako Nozawa faz a voz de Goku e seus filhos Gohan e Goten. As mulheres, por causa da voz mais fina, conseguem imitar vozes de criança com muita facilidade. Masako começou fazendo a voz de Goku na primeira parte da série e quando ele ficou mais velho conseguiu alterar a voz para um personagem diferente.

 

Com os filhos ela fazia a mesma coisa e deixou Akira Toriyama espantado: “Em uma cena em que Goku, Gohan e Goten apareciam juntos, Nozawa Masako conseguiu fazer as três vozes da conversa ao mesmo tempo”, disse Toriyama. Aqui no Brasil, Goku também é dublado por uma mulher (Úrsula Bezerra, a mesma dubladora de Naruto) em Dragon Ball.

 

Nomes dos personagens

13

 

Alguns personagens de Dragon Ball possuem nomes bem diferentes relacionados à comida e algumas outras coisas. Dá para citar vários exemplos como Vegeta que vem da palavra vegetal, Freeza de Freezer, Trunks de calções de banho em inglês e as tropas especiais Ginyu (Leite, em japonês) que têm seus nomes tirados do cardápio do café-da-manhã ocidental.

 

A mulher de Toriyama inventou o Kamehameha

14

 

Um dos golpes mais conhecidos de Goku (e mais imitado nas brincadeiras dos anos 90) foi inventado pela mulher de Toriyama. Ele estava aborrecido dizendo: “O nome do ataque especial do Mestre Kame vai ser alguma coisa com Ha”. Logo sua mulher disse: Kamehameha.

 

A palavra tinha uma sonoridade boa e foi logo incorporada ao personagem. O “Kame” significava tartaruga e “Ha” significava onda, mas a palavra inteira não tem significado algum em japonês. Entretanto, Kamehameha é um Deus havaiano. Misturando tudo dá até pra entender porque o Mestre Kame vive numa ilha e tem um casco de tartaruga nas costas.

 

Personagem preferido de Toriyama

15

 

Nada de Goku. Piccolo é o preferido do autor da série. O personagem foi criado por Akira Toriyama quando ele queria um antagonista que fosse um verdadeiro personagem maligno. Antes da sua criação, quase todos os vilões da série eram considerados muito adoráveis.

 

Quando Piccolo foi criado, Toriyama percebeu que sua aparição se transformou em um dos momentos mais interessantes da história do mangá e ele se tornou um de seus personagens favoritos. Apesar de que Akira considerava clichê a transformação de um vilão em herói, ele comentou que ainda se sentia emocionado ao desenhar Piccolo pois apesar de sua cara assustadora, ele se tornou uma criatura bastante simpática.

 

Piccolo surgiu dos desenhos que Akira fazia de humanos mas depois foi planejado para ser um demônio. Quando o protagonista Goku se tornou o homem mais forte da Terra, Toriyama decidiu criar personagens de outros planetas e a Piccolo foi estabelecido como um Namekuseijin.

 

Personagem que Toriyama mais odeia

16

 

Não é nenhum dos vilões. O personagem mais odiado pelo autor é a esposa de Goku: Chi-chi. Ele disse que a personagem é muito mandona e que apesar de tudo ele a fez “chata” de propósito. Ela zela pelo bem-estar de sua família, e deseja que seus filhos não sigam o estilo de vida de Goku, sempre envolvido em lutas e conflitos.

 

Chi-Chi tenta fazer Gohan se concentrar nos estudos durante sua infância, mas seu plano é interrompido por constantes ameaças à Terra durante esse período. Ela toma atitudes diferentes com Goten, e até mesmo o treina.

 

Filha do Rei Cutelo, Chi-chi também é bastante forte, sendo capaz de chegar às etapas finais do torneio Tenkaichi Budokai.

 

Goku se casou por comida

 

Chi-chi e Goku se conheceram quando crianças, e Goku promete se casar com ela, pensando que casamento é algum tipo de comida. Ela o confronta mais tarde e o faz cumprir sua promessa, apesar do mal-entendido.

 

Manga

Main article: Dragon Ball (manga)

 

Dragon Ball debuted in Weekly Shōnen Jump No. 51, 1984.

Written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama, Dragon Ball was serialized in the manga anthology Weekly Shōnen Jump from November 20, 1984 to May 23, 1995, when Toriyama grew exhausted and felt he needed a break from drawing. The 519 individual chapters were published into 42 tankōbon volumes by Shueisha from September 10, 1985 through August 4, 1995.[13][14][15] Between December 4, 2002 and April 2, 2004, the chapters were re-released in a collection of 34 kanzenban volumes, which included a slightly rewritten ending, new covers, and color artwork from its Weekly Shōnen Jump run.[16][17] The February 2013 issue of V Jump, which was released in December 2012, announced that parts of the manga will be fully colored and re-released in 2013.[18] Twenty volumes, beginning from chapter 195 and grouped by story arcs, were released between February 4, 2013 and July 4, 2014.[19][20] Twelve volumes covering the first 194 chapters were published between January 4 and March 4, 2016.[21][22] A sōshūhen edition that aims to recreate the manga as it was originally serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump with color pages, promotional text, and next chapter previews, began being published on May 13, 2016.[23]

 

Spin-offs and crossovers

Toriyama also created a short series, Neko Majin (1999–2005), that became a self-parody of Dragon Ball.[24] In 2006, a crossover between Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo (or Kochikame) and Dragon Ball by Toriyama and Kochikame author Osamu Akimoto appeared in the Super Kochikame (超こち亀 Chō Kochikame) manga.[25] That same year, Toriyama teamed up with Eiichiro Oda to create a crossover chapter of Dragon Ball and One Piece entitled Cross Epoch.[26] The final chapter of Toriyama's 2013 manga series Jaco the Galactic Patrolman revealed that it is set before Dragon Ball, with several characters making appearances.[27] Jaco's collected volumes contain a bonus Dragon Ball chapter depicting Goku's mother.[28]

 

A colored spin-off manga titled Dragon Ball SD written by Naho Ōishi has been published in Shueisha's Saikyō Jump magazine since its debut issue in December 2010.[29] A condensed retelling of Goku's adventures in a super deformed art style, it has been collected into four volumes as of February 2016.[30][31][32][33] Another manga penned by Ōishi, the three-chapter Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock that revolves around Bardock, Goku's father, was published in the monthly magazine V Jump from August and October 2011.[34]

 

Anime series

Dragon Ball

Main articles: Dragon Ball (anime) and List of Dragon Ball episodes

Toei Animation produced an anime television series based on the first 194 manga chapters, also titled Dragon Ball. The series premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on February 26, 1986 and ran until April 12, 1989, lasting 153 episodes.[2]

 

Dragon Ball Z

Main articles: Dragon Ball Z and List of Dragon Ball Z episodes

Instead of continuing the anime as Dragon Ball, Toei Animation decided to carry on with their adaptation under a new name and asked Akira Toriyama to come up with the title. Dragon Ball Z (ドラゴンボールZ(ゼット) Doragon Bōru Zetto?, commonly abbreviated as DBZ) picks up five years after the first series left off and adapts the final 325 chapters of the manga. It premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on April 26, 1989, taking over its predecessor's time slot, and ran for 291 episodes until its conclusion on January 31, 1996.[2]

 

Dragon Ball GT

Main articles: Dragon Ball GT and List of Dragon Ball GT episodes

Dragon Ball GT (ドラゴンボールGT(ジーティー) Doragon Bōru Jī Tī?, G(rand) T(ouring)[35]) premiered on Fuji TV on February 2, 1996 and ran until November 19, 1997 for 64 episodes.[2] Unlike the first two anime series, it is not based on Akira Toriyama's original Dragon Ball manga,[36] being created by Toei Animation as a sequel to the series or as Toriyama called it, a "grand side story of the original Dragon Ball".[35] Toriyama designed the main cast, the spaceship used in the show, the design of three planets, and came up with the title and logo. In addition to this, Toriyama also oversaw production of the series, just as he had for the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime.

 

Dragon Ball Kai

Main articles: Dragon Ball Kai and List of Dragon Ball Z Kai episodes

In February 2009, Toei Animation announced that it would begin broadcasting a revised version of Dragon Ball Z as part of the series' 20th anniversary celebrations. The series premiered on Fuji TV in Japan on April 5, 2009, under the name Dragon Ball Kai (ドラゴンボール改 Doragon Bōru Kai?, lit. "Dragon Ball Revised"), with the episodes remastered for HDTV, featuring updated opening and ending sequences, and a rerecording of the vocal tracks by most of the original cast.[37][38] The footage was also re-edited to more closely follow the manga, resulting in a faster-moving story, and damaged frames removed.[39] As such, it is a new version of Dragon Ball Z created from the original footage. Some shots were also remade from scratch in order to fix cropping and continuity issues.[40] The majority of the international versions, including Funimation Entertainment's English dub, are titled Dragon Ball Z Kai.[41][42]

 

Dragon Ball Super

Main articles: Dragon Ball Super and List of Dragon Ball Super episodes

On April 28, 2015, Toei Animation announced Dragon Ball Super (ドラゴンボール超 Doragon Bōru Sūpā?), the first all-new Dragon Ball television series to be released in 18 years. It debuted on July 5 and will run as a weekly series at 9:00 am on Fuji TV on Sundays.[43] Masako Nozawa reprised her roles as Goku, Gohan, and Goten. Most of the original cast reprise their roles as well.[44][45] Kouichi Yamadera and Masakazu Morita also reprise their roles, as Beerus and Whis, respectively.[45] The story of the anime is set four years after the defeat of Majin Boo, when the Earth has become peaceful once again. Akira Toriyama is credited as the original creator, as well for "original story & character design concepts."[46] It is also being adapted into a companion manga.[47]

 

Films

Anime

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Nineteen animated theatrical films based on the Dragon Ball series have been released in Japan. The first three films are based on the original Dragon Ball anime series. The remaining films include fifteen based on Dragon Ball Z and one tenth anniversary special (also based on the first anime series). The first five films were shown at the Toei Manga Festival (東映まんがまつり Tōei Manga Matsuri), while the sixth through seventeenth films were shown at the Toei Anime Fair (東映アニメフェア Toei Anime Fea). They were mostly alternate re-tellings of certain story arcs involving new characters or extra side-stories that do not correlate with the same continuity as the series. Since these movies were originally shown as back-to-back presentations alongside other Toei film productions, they were usually below feature length (around 45-60 minutes each), making them only slightly longer than an episode of the TV series (the sole exception being 1996's The Path to Power, which has a running time of 80 minutes). The newest films, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods (2013) and Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection 'F' (2015), were produced as full-length feature films and were given stand-alone theatrical releases in Japan; these being the first movies to have original creator Akira Toriyama deeply involved in their production.[48][49]

 

Live-action

An unofficial live-action Mandarin Chinese film adaptation of the series, Dragon Ball: The Magic Begins, was released in Taiwan in 1989.[2] In December 1990, the unofficial live-action Korean film Dragon Ball: Ssawora Son Goku, Igyeora Son Goku was released. 20th Century Fox acquired feature film rights to the Dragon Ball franchise in March 2002 and began production on an American live-action film entitled Dragonball Evolution.[50][51] Directed by James Wong and produced by Stephen Chow, it was released in the United States on April 10, 2009.[51][52]

 

TV Specials and other animations

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Three television specials based on the series were aired on Fuji TV in Japan. The first, The One True Final Battle ~The Z Warrior Who Challenged Freeza -- Son Goku's Father~, renamed Bardock – The Father of Goku by Funimation, was shown on October 17, 1990. The second special, The Hopeless Resistance!! Gohan and Trunks -- The Two Remaining Super Warriors, renamed The History of Trunks by Funimation, is based on a special chapter of the original manga and aired on March 24, 1993. Goku Side Story! The Four Star Ball is a Badge of Courage, renamed A Hero's Legacy by Funimation, aired on March 26, 1997. A two-part hour-long crossover special between Dragon Ball Z, One Piece and Toriko, referred to as Dream 9 Toriko & One Piece & Dragon Ball Z Super Collaboration Special!! aired on April 7, 2013.[53]

 

A two-episode original video animation (OVA) titled Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans was created in 1993 as strategy guides for the Famicom video game of the same name.[54] A remake titled Dragon Ball: Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans was created as a bonus feature for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2, which was released on November 11, 2010.[55]

 

The short film Dragon Ball: Yo! Son Goku and His Friends Return!! was created for the Jump Super Anime Tour,[56] which celebrated Weekly Shōnen Jump's 40th anniversary, and debuted on November 24, 2008. A short animated adaptation of Naho Ōishi's Bardock spinoff manga, Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock, was shown on December 17–18, 2011 at the Jump Festa 2012 event.[57]

 

Theme Park Attraction

"Dragon Ball Z: The Real 4D" debuted at Universal Studios Japan during Summer 2016. It features a battle between Goku and Freeza. Unlike most Dragon Ball animation, the ride is animated with CGI.

 

Video games

See also: List of Dragon Ball video games

 

A Dragon Ball Z arcade conversion kit that includes the PCB, instructions and operator's manual.

The Dragon Ball franchise has spawned multiple video games across various genres and platforms. Earlier games of the series included a system of card battling and were released for the Famicom following the storyline of the series.[58] Starting with the Super Famicom and Mega Drive, most of the games were from the fighting genre or RPG (Role Playing Game), such as the Super Butoden series.[59] The first Dragon Ball game to be released in the United States was Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout for the PlayStation in 1997.[60] For the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable games the characters were redone in 3D cel-shaded graphics. These games included the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai series and the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi series.[61][62] Dragon Ball Z: Burst Limit was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[63] Dragon Ball Xenoverse was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.[64][65] A massively multiplayer online role-playing game called Dragon Ball Online was available in Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan until the servers were shut down in 2013.[66]

 

Soundtracks

See also: List of Dragon Ball soundtracks

Myriad soundtracks were released in the anime, movies and the games. The music for the first two anime Dragon Ball and Z and its films was composed by Shunsuke Kikuchi, while the music from GT was composed by Akihito Tokunaga and the music from Kai was composed by Kenji Yamamoto and Norihito Sumitomo. For the first anime, the soundtracks released were Dragon Ball: Music Collection in 1985 and Dragon Ball: Complete Song Collection in 1991, although they were reissued in 2007 and 2003, respectively.[67] For the second anime, the soundtrack series released were Dragon Ball Z Hit Song Collection Series. It was produced and released by Columbia Records of Japan from July 21, 1989 to March 20, 1996 the show's entire lifespan. On September 20, 2006 Columbia re-released the Hit Song Collection on their Animex 1300 series.[68][69] Other CDs released are compilations, video games and films soundtracks as well as music from the English versions.[70]

 

Companion books

 

Cover of Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations

There have been numerous companion books to the Dragon Ball franchise. Chief among these are the Daizenshuu (大全集?) series, comprising seven hardback main volumes and three supplemental softcover volumes, covering the manga and the first two anime series and their theatrical films. The first of these, Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations (Daizenshuu volume 1), first published in Japan in 1995, is the only one that was released in English, being printed in 2008 by Viz Media.[71] It contains all 264 colored illustrations Akira Toriyama drew for the Weekly Shōnen Jump magazines' covers, bonus giveaways and specials, and all the covers for the 42 tankōbon. It also includes an interview with Toriyama on his work process. The remainder have never been released in English, and all are now out of print in Japan. From February 4 to May 9, 2013, condensed versions of the Daizenshuu with some updated information were released as the four-volume Chōzenshū (超全集?) series.[18] For Dragon Ball GT, the Dragon Ball GT Perfect Files were released in May and December 1997 by Shueisha's Jump Comics Selection imprint. They include series information, illustration galleries, behind-the-scenes information, and more. They were out of print for many years, but were re-released in April 2006 (accompanying the Japanese DVD release of Dragon Ball GT) and this edition is still in print.[72][73]

 

Coinciding with the 34-volume kanzenban re-release of the manga, and the release of the entire series on DVD for the first time in Japan, four new guidebooks were released in 2003 and 2004. Dragon Ball Landmark and Dragon Ball Forever cover the manga, using volume numbers for story points that reference the kanzenban release,[74][75] while Dragon Ball: Tenkaichi Densetsu (ドラゴンボール 天下一伝説?) and Dragon Ball Z: Son Goku Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 孫悟空伝説?) cover the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime, respectively.[76][77] Much of the material in these books is reused from the earlier Daizenshuu volumes, but they include new textual material including substantial interviews with the creator, cast and production staff of the series. Son Goku Densetsu in particular showcases previously-unpublished design sketches of Goku's father Bardock, drawn by character designer Katsuyoshi Nakatsuru prior to creator Akira Toriyama's revisions that resulted in the final version.

 

Following the release of Dragon Ball Kai in Japan, four new guidebooks were released: the two-volume Dragon Ball: Super Exciting Guide (ドラゴンボール 超エキサイティングガイド?) in 2009, covering the manga,[78][79] and two-volume Dragon Ball: Extreme Battle Collection (ドラゴンボール 極限バトルコレクション?) in 2010, covering the anime series.[80][81] Despite the TV series airing during this time being Kai, the Extreme Battle Collection books reference the earlier Z series in content and episode numbers. These books also include new question-and-answer sessions with Akira Toriyama, revealing a few new details about the world and characters of the series. 2010 also saw the release of a new artbook, Dragon Ball: Anime Illustrations Guide - The Golden Warrior (ドラゴンボール アニメイラスト集 「黄金の戦士」?); a sort of anime-counterpart to the manga-oriented Complete Illustrations, it showcases anime-original illustrations and includes interviews with the three principal character designers for the anime. Each of the Japanese "Dragon Box" DVD releases of the series and movies, which were released from 2003 to 2006, as well as the Blu-ray boxed sets of Dragon Ball Kai, released 2009 to 2011, come with a Dragon Book guide that contains details about the content therein. Each also contains a new interview with a member of the cast or staff of the series. These books have been reproduced textually for Funimation's release of the Dragon Ball Z Dragon Box sets from 2009 to 2011.

 

Collectible cards

See also: Dragon Ball Collectible Card Game

Collectible cards based on the Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z, and Dragon Ball GT series have been released by Bandai. These cards feature various scenes from the manga and anime stills, plus exclusive artwork from all three series. Bandai released the first set in the United States in July 2008.[82]

 

Reception

Manga

Dragon Ball is one of the most popular manga series of all time, and it continues to enjoy high readership today. By 2000, more than 126 million copies of its tankōbon volumes had been sold in Japan alone.[83] By 2012, this number had grown to pass 156 million in Japan and 230 million worldwide, making it the second best-selling Weekly Shōnen Jump manga of all time.[84][85] Dragon Ball is credited as one of the main reasons for the period when manga circulation was at its highest in the mid-1980s and mid-1990s.[86][87] For the 10th anniversary of the Japan Media Arts Festival in 2006, Japanese fans voted Dragon Ball the third greatest manga of all time.[88]

 

In a survey conducted by Oricon in 2007 among 1,000 people, Son Goku, the main character of the franchise, ranked first place as the "Strongest Manga Character of All Time."[89] Goku's journey and his ever growing strength resulted in the character winning "the admiration of young boys everywhere".[1] Manga artists, such as One Piece creator Eiichiro Oda and Naruto creator Masashi Kishimoto, have stated that Goku inspired their series' main protagonists as well as series structure.[90][91]

 

Manga critic Jason Thompson stated in 2011 that "Dragon Ball is by far the most influential shonen manga of the last 30 years, and today, almost every Shonen Jump artist lists it as one of their favorites and lifts from it in various ways."[92] He says the series "turns from a gag/adventure manga to an nearly-pure fighting manga",[92] and its basic formula of "lots of martial arts, lots of training sequences, a few jokes" became the model for other shōnen series, such as Naruto.[93] Thompson also called Toriyama's art influential and cited it as a reason for the series' popularity.[92] James S. Yadao, author of The Rough Guide to Manga, claims that the first several chapters of Dragon Ball "play out much like Saiyuki with Dr. Slump-like humour built in" and that Dr. Slump, Toriyama's previous manga, has a clear early influence on the series.[94] He feels the series "established its unique identity" after the first occasion when Goku's group disbands and he trains under Kame-sen'nin, when the story develops "a far more action-packed, sinister tone" with "wilder" battles with aerial and spiritual elements and an increased death count, while humor still makes an occasional appearance.[94] Yadao claims that an art shift occurs when the characters "lose the rounded, innocent look that he established in Dr. Slump and gain sharper angles that leap off the page with their energy and intensity."[95]

 

Animerica felt the series had "worldwide appeal", using dramatic pacing and over-the-top martial arts action to "maintain tension levels and keep a crippler crossface hold on the audience's attention spans".[96] In Little Boy: The Art of Japan's Exploding Subculture, Takashi Murakami commented that Dragon Ball's "never-ending cyclical narrative moves forward plausibly, seamlessly, and with great finesse."[83] Ridwan Khan from Animefringe.com commented that the manga had a "chubby" art style, but as the series continued the characters got more refined, leaner, and more muscular. Khan prefers the manga over the slow pacing of the anime counterparts.[97] Allen Divers of Anime News Network praised the story and humor of the manga as being very good at conveying all of the characters' personalities. Divers also called Viz's translation one of the best of all the English editions of the series due to its faithfulness to the original Japanese.[98] D. Aviva Rothschild of Rationalmagic.com remarked the first manga volume as "a superior humor title". They praised Goku's innocence and Bulma's insistence as one of the funniest parts of the series.[99]

 

The content of the manga has been controversial in United States. In November 1999, Toys "R" Us removed Viz's Dragon Ball from their stores nationwide when a Dallas parent complained the series had "borderline soft porn" after he bought them for his four-year-old son.[100] Commenting on the issue, Susan J. Napier explained it as a difference in culture.[100] After the ban, Viz reluctantly began to censor the series to keep wide distribution.[101] However, in 2001, after releasing three volumes censored, Viz announced Dragon Ball would be uncensored and reprinted due to fan reactions.[101] In October 2009, Wicomico County Public Schools in Maryland banned the Dragon Ball manga from their school district because it "depicts nudity, sexual contact between children and sexual innuendo among adults and children."[100]

 

Anime

The anime adaptations have also been very well-received and are better known in the Western world than the manga, with Anime News Network saying "Few anime series have mainstreamed it the way Dragon Ball Z has. To a certain generation of television consumers its characters are as well known as any in the animated realm, and for many it was the first step into the wilderness of anime fandom."[102] In 2000, satellite TV channel Animax together with Brutus, a men's lifestyle magazine, and Tsutaya, Japan's largest video rental chain, conducted a poll among 200,000 fans on the top anime series, with Dragon Ball coming in fourth.[103] TV Asahi conducted two polls in 2005 on the Top 100 Anime, Dragon Ball came in second in the nationwide survey conducted with multiple age-groups and in third in the online poll.[104][105] On several occasions the Dragon Ball anime has topped Japan's DVD sales.[106][107]

 

Carl Kimlinger of Anime News Network summed up Dragon Ball as "an action-packed tale told with rare humor and something even rarer—a genuine sense of adventure."[108] Both Kimlinger and colleague Theron Martin noted Funimation's reputation for drastic alterations of the script, but praised the dub.[108][109] However, some critics and most fans of the Japanese version have been more critical with Funimation's English dub and script of Dragon Ball Z over the years. Jeffrey Harris IGN criticized the voices including how Freeza's appearance combined with the feminine English voice left fans confused about Freeza's gender.[110] Carlos Ross of T.H.E.M. Anime Reviews considered the series' characters to be different from stereotypical stock characters and noted that they undergo much more development.[111] Despite praising Dragon Ball Z for its cast of characters, they criticized it for having long and repetitive fights.[112]

 

Dragon Ball Z is well-known, and often criticized, for its long, repetitive, dragged-out fights that span several episodes, with Martin commenting "DBZ practically turned drawing out fights into an art form."[113] However, Jason Thompson of io9 explained that this comes from the fact that the anime was being created alongside the manga.[114] Dragon Ball Z was listed as the 78th best animated show in IGN's Top 100 Animated Series,[115] and was also listed as the 50th greatest cartoon in Wizard magazine's Top 100 Greatest Cartoons list.[116]

 

Harris commented that Dragon Ball GT "is downright repellent", mentioning that the material and characters had lost their novelty and fun. He also criticized the GT character designs of Trunks and Vegeta as being goofy.[110] Zac Bertschy of Anime News Network also gave negative comments about GT, mentioning that the fights from the series were "a very simple childish exercise" and that many other anime were superior. The plot of Dragon Ball GT has also been criticized for giving a formula that was already used in its predecessors.[117]

 

The first episode of Dragon Ball Z Kai earned a viewer ratings percentage of 11.3, ahead of One Piece and behind Crayon Shin-chan.[118] Although following episodes had lower ratings, Kai was among the top 10 anime in viewer ratings every week in Japan for most of its run.[119][120]

Vocês devem estar pensando: “O que uma coisa ter a ver com a outra?”. Bom, todos sabem que Dragon Ball, mais especificamente Goku, foi baseado em uma lenda Chinesa, a lenda do Rei Macaco ou a lenda de Saiyuki no Japão.

 

Mas o próprio Akira Toriyama, criador da saga, disse em entrevista à revista Shonen Jump dos EUA, “se não fosse por um filme de Jackie Chan, Dragon Ball nunca teria sido criado” e não teríamos Son Goku hoje.

 

Toriyama era um grande fã dos filmes de artes marciais e em especial do ator Jackie Chan. Para homenagea-lo ele introduziu as artes marciais dentro do mangá além de se inspirar no ator para criar o atrapalhado e poderoso Goku.

 

Dragon Boy?

11

 

O primeiro mangá do estilo artes marciais de Toriyama foi um mangá chamado Dragon Boy e conta a história de um menino com asas de dragão que treina artes marciais em um bosque e que um dia recebe de seu Sensei a missão de levar uma princesa à sua terra natal em segurança. O mangá foi tão bem aceito pelos leitores que Toriyama decidiu então que assim seria a sua nova história, já que estava à procura de uma.

 

A partir de Drunken Master, Akira Toriyama começa a planejar uma história e personagens para Dragon Ball mantendo as origens chinesas do filme e inspirando-se na lenda do Rei Macaco, ou a lenda de Saiyuki a Jornada ao Oeste no Japão.

 

Goku era cotado para ser um macaco

12

 

De inicio a ideia seria fazer de Goku um macaco de verdade, mas essa ideia foi logo descartada pois seria uma copia do Rei Macaco. Então Toriyama inspirou-se em Dragon Boy para criar Goku, o menino seria humano mas com um adicional, uma cauda de macaco.

 

Dragon Ball ia ser finalizado assim que Goku encontra-se as esferas do dragão

 

Ainda bem que isso não aconteceu não é mesmo? Toriyama adicionou também as esferas do dragão na história, que quando juntas, dariam o direito a realizar sonhos, assim como na lenda de Saiyuki que partem em sua jornada em busca dos escritos sagrados do Budismo.

 

Dragon Ball estava fadado a terminar quando as sete esferas fossem reunidas, mas o sucesso do mangá foi tão grande que optaram por continuar com a história, e então Toriyama foi meio que “obrigado” a continuar desenhando os mangás que eram publicados semanalmente.

 

Goku é uma mulher?

 

Calma, calma. No Japão uma senhora chamada Masako Nozawa faz a voz de Goku e seus filhos Gohan e Goten. As mulheres, por causa da voz mais fina, conseguem imitar vozes de criança com muita facilidade. Masako começou fazendo a voz de Goku na primeira parte da série e quando ele ficou mais velho conseguiu alterar a voz para um personagem diferente.

 

Com os filhos ela fazia a mesma coisa e deixou Akira Toriyama espantado: “Em uma cena em que Goku, Gohan e Goten apareciam juntos, Nozawa Masako conseguiu fazer as três vozes da conversa ao mesmo tempo”, disse Toriyama. Aqui no Brasil, Goku também é dublado por uma mulher (Úrsula Bezerra, a mesma dubladora de Naruto) em Dragon Ball.

 

Nomes dos personagens

13

 

Alguns personagens de Dragon Ball possuem nomes bem diferentes relacionados à comida e algumas outras coisas. Dá para citar vários exemplos como Vegeta que vem da palavra vegetal, Freeza de Freezer, Trunks de calções de banho em inglês e as tropas especiais Ginyu (Leite, em japonês) que têm seus nomes tirados do cardápio do café-da-manhã ocidental.

 

A mulher de Toriyama inventou o Kamehameha

14

 

Um dos golpes mais conhecidos de Goku (e mais imitado nas brincadeiras dos anos 90) foi inventado pela mulher de Toriyama. Ele estava aborrecido dizendo: “O nome do ataque especial do Mestre Kame vai ser alguma coisa com Ha”. Logo sua mulher disse: Kamehameha.

 

A palavra tinha uma sonoridade boa e foi logo incorporada ao personagem. O “Kame” significava tartaruga e “Ha” significava onda, mas a palavra inteira não tem significado algum em japonês. Entretanto, Kamehameha é um Deus havaiano. Misturando tudo dá até pra entender porque o Mestre Kame vive numa ilha e tem um casco de tartaruga nas costas.

 

Personagem preferido de Toriyama

15

 

Nada de Goku. Piccolo é o preferido do autor da série. O personagem foi criado por Akira Toriyama quando ele queria um antagonista que fosse um verdadeiro personagem maligno. Antes da sua criação, quase todos os vilões da série eram considerados muito adoráveis.

 

Quando Piccolo foi criado, Toriyama percebeu que sua aparição se transformou em um dos momentos mais interessantes da história do mangá e ele se tornou um de seus personagens favoritos. Apesar de que Akira considerava clichê a transformação de um vilão em herói, ele comentou que ainda se sentia emocionado ao desenhar Piccolo pois apesar de sua cara assustadora, ele se tornou uma criatura bastante simpática.

 

Piccolo surgiu dos desenhos que Akira fazia de humanos mas depois foi planejado para ser um demônio. Quando o protagonista Goku se tornou o homem mais forte da Terra, Toriyama decidiu criar personagens de outros planetas e a Piccolo foi estabelecido como um Namekuseijin.

 

Personagem que Toriyama mais odeia

16

 

Não é nenhum dos vilões. O personagem mais odiado pelo autor é a esposa de Goku: Chi-chi. Ele disse que a personagem é muito mandona e que apesar de tudo ele a fez “chata” de propósito. Ela zela pelo bem-estar de sua família, e deseja que seus filhos não sigam o estilo de vida de Goku, sempre envolvido em lutas e conflitos.

 

Chi-Chi tenta fazer Gohan se concentrar nos estudos durante sua infância, mas seu plano é interrompido por constantes ameaças à Terra durante esse período. Ela toma atitudes diferentes com Goten, e até mesmo o treina.

 

Filha do Rei Cutelo, Chi-chi também é bastante forte, sendo capaz de chegar às etapas finais do torneio Tenkaichi Budokai.

 

Goku se casou por comida

 

Chi-chi e Goku se conheceram quando crianças, e Goku promete se casar com ela, pensando que casamento é algum tipo de comida. Ela o confronta mais tarde e o faz cumprir sua promessa, apesar do mal-entendido.

 

Manga

Main article: Dragon Ball (manga)

 

Dragon Ball debuted in Weekly Shōnen Jump No. 51, 1984.

Written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama, Dragon Ball was serialized in the manga anthology Weekly Shōnen Jump from November 20, 1984 to May 23, 1995, when Toriyama grew exhausted and felt he needed a break from drawing. The 519 individual chapters were published into 42 tankōbon volumes by Shueisha from September 10, 1985 through August 4, 1995.[13][14][15] Between December 4, 2002 and April 2, 2004, the chapters were re-released in a collection of 34 kanzenban volumes, which included a slightly rewritten ending, new covers, and color artwork from its Weekly Shōnen Jump run.[16][17] The February 2013 issue of V Jump, which was released in December 2012, announced that parts of the manga will be fully colored and re-released in 2013.[18] Twenty volumes, beginning from chapter 195 and grouped by story arcs, were released between February 4, 2013 and July 4, 2014.[19][20] Twelve volumes covering the first 194 chapters were published between January 4 and March 4, 2016.[21][22] A sōshūhen edition that aims to recreate the manga as it was originally serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump with color pages, promotional text, and next chapter previews, began being published on May 13, 2016.[23]

 

Spin-offs and crossovers

Toriyama also created a short series, Neko Majin (1999–2005), that became a self-parody of Dragon Ball.[24] In 2006, a crossover between Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo (or Kochikame) and Dragon Ball by Toriyama and Kochikame author Osamu Akimoto appeared in the Super Kochikame (超こち亀 Chō Kochikame) manga.[25] That same year, Toriyama teamed up with Eiichiro Oda to create a crossover chapter of Dragon Ball and One Piece entitled Cross Epoch.[26] The final chapter of Toriyama's 2013 manga series Jaco the Galactic Patrolman revealed that it is set before Dragon Ball, with several characters making appearances.[27] Jaco's collected volumes contain a bonus Dragon Ball chapter depicting Goku's mother.[28]

 

A colored spin-off manga titled Dragon Ball SD written by Naho Ōishi has been published in Shueisha's Saikyō Jump magazine since its debut issue in December 2010.[29] A condensed retelling of Goku's adventures in a super deformed art style, it has been collected into four volumes as of February 2016.[30][31][32][33] Another manga penned by Ōishi, the three-chapter Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock that revolves around Bardock, Goku's father, was published in the monthly magazine V Jump from August and October 2011.[34]

 

Anime series

Dragon Ball

Main articles: Dragon Ball (anime) and List of Dragon Ball episodes

Toei Animation produced an anime television series based on the first 194 manga chapters, also titled Dragon Ball. The series premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on February 26, 1986 and ran until April 12, 1989, lasting 153 episodes.[2]

 

Dragon Ball Z

Main articles: Dragon Ball Z and List of Dragon Ball Z episodes

Instead of continuing the anime as Dragon Ball, Toei Animation decided to carry on with their adaptation under a new name and asked Akira Toriyama to come up with the title. Dragon Ball Z (ドラゴンボールZ(ゼット) Doragon Bōru Zetto?, commonly abbreviated as DBZ) picks up five years after the first series left off and adapts the final 325 chapters of the manga. It premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on April 26, 1989, taking over its predecessor's time slot, and ran for 291 episodes until its conclusion on January 31, 1996.[2]

 

Dragon Ball GT

Main articles: Dragon Ball GT and List of Dragon Ball GT episodes

Dragon Ball GT (ドラゴンボールGT(ジーティー) Doragon Bōru Jī Tī?, G(rand) T(ouring)[35]) premiered on Fuji TV on February 2, 1996 and ran until November 19, 1997 for 64 episodes.[2] Unlike the first two anime series, it is not based on Akira Toriyama's original Dragon Ball manga,[36] being created by Toei Animation as a sequel to the series or as Toriyama called it, a "grand side story of the original Dragon Ball".[35] Toriyama designed the main cast, the spaceship used in the show, the design of three planets, and came up with the title and logo. In addition to this, Toriyama also oversaw production of the series, just as he had for the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime.

 

Dragon Ball Kai

Main articles: Dragon Ball Kai and List of Dragon Ball Z Kai episodes

In February 2009, Toei Animation announced that it would begin broadcasting a revised version of Dragon Ball Z as part of the series' 20th anniversary celebrations. The series premiered on Fuji TV in Japan on April 5, 2009, under the name Dragon Ball Kai (ドラゴンボール改 Doragon Bōru Kai?, lit. "Dragon Ball Revised"), with the episodes remastered for HDTV, featuring updated opening and ending sequences, and a rerecording of the vocal tracks by most of the original cast.[37][38] The footage was also re-edited to more closely follow the manga, resulting in a faster-moving story, and damaged frames removed.[39] As such, it is a new version of Dragon Ball Z created from the original footage. Some shots were also remade from scratch in order to fix cropping and continuity issues.[40] The majority of the international versions, including Funimation Entertainment's English dub, are titled Dragon Ball Z Kai.[41][42]

 

Dragon Ball Super

Main articles: Dragon Ball Super and List of Dragon Ball Super episodes

On April 28, 2015, Toei Animation announced Dragon Ball Super (ドラゴンボール超 Doragon Bōru Sūpā?), the first all-new Dragon Ball television series to be released in 18 years. It debuted on July 5 and will run as a weekly series at 9:00 am on Fuji TV on Sundays.[43] Masako Nozawa reprised her roles as Goku, Gohan, and Goten. Most of the original cast reprise their roles as well.[44][45] Kouichi Yamadera and Masakazu Morita also reprise their roles, as Beerus and Whis, respectively.[45] The story of the anime is set four years after the defeat of Majin Boo, when the Earth has become peaceful once again. Akira Toriyama is credited as the original creator, as well for "original story & character design concepts."[46] It is also being adapted into a companion manga.[47]

 

Films

Anime

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Nineteen animated theatrical films based on the Dragon Ball series have been released in Japan. The first three films are based on the original Dragon Ball anime series. The remaining films include fifteen based on Dragon Ball Z and one tenth anniversary special (also based on the first anime series). The first five films were shown at the Toei Manga Festival (東映まんがまつり Tōei Manga Matsuri), while the sixth through seventeenth films were shown at the Toei Anime Fair (東映アニメフェア Toei Anime Fea). They were mostly alternate re-tellings of certain story arcs involving new characters or extra side-stories that do not correlate with the same continuity as the series. Since these movies were originally shown as back-to-back presentations alongside other Toei film productions, they were usually below feature length (around 45-60 minutes each), making them only slightly longer than an episode of the TV series (the sole exception being 1996's The Path to Power, which has a running time of 80 minutes). The newest films, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods (2013) and Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection 'F' (2015), were produced as full-length feature films and were given stand-alone theatrical releases in Japan; these being the first movies to have original creator Akira Toriyama deeply involved in their production.[48][49]

 

Live-action

An unofficial live-action Mandarin Chinese film adaptation of the series, Dragon Ball: The Magic Begins, was released in Taiwan in 1989.[2] In December 1990, the unofficial live-action Korean film Dragon Ball: Ssawora Son Goku, Igyeora Son Goku was released. 20th Century Fox acquired feature film rights to the Dragon Ball franchise in March 2002 and began production on an American live-action film entitled Dragonball Evolution.[50][51] Directed by James Wong and produced by Stephen Chow, it was released in the United States on April 10, 2009.[51][52]

 

TV Specials and other animations

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Three television specials based on the series were aired on Fuji TV in Japan. The first, The One True Final Battle ~The Z Warrior Who Challenged Freeza -- Son Goku's Father~, renamed Bardock – The Father of Goku by Funimation, was shown on October 17, 1990. The second special, The Hopeless Resistance!! Gohan and Trunks -- The Two Remaining Super Warriors, renamed The History of Trunks by Funimation, is based on a special chapter of the original manga and aired on March 24, 1993. Goku Side Story! The Four Star Ball is a Badge of Courage, renamed A Hero's Legacy by Funimation, aired on March 26, 1997. A two-part hour-long crossover special between Dragon Ball Z, One Piece and Toriko, referred to as Dream 9 Toriko & One Piece & Dragon Ball Z Super Collaboration Special!! aired on April 7, 2013.[53]

 

A two-episode original video animation (OVA) titled Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans was created in 1993 as strategy guides for the Famicom video game of the same name.[54] A remake titled Dragon Ball: Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans was created as a bonus feature for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2, which was released on November 11, 2010.[55]

 

The short film Dragon Ball: Yo! Son Goku and His Friends Return!! was created for the Jump Super Anime Tour,[56] which celebrated Weekly Shōnen Jump's 40th anniversary, and debuted on November 24, 2008. A short animated adaptation of Naho Ōishi's Bardock spinoff manga, Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock, was shown on December 17–18, 2011 at the Jump Festa 2012 event.[57]

 

Theme Park Attraction

"Dragon Ball Z: The Real 4D" debuted at Universal Studios Japan during Summer 2016. It features a battle between Goku and Freeza. Unlike most Dragon Ball animation, the ride is animated with CGI.

 

Video games

See also: List of Dragon Ball video games

 

A Dragon Ball Z arcade conversion kit that includes the PCB, instructions and operator's manual.

The Dragon Ball franchise has spawned multiple video games across various genres and platforms. Earlier games of the series included a system of card battling and were released for the Famicom following the storyline of the series.[58] Starting with the Super Famicom and Mega Drive, most of the games were from the fighting genre or RPG (Role Playing Game), such as the Super Butoden series.[59] The first Dragon Ball game to be released in the United States was Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout for the PlayStation in 1997.[60] For the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable games the characters were redone in 3D cel-shaded graphics. These games included the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai series and the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi series.[61][62] Dragon Ball Z: Burst Limit was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[63] Dragon Ball Xenoverse was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.[64][65] A massively multiplayer online role-playing game called Dragon Ball Online was available in Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan until the servers were shut down in 2013.[66]

 

Soundtracks

See also: List of Dragon Ball soundtracks

Myriad soundtracks were released in the anime, movies and the games. The music for the first two anime Dragon Ball and Z and its films was composed by Shunsuke Kikuchi, while the music from GT was composed by Akihito Tokunaga and the music from Kai was composed by Kenji Yamamoto and Norihito Sumitomo. For the first anime, the soundtracks released were Dragon Ball: Music Collection in 1985 and Dragon Ball: Complete Song Collection in 1991, although they were reissued in 2007 and 2003, respectively.[67] For the second anime, the soundtrack series released were Dragon Ball Z Hit Song Collection Series. It was produced and released by Columbia Records of Japan from July 21, 1989 to March 20, 1996 the show's entire lifespan. On September 20, 2006 Columbia re-released the Hit Song Collection on their Animex 1300 series.[68][69] Other CDs released are compilations, video games and films soundtracks as well as music from the English versions.[70]

 

Companion books

 

Cover of Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations

There have been numerous companion books to the Dragon Ball franchise. Chief among these are the Daizenshuu (大全集?) series, comprising seven hardback main volumes and three supplemental softcover volumes, covering the manga and the first two anime series and their theatrical films. The first of these, Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations (Daizenshuu volume 1), first published in Japan in 1995, is the only one that was released in English, being printed in 2008 by Viz Media.[71] It contains all 264 colored illustrations Akira Toriyama drew for the Weekly Shōnen Jump magazines' covers, bonus giveaways and specials, and all the covers for the 42 tankōbon. It also includes an interview with Toriyama on his work process. The remainder have never been released in English, and all are now out of print in Japan. From February 4 to May 9, 2013, condensed versions of the Daizenshuu with some updated information were released as the four-volume Chōzenshū (超全集?) series.[18] For Dragon Ball GT, the Dragon Ball GT Perfect Files were released in May and December 1997 by Shueisha's Jump Comics Selection imprint. They include series information, illustration galleries, behind-the-scenes information, and more. They were out of print for many years, but were re-released in April 2006 (accompanying the Japanese DVD release of Dragon Ball GT) and this edition is still in print.[72][73]

 

Coinciding with the 34-volume kanzenban re-release of the manga, and the release of the entire series on DVD for the first time in Japan, four new guidebooks were released in 2003 and 2004. Dragon Ball Landmark and Dragon Ball Forever cover the manga, using volume numbers for story points that reference the kanzenban release,[74][75] while Dragon Ball: Tenkaichi Densetsu (ドラゴンボール 天下一伝説?) and Dragon Ball Z: Son Goku Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 孫悟空伝説?) cover the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime, respectively.[76][77] Much of the material in these books is reused from the earlier Daizenshuu volumes, but they include new textual material including substantial interviews with the creator, cast and production staff of the series. Son Goku Densetsu in particular showcases previously-unpublished design sketches of Goku's father Bardock, drawn by character designer Katsuyoshi Nakatsuru prior to creator Akira Toriyama's revisions that resulted in the final version.

 

Following the release of Dragon Ball Kai in Japan, four new guidebooks were released: the two-volume Dragon Ball: Super Exciting Guide (ドラゴンボール 超エキサイティングガイド?) in 2009, covering the manga,[78][79] and two-volume Dragon Ball: Extreme Battle Collection (ドラゴンボール 極限バトルコレクション?) in 2010, covering the anime series.[80][81] Despite the TV series airing during this time being Kai, the Extreme Battle Collection books reference the earlier Z series in content and episode numbers. These books also include new question-and-answer sessions with Akira Toriyama, revealing a few new details about the world and characters of the series. 2010 also saw the release of a new artbook, Dragon Ball: Anime Illustrations Guide - The Golden Warrior (ドラゴンボール アニメイラスト集 「黄金の戦士」?); a sort of anime-counterpart to the manga-oriented Complete Illustrations, it showcases anime-original illustrations and includes interviews with the three principal character designers for the anime. Each of the Japanese "Dragon Box" DVD releases of the series and movies, which were released from 2003 to 2006, as well as the Blu-ray boxed sets of Dragon Ball Kai, released 2009 to 2011, come with a Dragon Book guide that contains details about the content therein. Each also contains a new interview with a member of the cast or staff of the series. These books have been reproduced textually for Funimation's release of the Dragon Ball Z Dragon Box sets from 2009 to 2011.

 

Collectible cards

See also: Dragon Ball Collectible Card Game

Collectible cards based on the Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z, and Dragon Ball GT series have been released by Bandai. These cards feature various scenes from the manga and anime stills, plus exclusive artwork from all three series. Bandai released the first set in the United States in July 2008.[82]

 

Reception

Manga

Dragon Ball is one of the most popular manga series of all time, and it continues to enjoy high readership today. By 2000, more than 126 million copies of its tankōbon volumes had been sold in Japan alone.[83] By 2012, this number had grown to pass 156 million in Japan and 230 million worldwide, making it the second best-selling Weekly Shōnen Jump manga of all time.[84][85] Dragon Ball is credited as one of the main reasons for the period when manga circulation was at its highest in the mid-1980s and mid-1990s.[86][87] For the 10th anniversary of the Japan Media Arts Festival in 2006, Japanese fans voted Dragon Ball the third greatest manga of all time.[88]

 

In a survey conducted by Oricon in 2007 among 1,000 people, Son Goku, the main character of the franchise, ranked first place as the "Strongest Manga Character of All Time."[89] Goku's journey and his ever growing strength resulted in the character winning "the admiration of young boys everywhere".[1] Manga artists, such as One Piece creator Eiichiro Oda and Naruto creator Masashi Kishimoto, have stated that Goku inspired their series' main protagonists as well as series structure.[90][91]

 

Manga critic Jason Thompson stated in 2011 that "Dragon Ball is by far the most influential shonen manga of the last 30 years, and today, almost every Shonen Jump artist lists it as one of their favorites and lifts from it in various ways."[92] He says the series "turns from a gag/adventure manga to an nearly-pure fighting manga",[92] and its basic formula of "lots of martial arts, lots of training sequences, a few jokes" became the model for other shōnen series, such as Naruto.[93] Thompson also called Toriyama's art influential and cited it as a reason for the series' popularity.[92] James S. Yadao, author of The Rough Guide to Manga, claims that the first several chapters of Dragon Ball "play out much like Saiyuki with Dr. Slump-like humour built in" and that Dr. Slump, Toriyama's previous manga, has a clear early influence on the series.[94] He feels the series "established its unique identity" after the first occasion when Goku's group disbands and he trains under Kame-sen'nin, when the story develops "a far more action-packed, sinister tone" with "wilder" battles with aerial and spiritual elements and an increased death count, while humor still makes an occasional appearance.[94] Yadao claims that an art shift occurs when the characters "lose the rounded, innocent look that he established in Dr. Slump and gain sharper angles that leap off the page with their energy and intensity."[95]

 

Animerica felt the series had "worldwide appeal", using dramatic pacing and over-the-top martial arts action to "maintain tension levels and keep a crippler crossface hold on the audience's attention spans".[96] In Little Boy: The Art of Japan's Exploding Subculture, Takashi Murakami commented that Dragon Ball's "never-ending cyclical narrative moves forward plausibly, seamlessly, and with great finesse."[83] Ridwan Khan from Animefringe.com commented that the manga had a "chubby" art style, but as the series continued the characters got more refined, leaner, and more muscular. Khan prefers the manga over the slow pacing of the anime counterparts.[97] Allen Divers of Anime News Network praised the story and humor of the manga as being very good at conveying all of the characters' personalities. Divers also called Viz's translation one of the best of all the English editions of the series due to its faithfulness to the original Japanese.[98] D. Aviva Rothschild of Rationalmagic.com remarked the first manga volume as "a superior humor title". They praised Goku's innocence and Bulma's insistence as one of the funniest parts of the series.[99]

 

The content of the manga has been controversial in United States. In November 1999, Toys "R" Us removed Viz's Dragon Ball from their stores nationwide when a Dallas parent complained the series had "borderline soft porn" after he bought them for his four-year-old son.[100] Commenting on the issue, Susan J. Napier explained it as a difference in culture.[100] After the ban, Viz reluctantly began to censor the series to keep wide distribution.[101] However, in 2001, after releasing three volumes censored, Viz announced Dragon Ball would be uncensored and reprinted due to fan reactions.[101] In October 2009, Wicomico County Public Schools in Maryland banned the Dragon Ball manga from their school district because it "depicts nudity, sexual contact between children and sexual innuendo among adults and children."[100]

 

Anime

The anime adaptations have also been very well-received and are better known in the Western world than the manga, with Anime News Network saying "Few anime series have mainstreamed it the way Dragon Ball Z has. To a certain generation of television consumers its characters are as well known as any in the animated realm, and for many it was the first step into the wilderness of anime fandom."[102] In 2000, satellite TV channel Animax together with Brutus, a men's lifestyle magazine, and Tsutaya, Japan's largest video rental chain, conducted a poll among 200,000 fans on the top anime series, with Dragon Ball coming in fourth.[103] TV Asahi conducted two polls in 2005 on the Top 100 Anime, Dragon Ball came in second in the nationwide survey conducted with multiple age-groups and in third in the online poll.[104][105] On several occasions the Dragon Ball anime has topped Japan's DVD sales.[106][107]

 

Carl Kimlinger of Anime News Network summed up Dragon Ball as "an action-packed tale told with rare humor and something even rarer—a genuine sense of adventure."[108] Both Kimlinger and colleague Theron Martin noted Funimation's reputation for drastic alterations of the script, but praised the dub.[108][109] However, some critics and most fans of the Japanese version have been more critical with Funimation's English dub and script of Dragon Ball Z over the years. Jeffrey Harris IGN criticized the voices including how Freeza's appearance combined with the feminine English voice left fans confused about Freeza's gender.[110] Carlos Ross of T.H.E.M. Anime Reviews considered the series' characters to be different from stereotypical stock characters and noted that they undergo much more development.[111] Despite praising Dragon Ball Z for its cast of characters, they criticized it for having long and repetitive fights.[112]

 

Dragon Ball Z is well-known, and often criticized, for its long, repetitive, dragged-out fights that span several episodes, with Martin commenting "DBZ practically turned drawing out fights into an art form."[113] However, Jason Thompson of io9 explained that this comes from the fact that the anime was being created alongside the manga.[114] Dragon Ball Z was listed as the 78th best animated show in IGN's Top 100 Animated Series,[115] and was also listed as the 50th greatest cartoon in Wizard magazine's Top 100 Greatest Cartoons list.[116]

 

Harris commented that Dragon Ball GT "is downright repellent", mentioning that the material and characters had lost their novelty and fun. He also criticized the GT character designs of Trunks and Vegeta as being goofy.[110] Zac Bertschy of Anime News Network also gave negative comments about GT, mentioning that the fights from the series were "a very simple childish exercise" and that many other anime were superior. The plot of Dragon Ball GT has also been criticized for giving a formula that was already used in its predecessors.[117]

 

The first episode of Dragon Ball Z Kai earned a viewer ratings percentage of 11.3, ahead of One Piece and behind Crayon Shin-chan.[118] Although following episodes had lower ratings, Kai was among the top 10 anime in viewer ratings every week in Japan for most of its run.[119][120]

Vocês devem estar pensando: “O que uma coisa ter a ver com a outra?”. Bom, todos sabem que Dragon Ball, mais especificamente Goku, foi baseado em uma lenda Chinesa, a lenda do Rei Macaco ou a lenda de Saiyuki no Japão.

 

Mas o próprio Akira Toriyama, criador da saga, disse em entrevista à revista Shonen Jump dos EUA, “se não fosse por um filme de Jackie Chan, Dragon Ball nunca teria sido criado” e não teríamos Son Goku hoje.

 

Toriyama era um grande fã dos filmes de artes marciais e em especial do ator Jackie Chan. Para homenagea-lo ele introduziu as artes marciais dentro do mangá além de se inspirar no ator para criar o atrapalhado e poderoso Goku.

 

Dragon Boy?

11

 

O primeiro mangá do estilo artes marciais de Toriyama foi um mangá chamado Dragon Boy e conta a história de um menino com asas de dragão que treina artes marciais em um bosque e que um dia recebe de seu Sensei a missão de levar uma princesa à sua terra natal em segurança. O mangá foi tão bem aceito pelos leitores que Toriyama decidiu então que assim seria a sua nova história, já que estava à procura de uma.

 

A partir de Drunken Master, Akira Toriyama começa a planejar uma história e personagens para Dragon Ball mantendo as origens chinesas do filme e inspirando-se na lenda do Rei Macaco, ou a lenda de Saiyuki a Jornada ao Oeste no Japão.

 

Goku era cotado para ser um macaco

12

 

De inicio a ideia seria fazer de Goku um macaco de verdade, mas essa ideia foi logo descartada pois seria uma copia do Rei Macaco. Então Toriyama inspirou-se em Dragon Boy para criar Goku, o menino seria humano mas com um adicional, uma cauda de macaco.

 

Dragon Ball ia ser finalizado assim que Goku encontra-se as esferas do dragão

 

Ainda bem que isso não aconteceu não é mesmo? Toriyama adicionou também as esferas do dragão na história, que quando juntas, dariam o direito a realizar sonhos, assim como na lenda de Saiyuki que partem em sua jornada em busca dos escritos sagrados do Budismo.

 

Dragon Ball estava fadado a terminar quando as sete esferas fossem reunidas, mas o sucesso do mangá foi tão grande que optaram por continuar com a história, e então Toriyama foi meio que “obrigado” a continuar desenhando os mangás que eram publicados semanalmente.

 

Goku é uma mulher?

 

Calma, calma. No Japão uma senhora chamada Masako Nozawa faz a voz de Goku e seus filhos Gohan e Goten. As mulheres, por causa da voz mais fina, conseguem imitar vozes de criança com muita facilidade. Masako começou fazendo a voz de Goku na primeira parte da série e quando ele ficou mais velho conseguiu alterar a voz para um personagem diferente.

 

Com os filhos ela fazia a mesma coisa e deixou Akira Toriyama espantado: “Em uma cena em que Goku, Gohan e Goten apareciam juntos, Nozawa Masako conseguiu fazer as três vozes da conversa ao mesmo tempo”, disse Toriyama. Aqui no Brasil, Goku também é dublado por uma mulher (Úrsula Bezerra, a mesma dubladora de Naruto) em Dragon Ball.

 

Nomes dos personagens

13

 

Alguns personagens de Dragon Ball possuem nomes bem diferentes relacionados à comida e algumas outras coisas. Dá para citar vários exemplos como Vegeta que vem da palavra vegetal, Freeza de Freezer, Trunks de calções de banho em inglês e as tropas especiais Ginyu (Leite, em japonês) que têm seus nomes tirados do cardápio do café-da-manhã ocidental.

 

A mulher de Toriyama inventou o Kamehameha

14

 

Um dos golpes mais conhecidos de Goku (e mais imitado nas brincadeiras dos anos 90) foi inventado pela mulher de Toriyama. Ele estava aborrecido dizendo: “O nome do ataque especial do Mestre Kame vai ser alguma coisa com Ha”. Logo sua mulher disse: Kamehameha.

 

A palavra tinha uma sonoridade boa e foi logo incorporada ao personagem. O “Kame” significava tartaruga e “Ha” significava onda, mas a palavra inteira não tem significado algum em japonês. Entretanto, Kamehameha é um Deus havaiano. Misturando tudo dá até pra entender porque o Mestre Kame vive numa ilha e tem um casco de tartaruga nas costas.

 

Personagem preferido de Toriyama

15

 

Nada de Goku. Piccolo é o preferido do autor da série. O personagem foi criado por Akira Toriyama quando ele queria um antagonista que fosse um verdadeiro personagem maligno. Antes da sua criação, quase todos os vilões da série eram considerados muito adoráveis.

 

Quando Piccolo foi criado, Toriyama percebeu que sua aparição se transformou em um dos momentos mais interessantes da história do mangá e ele se tornou um de seus personagens favoritos. Apesar de que Akira considerava clichê a transformação de um vilão em herói, ele comentou que ainda se sentia emocionado ao desenhar Piccolo pois apesar de sua cara assustadora, ele se tornou uma criatura bastante simpática.

 

Piccolo surgiu dos desenhos que Akira fazia de humanos mas depois foi planejado para ser um demônio. Quando o protagonista Goku se tornou o homem mais forte da Terra, Toriyama decidiu criar personagens de outros planetas e a Piccolo foi estabelecido como um Namekuseijin.

 

Personagem que Toriyama mais odeia

16

 

Não é nenhum dos vilões. O personagem mais odiado pelo autor é a esposa de Goku: Chi-chi. Ele disse que a personagem é muito mandona e que apesar de tudo ele a fez “chata” de propósito. Ela zela pelo bem-estar de sua família, e deseja que seus filhos não sigam o estilo de vida de Goku, sempre envolvido em lutas e conflitos.

 

Chi-Chi tenta fazer Gohan se concentrar nos estudos durante sua infância, mas seu plano é interrompido por constantes ameaças à Terra durante esse período. Ela toma atitudes diferentes com Goten, e até mesmo o treina.

 

Filha do Rei Cutelo, Chi-chi também é bastante forte, sendo capaz de chegar às etapas finais do torneio Tenkaichi Budokai.

 

Goku se casou por comida

 

Chi-chi e Goku se conheceram quando crianças, e Goku promete se casar com ela, pensando que casamento é algum tipo de comida. Ela o confronta mais tarde e o faz cumprir sua promessa, apesar do mal-entendido.

 

Manga

Main article: Dragon Ball (manga)

 

Dragon Ball debuted in Weekly Shōnen Jump No. 51, 1984.

Written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama, Dragon Ball was serialized in the manga anthology Weekly Shōnen Jump from November 20, 1984 to May 23, 1995, when Toriyama grew exhausted and felt he needed a break from drawing. The 519 individual chapters were published into 42 tankōbon volumes by Shueisha from September 10, 1985 through August 4, 1995.[13][14][15] Between December 4, 2002 and April 2, 2004, the chapters were re-released in a collection of 34 kanzenban volumes, which included a slightly rewritten ending, new covers, and color artwork from its Weekly Shōnen Jump run.[16][17] The February 2013 issue of V Jump, which was released in December 2012, announced that parts of the manga will be fully colored and re-released in 2013.[18] Twenty volumes, beginning from chapter 195 and grouped by story arcs, were released between February 4, 2013 and July 4, 2014.[19][20] Twelve volumes covering the first 194 chapters were published between January 4 and March 4, 2016.[21][22] A sōshūhen edition that aims to recreate the manga as it was originally serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump with color pages, promotional text, and next chapter previews, began being published on May 13, 2016.[23]

 

Spin-offs and crossovers

Toriyama also created a short series, Neko Majin (1999–2005), that became a self-parody of Dragon Ball.[24] In 2006, a crossover between Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo (or Kochikame) and Dragon Ball by Toriyama and Kochikame author Osamu Akimoto appeared in the Super Kochikame (超こち亀 Chō Kochikame) manga.[25] That same year, Toriyama teamed up with Eiichiro Oda to create a crossover chapter of Dragon Ball and One Piece entitled Cross Epoch.[26] The final chapter of Toriyama's 2013 manga series Jaco the Galactic Patrolman revealed that it is set before Dragon Ball, with several characters making appearances.[27] Jaco's collected volumes contain a bonus Dragon Ball chapter depicting Goku's mother.[28]

 

A colored spin-off manga titled Dragon Ball SD written by Naho Ōishi has been published in Shueisha's Saikyō Jump magazine since its debut issue in December 2010.[29] A condensed retelling of Goku's adventures in a super deformed art style, it has been collected into four volumes as of February 2016.[30][31][32][33] Another manga penned by Ōishi, the three-chapter Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock that revolves around Bardock, Goku's father, was published in the monthly magazine V Jump from August and October 2011.[34]

 

Anime series

Dragon Ball

Main articles: Dragon Ball (anime) and List of Dragon Ball episodes

Toei Animation produced an anime television series based on the first 194 manga chapters, also titled Dragon Ball. The series premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on February 26, 1986 and ran until April 12, 1989, lasting 153 episodes.[2]

 

Dragon Ball Z

Main articles: Dragon Ball Z and List of Dragon Ball Z episodes

Instead of continuing the anime as Dragon Ball, Toei Animation decided to carry on with their adaptation under a new name and asked Akira Toriyama to come up with the title. Dragon Ball Z (ドラゴンボールZ(ゼット) Doragon Bōru Zetto?, commonly abbreviated as DBZ) picks up five years after the first series left off and adapts the final 325 chapters of the manga. It premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on April 26, 1989, taking over its predecessor's time slot, and ran for 291 episodes until its conclusion on January 31, 1996.[2]

 

Dragon Ball GT

Main articles: Dragon Ball GT and List of Dragon Ball GT episodes

Dragon Ball GT (ドラゴンボールGT(ジーティー) Doragon Bōru Jī Tī?, G(rand) T(ouring)[35]) premiered on Fuji TV on February 2, 1996 and ran until November 19, 1997 for 64 episodes.[2] Unlike the first two anime series, it is not based on Akira Toriyama's original Dragon Ball manga,[36] being created by Toei Animation as a sequel to the series or as Toriyama called it, a "grand side story of the original Dragon Ball".[35] Toriyama designed the main cast, the spaceship used in the show, the design of three planets, and came up with the title and logo. In addition to this, Toriyama also oversaw production of the series, just as he had for the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime.

 

Dragon Ball Kai

Main articles: Dragon Ball Kai and List of Dragon Ball Z Kai episodes

In February 2009, Toei Animation announced that it would begin broadcasting a revised version of Dragon Ball Z as part of the series' 20th anniversary celebrations. The series premiered on Fuji TV in Japan on April 5, 2009, under the name Dragon Ball Kai (ドラゴンボール改 Doragon Bōru Kai?, lit. "Dragon Ball Revised"), with the episodes remastered for HDTV, featuring updated opening and ending sequences, and a rerecording of the vocal tracks by most of the original cast.[37][38] The footage was also re-edited to more closely follow the manga, resulting in a faster-moving story, and damaged frames removed.[39] As such, it is a new version of Dragon Ball Z created from the original footage. Some shots were also remade from scratch in order to fix cropping and continuity issues.[40] The majority of the international versions, including Funimation Entertainment's English dub, are titled Dragon Ball Z Kai.[41][42]

 

Dragon Ball Super

Main articles: Dragon Ball Super and List of Dragon Ball Super episodes

On April 28, 2015, Toei Animation announced Dragon Ball Super (ドラゴンボール超 Doragon Bōru Sūpā?), the first all-new Dragon Ball television series to be released in 18 years. It debuted on July 5 and will run as a weekly series at 9:00 am on Fuji TV on Sundays.[43] Masako Nozawa reprised her roles as Goku, Gohan, and Goten. Most of the original cast reprise their roles as well.[44][45] Kouichi Yamadera and Masakazu Morita also reprise their roles, as Beerus and Whis, respectively.[45] The story of the anime is set four years after the defeat of Majin Boo, when the Earth has become peaceful once again. Akira Toriyama is credited as the original creator, as well for "original story & character design concepts."[46] It is also being adapted into a companion manga.[47]

 

Films

Anime

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Nineteen animated theatrical films based on the Dragon Ball series have been released in Japan. The first three films are based on the original Dragon Ball anime series. The remaining films include fifteen based on Dragon Ball Z and one tenth anniversary special (also based on the first anime series). The first five films were shown at the Toei Manga Festival (東映まんがまつり Tōei Manga Matsuri), while the sixth through seventeenth films were shown at the Toei Anime Fair (東映アニメフェア Toei Anime Fea). They were mostly alternate re-tellings of certain story arcs involving new characters or extra side-stories that do not correlate with the same continuity as the series. Since these movies were originally shown as back-to-back presentations alongside other Toei film productions, they were usually below feature length (around 45-60 minutes each), making them only slightly longer than an episode of the TV series (the sole exception being 1996's The Path to Power, which has a running time of 80 minutes). The newest films, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods (2013) and Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection 'F' (2015), were produced as full-length feature films and were given stand-alone theatrical releases in Japan; these being the first movies to have original creator Akira Toriyama deeply involved in their production.[48][49]

 

Live-action

An unofficial live-action Mandarin Chinese film adaptation of the series, Dragon Ball: The Magic Begins, was released in Taiwan in 1989.[2] In December 1990, the unofficial live-action Korean film Dragon Ball: Ssawora Son Goku, Igyeora Son Goku was released. 20th Century Fox acquired feature film rights to the Dragon Ball franchise in March 2002 and began production on an American live-action film entitled Dragonball Evolution.[50][51] Directed by James Wong and produced by Stephen Chow, it was released in the United States on April 10, 2009.[51][52]

 

TV Specials and other animations

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Three television specials based on the series were aired on Fuji TV in Japan. The first, The One True Final Battle ~The Z Warrior Who Challenged Freeza -- Son Goku's Father~, renamed Bardock – The Father of Goku by Funimation, was shown on October 17, 1990. The second special, The Hopeless Resistance!! Gohan and Trunks -- The Two Remaining Super Warriors, renamed The History of Trunks by Funimation, is based on a special chapter of the original manga and aired on March 24, 1993. Goku Side Story! The Four Star Ball is a Badge of Courage, renamed A Hero's Legacy by Funimation, aired on March 26, 1997. A two-part hour-long crossover special between Dragon Ball Z, One Piece and Toriko, referred to as Dream 9 Toriko & One Piece & Dragon Ball Z Super Collaboration Special!! aired on April 7, 2013.[53]

 

A two-episode original video animation (OVA) titled Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans was created in 1993 as strategy guides for the Famicom video game of the same name.[54] A remake titled Dragon Ball: Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans was created as a bonus feature for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2, which was released on November 11, 2010.[55]

 

The short film Dragon Ball: Yo! Son Goku and His Friends Return!! was created for the Jump Super Anime Tour,[56] which celebrated Weekly Shōnen Jump's 40th anniversary, and debuted on November 24, 2008. A short animated adaptation of Naho Ōishi's Bardock spinoff manga, Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock, was shown on December 17–18, 2011 at the Jump Festa 2012 event.[57]

 

Theme Park Attraction

"Dragon Ball Z: The Real 4D" debuted at Universal Studios Japan during Summer 2016. It features a battle between Goku and Freeza. Unlike most Dragon Ball animation, the ride is animated with CGI.

 

Video games

See also: List of Dragon Ball video games

 

A Dragon Ball Z arcade conversion kit that includes the PCB, instructions and operator's manual.

The Dragon Ball franchise has spawned multiple video games across various genres and platforms. Earlier games of the series included a system of card battling and were released for the Famicom following the storyline of the series.[58] Starting with the Super Famicom and Mega Drive, most of the games were from the fighting genre or RPG (Role Playing Game), such as the Super Butoden series.[59] The first Dragon Ball game to be released in the United States was Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout for the PlayStation in 1997.[60] For the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable games the characters were redone in 3D cel-shaded graphics. These games included the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai series and the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi series.[61][62] Dragon Ball Z: Burst Limit was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[63] Dragon Ball Xenoverse was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.[64][65] A massively multiplayer online role-playing game called Dragon Ball Online was available in Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan until the servers were shut down in 2013.[66]

 

Soundtracks

See also: List of Dragon Ball soundtracks

Myriad soundtracks were released in the anime, movies and the games. The music for the first two anime Dragon Ball and Z and its films was composed by Shunsuke Kikuchi, while the music from GT was composed by Akihito Tokunaga and the music from Kai was composed by Kenji Yamamoto and Norihito Sumitomo. For the first anime, the soundtracks released were Dragon Ball: Music Collection in 1985 and Dragon Ball: Complete Song Collection in 1991, although they were reissued in 2007 and 2003, respectively.[67] For the second anime, the soundtrack series released were Dragon Ball Z Hit Song Collection Series. It was produced and released by Columbia Records of Japan from July 21, 1989 to March 20, 1996 the show's entire lifespan. On September 20, 2006 Columbia re-released the Hit Song Collection on their Animex 1300 series.[68][69] Other CDs released are compilations, video games and films soundtracks as well as music from the English versions.[70]

 

Companion books

 

Cover of Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations

There have been numerous companion books to the Dragon Ball franchise. Chief among these are the Daizenshuu (大全集?) series, comprising seven hardback main volumes and three supplemental softcover volumes, covering the manga and the first two anime series and their theatrical films. The first of these, Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations (Daizenshuu volume 1), first published in Japan in 1995, is the only one that was released in English, being printed in 2008 by Viz Media.[71] It contains all 264 colored illustrations Akira Toriyama drew for the Weekly Shōnen Jump magazines' covers, bonus giveaways and specials, and all the covers for the 42 tankōbon. It also includes an interview with Toriyama on his work process. The remainder have never been released in English, and all are now out of print in Japan. From February 4 to May 9, 2013, condensed versions of the Daizenshuu with some updated information were released as the four-volume Chōzenshū (超全集?) series.[18] For Dragon Ball GT, the Dragon Ball GT Perfect Files were released in May and December 1997 by Shueisha's Jump Comics Selection imprint. They include series information, illustration galleries, behind-the-scenes information, and more. They were out of print for many years, but were re-released in April 2006 (accompanying the Japanese DVD release of Dragon Ball GT) and this edition is still in print.[72][73]

 

Coinciding with the 34-volume kanzenban re-release of the manga, and the release of the entire series on DVD for the first time in Japan, four new guidebooks were released in 2003 and 2004. Dragon Ball Landmark and Dragon Ball Forever cover the manga, using volume numbers for story points that reference the kanzenban release,[74][75] while Dragon Ball: Tenkaichi Densetsu (ドラゴンボール 天下一伝説?) and Dragon Ball Z: Son Goku Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 孫悟空伝説?) cover the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime, respectively.[76][77] Much of the material in these books is reused from the earlier Daizenshuu volumes, but they include new textual material including substantial interviews with the creator, cast and production staff of the series. Son Goku Densetsu in particular showcases previously-unpublished design sketches of Goku's father Bardock, drawn by character designer Katsuyoshi Nakatsuru prior to creator Akira Toriyama's revisions that resulted in the final version.

 

Following the release of Dragon Ball Kai in Japan, four new guidebooks were released: the two-volume Dragon Ball: Super Exciting Guide (ドラゴンボール 超エキサイティングガイド?) in 2009, covering the manga,[78][79] and two-volume Dragon Ball: Extreme Battle Collection (ドラゴンボール 極限バトルコレクション?) in 2010, covering the anime series.[80][81] Despite the TV series airing during this time being Kai, the Extreme Battle Collection books reference the earlier Z series in content and episode numbers. These books also include new question-and-answer sessions with Akira Toriyama, revealing a few new details about the world and characters of the series. 2010 also saw the release of a new artbook, Dragon Ball: Anime Illustrations Guide - The Golden Warrior (ドラゴンボール アニメイラスト集 「黄金の戦士」?); a sort of anime-counterpart to the manga-oriented Complete Illustrations, it showcases anime-original illustrations and includes interviews with the three principal character designers for the anime. Each of the Japanese "Dragon Box" DVD releases of the series and movies, which were released from 2003 to 2006, as well as the Blu-ray boxed sets of Dragon Ball Kai, released 2009 to 2011, come with a Dragon Book guide that contains details about the content therein. Each also contains a new interview with a member of the cast or staff of the series. These books have been reproduced textually for Funimation's release of the Dragon Ball Z Dragon Box sets from 2009 to 2011.

 

Collectible cards

See also: Dragon Ball Collectible Card Game

Collectible cards based on the Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z, and Dragon Ball GT series have been released by Bandai. These cards feature various scenes from the manga and anime stills, plus exclusive artwork from all three series. Bandai released the first set in the United States in July 2008.[82]

 

Reception

Manga

Dragon Ball is one of the most popular manga series of all time, and it continues to enjoy high readership today. By 2000, more than 126 million copies of its tankōbon volumes had been sold in Japan alone.[83] By 2012, this number had grown to pass 156 million in Japan and 230 million worldwide, making it the second best-selling Weekly Shōnen Jump manga of all time.[84][85] Dragon Ball is credited as one of the main reasons for the period when manga circulation was at its highest in the mid-1980s and mid-1990s.[86][87] For the 10th anniversary of the Japan Media Arts Festival in 2006, Japanese fans voted Dragon Ball the third greatest manga of all time.[88]

 

In a survey conducted by Oricon in 2007 among 1,000 people, Son Goku, the main character of the franchise, ranked first place as the "Strongest Manga Character of All Time."[89] Goku's journey and his ever growing strength resulted in the character winning "the admiration of young boys everywhere".[1] Manga artists, such as One Piece creator Eiichiro Oda and Naruto creator Masashi Kishimoto, have stated that Goku inspired their series' main protagonists as well as series structure.[90][91]

 

Manga critic Jason Thompson stated in 2011 that "Dragon Ball is by far the most influential shonen manga of the last 30 years, and today, almost every Shonen Jump artist lists it as one of their favorites and lifts from it in various ways."[92] He says the series "turns from a gag/adventure manga to an nearly-pure fighting manga",[92] and its basic formula of "lots of martial arts, lots of training sequences, a few jokes" became the model for other shōnen series, such as Naruto.[93] Thompson also called Toriyama's art influential and cited it as a reason for the series' popularity.[92] James S. Yadao, author of The Rough Guide to Manga, claims that the first several chapters of Dragon Ball "play out much like Saiyuki with Dr. Slump-like humour built in" and that Dr. Slump, Toriyama's previous manga, has a clear early influence on the series.[94] He feels the series "established its unique identity" after the first occasion when Goku's group disbands and he trains under Kame-sen'nin, when the story develops "a far more action-packed, sinister tone" with "wilder" battles with aerial and spiritual elements and an increased death count, while humor still makes an occasional appearance.[94] Yadao claims that an art shift occurs when the characters "lose the rounded, innocent look that he established in Dr. Slump and gain sharper angles that leap off the page with their energy and intensity."[95]

 

Animerica felt the series had "worldwide appeal", using dramatic pacing and over-the-top martial arts action to "maintain tension levels and keep a crippler crossface hold on the audience's attention spans".[96] In Little Boy: The Art of Japan's Exploding Subculture, Takashi Murakami commented that Dragon Ball's "never-ending cyclical narrative moves forward plausibly, seamlessly, and with great finesse."[83] Ridwan Khan from Animefringe.com commented that the manga had a "chubby" art style, but as the series continued the characters got more refined, leaner, and more muscular. Khan prefers the manga over the slow pacing of the anime counterparts.[97] Allen Divers of Anime News Network praised the story and humor of the manga as being very good at conveying all of the characters' personalities. Divers also called Viz's translation one of the best of all the English editions of the series due to its faithfulness to the original Japanese.[98] D. Aviva Rothschild of Rationalmagic.com remarked the first manga volume as "a superior humor title". They praised Goku's innocence and Bulma's insistence as one of the funniest parts of the series.[99]

 

The content of the manga has been controversial in United States. In November 1999, Toys "R" Us removed Viz's Dragon Ball from their stores nationwide when a Dallas parent complained the series had "borderline soft porn" after he bought them for his four-year-old son.[100] Commenting on the issue, Susan J. Napier explained it as a difference in culture.[100] After the ban, Viz reluctantly began to censor the series to keep wide distribution.[101] However, in 2001, after releasing three volumes censored, Viz announced Dragon Ball would be uncensored and reprinted due to fan reactions.[101] In October 2009, Wicomico County Public Schools in Maryland banned the Dragon Ball manga from their school district because it "depicts nudity, sexual contact between children and sexual innuendo among adults and children."[100]

 

Anime

The anime adaptations have also been very well-received and are better known in the Western world than the manga, with Anime News Network saying "Few anime series have mainstreamed it the way Dragon Ball Z has. To a certain generation of television consumers its characters are as well known as any in the animated realm, and for many it was the first step into the wilderness of anime fandom."[102] In 2000, satellite TV channel Animax together with Brutus, a men's lifestyle magazine, and Tsutaya, Japan's largest video rental chain, conducted a poll among 200,000 fans on the top anime series, with Dragon Ball coming in fourth.[103] TV Asahi conducted two polls in 2005 on the Top 100 Anime, Dragon Ball came in second in the nationwide survey conducted with multiple age-groups and in third in the online poll.[104][105] On several occasions the Dragon Ball anime has topped Japan's DVD sales.[106][107]

 

Carl Kimlinger of Anime News Network summed up Dragon Ball as "an action-packed tale told with rare humor and something even rarer—a genuine sense of adventure."[108] Both Kimlinger and colleague Theron Martin noted Funimation's reputation for drastic alterations of the script, but praised the dub.[108][109] However, some critics and most fans of the Japanese version have been more critical with Funimation's English dub and script of Dragon Ball Z over the years. Jeffrey Harris IGN criticized the voices including how Freeza's appearance combined with the feminine English voice left fans confused about Freeza's gender.[110] Carlos Ross of T.H.E.M. Anime Reviews considered the series' characters to be different from stereotypical stock characters and noted that they undergo much more development.[111] Despite praising Dragon Ball Z for its cast of characters, they criticized it for having long and repetitive fights.[112]

 

Dragon Ball Z is well-known, and often criticized, for its long, repetitive, dragged-out fights that span several episodes, with Martin commenting "DBZ practically turned drawing out fights into an art form."[113] However, Jason Thompson of io9 explained that this comes from the fact that the anime was being created alongside the manga.[114] Dragon Ball Z was listed as the 78th best animated show in IGN's Top 100 Animated Series,[115] and was also listed as the 50th greatest cartoon in Wizard magazine's Top 100 Greatest Cartoons list.[116]

 

Harris commented that Dragon Ball GT "is downright repellent", mentioning that the material and characters had lost their novelty and fun. He also criticized the GT character designs of Trunks and Vegeta as being goofy.[110] Zac Bertschy of Anime News Network also gave negative comments about GT, mentioning that the fights from the series were "a very simple childish exercise" and that many other anime were superior. The plot of Dragon Ball GT has also been criticized for giving a formula that was already used in its predecessors.[117]

 

The first episode of Dragon Ball Z Kai earned a viewer ratings percentage of 11.3, ahead of One Piece and behind Crayon Shin-chan.[118] Although following episodes had lower ratings, Kai was among the top 10 anime in viewer ratings every week in Japan for most of its run.[119][120]

Vocês devem estar pensando: “O que uma coisa ter a ver com a outra?”. Bom, todos sabem que Dragon Ball, mais especificamente Goku, foi baseado em uma lenda Chinesa, a lenda do Rei Macaco ou a lenda de Saiyuki no Japão.

 

Mas o próprio Akira Toriyama, criador da saga, disse em entrevista à revista Shonen Jump dos EUA, “se não fosse por um filme de Jackie Chan, Dragon Ball nunca teria sido criado” e não teríamos Son Goku hoje.

 

Toriyama era um grande fã dos filmes de artes marciais e em especial do ator Jackie Chan. Para homenagea-lo ele introduziu as artes marciais dentro do mangá além de se inspirar no ator para criar o atrapalhado e poderoso Goku.

 

Dragon Boy?

11

 

O primeiro mangá do estilo artes marciais de Toriyama foi um mangá chamado Dragon Boy e conta a história de um menino com asas de dragão que treina artes marciais em um bosque e que um dia recebe de seu Sensei a missão de levar uma princesa à sua terra natal em segurança. O mangá foi tão bem aceito pelos leitores que Toriyama decidiu então que assim seria a sua nova história, já que estava à procura de uma.

 

A partir de Drunken Master, Akira Toriyama começa a planejar uma história e personagens para Dragon Ball mantendo as origens chinesas do filme e inspirando-se na lenda do Rei Macaco, ou a lenda de Saiyuki a Jornada ao Oeste no Japão.

 

Goku era cotado para ser um macaco

12

 

De inicio a ideia seria fazer de Goku um macaco de verdade, mas essa ideia foi logo descartada pois seria uma copia do Rei Macaco. Então Toriyama inspirou-se em Dragon Boy para criar Goku, o menino seria humano mas com um adicional, uma cauda de macaco.

 

Dragon Ball ia ser finalizado assim que Goku encontra-se as esferas do dragão

 

Ainda bem que isso não aconteceu não é mesmo? Toriyama adicionou também as esferas do dragão na história, que quando juntas, dariam o direito a realizar sonhos, assim como na lenda de Saiyuki que partem em sua jornada em busca dos escritos sagrados do Budismo.

 

Dragon Ball estava fadado a terminar quando as sete esferas fossem reunidas, mas o sucesso do mangá foi tão grande que optaram por continuar com a história, e então Toriyama foi meio que “obrigado” a continuar desenhando os mangás que eram publicados semanalmente.

 

Goku é uma mulher?

 

Calma, calma. No Japão uma senhora chamada Masako Nozawa faz a voz de Goku e seus filhos Gohan e Goten. As mulheres, por causa da voz mais fina, conseguem imitar vozes de criança com muita facilidade. Masako começou fazendo a voz de Goku na primeira parte da série e quando ele ficou mais velho conseguiu alterar a voz para um personagem diferente.

 

Com os filhos ela fazia a mesma coisa e deixou Akira Toriyama espantado: “Em uma cena em que Goku, Gohan e Goten apareciam juntos, Nozawa Masako conseguiu fazer as três vozes da conversa ao mesmo tempo”, disse Toriyama. Aqui no Brasil, Goku também é dublado por uma mulher (Úrsula Bezerra, a mesma dubladora de Naruto) em Dragon Ball.

 

Nomes dos personagens

13

 

Alguns personagens de Dragon Ball possuem nomes bem diferentes relacionados à comida e algumas outras coisas. Dá para citar vários exemplos como Vegeta que vem da palavra vegetal, Freeza de Freezer, Trunks de calções de banho em inglês e as tropas especiais Ginyu (Leite, em japonês) que têm seus nomes tirados do cardápio do café-da-manhã ocidental.

 

A mulher de Toriyama inventou o Kamehameha

14

 

Um dos golpes mais conhecidos de Goku (e mais imitado nas brincadeiras dos anos 90) foi inventado pela mulher de Toriyama. Ele estava aborrecido dizendo: “O nome do ataque especial do Mestre Kame vai ser alguma coisa com Ha”. Logo sua mulher disse: Kamehameha.

 

A palavra tinha uma sonoridade boa e foi logo incorporada ao personagem. O “Kame” significava tartaruga e “Ha” significava onda, mas a palavra inteira não tem significado algum em japonês. Entretanto, Kamehameha é um Deus havaiano. Misturando tudo dá até pra entender porque o Mestre Kame vive numa ilha e tem um casco de tartaruga nas costas.

 

Personagem preferido de Toriyama

15

 

Nada de Goku. Piccolo é o preferido do autor da série. O personagem foi criado por Akira Toriyama quando ele queria um antagonista que fosse um verdadeiro personagem maligno. Antes da sua criação, quase todos os vilões da série eram considerados muito adoráveis.

 

Quando Piccolo foi criado, Toriyama percebeu que sua aparição se transformou em um dos momentos mais interessantes da história do mangá e ele se tornou um de seus personagens favoritos. Apesar de que Akira considerava clichê a transformação de um vilão em herói, ele comentou que ainda se sentia emocionado ao desenhar Piccolo pois apesar de sua cara assustadora, ele se tornou uma criatura bastante simpática.

 

Piccolo surgiu dos desenhos que Akira fazia de humanos mas depois foi planejado para ser um demônio. Quando o protagonista Goku se tornou o homem mais forte da Terra, Toriyama decidiu criar personagens de outros planetas e a Piccolo foi estabelecido como um Namekuseijin.

 

Personagem que Toriyama mais odeia

16

 

Não é nenhum dos vilões. O personagem mais odiado pelo autor é a esposa de Goku: Chi-chi. Ele disse que a personagem é muito mandona e que apesar de tudo ele a fez “chata” de propósito. Ela zela pelo bem-estar de sua família, e deseja que seus filhos não sigam o estilo de vida de Goku, sempre envolvido em lutas e conflitos.

 

Chi-Chi tenta fazer Gohan se concentrar nos estudos durante sua infância, mas seu plano é interrompido por constantes ameaças à Terra durante esse período. Ela toma atitudes diferentes com Goten, e até mesmo o treina.

 

Filha do Rei Cutelo, Chi-chi também é bastante forte, sendo capaz de chegar às etapas finais do torneio Tenkaichi Budokai.

 

Goku se casou por comida

 

Chi-chi e Goku se conheceram quando crianças, e Goku promete se casar com ela, pensando que casamento é algum tipo de comida. Ela o confronta mais tarde e o faz cumprir sua promessa, apesar do mal-entendido.

 

Manga

Main article: Dragon Ball (manga)

 

Dragon Ball debuted in Weekly Shōnen Jump No. 51, 1984.

Written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama, Dragon Ball was serialized in the manga anthology Weekly Shōnen Jump from November 20, 1984 to May 23, 1995, when Toriyama grew exhausted and felt he needed a break from drawing. The 519 individual chapters were published into 42 tankōbon volumes by Shueisha from September 10, 1985 through August 4, 1995.[13][14][15] Between December 4, 2002 and April 2, 2004, the chapters were re-released in a collection of 34 kanzenban volumes, which included a slightly rewritten ending, new covers, and color artwork from its Weekly Shōnen Jump run.[16][17] The February 2013 issue of V Jump, which was released in December 2012, announced that parts of the manga will be fully colored and re-released in 2013.[18] Twenty volumes, beginning from chapter 195 and grouped by story arcs, were released between February 4, 2013 and July 4, 2014.[19][20] Twelve volumes covering the first 194 chapters were published between January 4 and March 4, 2016.[21][22] A sōshūhen edition that aims to recreate the manga as it was originally serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump with color pages, promotional text, and next chapter previews, began being published on May 13, 2016.[23]

 

Spin-offs and crossovers

Toriyama also created a short series, Neko Majin (1999–2005), that became a self-parody of Dragon Ball.[24] In 2006, a crossover between Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo (or Kochikame) and Dragon Ball by Toriyama and Kochikame author Osamu Akimoto appeared in the Super Kochikame (超こち亀 Chō Kochikame) manga.[25] That same year, Toriyama teamed up with Eiichiro Oda to create a crossover chapter of Dragon Ball and One Piece entitled Cross Epoch.[26] The final chapter of Toriyama's 2013 manga series Jaco the Galactic Patrolman revealed that it is set before Dragon Ball, with several characters making appearances.[27] Jaco's collected volumes contain a bonus Dragon Ball chapter depicting Goku's mother.[28]

 

A colored spin-off manga titled Dragon Ball SD written by Naho Ōishi has been published in Shueisha's Saikyō Jump magazine since its debut issue in December 2010.[29] A condensed retelling of Goku's adventures in a super deformed art style, it has been collected into four volumes as of February 2016.[30][31][32][33] Another manga penned by Ōishi, the three-chapter Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock that revolves around Bardock, Goku's father, was published in the monthly magazine V Jump from August and October 2011.[34]

 

Anime series

Dragon Ball

Main articles: Dragon Ball (anime) and List of Dragon Ball episodes

Toei Animation produced an anime television series based on the first 194 manga chapters, also titled Dragon Ball. The series premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on February 26, 1986 and ran until April 12, 1989, lasting 153 episodes.[2]

 

Dragon Ball Z

Main articles: Dragon Ball Z and List of Dragon Ball Z episodes

Instead of continuing the anime as Dragon Ball, Toei Animation decided to carry on with their adaptation under a new name and asked Akira Toriyama to come up with the title. Dragon Ball Z (ドラゴンボールZ(ゼット) Doragon Bōru Zetto?, commonly abbreviated as DBZ) picks up five years after the first series left off and adapts the final 325 chapters of the manga. It premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on April 26, 1989, taking over its predecessor's time slot, and ran for 291 episodes until its conclusion on January 31, 1996.[2]

 

Dragon Ball GT

Main articles: Dragon Ball GT and List of Dragon Ball GT episodes

Dragon Ball GT (ドラゴンボールGT(ジーティー) Doragon Bōru Jī Tī?, G(rand) T(ouring)[35]) premiered on Fuji TV on February 2, 1996 and ran until November 19, 1997 for 64 episodes.[2] Unlike the first two anime series, it is not based on Akira Toriyama's original Dragon Ball manga,[36] being created by Toei Animation as a sequel to the series or as Toriyama called it, a "grand side story of the original Dragon Ball".[35] Toriyama designed the main cast, the spaceship used in the show, the design of three planets, and came up with the title and logo. In addition to this, Toriyama also oversaw production of the series, just as he had for the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime.

 

Dragon Ball Kai

Main articles: Dragon Ball Kai and List of Dragon Ball Z Kai episodes

In February 2009, Toei Animation announced that it would begin broadcasting a revised version of Dragon Ball Z as part of the series' 20th anniversary celebrations. The series premiered on Fuji TV in Japan on April 5, 2009, under the name Dragon Ball Kai (ドラゴンボール改 Doragon Bōru Kai?, lit. "Dragon Ball Revised"), with the episodes remastered for HDTV, featuring updated opening and ending sequences, and a rerecording of the vocal tracks by most of the original cast.[37][38] The footage was also re-edited to more closely follow the manga, resulting in a faster-moving story, and damaged frames removed.[39] As such, it is a new version of Dragon Ball Z created from the original footage. Some shots were also remade from scratch in order to fix cropping and continuity issues.[40] The majority of the international versions, including Funimation Entertainment's English dub, are titled Dragon Ball Z Kai.[41][42]

 

Dragon Ball Super

Main articles: Dragon Ball Super and List of Dragon Ball Super episodes

On April 28, 2015, Toei Animation announced Dragon Ball Super (ドラゴンボール超 Doragon Bōru Sūpā?), the first all-new Dragon Ball television series to be released in 18 years. It debuted on July 5 and will run as a weekly series at 9:00 am on Fuji TV on Sundays.[43] Masako Nozawa reprised her roles as Goku, Gohan, and Goten. Most of the original cast reprise their roles as well.[44][45] Kouichi Yamadera and Masakazu Morita also reprise their roles, as Beerus and Whis, respectively.[45] The story of the anime is set four years after the defeat of Majin Boo, when the Earth has become peaceful once again. Akira Toriyama is credited as the original creator, as well for "original story & character design concepts."[46] It is also being adapted into a companion manga.[47]

 

Films

Anime

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Nineteen animated theatrical films based on the Dragon Ball series have been released in Japan. The first three films are based on the original Dragon Ball anime series. The remaining films include fifteen based on Dragon Ball Z and one tenth anniversary special (also based on the first anime series). The first five films were shown at the Toei Manga Festival (東映まんがまつり Tōei Manga Matsuri), while the sixth through seventeenth films were shown at the Toei Anime Fair (東映アニメフェア Toei Anime Fea). They were mostly alternate re-tellings of certain story arcs involving new characters or extra side-stories that do not correlate with the same continuity as the series. Since these movies were originally shown as back-to-back presentations alongside other Toei film productions, they were usually below feature length (around 45-60 minutes each), making them only slightly longer than an episode of the TV series (the sole exception being 1996's The Path to Power, which has a running time of 80 minutes). The newest films, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods (2013) and Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection 'F' (2015), were produced as full-length feature films and were given stand-alone theatrical releases in Japan; these being the first movies to have original creator Akira Toriyama deeply involved in their production.[48][49]

 

Live-action

An unofficial live-action Mandarin Chinese film adaptation of the series, Dragon Ball: The Magic Begins, was released in Taiwan in 1989.[2] In December 1990, the unofficial live-action Korean film Dragon Ball: Ssawora Son Goku, Igyeora Son Goku was released. 20th Century Fox acquired feature film rights to the Dragon Ball franchise in March 2002 and began production on an American live-action film entitled Dragonball Evolution.[50][51] Directed by James Wong and produced by Stephen Chow, it was released in the United States on April 10, 2009.[51][52]

 

TV Specials and other animations

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Three television specials based on the series were aired on Fuji TV in Japan. The first, The One True Final Battle ~The Z Warrior Who Challenged Freeza -- Son Goku's Father~, renamed Bardock – The Father of Goku by Funimation, was shown on October 17, 1990. The second special, The Hopeless Resistance!! Gohan and Trunks -- The Two Remaining Super Warriors, renamed The History of Trunks by Funimation, is based on a special chapter of the original manga and aired on March 24, 1993. Goku Side Story! The Four Star Ball is a Badge of Courage, renamed A Hero's Legacy by Funimation, aired on March 26, 1997. A two-part hour-long crossover special between Dragon Ball Z, One Piece and Toriko, referred to as Dream 9 Toriko & One Piece & Dragon Ball Z Super Collaboration Special!! aired on April 7, 2013.[53]

 

A two-episode original video animation (OVA) titled Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans was created in 1993 as strategy guides for the Famicom video game of the same name.[54] A remake titled Dragon Ball: Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans was created as a bonus feature for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2, which was released on November 11, 2010.[55]

 

The short film Dragon Ball: Yo! Son Goku and His Friends Return!! was created for the Jump Super Anime Tour,[56] which celebrated Weekly Shōnen Jump's 40th anniversary, and debuted on November 24, 2008. A short animated adaptation of Naho Ōishi's Bardock spinoff manga, Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock, was shown on December 17–18, 2011 at the Jump Festa 2012 event.[57]

 

Theme Park Attraction

"Dragon Ball Z: The Real 4D" debuted at Universal Studios Japan during Summer 2016. It features a battle between Goku and Freeza. Unlike most Dragon Ball animation, the ride is animated with CGI.

 

Video games

See also: List of Dragon Ball video games

 

A Dragon Ball Z arcade conversion kit that includes the PCB, instructions and operator's manual.

The Dragon Ball franchise has spawned multiple video games across various genres and platforms. Earlier games of the series included a system of card battling and were released for the Famicom following the storyline of the series.[58] Starting with the Super Famicom and Mega Drive, most of the games were from the fighting genre or RPG (Role Playing Game), such as the Super Butoden series.[59] The first Dragon Ball game to be released in the United States was Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout for the PlayStation in 1997.[60] For the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable games the characters were redone in 3D cel-shaded graphics. These games included the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai series and the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi series.[61][62] Dragon Ball Z: Burst Limit was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[63] Dragon Ball Xenoverse was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.[64][65] A massively multiplayer online role-playing game called Dragon Ball Online was available in Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan until the servers were shut down in 2013.[66]

 

Soundtracks

See also: List of Dragon Ball soundtracks

Myriad soundtracks were released in the anime, movies and the games. The music for the first two anime Dragon Ball and Z and its films was composed by Shunsuke Kikuchi, while the music from GT was composed by Akihito Tokunaga and the music from Kai was composed by Kenji Yamamoto and Norihito Sumitomo. For the first anime, the soundtracks released were Dragon Ball: Music Collection in 1985 and Dragon Ball: Complete Song Collection in 1991, although they were reissued in 2007 and 2003, respectively.[67] For the second anime, the soundtrack series released were Dragon Ball Z Hit Song Collection Series. It was produced and released by Columbia Records of Japan from July 21, 1989 to March 20, 1996 the show's entire lifespan. On September 20, 2006 Columbia re-released the Hit Song Collection on their Animex 1300 series.[68][69] Other CDs released are compilations, video games and films soundtracks as well as music from the English versions.[70]

 

Companion books

 

Cover of Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations

There have been numerous companion books to the Dragon Ball franchise. Chief among these are the Daizenshuu (大全集?) series, comprising seven hardback main volumes and three supplemental softcover volumes, covering the manga and the first two anime series and their theatrical films. The first of these, Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations (Daizenshuu volume 1), first published in Japan in 1995, is the only one that was released in English, being printed in 2008 by Viz Media.[71] It contains all 264 colored illustrations Akira Toriyama drew for the Weekly Shōnen Jump magazines' covers, bonus giveaways and specials, and all the covers for the 42 tankōbon. It also includes an interview with Toriyama on his work process. The remainder have never been released in English, and all are now out of print in Japan. From February 4 to May 9, 2013, condensed versions of the Daizenshuu with some updated information were released as the four-volume Chōzenshū (超全集?) series.[18] For Dragon Ball GT, the Dragon Ball GT Perfect Files were released in May and December 1997 by Shueisha's Jump Comics Selection imprint. They include series information, illustration galleries, behind-the-scenes information, and more. They were out of print for many years, but were re-released in April 2006 (accompanying the Japanese DVD release of Dragon Ball GT) and this edition is still in print.[72][73]

 

Coinciding with the 34-volume kanzenban re-release of the manga, and the release of the entire series on DVD for the first time in Japan, four new guidebooks were released in 2003 and 2004. Dragon Ball Landmark and Dragon Ball Forever cover the manga, using volume numbers for story points that reference the kanzenban release,[74][75] while Dragon Ball: Tenkaichi Densetsu (ドラゴンボール 天下一伝説?) and Dragon Ball Z: Son Goku Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 孫悟空伝説?) cover the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime, respectively.[76][77] Much of the material in these books is reused from the earlier Daizenshuu volumes, but they include new textual material including substantial interviews with the creator, cast and production staff of the series. Son Goku Densetsu in particular showcases previously-unpublished design sketches of Goku's father Bardock, drawn by character designer Katsuyoshi Nakatsuru prior to creator Akira Toriyama's revisions that resulted in the final version.

 

Following the release of Dragon Ball Kai in Japan, four new guidebooks were released: the two-volume Dragon Ball: Super Exciting Guide (ドラゴンボール 超エキサイティングガイド?) in 2009, covering the manga,[78][79] and two-volume Dragon Ball: Extreme Battle Collection (ドラゴンボール 極限バトルコレクション?) in 2010, covering the anime series.[80][81] Despite the TV series airing during this time being Kai, the Extreme Battle Collection books reference the earlier Z series in content and episode numbers. These books also include new question-and-answer sessions with Akira Toriyama, revealing a few new details about the world and characters of the series. 2010 also saw the release of a new artbook, Dragon Ball: Anime Illustrations Guide - The Golden Warrior (ドラゴンボール アニメイラスト集 「黄金の戦士」?); a sort of anime-counterpart to the manga-oriented Complete Illustrations, it showcases anime-original illustrations and includes interviews with the three principal character designers for the anime. Each of the Japanese "Dragon Box" DVD releases of the series and movies, which were released from 2003 to 2006, as well as the Blu-ray boxed sets of Dragon Ball Kai, released 2009 to 2011, come with a Dragon Book guide that contains details about the content therein. Each also contains a new interview with a member of the cast or staff of the series. These books have been reproduced textually for Funimation's release of the Dragon Ball Z Dragon Box sets from 2009 to 2011.

 

Collectible cards

See also: Dragon Ball Collectible Card Game

Collectible cards based on the Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z, and Dragon Ball GT series have been released by Bandai. These cards feature various scenes from the manga and anime stills, plus exclusive artwork from all three series. Bandai released the first set in the United States in July 2008.[82]

 

Reception

Manga

Dragon Ball is one of the most popular manga series of all time, and it continues to enjoy high readership today. By 2000, more than 126 million copies of its tankōbon volumes had been sold in Japan alone.[83] By 2012, this number had grown to pass 156 million in Japan and 230 million worldwide, making it the second best-selling Weekly Shōnen Jump manga of all time.[84][85] Dragon Ball is credited as one of the main reasons for the period when manga circulation was at its highest in the mid-1980s and mid-1990s.[86][87] For the 10th anniversary of the Japan Media Arts Festival in 2006, Japanese fans voted Dragon Ball the third greatest manga of all time.[88]

 

In a survey conducted by Oricon in 2007 among 1,000 people, Son Goku, the main character of the franchise, ranked first place as the "Strongest Manga Character of All Time."[89] Goku's journey and his ever growing strength resulted in the character winning "the admiration of young boys everywhere".[1] Manga artists, such as One Piece creator Eiichiro Oda and Naruto creator Masashi Kishimoto, have stated that Goku inspired their series' main protagonists as well as series structure.[90][91]

 

Manga critic Jason Thompson stated in 2011 that "Dragon Ball is by far the most influential shonen manga of the last 30 years, and today, almost every Shonen Jump artist lists it as one of their favorites and lifts from it in various ways."[92] He says the series "turns from a gag/adventure manga to an nearly-pure fighting manga",[92] and its basic formula of "lots of martial arts, lots of training sequences, a few jokes" became the model for other shōnen series, such as Naruto.[93] Thompson also called Toriyama's art influential and cited it as a reason for the series' popularity.[92] James S. Yadao, author of The Rough Guide to Manga, claims that the first several chapters of Dragon Ball "play out much like Saiyuki with Dr. Slump-like humour built in" and that Dr. Slump, Toriyama's previous manga, has a clear early influence on the series.[94] He feels the series "established its unique identity" after the first occasion when Goku's group disbands and he trains under Kame-sen'nin, when the story develops "a far more action-packed, sinister tone" with "wilder" battles with aerial and spiritual elements and an increased death count, while humor still makes an occasional appearance.[94] Yadao claims that an art shift occurs when the characters "lose the rounded, innocent look that he established in Dr. Slump and gain sharper angles that leap off the page with their energy and intensity."[95]

 

Animerica felt the series had "worldwide appeal", using dramatic pacing and over-the-top martial arts action to "maintain tension levels and keep a crippler crossface hold on the audience's attention spans".[96] In Little Boy: The Art of Japan's Exploding Subculture, Takashi Murakami commented that Dragon Ball's "never-ending cyclical narrative moves forward plausibly, seamlessly, and with great finesse."[83] Ridwan Khan from Animefringe.com commented that the manga had a "chubby" art style, but as the series continued the characters got more refined, leaner, and more muscular. Khan prefers the manga over the slow pacing of the anime counterparts.[97] Allen Divers of Anime News Network praised the story and humor of the manga as being very good at conveying all of the characters' personalities. Divers also called Viz's translation one of the best of all the English editions of the series due to its faithfulness to the original Japanese.[98] D. Aviva Rothschild of Rationalmagic.com remarked the first manga volume as "a superior humor title". They praised Goku's innocence and Bulma's insistence as one of the funniest parts of the series.[99]

 

The content of the manga has been controversial in United States. In November 1999, Toys "R" Us removed Viz's Dragon Ball from their stores nationwide when a Dallas parent complained the series had "borderline soft porn" after he bought them for his four-year-old son.[100] Commenting on the issue, Susan J. Napier explained it as a difference in culture.[100] After the ban, Viz reluctantly began to censor the series to keep wide distribution.[101] However, in 2001, after releasing three volumes censored, Viz announced Dragon Ball would be uncensored and reprinted due to fan reactions.[101] In October 2009, Wicomico County Public Schools in Maryland banned the Dragon Ball manga from their school district because it "depicts nudity, sexual contact between children and sexual innuendo among adults and children."[100]

 

Anime

The anime adaptations have also been very well-received and are better known in the Western world than the manga, with Anime News Network saying "Few anime series have mainstreamed it the way Dragon Ball Z has. To a certain generation of television consumers its characters are as well known as any in the animated realm, and for many it was the first step into the wilderness of anime fandom."[102] In 2000, satellite TV channel Animax together with Brutus, a men's lifestyle magazine, and Tsutaya, Japan's largest video rental chain, conducted a poll among 200,000 fans on the top anime series, with Dragon Ball coming in fourth.[103] TV Asahi conducted two polls in 2005 on the Top 100 Anime, Dragon Ball came in second in the nationwide survey conducted with multiple age-groups and in third in the online poll.[104][105] On several occasions the Dragon Ball anime has topped Japan's DVD sales.[106][107]

 

Carl Kimlinger of Anime News Network summed up Dragon Ball as "an action-packed tale told with rare humor and something even rarer—a genuine sense of adventure."[108] Both Kimlinger and colleague Theron Martin noted Funimation's reputation for drastic alterations of the script, but praised the dub.[108][109] However, some critics and most fans of the Japanese version have been more critical with Funimation's English dub and script of Dragon Ball Z over the years. Jeffrey Harris IGN criticized the voices including how Freeza's appearance combined with the feminine English voice left fans confused about Freeza's gender.[110] Carlos Ross of T.H.E.M. Anime Reviews considered the series' characters to be different from stereotypical stock characters and noted that they undergo much more development.[111] Despite praising Dragon Ball Z for its cast of characters, they criticized it for having long and repetitive fights.[112]

 

Dragon Ball Z is well-known, and often criticized, for its long, repetitive, dragged-out fights that span several episodes, with Martin commenting "DBZ practically turned drawing out fights into an art form."[113] However, Jason Thompson of io9 explained that this comes from the fact that the anime was being created alongside the manga.[114] Dragon Ball Z was listed as the 78th best animated show in IGN's Top 100 Animated Series,[115] and was also listed as the 50th greatest cartoon in Wizard magazine's Top 100 Greatest Cartoons list.[116]

 

Harris commented that Dragon Ball GT "is downright repellent", mentioning that the material and characters had lost their novelty and fun. He also criticized the GT character designs of Trunks and Vegeta as being goofy.[110] Zac Bertschy of Anime News Network also gave negative comments about GT, mentioning that the fights from the series were "a very simple childish exercise" and that many other anime were superior. The plot of Dragon Ball GT has also been criticized for giving a formula that was already used in its predecessors.[117]

 

The first episode of Dragon Ball Z Kai earned a viewer ratings percentage of 11.3, ahead of One Piece and behind Crayon Shin-chan.[118] Although following episodes had lower ratings, Kai was among the top 10 anime in viewer ratings every week in Japan for most of its run.[119][120]

 

Manga

Main article: Dragon Ball (manga)

 

Dragon Ball debuted in Weekly Shōnen Jump No. 51, 1984.

Written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama, Dragon Ball was serialized in the manga anthology Weekly Shōnen Jump from November 20, 1984 to May 23, 1995, when Toriyama grew exhausted and felt he needed a break from drawing. The 519 individual chapters were published into 42 tankōbon volumes by Shueisha from September 10, 1985 through August 4, 1995.[13][14][15] Between December 4, 2002 and April 2, 2004, the chapters were re-released in a collection of 34 kanzenban volumes, which included a slightly rewritten ending, new covers, and color artwork from its Weekly Shōnen Jump run.[16][17] The February 2013 issue of V Jump, which was released in December 2012, announced that parts of the manga will be fully colored and re-released in 2013.[18] Twenty volumes, beginning from chapter 195 and grouped by story arcs, were released between February 4, 2013 and July 4, 2014.[19][20] Twelve volumes covering the first 194 chapters were published between January 4 and March 4, 2016.[21][22] A sōshūhen edition that aims to recreate the manga as it was originally serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump with color pages, promotional text, and next chapter previews, began being published on May 13, 2016.[23]

 

Spin-offs and crossovers

Toriyama also created a short series, Neko Majin (1999–2005), that became a self-parody of Dragon Ball.[24] In 2006, a crossover between Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo (or Kochikame) and Dragon Ball by Toriyama and Kochikame author Osamu Akimoto appeared in the Super Kochikame (超こち亀 Chō Kochikame) manga.[25] That same year, Toriyama teamed up with Eiichiro Oda to create a crossover chapter of Dragon Ball and One Piece entitled Cross Epoch.[26] The final chapter of Toriyama's 2013 manga series Jaco the Galactic Patrolman revealed that it is set before Dragon Ball, with several characters making appearances.[27] Jaco's collected volumes contain a bonus Dragon Ball chapter depicting Goku's mother.[28]

 

A colored spin-off manga titled Dragon Ball SD written by Naho Ōishi has been published in Shueisha's Saikyō Jump magazine since its debut issue in December 2010.[29] A condensed retelling of Goku's adventures in a super deformed art style, it has been collected into four volumes as of February 2016.[30][31][32][33] Another manga penned by Ōishi, the three-chapter Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock that revolves around Bardock, Goku's father, was published in the monthly magazine V Jump from August and October 2011.[34]

 

Anime series

Dragon Ball

Main articles: Dragon Ball (anime) and List of Dragon Ball episodes

Toei Animation produced an anime television series based on the first 194 manga chapters, also titled Dragon Ball. The series premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on February 26, 1986 and ran until April 12, 1989, lasting 153 episodes.[2]

 

Dragon Ball Z

Main articles: Dragon Ball Z and List of Dragon Ball Z episodes

Instead of continuing the anime as Dragon Ball, Toei Animation decided to carry on with their adaptation under a new name and asked Akira Toriyama to come up with the title. Dragon Ball Z (ドラゴンボールZ(ゼット) Doragon Bōru Zetto?, commonly abbreviated as DBZ) picks up five years after the first series left off and adapts the final 325 chapters of the manga. It premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on April 26, 1989, taking over its predecessor's time slot, and ran for 291 episodes until its conclusion on January 31, 1996.[2]

 

Dragon Ball GT

Main articles: Dragon Ball GT and List of Dragon Ball GT episodes

Dragon Ball GT (ドラゴンボールGT(ジーティー) Doragon Bōru Jī Tī?, G(rand) T(ouring)[35]) premiered on Fuji TV on February 2, 1996 and ran until November 19, 1997 for 64 episodes.[2] Unlike the first two anime series, it is not based on Akira Toriyama's original Dragon Ball manga,[36] being created by Toei Animation as a sequel to the series or as Toriyama called it, a "grand side story of the original Dragon Ball".[35] Toriyama designed the main cast, the spaceship used in the show, the design of three planets, and came up with the title and logo. In addition to this, Toriyama also oversaw production of the series, just as he had for the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime.

 

Dragon Ball Kai

Main articles: Dragon Ball Kai and List of Dragon Ball Z Kai episodes

In February 2009, Toei Animation announced that it would begin broadcasting a revised version of Dragon Ball Z as part of the series' 20th anniversary celebrations. The series premiered on Fuji TV in Japan on April 5, 2009, under the name Dragon Ball Kai (ドラゴンボール改 Doragon Bōru Kai?, lit. "Dragon Ball Revised"), with the episodes remastered for HDTV, featuring updated opening and ending sequences, and a rerecording of the vocal tracks by most of the original cast.[37][38] The footage was also re-edited to more closely follow the manga, resulting in a faster-moving story, and damaged frames removed.[39] As such, it is a new version of Dragon Ball Z created from the original footage. Some shots were also remade from scratch in order to fix cropping and continuity issues.[40] The majority of the international versions, including Funimation Entertainment's English dub, are titled Dragon Ball Z Kai.[41][42]

 

Dragon Ball Super

Main articles: Dragon Ball Super and List of Dragon Ball Super episodes

On April 28, 2015, Toei Animation announced Dragon Ball Super (ドラゴンボール超 Doragon Bōru Sūpā?), the first all-new Dragon Ball television series to be released in 18 years. It debuted on July 5 and will run as a weekly series at 9:00 am on Fuji TV on Sundays.[43] Masako Nozawa reprised her roles as Goku, Gohan, and Goten. Most of the original cast reprise their roles as well.[44][45] Kouichi Yamadera and Masakazu Morita also reprise their roles, as Beerus and Whis, respectively.[45] The story of the anime is set four years after the defeat of Majin Boo, when the Earth has become peaceful once again. Akira Toriyama is credited as the original creator, as well for "original story & character design concepts."[46] It is also being adapted into a companion manga.[47]

 

Films

Anime

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Nineteen animated theatrical films based on the Dragon Ball series have been released in Japan. The first three films are based on the original Dragon Ball anime series. The remaining films include fifteen based on Dragon Ball Z and one tenth anniversary special (also based on the first anime series). The first five films were shown at the Toei Manga Festival (東映まんがまつり Tōei Manga Matsuri), while the sixth through seventeenth films were shown at the Toei Anime Fair (東映アニメフェア Toei Anime Fea). They were mostly alternate re-tellings of certain story arcs involving new characters or extra side-stories that do not correlate with the same continuity as the series. Since these movies were originally shown as back-to-back presentations alongside other Toei film productions, they were usually below feature length (around 45-60 minutes each), making them only slightly longer than an episode of the TV series (the sole exception being 1996's The Path to Power, which has a running time of 80 minutes). The newest films, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods (2013) and Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection 'F' (2015), were produced as full-length feature films and were given stand-alone theatrical releases in Japan; these being the first movies to have original creator Akira Toriyama deeply involved in their production.[48][49]

 

Live-action

An unofficial live-action Mandarin Chinese film adaptation of the series, Dragon Ball: The Magic Begins, was released in Taiwan in 1989.[2] In December 1990, the unofficial live-action Korean film Dragon Ball: Ssawora Son Goku, Igyeora Son Goku was released. 20th Century Fox acquired feature film rights to the Dragon Ball franchise in March 2002 and began production on an American live-action film entitled Dragonball Evolution.[50][51] Directed by James Wong and produced by Stephen Chow, it was released in the United States on April 10, 2009.[51][52]

 

TV Specials and other animations

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Three television specials based on the series were aired on Fuji TV in Japan. The first, The One True Final Battle ~The Z Warrior Who Challenged Freeza -- Son Goku's Father~, renamed Bardock – The Father of Goku by Funimation, was shown on October 17, 1990. The second special, The Hopeless Resistance!! Gohan and Trunks -- The Two Remaining Super Warriors, renamed The History of Trunks by Funimation, is based on a special chapter of the original manga and aired on March 24, 1993. Goku Side Story! The Four Star Ball is a Badge of Courage, renamed A Hero's Legacy by Funimation, aired on March 26, 1997. A two-part hour-long crossover special between Dragon Ball Z, One Piece and Toriko, referred to as Dream 9 Toriko & One Piece & Dragon Ball Z Super Collaboration Special!! aired on April 7, 2013.[53]

 

A two-episode original video animation (OVA) titled Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans was created in 1993 as strategy guides for the Famicom video game of the same name.[54] A remake titled Dragon Ball: Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans was created as a bonus feature for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2, which was released on November 11, 2010.[55]

 

The short film Dragon Ball: Yo! Son Goku and His Friends Return!! was created for the Jump Super Anime Tour,[56] which celebrated Weekly Shōnen Jump's 40th anniversary, and debuted on November 24, 2008. A short animated adaptation of Naho Ōishi's Bardock spinoff manga, Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock, was shown on December 17–18, 2011 at the Jump Festa 2012 event.[57]

 

Theme Park Attraction

"Dragon Ball Z: The Real 4D" debuted at Universal Studios Japan during Summer 2016. It features a battle between Goku and Freeza. Unlike most Dragon Ball animation, the ride is animated with CGI.

 

Video games

See also: List of Dragon Ball video games

 

A Dragon Ball Z arcade conversion kit that includes the PCB, instructions and operator's manual.

The Dragon Ball franchise has spawned multiple video games across various genres and platforms. Earlier games of the series included a system of card battling and were released for the Famicom following the storyline of the series.[58] Starting with the Super Famicom and Mega Drive, most of the games were from the fighting genre or RPG (Role Playing Game), such as the Super Butoden series.[59] The first Dragon Ball game to be released in the United States was Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout for the PlayStation in 1997.[60] For the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable games the characters were redone in 3D cel-shaded graphics. These games included the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai series and the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi series.[61][62] Dragon Ball Z: Burst Limit was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[63] Dragon Ball Xenoverse was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.[64][65] A massively multiplayer online role-playing game called Dragon Ball Online was available in Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan until the servers were shut down in 2013.[66]

 

Soundtracks

See also: List of Dragon Ball soundtracks

Myriad soundtracks were released in the anime, movies and the games. The music for the first two anime Dragon Ball and Z and its films was composed by Shunsuke Kikuchi, while the music from GT was composed by Akihito Tokunaga and the music from Kai was composed by Kenji Yamamoto and Norihito Sumitomo. For the first anime, the soundtracks released were Dragon Ball: Music Collection in 1985 and Dragon Ball: Complete Song Collection in 1991, although they were reissued in 2007 and 2003, respectively.[67] For the second anime, the soundtrack series released were Dragon Ball Z Hit Song Collection Series. It was produced and released by Columbia Records of Japan from July 21, 1989 to March 20, 1996 the show's entire lifespan. On September 20, 2006 Columbia re-released the Hit Song Collection on their Animex 1300 series.[68][69] Other CDs released are compilations, video games and films soundtracks as well as music from the English versions.[70]

 

Companion books

 

Cover of Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations

There have been numerous companion books to the Dragon Ball franchise. Chief among these are the Daizenshuu (大全集?) series, comprising seven hardback main volumes and three supplemental softcover volumes, covering the manga and the first two anime series and their theatrical films. The first of these, Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations (Daizenshuu volume 1), first published in Japan in 1995, is the only one that was released in English, being printed in 2008 by Viz Media.[71] It contains all 264 colored illustrations Akira Toriyama drew for the Weekly Shōnen Jump magazines' covers, bonus giveaways and specials, and all the covers for the 42 tankōbon. It also includes an interview with Toriyama on his work process. The remainder have never been released in English, and all are now out of print in Japan. From February 4 to May 9, 2013, condensed versions of the Daizenshuu with some updated information were released as the four-volume Chōzenshū (超全集?) series.[18] For Dragon Ball GT, the Dragon Ball GT Perfect Files were released in May and December 1997 by Shueisha's Jump Comics Selection imprint. They include series information, illustration galleries, behind-the-scenes information, and more. They were out of print for many years, but were re-released in April 2006 (accompanying the Japanese DVD release of Dragon Ball GT) and this edition is still in print.[72][73]

 

Coinciding with the 34-volume kanzenban re-release of the manga, and the release of the entire series on DVD for the first time in Japan, four new guidebooks were released in 2003 and 2004. Dragon Ball Landmark and Dragon Ball Forever cover the manga, using volume numbers for story points that reference the kanzenban release,[74][75] while Dragon Ball: Tenkaichi Densetsu (ドラゴンボール 天下一伝説?) and Dragon Ball Z: Son Goku Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 孫悟空伝説?) cover the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime, respectively.[76][77] Much of the material in these books is reused from the earlier Daizenshuu volumes, but they include new textual material including substantial interviews with the creator, cast and production staff of the series. Son Goku Densetsu in particular showcases previously-unpublished design sketches of Goku's father Bardock, drawn by character designer Katsuyoshi Nakatsuru prior to creator Akira Toriyama's revisions that resulted in the final version.

 

Following the release of Dragon Ball Kai in Japan, four new guidebooks were released: the two-volume Dragon Ball: Super Exciting Guide (ドラゴンボール 超エキサイティングガイド?) in 2009, covering the manga,[78][79] and two-volume Dragon Ball: Extreme Battle Collection (ドラゴンボール 極限バトルコレクション?) in 2010, covering the anime series.[80][81] Despite the TV series airing during this time being Kai, the Extreme Battle Collection books reference the earlier Z series in content and episode numbers. These books also include new question-and-answer sessions with Akira Toriyama, revealing a few new details about the world and characters of the series. 2010 also saw the release of a new artbook, Dragon Ball: Anime Illustrations Guide - The Golden Warrior (ドラゴンボール アニメイラスト集 「黄金の戦士」?); a sort of anime-counterpart to the manga-oriented Complete Illustrations, it showcases anime-original illustrations and includes interviews with the three principal character designers for the anime. Each of the Japanese "Dragon Box" DVD releases of the series and movies, which were released from 2003 to 2006, as well as the Blu-ray boxed sets of Dragon Ball Kai, released 2009 to 2011, come with a Dragon Book guide that contains details about the content therein. Each also contains a new interview with a member of the cast or staff of the series. These books have been reproduced textually for Funimation's release of the Dragon Ball Z Dragon Box sets from 2009 to 2011.

 

Collectible cards

See also: Dragon Ball Collectible Card Game

Collectible cards based on the Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z, and Dragon Ball GT series have been released by Bandai. These cards feature various scenes from the manga and anime stills, plus exclusive artwork from all three series. Bandai released the first set in the United States in July 2008.[82]

 

Reception

Manga

Dragon Ball is one of the most popular manga series of all time, and it continues to enjoy high readership today. By 2000, more than 126 million copies of its tankōbon volumes had been sold in Japan alone.[83] By 2012, this number had grown to pass 156 million in Japan and 230 million worldwide, making it the second best-selling Weekly Shōnen Jump manga of all time.[84][85] Dragon Ball is credited as one of the main reasons for the period when manga circulation was at its highest in the mid-1980s and mid-1990s.[86][87] For the 10th anniversary of the Japan Media Arts Festival in 2006, Japanese fans voted Dragon Ball the third greatest manga of all time.[88]

 

In a survey conducted by Oricon in 2007 among 1,000 people, Son Goku, the main character of the franchise, ranked first place as the "Strongest Manga Character of All Time."[89] Goku's journey and his ever growing strength resulted in the character winning "the admiration of young boys everywhere".[1] Manga artists, such as One Piece creator Eiichiro Oda and Naruto creator Masashi Kishimoto, have stated that Goku inspired their series' main protagonists as well as series structure.[90][91]

 

Manga critic Jason Thompson stated in 2011 that "Dragon Ball is by far the most influential shonen manga of the last 30 years, and today, almost every Shonen Jump artist lists it as one of their favorites and lifts from it in various ways."[92] He says the series "turns from a gag/adventure manga to an nearly-pure fighting manga",[92] and its basic formula of "lots of martial arts, lots of training sequences, a few jokes" became the model for other shōnen series, such as Naruto.[93] Thompson also called Toriyama's art influential and cited it as a reason for the series' popularity.[92] James S. Yadao, author of The Rough Guide to Manga, claims that the first several chapters of Dragon Ball "play out much like Saiyuki with Dr. Slump-like humour built in" and that Dr. Slump, Toriyama's previous manga, has a clear early influence on the series.[94] He feels the series "established its unique identity" after the first occasion when Goku's group disbands and he trains under Kame-sen'nin, when the story develops "a far more action-packed, sinister tone" with "wilder" battles with aerial and spiritual elements and an increased death count, while humor still makes an occasional appearance.[94] Yadao claims that an art shift occurs when the characters "lose the rounded, innocent look that he established in Dr. Slump and gain sharper angles that leap off the page with their energy and intensity."[95]

 

Animerica felt the series had "worldwide appeal", using dramatic pacing and over-the-top martial arts action to "maintain tension levels and keep a crippler crossface hold on the audience's attention spans".[96] In Little Boy: The Art of Japan's Exploding Subculture, Takashi Murakami commented that Dragon Ball's "never-ending cyclical narrative moves forward plausibly, seamlessly, and with great finesse."[83] Ridwan Khan from Animefringe.com commented that the manga had a "chubby" art style, but as the series continued the characters got more refined, leaner, and more muscular. Khan prefers the manga over the slow pacing of the anime counterparts.[97] Allen Divers of Anime News Network praised the story and humor of the manga as being very good at conveying all of the characters' personalities. Divers also called Viz's translation one of the best of all the English editions of the series due to its faithfulness to the original Japanese.[98] D. Aviva Rothschild of Rationalmagic.com remarked the first manga volume as "a superior humor title". They praised Goku's innocence and Bulma's insistence as one of the funniest parts of the series.[99]

 

The content of the manga has been controversial in United States. In November 1999, Toys "R" Us removed Viz's Dragon Ball from their stores nationwide when a Dallas parent complained the series had "borderline soft porn" after he bought them for his four-year-old son.[100] Commenting on the issue, Susan J. Napier explained it as a difference in culture.[100] After the ban, Viz reluctantly began to censor the series to keep wide distribution.[101] However, in 2001, after releasing three volumes censored, Viz announced Dragon Ball would be uncensored and reprinted due to fan reactions.[101] In October 2009, Wicomico County Public Schools in Maryland banned the Dragon Ball manga from their school district because it "depicts nudity, sexual contact between children and sexual innuendo among adults and children."[100]

 

Anime

The anime adaptations have also been very well-received and are better known in the Western world than the manga, with Anime News Network saying "Few anime series have mainstreamed it the way Dragon Ball Z has. To a certain generation of television consumers its characters are as well known as any in the animated realm, and for many it was the first step into the wilderness of anime fandom."[102] In 2000, satellite TV channel Animax together with Brutus, a men's lifestyle magazine, and Tsutaya, Japan's largest video rental chain, conducted a poll among 200,000 fans on the top anime series, with Dragon Ball coming in fourth.[103] TV Asahi conducted two polls in 2005 on the Top 100 Anime, Dragon Ball came in second in the nationwide survey conducted with multiple age-groups and in third in the online poll.[104][105] On several occasions the Dragon Ball anime has topped Japan's DVD sales.[106][107]

 

Carl Kimlinger of Anime News Network summed up Dragon Ball as "an action-packed tale told with rare humor and something even rarer—a genuine sense of adventure."[108] Both Kimlinger and colleague Theron Martin noted Funimation's reputation for drastic alterations of the script, but praised the dub.[108][109] However, some critics and most fans of the Japanese version have been more critical with Funimation's English dub and script of Dragon Ball Z over the years. Jeffrey Harris IGN criticized the voices including how Freeza's appearance combined with the feminine English voice left fans confused about Freeza's gender.[110] Carlos Ross of T.H.E.M. Anime Reviews considered the series' characters to be different from stereotypical stock characters and noted that they undergo much more development.[111] Despite praising Dragon Ball Z for its cast of characters, they criticized it for having long and repetitive fights.[112]

 

Dragon Ball Z is well-known, and often criticized, for its long, repetitive, dragged-out fights that span several episodes, with Martin commenting "DBZ practically turned drawing out fights into an art form."[113] However, Jason Thompson of io9 explained that this comes from the fact that the anime was being created alongside the manga.[114] Dragon Ball Z was listed as the 78th best animated show in IGN's Top 100 Animated Series,[115] and was also listed as the 50th greatest cartoon in Wizard magazine's Top 100 Greatest Cartoons list.[116]

 

Harris commented that Dragon Ball GT "is downright repellent", mentioning that the material and characters had lost their novelty and fun. He also criticized the GT character designs of Trunks and Vegeta as being goofy.[110] Zac Bertschy of Anime News Network also gave negative comments about GT, mentioning that the fights from the series were "a very simple childish exercise" and that many other anime were superior. The plot of Dragon Ball GT has also been criticized for giving a formula that was already used in its predecessors.[117]

 

The first episode of Dragon Ball Z Kai earned a viewer ratings percentage of 11.3, ahead of One Piece and behind Crayon Shin-chan.[118] Although following episodes had lower ratings, Kai was among the top 10 anime in viewer ratings every week in Japan for most of its run.[119][120]

 

Manga

Main article: Dragon Ball (manga)

 

Dragon Ball debuted in Weekly Shōnen Jump No. 51, 1984.

Written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama, Dragon Ball was serialized in the manga anthology Weekly Shōnen Jump from November 20, 1984 to May 23, 1995, when Toriyama grew exhausted and felt he needed a break from drawing. The 519 individual chapters were published into 42 tankōbon volumes by Shueisha from September 10, 1985 through August 4, 1995.[13][14][15] Between December 4, 2002 and April 2, 2004, the chapters were re-released in a collection of 34 kanzenban volumes, which included a slightly rewritten ending, new covers, and color artwork from its Weekly Shōnen Jump run.[16][17] The February 2013 issue of V Jump, which was released in December 2012, announced that parts of the manga will be fully colored and re-released in 2013.[18] Twenty volumes, beginning from chapter 195 and grouped by story arcs, were released between February 4, 2013 and July 4, 2014.[19][20] Twelve volumes covering the first 194 chapters were published between January 4 and March 4, 2016.[21][22] A sōshūhen edition that aims to recreate the manga as it was originally serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump with color pages, promotional text, and next chapter previews, began being published on May 13, 2016.[23]

 

Spin-offs and crossovers

Toriyama also created a short series, Neko Majin (1999–2005), that became a self-parody of Dragon Ball.[24] In 2006, a crossover between Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo (or Kochikame) and Dragon Ball by Toriyama and Kochikame author Osamu Akimoto appeared in the Super Kochikame (超こち亀 Chō Kochikame) manga.[25] That same year, Toriyama teamed up with Eiichiro Oda to create a crossover chapter of Dragon Ball and One Piece entitled Cross Epoch.[26] The final chapter of Toriyama's 2013 manga series Jaco the Galactic Patrolman revealed that it is set before Dragon Ball, with several characters making appearances.[27] Jaco's collected volumes contain a bonus Dragon Ball chapter depicting Goku's mother.[28]

 

A colored spin-off manga titled Dragon Ball SD written by Naho Ōishi has been published in Shueisha's Saikyō Jump magazine since its debut issue in December 2010.[29] A condensed retelling of Goku's adventures in a super deformed art style, it has been collected into four volumes as of February 2016.[30][31][32][33] Another manga penned by Ōishi, the three-chapter Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock that revolves around Bardock, Goku's father, was published in the monthly magazine V Jump from August and October 2011.[34]

 

Anime series

Dragon Ball

Main articles: Dragon Ball (anime) and List of Dragon Ball episodes

Toei Animation produced an anime television series based on the first 194 manga chapters, also titled Dragon Ball. The series premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on February 26, 1986 and ran until April 12, 1989, lasting 153 episodes.[2]

 

Dragon Ball Z

Main articles: Dragon Ball Z and List of Dragon Ball Z episodes

Instead of continuing the anime as Dragon Ball, Toei Animation decided to carry on with their adaptation under a new name and asked Akira Toriyama to come up with the title. Dragon Ball Z (ドラゴンボールZ(ゼット) Doragon Bōru Zetto?, commonly abbreviated as DBZ) picks up five years after the first series left off and adapts the final 325 chapters of the manga. It premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on April 26, 1989, taking over its predecessor's time slot, and ran for 291 episodes until its conclusion on January 31, 1996.[2]

 

Dragon Ball GT

Main articles: Dragon Ball GT and List of Dragon Ball GT episodes

Dragon Ball GT (ドラゴンボールGT(ジーティー) Doragon Bōru Jī Tī?, G(rand) T(ouring)[35]) premiered on Fuji TV on February 2, 1996 and ran until November 19, 1997 for 64 episodes.[2] Unlike the first two anime series, it is not based on Akira Toriyama's original Dragon Ball manga,[36] being created by Toei Animation as a sequel to the series or as Toriyama called it, a "grand side story of the original Dragon Ball".[35] Toriyama designed the main cast, the spaceship used in the show, the design of three planets, and came up with the title and logo. In addition to this, Toriyama also oversaw production of the series, just as he had for the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime.

 

Dragon Ball Kai

Main articles: Dragon Ball Kai and List of Dragon Ball Z Kai episodes

In February 2009, Toei Animation announced that it would begin broadcasting a revised version of Dragon Ball Z as part of the series' 20th anniversary celebrations. The series premiered on Fuji TV in Japan on April 5, 2009, under the name Dragon Ball Kai (ドラゴンボール改 Doragon Bōru Kai?, lit. "Dragon Ball Revised"), with the episodes remastered for HDTV, featuring updated opening and ending sequences, and a rerecording of the vocal tracks by most of the original cast.[37][38] The footage was also re-edited to more closely follow the manga, resulting in a faster-moving story, and damaged frames removed.[39] As such, it is a new version of Dragon Ball Z created from the original footage. Some shots were also remade from scratch in order to fix cropping and continuity issues.[40] The majority of the international versions, including Funimation Entertainment's English dub, are titled Dragon Ball Z Kai.[41][42]

 

Dragon Ball Super

Main articles: Dragon Ball Super and List of Dragon Ball Super episodes

On April 28, 2015, Toei Animation announced Dragon Ball Super (ドラゴンボール超 Doragon Bōru Sūpā?), the first all-new Dragon Ball television series to be released in 18 years. It debuted on July 5 and will run as a weekly series at 9:00 am on Fuji TV on Sundays.[43] Masako Nozawa reprised her roles as Goku, Gohan, and Goten. Most of the original cast reprise their roles as well.[44][45] Kouichi Yamadera and Masakazu Morita also reprise their roles, as Beerus and Whis, respectively.[45] The story of the anime is set four years after the defeat of Majin Boo, when the Earth has become peaceful once again. Akira Toriyama is credited as the original creator, as well for "original story & character design concepts."[46] It is also being adapted into a companion manga.[47]

 

Films

Anime

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Nineteen animated theatrical films based on the Dragon Ball series have been released in Japan. The first three films are based on the original Dragon Ball anime series. The remaining films include fifteen based on Dragon Ball Z and one tenth anniversary special (also based on the first anime series). The first five films were shown at the Toei Manga Festival (東映まんがまつり Tōei Manga Matsuri), while the sixth through seventeenth films were shown at the Toei Anime Fair (東映アニメフェア Toei Anime Fea). They were mostly alternate re-tellings of certain story arcs involving new characters or extra side-stories that do not correlate with the same continuity as the series. Since these movies were originally shown as back-to-back presentations alongside other Toei film productions, they were usually below feature length (around 45-60 minutes each), making them only slightly longer than an episode of the TV series (the sole exception being 1996's The Path to Power, which has a running time of 80 minutes). The newest films, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods (2013) and Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection 'F' (2015), were produced as full-length feature films and were given stand-alone theatrical releases in Japan; these being the first movies to have original creator Akira Toriyama deeply involved in their production.[48][49]

 

Live-action

An unofficial live-action Mandarin Chinese film adaptation of the series, Dragon Ball: The Magic Begins, was released in Taiwan in 1989.[2] In December 1990, the unofficial live-action Korean film Dragon Ball: Ssawora Son Goku, Igyeora Son Goku was released. 20th Century Fox acquired feature film rights to the Dragon Ball franchise in March 2002 and began production on an American live-action film entitled Dragonball Evolution.[50][51] Directed by James Wong and produced by Stephen Chow, it was released in the United States on April 10, 2009.[51][52]

 

TV Specials and other animations

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Three television specials based on the series were aired on Fuji TV in Japan. The first, The One True Final Battle ~The Z Warrior Who Challenged Freeza -- Son Goku's Father~, renamed Bardock – The Father of Goku by Funimation, was shown on October 17, 1990. The second special, The Hopeless Resistance!! Gohan and Trunks -- The Two Remaining Super Warriors, renamed The History of Trunks by Funimation, is based on a special chapter of the original manga and aired on March 24, 1993. Goku Side Story! The Four Star Ball is a Badge of Courage, renamed A Hero's Legacy by Funimation, aired on March 26, 1997. A two-part hour-long crossover special between Dragon Ball Z, One Piece and Toriko, referred to as Dream 9 Toriko & One Piece & Dragon Ball Z Super Collaboration Special!! aired on April 7, 2013.[53]

 

A two-episode original video animation (OVA) titled Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans was created in 1993 as strategy guides for the Famicom video game of the same name.[54] A remake titled Dragon Ball: Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans was created as a bonus feature for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2, which was released on November 11, 2010.[55]

 

The short film Dragon Ball: Yo! Son Goku and His Friends Return!! was created for the Jump Super Anime Tour,[56] which celebrated Weekly Shōnen Jump's 40th anniversary, and debuted on November 24, 2008. A short animated adaptation of Naho Ōishi's Bardock spinoff manga, Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock, was shown on December 17–18, 2011 at the Jump Festa 2012 event.[57]

 

Theme Park Attraction

"Dragon Ball Z: The Real 4D" debuted at Universal Studios Japan during Summer 2016. It features a battle between Goku and Freeza. Unlike most Dragon Ball animation, the ride is animated with CGI.

 

Video games

See also: List of Dragon Ball video games

 

A Dragon Ball Z arcade conversion kit that includes the PCB, instructions and operator's manual.

The Dragon Ball franchise has spawned multiple video games across various genres and platforms. Earlier games of the series included a system of card battling and were released for the Famicom following the storyline of the series.[58] Starting with the Super Famicom and Mega Drive, most of the games were from the fighting genre or RPG (Role Playing Game), such as the Super Butoden series.[59] The first Dragon Ball game to be released in the United States was Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout for the PlayStation in 1997.[60] For the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable games the characters were redone in 3D cel-shaded graphics. These games included the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai series and the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi series.[61][62] Dragon Ball Z: Burst Limit was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[63] Dragon Ball Xenoverse was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.[64][65] A massively multiplayer online role-playing game called Dragon Ball Online was available in Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan until the servers were shut down in 2013.[66]

 

Soundtracks

See also: List of Dragon Ball soundtracks

Myriad soundtracks were released in the anime, movies and the games. The music for the first two anime Dragon Ball and Z and its films was composed by Shunsuke Kikuchi, while the music from GT was composed by Akihito Tokunaga and the music from Kai was composed by Kenji Yamamoto and Norihito Sumitomo. For the first anime, the soundtracks released were Dragon Ball: Music Collection in 1985 and Dragon Ball: Complete Song Collection in 1991, although they were reissued in 2007 and 2003, respectively.[67] For the second anime, the soundtrack series released were Dragon Ball Z Hit Song Collection Series. It was produced and released by Columbia Records of Japan from July 21, 1989 to March 20, 1996 the show's entire lifespan. On September 20, 2006 Columbia re-released the Hit Song Collection on their Animex 1300 series.[68][69] Other CDs released are compilations, video games and films soundtracks as well as music from the English versions.[70]

 

Companion books

 

Cover of Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations

There have been numerous companion books to the Dragon Ball franchise. Chief among these are the Daizenshuu (大全集?) series, comprising seven hardback main volumes and three supplemental softcover volumes, covering the manga and the first two anime series and their theatrical films. The first of these, Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations (Daizenshuu volume 1), first published in Japan in 1995, is the only one that was released in English, being printed in 2008 by Viz Media.[71] It contains all 264 colored illustrations Akira Toriyama drew for the Weekly Shōnen Jump magazines' covers, bonus giveaways and specials, and all the covers for the 42 tankōbon. It also includes an interview with Toriyama on his work process. The remainder have never been released in English, and all are now out of print in Japan. From February 4 to May 9, 2013, condensed versions of the Daizenshuu with some updated information were released as the four-volume Chōzenshū (超全集?) series.[18] For Dragon Ball GT, the Dragon Ball GT Perfect Files were released in May and December 1997 by Shueisha's Jump Comics Selection imprint. They include series information, illustration galleries, behind-the-scenes information, and more. They were out of print for many years, but were re-released in April 2006 (accompanying the Japanese DVD release of Dragon Ball GT) and this edition is still in print.[72][73]

 

Coinciding with the 34-volume kanzenban re-release of the manga, and the release of the entire series on DVD for the first time in Japan, four new guidebooks were released in 2003 and 2004. Dragon Ball Landmark and Dragon Ball Forever cover the manga, using volume numbers for story points that reference the kanzenban release,[74][75] while Dragon Ball: Tenkaichi Densetsu (ドラゴンボール 天下一伝説?) and Dragon Ball Z: Son Goku Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 孫悟空伝説?) cover the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime, respectively.[76][77] Much of the material in these books is reused from the earlier Daizenshuu volumes, but they include new textual material including substantial interviews with the creator, cast and production staff of the series. Son Goku Densetsu in particular showcases previously-unpublished design sketches of Goku's father Bardock, drawn by character designer Katsuyoshi Nakatsuru prior to creator Akira Toriyama's revisions that resulted in the final version.

 

Following the release of Dragon Ball Kai in Japan, four new guidebooks were released: the two-volume Dragon Ball: Super Exciting Guide (ドラゴンボール 超エキサイティングガイド?) in 2009, covering the manga,[78][79] and two-volume Dragon Ball: Extreme Battle Collection (ドラゴンボール 極限バトルコレクション?) in 2010, covering the anime series.[80][81] Despite the TV series airing during this time being Kai, the Extreme Battle Collection books reference the earlier Z series in content and episode numbers. These books also include new question-and-answer sessions with Akira Toriyama, revealing a few new details about the world and characters of the series. 2010 also saw the release of a new artbook, Dragon Ball: Anime Illustrations Guide - The Golden Warrior (ドラゴンボール アニメイラスト集 「黄金の戦士」?); a sort of anime-counterpart to the manga-oriented Complete Illustrations, it showcases anime-original illustrations and includes interviews with the three principal character designers for the anime. Each of the Japanese "Dragon Box" DVD releases of the series and movies, which were released from 2003 to 2006, as well as the Blu-ray boxed sets of Dragon Ball Kai, released 2009 to 2011, come with a Dragon Book guide that contains details about the content therein. Each also contains a new interview with a member of the cast or staff of the series. These books have been reproduced textually for Funimation's release of the Dragon Ball Z Dragon Box sets from 2009 to 2011.

 

Collectible cards

See also: Dragon Ball Collectible Card Game

Collectible cards based on the Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z, and Dragon Ball GT series have been released by Bandai. These cards feature various scenes from the manga and anime stills, plus exclusive artwork from all three series. Bandai released the first set in the United States in July 2008.[82]

 

Reception

Manga

Dragon Ball is one of the most popular manga series of all time, and it continues to enjoy high readership today. By 2000, more than 126 million copies of its tankōbon volumes had been sold in Japan alone.[83] By 2012, this number had grown to pass 156 million in Japan and 230 million worldwide, making it the second best-selling Weekly Shōnen Jump manga of all time.[84][85] Dragon Ball is credited as one of the main reasons for the period when manga circulation was at its highest in the mid-1980s and mid-1990s.[86][87] For the 10th anniversary of the Japan Media Arts Festival in 2006, Japanese fans voted Dragon Ball the third greatest manga of all time.[88]

 

In a survey conducted by Oricon in 2007 among 1,000 people, Son Goku, the main character of the franchise, ranked first place as the "Strongest Manga Character of All Time."[89] Goku's journey and his ever growing strength resulted in the character winning "the admiration of young boys everywhere".[1] Manga artists, such as One Piece creator Eiichiro Oda and Naruto creator Masashi Kishimoto, have stated that Goku inspired their series' main protagonists as well as series structure.[90][91]

 

Manga critic Jason Thompson stated in 2011 that "Dragon Ball is by far the most influential shonen manga of the last 30 years, and today, almost every Shonen Jump artist lists it as one of their favorites and lifts from it in various ways."[92] He says the series "turns from a gag/adventure manga to an nearly-pure fighting manga",[92] and its basic formula of "lots of martial arts, lots of training sequences, a few jokes" became the model for other shōnen series, such as Naruto.[93] Thompson also called Toriyama's art influential and cited it as a reason for the series' popularity.[92] James S. Yadao, author of The Rough Guide to Manga, claims that the first several chapters of Dragon Ball "play out much like Saiyuki with Dr. Slump-like humour built in" and that Dr. Slump, Toriyama's previous manga, has a clear early influence on the series.[94] He feels the series "established its unique identity" after the first occasion when Goku's group disbands and he trains under Kame-sen'nin, when the story develops "a far more action-packed, sinister tone" with "wilder" battles with aerial and spiritual elements and an increased death count, while humor still makes an occasional appearance.[94] Yadao claims that an art shift occurs when the characters "lose the rounded, innocent look that he established in Dr. Slump and gain sharper angles that leap off the page with their energy and intensity."[95]

 

Animerica felt the series had "worldwide appeal", using dramatic pacing and over-the-top martial arts action to "maintain tension levels and keep a crippler crossface hold on the audience's attention spans".[96] In Little Boy: The Art of Japan's Exploding Subculture, Takashi Murakami commented that Dragon Ball's "never-ending cyclical narrative moves forward plausibly, seamlessly, and with great finesse."[83] Ridwan Khan from Animefringe.com commented that the manga had a "chubby" art style, but as the series continued the characters got more refined, leaner, and more muscular. Khan prefers the manga over the slow pacing of the anime counterparts.[97] Allen Divers of Anime News Network praised the story and humor of the manga as being very good at conveying all of the characters' personalities. Divers also called Viz's translation one of the best of all the English editions of the series due to its faithfulness to the original Japanese.[98] D. Aviva Rothschild of Rationalmagic.com remarked the first manga volume as "a superior humor title". They praised Goku's innocence and Bulma's insistence as one of the funniest parts of the series.[99]

 

The content of the manga has been controversial in United States. In November 1999, Toys "R" Us removed Viz's Dragon Ball from their stores nationwide when a Dallas parent complained the series had "borderline soft porn" after he bought them for his four-year-old son.[100] Commenting on the issue, Susan J. Napier explained it as a difference in culture.[100] After the ban, Viz reluctantly began to censor the series to keep wide distribution.[101] However, in 2001, after releasing three volumes censored, Viz announced Dragon Ball would be uncensored and reprinted due to fan reactions.[101] In October 2009, Wicomico County Public Schools in Maryland banned the Dragon Ball manga from their school district because it "depicts nudity, sexual contact between children and sexual innuendo among adults and children."[100]

 

Anime

The anime adaptations have also been very well-received and are better known in the Western world than the manga, with Anime News Network saying "Few anime series have mainstreamed it the way Dragon Ball Z has. To a certain generation of television consumers its characters are as well known as any in the animated realm, and for many it was the first step into the wilderness of anime fandom."[102] In 2000, satellite TV channel Animax together with Brutus, a men's lifestyle magazine, and Tsutaya, Japan's largest video rental chain, conducted a poll among 200,000 fans on the top anime series, with Dragon Ball coming in fourth.[103] TV Asahi conducted two polls in 2005 on the Top 100 Anime, Dragon Ball came in second in the nationwide survey conducted with multiple age-groups and in third in the online poll.[104][105] On several occasions the Dragon Ball anime has topped Japan's DVD sales.[106][107]

 

Carl Kimlinger of Anime News Network summed up Dragon Ball as "an action-packed tale told with rare humor and something even rarer—a genuine sense of adventure."[108] Both Kimlinger and colleague Theron Martin noted Funimation's reputation for drastic alterations of the script, but praised the dub.[108][109] However, some critics and most fans of the Japanese version have been more critical with Funimation's English dub and script of Dragon Ball Z over the years. Jeffrey Harris IGN criticized the voices including how Freeza's appearance combined with the feminine English voice left fans confused about Freeza's gender.[110] Carlos Ross of T.H.E.M. Anime Reviews considered the series' characters to be different from stereotypical stock characters and noted that they undergo much more development.[111] Despite praising Dragon Ball Z for its cast of characters, they criticized it for having long and repetitive fights.[112]

 

Dragon Ball Z is well-known, and often criticized, for its long, repetitive, dragged-out fights that span several episodes, with Martin commenting "DBZ practically turned drawing out fights into an art form."[113] However, Jason Thompson of io9 explained that this comes from the fact that the anime was being created alongside the manga.[114] Dragon Ball Z was listed as the 78th best animated show in IGN's Top 100 Animated Series,[115] and was also listed as the 50th greatest cartoon in Wizard magazine's Top 100 Greatest Cartoons list.[116]

 

Harris commented that Dragon Ball GT "is downright repellent", mentioning that the material and characters had lost their novelty and fun. He also criticized the GT character designs of Trunks and Vegeta as being goofy.[110] Zac Bertschy of Anime News Network also gave negative comments about GT, mentioning that the fights from the series were "a very simple childish exercise" and that many other anime were superior. The plot of Dragon Ball GT has also been criticized for giving a formula that was already used in its predecessors.[117]

 

The first episode of Dragon Ball Z Kai earned a viewer ratings percentage of 11.3, ahead of One Piece and behind Crayon Shin-chan.[118] Although following episodes had lower ratings, Kai was among the top 10 anime in viewer ratings every week in Japan for most of its run.[119][120]

 

Manga

Main article: Dragon Ball (manga)

 

Dragon Ball debuted in Weekly Shōnen Jump No. 51, 1984.

Written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama, Dragon Ball was serialized in the manga anthology Weekly Shōnen Jump from November 20, 1984 to May 23, 1995, when Toriyama grew exhausted and felt he needed a break from drawing. The 519 individual chapters were published into 42 tankōbon volumes by Shueisha from September 10, 1985 through August 4, 1995.[13][14][15] Between December 4, 2002 and April 2, 2004, the chapters were re-released in a collection of 34 kanzenban volumes, which included a slightly rewritten ending, new covers, and color artwork from its Weekly Shōnen Jump run.[16][17] The February 2013 issue of V Jump, which was released in December 2012, announced that parts of the manga will be fully colored and re-released in 2013.[18] Twenty volumes, beginning from chapter 195 and grouped by story arcs, were released between February 4, 2013 and July 4, 2014.[19][20] Twelve volumes covering the first 194 chapters were published between January 4 and March 4, 2016.[21][22] A sōshūhen edition that aims to recreate the manga as it was originally serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump with color pages, promotional text, and next chapter previews, began being published on May 13, 2016.[23]

 

Spin-offs and crossovers

Toriyama also created a short series, Neko Majin (1999–2005), that became a self-parody of Dragon Ball.[24] In 2006, a crossover between Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo (or Kochikame) and Dragon Ball by Toriyama and Kochikame author Osamu Akimoto appeared in the Super Kochikame (超こち亀 Chō Kochikame) manga.[25] That same year, Toriyama teamed up with Eiichiro Oda to create a crossover chapter of Dragon Ball and One Piece entitled Cross Epoch.[26] The final chapter of Toriyama's 2013 manga series Jaco the Galactic Patrolman revealed that it is set before Dragon Ball, with several characters making appearances.[27] Jaco's collected volumes contain a bonus Dragon Ball chapter depicting Goku's mother.[28]

 

A colored spin-off manga titled Dragon Ball SD written by Naho Ōishi has been published in Shueisha's Saikyō Jump magazine since its debut issue in December 2010.[29] A condensed retelling of Goku's adventures in a super deformed art style, it has been collected into four volumes as of February 2016.[30][31][32][33] Another manga penned by Ōishi, the three-chapter Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock that revolves around Bardock, Goku's father, was published in the monthly magazine V Jump from August and October 2011.[34]

 

Anime series

Dragon Ball

Main articles: Dragon Ball (anime) and List of Dragon Ball episodes

Toei Animation produced an anime television series based on the first 194 manga chapters, also titled Dragon Ball. The series premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on February 26, 1986 and ran until April 12, 1989, lasting 153 episodes.[2]

 

Dragon Ball Z

Main articles: Dragon Ball Z and List of Dragon Ball Z episodes

Instead of continuing the anime as Dragon Ball, Toei Animation decided to carry on with their adaptation under a new name and asked Akira Toriyama to come up with the title. Dragon Ball Z (ドラゴンボールZ(ゼット) Doragon Bōru Zetto?, commonly abbreviated as DBZ) picks up five years after the first series left off and adapts the final 325 chapters of the manga. It premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on April 26, 1989, taking over its predecessor's time slot, and ran for 291 episodes until its conclusion on January 31, 1996.[2]

 

Dragon Ball GT

Main articles: Dragon Ball GT and List of Dragon Ball GT episodes

Dragon Ball GT (ドラゴンボールGT(ジーティー) Doragon Bōru Jī Tī?, G(rand) T(ouring)[35]) premiered on Fuji TV on February 2, 1996 and ran until November 19, 1997 for 64 episodes.[2] Unlike the first two anime series, it is not based on Akira Toriyama's original Dragon Ball manga,[36] being created by Toei Animation as a sequel to the series or as Toriyama called it, a "grand side story of the original Dragon Ball".[35] Toriyama designed the main cast, the spaceship used in the show, the design of three planets, and came up with the title and logo. In addition to this, Toriyama also oversaw production of the series, just as he had for the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime.

 

Dragon Ball Kai

Main articles: Dragon Ball Kai and List of Dragon Ball Z Kai episodes

In February 2009, Toei Animation announced that it would begin broadcasting a revised version of Dragon Ball Z as part of the series' 20th anniversary celebrations. The series premiered on Fuji TV in Japan on April 5, 2009, under the name Dragon Ball Kai (ドラゴンボール改 Doragon Bōru Kai?, lit. "Dragon Ball Revised"), with the episodes remastered for HDTV, featuring updated opening and ending sequences, and a rerecording of the vocal tracks by most of the original cast.[37][38] The footage was also re-edited to more closely follow the manga, resulting in a faster-moving story, and damaged frames removed.[39] As such, it is a new version of Dragon Ball Z created from the original footage. Some shots were also remade from scratch in order to fix cropping and continuity issues.[40] The majority of the international versions, including Funimation Entertainment's English dub, are titled Dragon Ball Z Kai.[41][42]

 

Dragon Ball Super

Main articles: Dragon Ball Super and List of Dragon Ball Super episodes

On April 28, 2015, Toei Animation announced Dragon Ball Super (ドラゴンボール超 Doragon Bōru Sūpā?), the first all-new Dragon Ball television series to be released in 18 years. It debuted on July 5 and will run as a weekly series at 9:00 am on Fuji TV on Sundays.[43] Masako Nozawa reprised her roles as Goku, Gohan, and Goten. Most of the original cast reprise their roles as well.[44][45] Kouichi Yamadera and Masakazu Morita also reprise their roles, as Beerus and Whis, respectively.[45] The story of the anime is set four years after the defeat of Majin Boo, when the Earth has become peaceful once again. Akira Toriyama is credited as the original creator, as well for "original story & character design concepts."[46] It is also being adapted into a companion manga.[47]

 

Films

Anime

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Nineteen animated theatrical films based on the Dragon Ball series have been released in Japan. The first three films are based on the original Dragon Ball anime series. The remaining films include fifteen based on Dragon Ball Z and one tenth anniversary special (also based on the first anime series). The first five films were shown at the Toei Manga Festival (東映まんがまつり Tōei Manga Matsuri), while the sixth through seventeenth films were shown at the Toei Anime Fair (東映アニメフェア Toei Anime Fea). They were mostly alternate re-tellings of certain story arcs involving new characters or extra side-stories that do not correlate with the same continuity as the series. Since these movies were originally shown as back-to-back presentations alongside other Toei film productions, they were usually below feature length (around 45-60 minutes each), making them only slightly longer than an episode of the TV series (the sole exception being 1996's The Path to Power, which has a running time of 80 minutes). The newest films, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods (2013) and Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection 'F' (2015), were produced as full-length feature films and were given stand-alone theatrical releases in Japan; these being the first movies to have original creator Akira Toriyama deeply involved in their production.[48][49]

 

Live-action

An unofficial live-action Mandarin Chinese film adaptation of the series, Dragon Ball: The Magic Begins, was released in Taiwan in 1989.[2] In December 1990, the unofficial live-action Korean film Dragon Ball: Ssawora Son Goku, Igyeora Son Goku was released. 20th Century Fox acquired feature film rights to the Dragon Ball franchise in March 2002 and began production on an American live-action film entitled Dragonball Evolution.[50][51] Directed by James Wong and produced by Stephen Chow, it was released in the United States on April 10, 2009.[51][52]

 

TV Specials and other animations

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Three television specials based on the series were aired on Fuji TV in Japan. The first, The One True Final Battle ~The Z Warrior Who Challenged Freeza -- Son Goku's Father~, renamed Bardock – The Father of Goku by Funimation, was shown on October 17, 1990. The second special, The Hopeless Resistance!! Gohan and Trunks -- The Two Remaining Super Warriors, renamed The History of Trunks by Funimation, is based on a special chapter of the original manga and aired on March 24, 1993. Goku Side Story! The Four Star Ball is a Badge of Courage, renamed A Hero's Legacy by Funimation, aired on March 26, 1997. A two-part hour-long crossover special between Dragon Ball Z, One Piece and Toriko, referred to as Dream 9 Toriko & One Piece & Dragon Ball Z Super Collaboration Special!! aired on April 7, 2013.[53]

 

A two-episode original video animation (OVA) titled Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans was created in 1993 as strategy guides for the Famicom video game of the same name.[54] A remake titled Dragon Ball: Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans was created as a bonus feature for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2, which was released on November 11, 2010.[55]

 

The short film Dragon Ball: Yo! Son Goku and His Friends Return!! was created for the Jump Super Anime Tour,[56] which celebrated Weekly Shōnen Jump's 40th anniversary, and debuted on November 24, 2008. A short animated adaptation of Naho Ōishi's Bardock spinoff manga, Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock, was shown on December 17–18, 2011 at the Jump Festa 2012 event.[57]

 

Theme Park Attraction

"Dragon Ball Z: The Real 4D" debuted at Universal Studios Japan during Summer 2016. It features a battle between Goku and Freeza. Unlike most Dragon Ball animation, the ride is animated with CGI.

 

Video games

See also: List of Dragon Ball video games

 

A Dragon Ball Z arcade conversion kit that includes the PCB, instructions and operator's manual.

The Dragon Ball franchise has spawned multiple video games across various genres and platforms. Earlier games of the series included a system of card battling and were released for the Famicom following the storyline of the series.[58] Starting with the Super Famicom and Mega Drive, most of the games were from the fighting genre or RPG (Role Playing Game), such as the Super Butoden series.[59] The first Dragon Ball game to be released in the United States was Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout for the PlayStation in 1997.[60] For the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable games the characters were redone in 3D cel-shaded graphics. These games included the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai series and the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi series.[61][62] Dragon Ball Z: Burst Limit was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[63] Dragon Ball Xenoverse was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.[64][65] A massively multiplayer online role-playing game called Dragon Ball Online was available in Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan until the servers were shut down in 2013.[66]

 

Soundtracks

See also: List of Dragon Ball soundtracks

Myriad soundtracks were released in the anime, movies and the games. The music for the first two anime Dragon Ball and Z and its films was composed by Shunsuke Kikuchi, while the music from GT was composed by Akihito Tokunaga and the music from Kai was composed by Kenji Yamamoto and Norihito Sumitomo. For the first anime, the soundtracks released were Dragon Ball: Music Collection in 1985 and Dragon Ball: Complete Song Collection in 1991, although they were reissued in 2007 and 2003, respectively.[67] For the second anime, the soundtrack series released were Dragon Ball Z Hit Song Collection Series. It was produced and released by Columbia Records of Japan from July 21, 1989 to March 20, 1996 the show's entire lifespan. On September 20, 2006 Columbia re-released the Hit Song Collection on their Animex 1300 series.[68][69] Other CDs released are compilations, video games and films soundtracks as well as music from the English versions.[70]

 

Companion books

 

Cover of Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations

There have been numerous companion books to the Dragon Ball franchise. Chief among these are the Daizenshuu (大全集?) series, comprising seven hardback main volumes and three supplemental softcover volumes, covering the manga and the first two anime series and their theatrical films. The first of these, Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations (Daizenshuu volume 1), first published in Japan in 1995, is the only one that was released in English, being printed in 2008 by Viz Media.[71] It contains all 264 colored illustrations Akira Toriyama drew for the Weekly Shōnen Jump magazines' covers, bonus giveaways and specials, and all the covers for the 42 tankōbon. It also includes an interview with Toriyama on his work process. The remainder have never been released in English, and all are now out of print in Japan. From February 4 to May 9, 2013, condensed versions of the Daizenshuu with some updated information were released as the four-volume Chōzenshū (超全集?) series.[18] For Dragon Ball GT, the Dragon Ball GT Perfect Files were released in May and December 1997 by Shueisha's Jump Comics Selection imprint. They include series information, illustration galleries, behind-the-scenes information, and more. They were out of print for many years, but were re-released in April 2006 (accompanying the Japanese DVD release of Dragon Ball GT) and this edition is still in print.[72][73]

 

Coinciding with the 34-volume kanzenban re-release of the manga, and the release of the entire series on DVD for the first time in Japan, four new guidebooks were released in 2003 and 2004. Dragon Ball Landmark and Dragon Ball Forever cover the manga, using volume numbers for story points that reference the kanzenban release,[74][75] while Dragon Ball: Tenkaichi Densetsu (ドラゴンボール 天下一伝説?) and Dragon Ball Z: Son Goku Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 孫悟空伝説?) cover the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime, respectively.[76][77] Much of the material in these books is reused from the earlier Daizenshuu volumes, but they include new textual material including substantial interviews with the creator, cast and production staff of the series. Son Goku Densetsu in particular showcases previously-unpublished design sketches of Goku's father Bardock, drawn by character designer Katsuyoshi Nakatsuru prior to creator Akira Toriyama's revisions that resulted in the final version.

 

Following the release of Dragon Ball Kai in Japan, four new guidebooks were released: the two-volume Dragon Ball: Super Exciting Guide (ドラゴンボール 超エキサイティングガイド?) in 2009, covering the manga,[78][79] and two-volume Dragon Ball: Extreme Battle Collection (ドラゴンボール 極限バトルコレクション?) in 2010, covering the anime series.[80][81] Despite the TV series airing during this time being Kai, the Extreme Battle Collection books reference the earlier Z series in content and episode numbers. These books also include new question-and-answer sessions with Akira Toriyama, revealing a few new details about the world and characters of the series. 2010 also saw the release of a new artbook, Dragon Ball: Anime Illustrations Guide - The Golden Warrior (ドラゴンボール アニメイラスト集 「黄金の戦士」?); a sort of anime-counterpart to the manga-oriented Complete Illustrations, it showcases anime-original illustrations and includes interviews with the three principal character designers for the anime. Each of the Japanese "Dragon Box" DVD releases of the series and movies, which were released from 2003 to 2006, as well as the Blu-ray boxed sets of Dragon Ball Kai, released 2009 to 2011, come with a Dragon Book guide that contains details about the content therein. Each also contains a new interview with a member of the cast or staff of the series. These books have been reproduced textually for Funimation's release of the Dragon Ball Z Dragon Box sets from 2009 to 2011.

 

Collectible cards

See also: Dragon Ball Collectible Card Game

Collectible cards based on the Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z, and Dragon Ball GT series have been released by Bandai. These cards feature various scenes from the manga and anime stills, plus exclusive artwork from all three series. Bandai released the first set in the United States in July 2008.[82]

 

Reception

Manga

Dragon Ball is one of the most popular manga series of all time, and it continues to enjoy high readership today. By 2000, more than 126 million copies of its tankōbon volumes had been sold in Japan alone.[83] By 2012, this number had grown to pass 156 million in Japan and 230 million worldwide, making it the second best-selling Weekly Shōnen Jump manga of all time.[84][85] Dragon Ball is credited as one of the main reasons for the period when manga circulation was at its highest in the mid-1980s and mid-1990s.[86][87] For the 10th anniversary of the Japan Media Arts Festival in 2006, Japanese fans voted Dragon Ball the third greatest manga of all time.[88]

 

In a survey conducted by Oricon in 2007 among 1,000 people, Son Goku, the main character of the franchise, ranked first place as the "Strongest Manga Character of All Time."[89] Goku's journey and his ever growing strength resulted in the character winning "the admiration of young boys everywhere".[1] Manga artists, such as One Piece creator Eiichiro Oda and Naruto creator Masashi Kishimoto, have stated that Goku inspired their series' main protagonists as well as series structure.[90][91]

 

Manga critic Jason Thompson stated in 2011 that "Dragon Ball is by far the most influential shonen manga of the last 30 years, and today, almost every Shonen Jump artist lists it as one of their favorites and lifts from it in various ways."[92] He says the series "turns from a gag/adventure manga to an nearly-pure fighting manga",[92] and its basic formula of "lots of martial arts, lots of training sequences, a few jokes" became the model for other shōnen series, such as Naruto.[93] Thompson also called Toriyama's art influential and cited it as a reason for the series' popularity.[92] James S. Yadao, author of The Rough Guide to Manga, claims that the first several chapters of Dragon Ball "play out much like Saiyuki with Dr. Slump-like humour built in" and that Dr. Slump, Toriyama's previous manga, has a clear early influence on the series.[94] He feels the series "established its unique identity" after the first occasion when Goku's group disbands and he trains under Kame-sen'nin, when the story develops "a far more action-packed, sinister tone" with "wilder" battles with aerial and spiritual elements and an increased death count, while humor still makes an occasional appearance.[94] Yadao claims that an art shift occurs when the characters "lose the rounded, innocent look that he established in Dr. Slump and gain sharper angles that leap off the page with their energy and intensity."[95]

 

Animerica felt the series had "worldwide appeal", using dramatic pacing and over-the-top martial arts action to "maintain tension levels and keep a crippler crossface hold on the audience's attention spans".[96] In Little Boy: The Art of Japan's Exploding Subculture, Takashi Murakami commented that Dragon Ball's "never-ending cyclical narrative moves forward plausibly, seamlessly, and with great finesse."[83] Ridwan Khan from Animefringe.com commented that the manga had a "chubby" art style, but as the series continued the characters got more refined, leaner, and more muscular. Khan prefers the manga over the slow pacing of the anime counterparts.[97] Allen Divers of Anime News Network praised the story and humor of the manga as being very good at conveying all of the characters' personalities. Divers also called Viz's translation one of the best of all the English editions of the series due to its faithfulness to the original Japanese.[98] D. Aviva Rothschild of Rationalmagic.com remarked the first manga volume as "a superior humor title". They praised Goku's innocence and Bulma's insistence as one of the funniest parts of the series.[99]

 

The content of the manga has been controversial in United States. In November 1999, Toys "R" Us removed Viz's Dragon Ball from their stores nationwide when a Dallas parent complained the series had "borderline soft porn" after he bought them for his four-year-old son.[100] Commenting on the issue, Susan J. Napier explained it as a difference in culture.[100] After the ban, Viz reluctantly began to censor the series to keep wide distribution.[101] However, in 2001, after releasing three volumes censored, Viz announced Dragon Ball would be uncensored and reprinted due to fan reactions.[101] In October 2009, Wicomico County Public Schools in Maryland banned the Dragon Ball manga from their school district because it "depicts nudity, sexual contact between children and sexual innuendo among adults and children."[100]

 

Anime

The anime adaptations have also been very well-received and are better known in the Western world than the manga, with Anime News Network saying "Few anime series have mainstreamed it the way Dragon Ball Z has. To a certain generation of television consumers its characters are as well known as any in the animated realm, and for many it was the first step into the wilderness of anime fandom."[102] In 2000, satellite TV channel Animax together with Brutus, a men's lifestyle magazine, and Tsutaya, Japan's largest video rental chain, conducted a poll among 200,000 fans on the top anime series, with Dragon Ball coming in fourth.[103] TV Asahi conducted two polls in 2005 on the Top 100 Anime, Dragon Ball came in second in the nationwide survey conducted with multiple age-groups and in third in the online poll.[104][105] On several occasions the Dragon Ball anime has topped Japan's DVD sales.[106][107]

 

Carl Kimlinger of Anime News Network summed up Dragon Ball as "an action-packed tale told with rare humor and something even rarer—a genuine sense of adventure."[108] Both Kimlinger and colleague Theron Martin noted Funimation's reputation for drastic alterations of the script, but praised the dub.[108][109] However, some critics and most fans of the Japanese version have been more critical with Funimation's English dub and script of Dragon Ball Z over the years. Jeffrey Harris IGN criticized the voices including how Freeza's appearance combined with the feminine English voice left fans confused about Freeza's gender.[110] Carlos Ross of T.H.E.M. Anime Reviews considered the series' characters to be different from stereotypical stock characters and noted that they undergo much more development.[111] Despite praising Dragon Ball Z for its cast of characters, they criticized it for having long and repetitive fights.[112]

 

Dragon Ball Z is well-known, and often criticized, for its long, repetitive, dragged-out fights that span several episodes, with Martin commenting "DBZ practically turned drawing out fights into an art form."[113] However, Jason Thompson of io9 explained that this comes from the fact that the anime was being created alongside the manga.[114] Dragon Ball Z was listed as the 78th best animated show in IGN's Top 100 Animated Series,[115] and was also listed as the 50th greatest cartoon in Wizard magazine's Top 100 Greatest Cartoons list.[116]

 

Harris commented that Dragon Ball GT "is downright repellent", mentioning that the material and characters had lost their novelty and fun. He also criticized the GT character designs of Trunks and Vegeta as being goofy.[110] Zac Bertschy of Anime News Network also gave negative comments about GT, mentioning that the fights from the series were "a very simple childish exercise" and that many other anime were superior. The plot of Dragon Ball GT has also been criticized for giving a formula that was already used in its predecessors.[117]

 

The first episode of Dragon Ball Z Kai earned a viewer ratings percentage of 11.3, ahead of One Piece and behind Crayon Shin-chan.[118] Although following episodes had lower ratings, Kai was among the top 10 anime in viewer ratings every week in Japan for most of its run.[119][120]

 

Manga

Main article: Dragon Ball (manga)

 

Dragon Ball debuted in Weekly Shōnen Jump No. 51, 1984.

Written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama, Dragon Ball was serialized in the manga anthology Weekly Shōnen Jump from November 20, 1984 to May 23, 1995, when Toriyama grew exhausted and felt he needed a break from drawing. The 519 individual chapters were published into 42 tankōbon volumes by Shueisha from September 10, 1985 through August 4, 1995.[13][14][15] Between December 4, 2002 and April 2, 2004, the chapters were re-released in a collection of 34 kanzenban volumes, which included a slightly rewritten ending, new covers, and color artwork from its Weekly Shōnen Jump run.[16][17] The February 2013 issue of V Jump, which was released in December 2012, announced that parts of the manga will be fully colored and re-released in 2013.[18] Twenty volumes, beginning from chapter 195 and grouped by story arcs, were released between February 4, 2013 and July 4, 2014.[19][20] Twelve volumes covering the first 194 chapters were published between January 4 and March 4, 2016.[21][22] A sōshūhen edition that aims to recreate the manga as it was originally serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump with color pages, promotional text, and next chapter previews, began being published on May 13, 2016.[23]

 

Spin-offs and crossovers

Toriyama also created a short series, Neko Majin (1999–2005), that became a self-parody of Dragon Ball.[24] In 2006, a crossover between Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo (or Kochikame) and Dragon Ball by Toriyama and Kochikame author Osamu Akimoto appeared in the Super Kochikame (超こち亀 Chō Kochikame) manga.[25] That same year, Toriyama teamed up with Eiichiro Oda to create a crossover chapter of Dragon Ball and One Piece entitled Cross Epoch.[26] The final chapter of Toriyama's 2013 manga series Jaco the Galactic Patrolman revealed that it is set before Dragon Ball, with several characters making appearances.[27] Jaco's collected volumes contain a bonus Dragon Ball chapter depicting Goku's mother.[28]

 

A colored spin-off manga titled Dragon Ball SD written by Naho Ōishi has been published in Shueisha's Saikyō Jump magazine since its debut issue in December 2010.[29] A condensed retelling of Goku's adventures in a super deformed art style, it has been collected into four volumes as of February 2016.[30][31][32][33] Another manga penned by Ōishi, the three-chapter Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock that revolves around Bardock, Goku's father, was published in the monthly magazine V Jump from August and October 2011.[34]

 

Anime series

Dragon Ball

Main articles: Dragon Ball (anime) and List of Dragon Ball episodes

Toei Animation produced an anime television series based on the first 194 manga chapters, also titled Dragon Ball. The series premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on February 26, 1986 and ran until April 12, 1989, lasting 153 episodes.[2]

 

Dragon Ball Z

Main articles: Dragon Ball Z and List of Dragon Ball Z episodes

Instead of continuing the anime as Dragon Ball, Toei Animation decided to carry on with their adaptation under a new name and asked Akira Toriyama to come up with the title. Dragon Ball Z (ドラゴンボールZ(ゼット) Doragon Bōru Zetto?, commonly abbreviated as DBZ) picks up five years after the first series left off and adapts the final 325 chapters of the manga. It premiered in Japan on Fuji Television on April 26, 1989, taking over its predecessor's time slot, and ran for 291 episodes until its conclusion on January 31, 1996.[2]

 

Dragon Ball GT

Main articles: Dragon Ball GT and List of Dragon Ball GT episodes

Dragon Ball GT (ドラゴンボールGT(ジーティー) Doragon Bōru Jī Tī?, G(rand) T(ouring)[35]) premiered on Fuji TV on February 2, 1996 and ran until November 19, 1997 for 64 episodes.[2] Unlike the first two anime series, it is not based on Akira Toriyama's original Dragon Ball manga,[36] being created by Toei Animation as a sequel to the series or as Toriyama called it, a "grand side story of the original Dragon Ball".[35] Toriyama designed the main cast, the spaceship used in the show, the design of three planets, and came up with the title and logo. In addition to this, Toriyama also oversaw production of the series, just as he had for the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime.

 

Dragon Ball Kai

Main articles: Dragon Ball Kai and List of Dragon Ball Z Kai episodes

In February 2009, Toei Animation announced that it would begin broadcasting a revised version of Dragon Ball Z as part of the series' 20th anniversary celebrations. The series premiered on Fuji TV in Japan on April 5, 2009, under the name Dragon Ball Kai (ドラゴンボール改 Doragon Bōru Kai?, lit. "Dragon Ball Revised"), with the episodes remastered for HDTV, featuring updated opening and ending sequences, and a rerecording of the vocal tracks by most of the original cast.[37][38] The footage was also re-edited to more closely follow the manga, resulting in a faster-moving story, and damaged frames removed.[39] As such, it is a new version of Dragon Ball Z created from the original footage. Some shots were also remade from scratch in order to fix cropping and continuity issues.[40] The majority of the international versions, including Funimation Entertainment's English dub, are titled Dragon Ball Z Kai.[41][42]

 

Dragon Ball Super

Main articles: Dragon Ball Super and List of Dragon Ball Super episodes

On April 28, 2015, Toei Animation announced Dragon Ball Super (ドラゴンボール超 Doragon Bōru Sūpā?), the first all-new Dragon Ball television series to be released in 18 years. It debuted on July 5 and will run as a weekly series at 9:00 am on Fuji TV on Sundays.[43] Masako Nozawa reprised her roles as Goku, Gohan, and Goten. Most of the original cast reprise their roles as well.[44][45] Kouichi Yamadera and Masakazu Morita also reprise their roles, as Beerus and Whis, respectively.[45] The story of the anime is set four years after the defeat of Majin Boo, when the Earth has become peaceful once again. Akira Toriyama is credited as the original creator, as well for "original story & character design concepts."[46] It is also being adapted into a companion manga.[47]

 

Films

Anime

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Nineteen animated theatrical films based on the Dragon Ball series have been released in Japan. The first three films are based on the original Dragon Ball anime series. The remaining films include fifteen based on Dragon Ball Z and one tenth anniversary special (also based on the first anime series). The first five films were shown at the Toei Manga Festival (東映まんがまつり Tōei Manga Matsuri), while the sixth through seventeenth films were shown at the Toei Anime Fair (東映アニメフェア Toei Anime Fea). They were mostly alternate re-tellings of certain story arcs involving new characters or extra side-stories that do not correlate with the same continuity as the series. Since these movies were originally shown as back-to-back presentations alongside other Toei film productions, they were usually below feature length (around 45-60 minutes each), making them only slightly longer than an episode of the TV series (the sole exception being 1996's The Path to Power, which has a running time of 80 minutes). The newest films, Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods (2013) and Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection 'F' (2015), were produced as full-length feature films and were given stand-alone theatrical releases in Japan; these being the first movies to have original creator Akira Toriyama deeply involved in their production.[48][49]

 

Live-action

An unofficial live-action Mandarin Chinese film adaptation of the series, Dragon Ball: The Magic Begins, was released in Taiwan in 1989.[2] In December 1990, the unofficial live-action Korean film Dragon Ball: Ssawora Son Goku, Igyeora Son Goku was released. 20th Century Fox acquired feature film rights to the Dragon Ball franchise in March 2002 and began production on an American live-action film entitled Dragonball Evolution.[50][51] Directed by James Wong and produced by Stephen Chow, it was released in the United States on April 10, 2009.[51][52]

 

TV Specials and other animations

See also: List of Dragon Ball films

Three television specials based on the series were aired on Fuji TV in Japan. The first, The One True Final Battle ~The Z Warrior Who Challenged Freeza -- Son Goku's Father~, renamed Bardock – The Father of Goku by Funimation, was shown on October 17, 1990. The second special, The Hopeless Resistance!! Gohan and Trunks -- The Two Remaining Super Warriors, renamed The History of Trunks by Funimation, is based on a special chapter of the original manga and aired on March 24, 1993. Goku Side Story! The Four Star Ball is a Badge of Courage, renamed A Hero's Legacy by Funimation, aired on March 26, 1997. A two-part hour-long crossover special between Dragon Ball Z, One Piece and Toriko, referred to as Dream 9 Toriko & One Piece & Dragon Ball Z Super Collaboration Special!! aired on April 7, 2013.[53]

 

A two-episode original video animation (OVA) titled Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans was created in 1993 as strategy guides for the Famicom video game of the same name.[54] A remake titled Dragon Ball: Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans was created as a bonus feature for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2, which was released on November 11, 2010.[55]

 

The short film Dragon Ball: Yo! Son Goku and His Friends Return!! was created for the Jump Super Anime Tour,[56] which celebrated Weekly Shōnen Jump's 40th anniversary, and debuted on November 24, 2008. A short animated adaptation of Naho Ōishi's Bardock spinoff manga, Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock, was shown on December 17–18, 2011 at the Jump Festa 2012 event.[57]

 

Theme Park Attraction

"Dragon Ball Z: The Real 4D" debuted at Universal Studios Japan during Summer 2016. It features a battle between Goku and Freeza. Unlike most Dragon Ball animation, the ride is animated with CGI.

 

Video games

See also: List of Dragon Ball video games

 

A Dragon Ball Z arcade conversion kit that includes the PCB, instructions and operator's manual.

The Dragon Ball franchise has spawned multiple video games across various genres and platforms. Earlier games of the series included a system of card battling and were released for the Famicom following the storyline of the series.[58] Starting with the Super Famicom and Mega Drive, most of the games were from the fighting genre or RPG (Role Playing Game), such as the Super Butoden series.[59] The first Dragon Ball game to be released in the United States was Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout for the PlayStation in 1997.[60] For the PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable games the characters were redone in 3D cel-shaded graphics. These games included the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai series and the Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi series.[61][62] Dragon Ball Z: Burst Limit was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[63] Dragon Ball Xenoverse was the first game of the franchise developed for the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.[64][65] A massively multiplayer online role-playing game called Dragon Ball Online was available in Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan until the servers were shut down in 2013.[66]

 

Soundtracks

See also: List of Dragon Ball soundtracks

Myriad soundtracks were released in the anime, movies and the games. The music for the first two anime Dragon Ball and Z and its films was composed by Shunsuke Kikuchi, while the music from GT was composed by Akihito Tokunaga and the music from Kai was composed by Kenji Yamamoto and Norihito Sumitomo. For the first anime, the soundtracks released were Dragon Ball: Music Collection in 1985 and Dragon Ball: Complete Song Collection in 1991, although they were reissued in 2007 and 2003, respectively.[67] For the second anime, the soundtrack series released were Dragon Ball Z Hit Song Collection Series. It was produced and released by Columbia Records of Japan from July 21, 1989 to March 20, 1996 the show's entire lifespan. On September 20, 2006 Columbia re-released the Hit Song Collection on their Animex 1300 series.[68][69] Other CDs released are compilations, video games and films soundtracks as well as music from the English versions.[70]

 

Companion books

 

Cover of Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations

There have been numerous companion books to the Dragon Ball franchise. Chief among these are the Daizenshuu (大全集?) series, comprising seven hardback main volumes and three supplemental softcover volumes, covering the manga and the first two anime series and their theatrical films. The first of these, Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations (Daizenshuu volume 1), first published in Japan in 1995, is the only one that was released in English, being printed in 2008 by Viz Media.[71] It contains all 264 colored illustrations Akira Toriyama drew for the Weekly Shōnen Jump magazines' covers, bonus giveaways and specials, and all the covers for the 42 tankōbon. It also includes an interview with Toriyama on his work process. The remainder have never been released in English, and all are now out of print in Japan. From February 4 to May 9, 2013, condensed versions of the Daizenshuu with some updated information were released as the four-volume Chōzenshū (超全集?) series.[18] For Dragon Ball GT, the Dragon Ball GT Perfect Files were released in May and December 1997 by Shueisha's Jump Comics Selection imprint. They include series information, illustration galleries, behind-the-scenes information, and more. They were out of print for many years, but were re-released in April 2006 (accompanying the Japanese DVD release of Dragon Ball GT) and this edition is still in print.[72][73]

 

Coinciding with the 34-volume kanzenban re-release of the manga, and the release of the entire series on DVD for the first time in Japan, four new guidebooks were released in 2003 and 2004. Dragon Ball Landmark and Dragon Ball Forever cover the manga, using volume numbers for story points that reference the kanzenban release,[74][75] while Dragon Ball: Tenkaichi Densetsu (ドラゴンボール 天下一伝説?) and Dragon Ball Z: Son Goku Densetsu (ドラゴンボールZ 孫悟空伝説?) cover the Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball Z anime, respectively.[76][77] Much of the material in these books is reused from the earlier Daizenshuu volumes, but they include new textual material including substantial interviews with the creator, cast and production staff of the series. Son Goku Densetsu in particular showcases previously-unpublished design sketches of Goku's father Bardock, drawn by character designer Katsuyoshi Nakatsuru prior to creator Akira Toriyama's revisions that resulted in the final version.

 

Following the release of Dragon Ball Kai in Japan, four new guidebooks were released: the two-volume Dragon Ball: Super Exciting Guide (ドラゴンボール 超エキサイティングガイド?) in 2009, covering the manga,[78][79] and two-volume Dragon Ball: Extreme Battle Collection (ドラゴンボール 極限バトルコレクション?) in 2010, covering the anime series.[80][81] Despite the TV series airing during this time being Kai, the Extreme Battle Collection books reference the earlier Z series in content and episode numbers. These books also include new question-and-answer sessions with Akira Toriyama, revealing a few new details about the world and characters of the series. 2010 also saw the release of a new artbook, Dragon Ball: Anime Illustrations Guide - The Golden Warrior (ドラゴンボール アニメイラスト集 「黄金の戦士」?); a sort of anime-counterpart to the manga-oriented Complete Illustrations, it showcases anime-original illustrations and includes interviews with the three principal character designers for the anime. Each of the Japanese "Dragon Box" DVD releases of the series and movies, which were released from 2003 to 2006, as well as the Blu-ray boxed sets of Dragon Ball Kai, released 2009 to 2011, come with a Dragon Book guide that contains details about the content therein. Each also contains a new interview with a member of the cast or staff of the series. These books have been reproduced textually for Funimation's release of the Dragon Ball Z Dragon Box sets from 2009 to 2011.

 

Collectible cards

See also: Dragon Ball Collectible Card Game

Collectible cards based on the Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z, and Dragon Ball GT series have been released by Bandai. These cards feature various scenes from the manga and anime stills, plus exclusive artwork from all three series. Bandai released the first set in the United States in July 2008.[82]

 

Reception

Manga

Dragon Ball is one of the most popular manga series of all time, and it continues to enjoy high readership today. By 2000, more than 126 million copies of its tankōbon volumes had been sold in Japan alone.[83] By 2012, this number had grown to pass 156 million in Japan and 230 million worldwide, making it the second best-selling Weekly Shōnen Jump manga of all time.[84][85] Dragon Ball is credited as one of the main reasons for the period when manga circulation was at its highest in the mid-1980s and mid-1990s.[86][87] For the 10th anniversary of the Japan Media Arts Festival in 2006, Japanese fans voted Dragon Ball the third greatest manga of all time.[88]

 

In a survey conducted by Oricon in 2007 among 1,000 people, Son Goku, the main character of the franchise, ranked first place as the "Strongest Manga Character of All Time."[89] Goku's journey and his ever growing strength resulted in the character winning "the admiration of young boys everywhere".[1] Manga artists, such as One Piece creator Eiichiro Oda and Naruto creator Masashi Kishimoto, have stated that Goku inspired their series' main protagonists as well as series structure.[90][91]

 

Manga critic Jason Thompson stated in 2011 that "Dragon Ball is by far the most influential shonen manga of the last 30 years, and today, almost every Shonen Jump artist lists it as one of their favorites and lifts from it in various ways."[92] He says the series "turns from a gag/adventure manga to an nearly-pure fighting manga",[92] and its basic formula of "lots of martial arts, lots of training sequences, a few jokes" became the model for other shōnen series, such as Naruto.[93] Thompson also called Toriyama's art influential and cited it as a reason for the series' popularity.[92] James S. Yadao, author of The Rough Guide to Manga, claims that the first several chapters of Dragon Ball "play out much like Saiyuki with Dr. Slump-like humour built in" and that Dr. Slump, Toriyama's previous manga, has a clear early influence on the series.[94] He feels the series "established its unique identity" after the first occasion when Goku's group disbands and he trains under Kame-sen'nin, when the story develops "a far more action-packed, sinister tone" with "wilder" battles with aerial and spiritual elements and an increased death count, while humor still makes an occasional appearance.[94] Yadao claims that an art shift occurs when the characters "lose the rounded, innocent look that he established in Dr. Slump and gain sharper angles that leap off the page with their energy and intensity."[95]

 

Animerica felt the series had "worldwide appeal", using dramatic pacing and over-the-top martial arts action to "maintain tension levels and keep a crippler crossface hold on the audience's attention spans".[96] In Little Boy: The Art of Japan's Exploding Subculture, Takashi Murakami commented that Dragon Ball's "never-ending cyclical narrative moves forward plausibly, seamlessly, and with great finesse."[83] Ridwan Khan from Animefringe.com commented that the manga had a "chubby" art style, but as the series continued the characters got more refined, leaner, and more muscular. Khan prefers the manga over the slow pacing of the anime counterparts.[97] Allen Divers of Anime News Network praised the story and humor of the manga as being very good at conveying all of the characters' personalities. Divers also called Viz's translation one of the best of all the English editions of the series due to its faithfulness to the original Japanese.[98] D. Aviva Rothschild of Rationalmagic.com remarked the first manga volume as "a superior humor title". They praised Goku's innocence and Bulma's insistence as one of the funniest parts of the series.[99]

 

The content of the manga has been controversial in United States. In November 1999, Toys "R" Us removed Viz's Dragon Ball from their stores nationwide when a Dallas parent complained the series had "borderline soft porn" after he bought them for his four-year-old son.[100] Commenting on the issue, Susan J. Napier explained it as a difference in culture.[100] After the ban, Viz reluctantly began to censor the series to keep wide distribution.[101] However, in 2001, after releasing three volumes censored, Viz announced Dragon Ball would be uncensored and reprinted due to fan reactions.[101] In October 2009, Wicomico County Public Schools in Maryland banned the Dragon Ball manga from their school district because it "depicts nudity, sexual contact between children and sexual innuendo among adults and children."[100]

 

Anime

The anime adaptations have also been very well-received and are better known in the Western world than the manga, with Anime News Network saying "Few anime series have mainstreamed it the way Dragon Ball Z has. To a certain generation of television consumers its characters are as well known as any in the animated realm, and for many it was the first step into the wilderness of anime fandom."[102] In 2000, satellite TV channel Animax together with Brutus, a men's lifestyle magazine, and Tsutaya, Japan's largest video rental chain, conducted a poll among 200,000 fans on the top anime series, with Dragon Ball coming in fourth.[103] TV Asahi conducted two polls in 2005 on the Top 100 Anime, Dragon Ball came in second in the nationwide survey conducted with multiple age-groups and in third in the online poll.[104][105] On several occasions the Dragon Ball anime has topped Japan's DVD sales.[106][107]

 

Carl Kimlinger of Anime News Network summed up Dragon Ball as "an action-packed tale told with rare humor and something even rarer—a genuine sense of adventure."[108] Both Kimlinger and colleague Theron Martin noted Funimation's reputation for drastic alterations of the script, but praised the dub.[108][109] However, some critics and most fans of the Japanese version have been more critical with Funimation's English dub and script of Dragon Ball Z over the years. Jeffrey Harris IGN criticized the voices including how Freeza's appearance combined with the feminine English voice left fans confused about Freeza's gender.[110] Carlos Ross of T.H.E.M. Anime Reviews considered the series' characters to be different from stereotypical stock characters and noted that they undergo much more development.[111] Despite praising Dragon Ball Z for its cast of characters, they criticized it for having long and repetitive fights.[112]

 

Dragon Ball Z is well-known, and often criticized, for its long, repetitive, dragged-out fights that span several episodes, with Martin commenting "DBZ practically turned drawing out fights into an art form."[113] However, Jason Thompson of io9 explained that this comes from the fact that the anime was being created alongside the manga.[114] Dragon Ball Z was listed as the 78th best animated show in IGN's Top 100 Animated Series,[115] and was also listed as the 50th greatest cartoon in Wizard magazine's Top 100 Greatest Cartoons list.[116]

 

Harris commented that Dragon Ball GT "is downright repellent", mentioning that the material and characters had lost their novelty and fun. He also criticized the GT character designs of Trunks and Vegeta as being goofy.[110] Zac Bertschy of Anime News Network also gave negative comments about GT, mentioning that the fights from the series were "a very simple childish exercise" and that many other anime were superior. The plot of Dragon Ball GT has also been criticized for giving a formula that was already used in its predecessors.[117]

 

The first episode of Dragon Ball Z Kai earned a viewer ratings percentage of 11.3, ahead of One Piece and behind Crayon Shin-chan.[118] Although following episodes had lower ratings, Kai was among the top 10 anime in viewer ratings every week in Japan for most of its run.[119][120]

 

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Goku SS4

Deus Goku

Gohan criança

Gohan jovem (1/2)

Gohan adulto (Normal/Ultimate)

Kuririn

Piccolo

Yamcha

Tenshinhan

Vegeta (Normal/1/2)

Trunks criança (Normal/1)

Trunks do Futuro (Normal/1)

Goten (Normal/1)

Mr. Satan

Grande Saiyaman

Grande Saiyaman 2 (Videl)

Gotenks (Normal/1/3)

Vegito (Normal/Super)

Gogeta SS4

Raditz

Nappa

Saibaiman

Freeza (1ª forma)

Freeza (Forma Final)

Freeza (Forma Final 100%)

Capitão Ginyu

Rekum

Guldo

Jeice

Burter

Apur

Raspberry

Cell (Perfeito)

Cell (Perfeito 100%)

Cell Jr.

Androide #17

Androide #18

Majin Boo (gordo)

Super Boo

Kid Boo

Bills - Deus da Destruição

Whis

Bardock

Super Li Shenlong

Super Androide #17

Jaco (protagonista do mangá Jaco: The Galactic Patrolman, situado no mesmo universo da série Dragon Ball)

Vegeta SS4

Goku criança (Dragon Ball GT)

Trunks (Dragon Ball GT - Normal/1)

Pan

Dragon Ball: Xenoverse já saiu no Japão e está previsto para lançamento no Ocidente na última semana de fevereiro, para os consoles PC, PS4, Xbox One, PS3 e Xbox 360.

Saga dos Saiyajins (Raditz)

Saga dos Saiyajins 2 (Vegeta e Nappa)

Planeta Namekusei (Forças Especiais Ginyu)

Freeza

Cell (não sabemos o motivo de ela aparecer antes dos androides)

Saga dos Androides

Majin Boo

Filme “Dragon Ball Z: A Batalha dos Deuses” (Bills)

Demigra (novo vilão exclusivo do jogo)

Apesar de contar com personagens da série GT, o jogo não cobrirá essa parte da história. Após terminar as nove sagas, você poderá adquirir o Crystal of Time para conseguir algum bônus que ainda não foi revelado. Para completar a joia (que está dividida em cinco pedaços), será necessário realizar as seguintes missões:

Complete a Quest 3 na Saga de Demigra

Fale com Recon na “Time Square”

Consiga “Perfect” na Parallel Quest 49 “The Saiyans Rebellion”

Derrote Goku na Parallel Quest 14 “The Legendary Super Saiyan” ou Ginyu (possuindo o corpo de Goku) na Parallel Quest 18 “Ginyu Corps Return”

Consiga “Perfect” na Parallel Quest 2 “Get Ready for the Saiyan Invasion” ou derrote Super Saiyan Goku na Parallel Quest 21 “Let the Cell Games Begin!”

Assassination Classroom

Bakuman

Beelzebub

Bouken Oh Beet (ou Beet the Vandel Buster)

Bleach

Bobobo-bo Bo-bobo

Busou Renkin

Captain Tsubasa

City Hunter

Cowa!

Death Note

Den'ei Shōjo (Video Girl Ai)

Digimon Xros Wars

Dragon Drive

Dr. Slump

D.Gray-man

Dragon Ball

Dragon Quest : Dai no Daibouken

DNA²

Elfen Lied

Enigma

Gintama

GUNNM (a.k.a. Battle Angel Alita)

Hikaru no Go

Hokuto no Ken (ou Fist of the North Star)

Hōshin Engi (Soul Hunter)

Hunter × Hunter

Ichigo 100%

I"s

JoJo's Bizarre Adventure

Katekyo Hitman Reborn (Reborn!)

Kinnikuman

Tatakae!! Ramenman

Kinnikuman: Nisei (ou Músculo Total)

Kochira Katsushika-ku Kameari Kōen-mae Hashutsujo (ou Kochikame)

Kuni ga Moeru

Kuroko no Basket

Legendz

Level E

Liar Game

Meiryo-tei Goto Seijuro

Nana

Naruto

One Piece

Onmyou Taisenki

Tennis no Ouji-Sama (ou Prince of Tennis)

Read or Die

Versailles no Bara (ou A Rosa de Versailles)

Rurouni Kenshin (ou Samurai X)

Saint Seiya (ou Cavaleiros do Zodíaco)

Slam Dunk

Shaman King

Tokyo Ghoul

Tenjho Tenge

Yu-Gi-Oh!

Yu-Gi-Oh! GX

Yu-Gi-Oh! R

Yu Yu Hakusho

Whistle!

World Trigger

Zombiepowder

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Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball SD Manga Spinoff to Be Printed in December". Anime News Network. November 18, 2010. Retrieved June 2, 2008.

Jump up ^ "ドラゴンボールSD 1" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Retrieved November 25, 2014.

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^ Jump up to: a b Akira Toriyama message in the Dragon Book included with the Dragon Ball GT Dragon Box DVD set.

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Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball Z to Rerun on Japanese TV in HD in April". Anime News Network. February 6, 2009. Retrieved February 21, 2009.

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Jump up ^ "「ドラゴンボールZ」放送開始20周年記念! HDリマスター坂で テレビアニメが堂々復活!! 孫悟空伝説再び!! その名も... DRAGON BALL KAI". V Jump (in Japanese). Japan: Shueisha: 10. February 9, 2009.

Jump up ^ Paschal, Jacob T. (May 19, 2010). "What is Dragon Ball Kai? Part I: The History Of Kai". toonzone.com. Retrieved April 28, 2015.

Jump up ^ "Navarre Reveals Funimation's Dragon Ball Kai License". Anime News Network. February 2, 2010. Retrieved February 2, 2010.

Jump up ^ Heldenfelds, Rich (March 11, 2010). "Nickelodeon Announces Fall Plans". Ohiomm.com. Akron Beach Journal. Retrieved September 5, 2012.[dead link]

Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball Super TV Anime Debuts on July 5". Anime News Network. June 4, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.

Jump up ^ 作品情報 [Credits] (in Japanese). Toei Animation. Retrieved August 17, 2015.

^ Jump up to: a b "Dragon Ball Super Main Visual Reveals 2 New Characters". Anime News Network. June 15, 2015. Retrieved June 26, 2015.

Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball Gets 1st New TV Anime in 18 Years in July". Anime News Network. April 28, 2015.

Jump up ^ Osborn, Alex (May 19, 2015). "Dragon Ball Super Getting Companion Manga". IGN. Retrieved May 19, 2015.

Jump up ^ "Akira Toriyama, Toei Make Dragon Ball Z Film Next March". Anime News Network. Retrieved March 22, 2013.

Jump up ^ "1st Key Visual For 2015 Dragon Ball Z Film Reveals Frieza". ANN. Retrieved November 17, 2014.

Jump up ^ Gardner, Chris (March 12, 2002). "Fox draws deal for DragonBall live-action pics". The Hollywood Reporter. 372 (28).

^ Jump up to: a b Tatiana Siegel (November 13, 2007). "Dragonball comes to bigscreen". Variety. Retrieved November 14, 2007.

Jump up ^ "DragonBall Movie". Fox Japan. Archived from the original on June 23, 2008. Retrieved June 18, 2008.

Jump up ^ "Toriko, One Piece, Dragon Ball Z Get Crossover Anime Special". Anime News Network. February 5, 2013. Retrieved February 6, 2013.

Jump up ^ "List of OVA produced by Toei in the 1990s". Archived from the original on April 20, 2008. Retrieved September 27, 2008.

Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball: RB2 Game to Add New 1/2-Hour Anime". Anime News Network. August 9, 2010. Retrieved December 16, 2012.

Jump up ^ "New DB, Tegami Bachi, Romance Dawn Anime DVD Offered". Anime News Network. December 12, 2008. Retrieved December 16, 2012.

Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball Episode of Bardock Spinoff Manga Gets Anime". Anime News Network. November 21, 2011. Retrieved December 16, 2012.

Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball: Daimaou Fukkatsu". GameSpot. Retrieved September 26, 2008.

Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball Z Super Butouden". GameSpot. Archived from the original on December 20, 2008. Retrieved September 26, 2008.

Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout". GameSpot. Retrieved January 10, 2009.

Jump up ^ "DBZ: Budokai to ship early". Anime News Network. November 13, 2002. Retrieved September 26, 2008.

Jump up ^ Mueller, Greg (August 15, 2005). "Dragon Ball Z: Budokai Tenkaichi Hands-On". GameSpot. Retrieved September 26, 2008.

Jump up ^ "Atari Announces the Next Generation Chapter for Dragon Ball Z(R) Video Game Series" (Press release). Atari. January 16, 2008. Retrieved September 24, 2008.

Jump up ^ Te, Zorine (June 11, 2014). "E3 2014: Powering Up Dragon Ball Xenoverse to the Next Generation". GameSpot. Retrieved April 19, 2015.

Jump up ^ Reparaz, Mikel (June 30, 2014). "DBZ Goes Next-Gen With Dragon Ball Xenoverse". IGN. Retrieved April 20, 2015.

Jump up ^ "드래곤볼 온라인 서비스 종료 안내 (End of Dragon Ball Online)". Dragon Ball Online - Net Marble. August 26, 2013. Retrieved September 7, 2013.

Jump up ^ "Dragonball Music Collection". CDJapan.com. Retrieved September 26, 2008.

Jump up ^ "DRAGONBALL Z Hit Kyoku Shu". CDJapan.com. Retrieved September 26, 2008.

Jump up ^ "DRAGONBALL Z Hit Kyoku Shu 18½". CDJapan.com. Retrieved September 26, 2008.

Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball Z Best Song Collection "Legend of Dragonworld"". CDJapan.com. Retrieved September 26, 2008.

Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball: The Complete Illustrations". Viz Media. Retrieved July 20, 2013.

Jump up ^ "復刻版ドラゴンボールGTパーフェクトファイル vol.1 (Dragon Ball GT: Perfect File vol.1)". Shueisha. Retrieved December 22, 2013.

Jump up ^ "復刻版ドラゴンボールGTパーフェクトファイル vol.2 (Dragon Ball GT: Perfect File vol.2)". Shueisha. Retrieved December 22, 2013.

Jump up ^ "Dragonball FOREVER". Shueisha. Retrieved December 22, 2013.

Jump up ^ "Dragonball LANDMARK". Shueisha. Retrieved December 22, 2013.

Jump up ^ "テレビアニメ完全カイド「DRAGONBALL」~天下一伝説~ (Dragon Ball: Tenkaichi Densetsu)". Shueisha. Retrieved September 1, 2013.

Jump up ^ "テレビアニメ完全ガイド Dragonball Z 孫悟空伝説 (Dragon Ball Z: Son Goku Densetsu)". Shueisha. Retrieved September 1, 2013.

Jump up ^ "DRAGON BALL 超エキサイティングガイド ストーリー編 (Dragon Ball: Super Exciting Guide Story)". Shueisha. Retrieved December 22, 2013.

Jump up ^ "DRAGON BALL 超エキサイティングガイド キャラクター編 (Dragon Ball: Super Exciting Guide Character)". Shueisha. Retrieved December 22, 2013.

Jump up ^ "DRAGON BALL 極限バトルコレクション ラウンド01 (Dragon Ball: Extreme Battle Collection: Round 1)". Shueisha. Retrieved December 22, 2013.

Jump up ^ "DRAGON BALL 極限バトルコレクション ラウンド02 (Dragon Ball: Extreme Battle Collection: Round 2)". Shueisha. Retrieved December 22, 2013.

Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball Collectible Card Game - Series #1: The Warriors Return". Bandai. Retrieved September 7, 2013.

^ Jump up to: a b Murakami, Takashi (May 15, 2005). "Earth in My Window". Little Boy: The Art of Japan's Exploding Subculture. Linda Hoaglund (translator). Yale University Press, Japan Society. pp. 105–106. ISBN 0-300-10285-2.

Jump up ^ "Top 10 Shonen Jump Manga by All-Time Volume Sales". Retrieved November 17, 2012.

Jump up ^ "2013's Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods Film Story Outlined". Retrieved December 6, 2012.

Jump up ^ Ibaraki, Masahiko (March 31, 2008). "The Reminiscence of My 25 Years with Shonen Jump". Ohara, T. (trans). ComiPress. Retrieved July 10, 2013.

Jump up ^ "The Rise and Fall of Weekly Shonen Jump: A Look at the Circulation of Weekly Jump". ComiPress. May 8, 2007. Retrieved July 10, 2013.

Jump up ^ "Top 10 Anime and Manga at Japan Media Arts Festival". Anime News Network. October 4, 2006. Retrieved November 17, 2012.

Jump up ^ 1000人が選んだ!漫画史上"最強"キャラクターランキング! (in Japanese). Retrieved October 28, 2007.

Jump up ^ Oda, Eiichiro (2001). One Piece Color Walk 1. Shueisha. ISBN 4-08-859217-4.

Jump up ^ Kishimoto, Masashi (2007). Uzumaki: the Art of Naruto. Viz Media. pp. 138–139. ISBN 1-4215-1407-9.

^ Jump up to: a b c Thompson, Jason (March 10, 2011). "Jason Thompson's House of 1000 Manga - Dragon Ball". Anime News Network. Retrieved July 10, 2013.

Jump up ^ Thompson, Jason (April 8, 2009). "What is Dragon Ball?". Io9. Retrieved December 9, 2009.

^ Jump up to: a b Yadao, James S. The Rough Guide to Manga. Penguin Books, October 1, 2009. p. 116. ISBN 1405384239, 9781405384230. Available on Google Books. "Also in evidence is the influence of Dr. Slump, especially in the early chapters, which play out much like Saiyuki with Dr. Slump-like humour built in."

Jump up ^ Yadao, James S. The Rough Guide to Manga. Penguin Books, October 1, 2009. p. 116-117. ISBN 1405384239, 9781405384230. Available on Google Books.

Jump up ^ "Anime Radar: News". Animerica. San Francisco, California: Viz Media. 9 (2): 36. March 2001. ISSN 1067-0831. OCLC 27130932.

Jump up ^ Khan, Ridwan (July 2003). "Dragon Ball Vol.1 review". Animefringe.com. Archived from the original on December 11, 2008. Retrieved September 27, 2008.

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Jump up ^ "Dragon Ball Volume 1 review". Rationalmagic.com. Retrieved October 3, 2008.

^ Jump up to: a b c "Maryland School Library to Remove Dragon Ball Manga". Anime News Network. October 7, 2009. Retrieved July 10, 2013.

^ Jump up to: a b "Viz explains censorship in Dragonball Manga". Anime News Network. August 22, 2000. Retrieved March 30, 2013.

Jump up ^ "Dragon Box Z Set 2". Anime News Network. March 8, 2010. Retrieved July 10, 2013.

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^ Jump up to: a b Kimlinger, Carl (December 14, 2009). "Dragon Ball DVD Season 2 Uncut Set". Anime News Network. Retrieved July 10, 2013.

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Jump up ^ Thompson, Jason (April 8, 2009). "Isn't Dragon Ball just a bunch of speedlines and ripped dudes with bad hair screaming "It's over 9,000!"". Io9. Retrieved July 10, 2013.

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Jump up ^ "Wizard Magazine's Top 100 cartoons list". Listal. Retrieved April 30, 2011.

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Jump up ^ "Japanese Anime TV Ranking, March 30-April 5". Anime News Network. April 13, 2009. Retrieved April 29, 2009.

Jump up ^ "Japanese Anime TV Ranking, April 6–12". Anime News Network. April 16, 2009. Retrieved April 29, 2009.

Jump up ^ "Japanese Anime TV Ranking, April 13–19". Anime News Network. April 22, 2009. Retrieved April 29, 2009.

External links

iconDragon Ball portal

iconAnime and manga portal

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Dragon Ball.

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Dragon Ball

Official Dragon Ball 30th anniversary website (Japanese)

Dragon Ball (manga) at Anime News Network's encyclopedia

[show] v t e

Dragon Ball by Akira Toriyama

[show] v t e

Dragon Ball films and TV specials

[show] v t e

Dragon Ball video games

[show] v t e

Dragon Ball soundtrack albums and songs

[show] v t e

Akira Toriyama

[show] v t e

Weekly Shōnen Jump: 1980–1989

[show] v t e

Wu Cheng'en's Journey to the West

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