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Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Raleigh, NC - On November 18, NC Vision Zero hosts the third annual World Day of Remembrance (WDR) event at the State Capitol. A memorial display featuring thousands of shoes will be open to the public from 10am-5pm. The press event at 3pm will include remarks from Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey, NCGHSP Director Mark Ezzell, and Tammy Garlock, who lost her son in a distracted driving crash.

The WDR memorial exhibit will display thousands of shoes, each pair representing a victim of traffic crashes on NC roads. Visitors to the exhibit can place yellow paper flowers on shoes to remember lost loved ones and honor their memory.

The annual exhibit is one of several WDR events around the globe, each focused on honoring the lives lost on our world’s roads and spreading awareness about preventable traffic violence.

About World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

The third Sunday of every November, the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims calls attention to the suffering and heartache felt by millions as a result of preventable traffic violence. Hundreds of events honoring the lives lost are hosted all over the world.

About NC Vision Zero

Last year, 1,412 people were killed another 4,500 were seriously injured on North Carolina roads. NC Vision Zero is a collaborative, data-driven program aimed at eliminating these preventable roadway deaths and serious injuries. For more information, visit ncvisionzero.org.

 

NC Vision Zero Task Force Mission & Vision

Background

1,412 people were killed on North Carolina roads in 2017. Year after year, traffic

violence destroys an unacceptable number of lives in North Carolina: North Carolinians

clearly face a public health crisis. People of conscience naturally resent paying such an

unnecessary and unjust price for mobility. Every death from traffic violence is

demonstrably preventable.

Motor vehicle crashes are also financially costly, as one of the leading causes of Years

of Productive Life Lost due to unintentional injury for all age groups below 65 (CDC). In

one year, crash-related deaths cost North Carolina residents $1.71 Billion in medical

costs and work loss costs (CDC).

Resolved that losing even one life to traffic violence is unacceptable, the North Carolina

Executive Committee for Highway Safety (ECHS) passed a resolution adopting a Vision

Zero initiative in May 2015. The NC ECHS concluded that overcoming the challenges

connected with transforming traffic safety culture and drastically reducing serious injury

and death on our roadways would require a sustained collaborative effort. It therefore

established the NC Vision Zero Task Force to facilitate collaboration and lead the zero

tolerance charge for the state.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force consists of public and private-sector stakeholders, as

well as experts in the fields of engineering, law enforcement, education, emergency

response, and public engagement from across North Carolina. Its intent is to assist with

the implementation of North Carolina’s statewide Vision Zero initiative. It provides an

adaptive ecosystem, in which all participating safety initiatives can share information

freely and fluidly.

NC Vision Zero Principles:

1. No loss of life on North Carolina roads is acceptable.

2. All road users deserve safe streets.

3. North Carolinians should not incur risk of death or serious injury in exchange for

mobility.

4. A safe systems approach is required to eliminate fatal and serious injuries.

What is Vision Zero?

Vision Zero is a transportation safety paradigm conceived in Sweden in the late 1990s

to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries by means of systemic interventions.

Through its Vision Zero efforts, Sweden has reduced traffic fatalities by half, making it

one of the safest places to travel in the world. A central tenet of Vision Zero is that

people should not be killed or seriously injured as a consequence of mobility. Vision

Zero recognizes that humans make mistakes and, therefore, that the transportation

system should be designed to minimize the consequences of those errors.

Vision Zero is based on a Safe Systems approach , equally reliant on safer roads,

safer vehicles, and safer road users to achieve zero roadway deaths.

Safer Roads

Roadways should be designed to protect their imperfect, human users by physically

limiting the range of possible dangerous acts those users can perform.

Safer Vehicles

Vehicle technology should be designed to compensate for natural human deficiencies of

attention, perception, reaction speed, etc. to prevent or mitigate crashes.

Safer Road Users

Outreach should be designed to encourage a sense of shared responsibility in all

road-users, motivating them always to make intelligent, courteous, and safe decisions

on the road.

NC Vision Zero Task Force Vision, Mission, and Goals

Vision: To eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries through collaborative,

data-driven interventions.

The purpose of the NC Vision Zero Task Force is to eliminate deaths and serious

injuries on all modes of ground transportation using data-driven prevention strategies

(with emphasis on a safe systems approach) in collaboration with local, regional, and

state partners.

Mission: To supply all safety stakeholders in North Carolina with effective resources,

tools, and information, enabling them to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force mission includes the following goals:

● Serve as a clearinghouse for North Carolina safety data, research, and

resources.

● Provide a bridge for collaboration by facilitating communications between traffic

safety stakeholders across the state.

● Encourage and promote safe systems designs, which prioritize safety over

speed.

● Inspire and encourage, support and amplify local, regional, and statewide Vision

Zero initiatives.

● Facilitate access to information regarding safety initiatives operating and

developing in North Carolina.

● Advocate for processes and outcomes which promote public health equity,

engage with populations disproportionately killed or seriously injured on North

Carolina roads, and protect the most vulnerable road users.

● Serve as conduit for advocates, concerned citizens, and traffic safety

professionals to present research, efforts, and proposed solutions for statewide

consideration and implementation.

● Provide updates and recommendations to ECHS.

● Establish criteria/guidelines/best practices for local Vision Zero initiatives.

● Promote policies and practices to account for the safety of all road users

regardless of mode of transportation, age, ability, race, or income.

● Promote a culture of traffic safety in North Carolina, in which roadway violence is

not tolerated or socially acceptable.

● Provide research, crash data, and stakeholder engagement for proposed

policies.

Long Term Goals

● Cut fatalities and serious injuries in North Carolina in half by 2030, as established

in the North Carolina Highway Safety Plan.

● Improve access, transparency, and public understanding of crash causes and

data.

● Educate and empower North Carolinians to speak up if someone is being unsafe

on the road.

● Engage researchers, practitioners, and invested community members toward

developing a deeper understanding of the contributing factors involved in road

user safety, and investigating ways to effectively implement proven

countermeasures and community-based interventions.

 

Contact: Miracle King, NCDOT Communications Specialist 919-814-3657 miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Raleigh, NC - On November 18, NC Vision Zero hosts the third annual World Day of Remembrance (WDR) event at the State Capitol. A memorial display featuring thousands of shoes will be open to the public from 10am-5pm. The press event at 3pm will include remarks from Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey, NCGHSP Director Mark Ezzell, and Tammy Garlock, who lost her son in a distracted driving crash.

The WDR memorial exhibit will display thousands of shoes, each pair representing a victim of traffic crashes on NC roads. Visitors to the exhibit can place yellow paper flowers on shoes to remember lost loved ones and honor their memory.

The annual exhibit is one of several WDR events around the globe, each focused on honoring the lives lost on our world’s roads and spreading awareness about preventable traffic violence.

About World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

The third Sunday of every November, the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims calls attention to the suffering and heartache felt by millions as a result of preventable traffic violence. Hundreds of events honoring the lives lost are hosted all over the world.

About NC Vision Zero

Last year, 1,412 people were killed another 4,500 were seriously injured on North Carolina roads. NC Vision Zero is a collaborative, data-driven program aimed at eliminating these preventable roadway deaths and serious injuries. For more information, visit ncvisionzero.org.

 

NC Vision Zero Task Force Mission & Vision

Background

1,412 people were killed on North Carolina roads in 2017. Year after year, traffic

violence destroys an unacceptable number of lives in North Carolina: North Carolinians

clearly face a public health crisis. People of conscience naturally resent paying such an

unnecessary and unjust price for mobility. Every death from traffic violence is

demonstrably preventable.

Motor vehicle crashes are also financially costly, as one of the leading causes of Years

of Productive Life Lost due to unintentional injury for all age groups below 65 (CDC). In

one year, crash-related deaths cost North Carolina residents $1.71 Billion in medical

costs and work loss costs (CDC).

Resolved that losing even one life to traffic violence is unacceptable, the North Carolina

Executive Committee for Highway Safety (ECHS) passed a resolution adopting a Vision

Zero initiative in May 2015. The NC ECHS concluded that overcoming the challenges

connected with transforming traffic safety culture and drastically reducing serious injury

and death on our roadways would require a sustained collaborative effort. It therefore

established the NC Vision Zero Task Force to facilitate collaboration and lead the zero

tolerance charge for the state.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force consists of public and private-sector stakeholders, as

well as experts in the fields of engineering, law enforcement, education, emergency

response, and public engagement from across North Carolina. Its intent is to assist with

the implementation of North Carolina’s statewide Vision Zero initiative. It provides an

adaptive ecosystem, in which all participating safety initiatives can share information

freely and fluidly.

NC Vision Zero Principles:

1. No loss of life on North Carolina roads is acceptable.

2. All road users deserve safe streets.

3. North Carolinians should not incur risk of death or serious injury in exchange for

mobility.

4. A safe systems approach is required to eliminate fatal and serious injuries.

What is Vision Zero?

Vision Zero is a transportation safety paradigm conceived in Sweden in the late 1990s

to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries by means of systemic interventions.

Through its Vision Zero efforts, Sweden has reduced traffic fatalities by half, making it

one of the safest places to travel in the world. A central tenet of Vision Zero is that

people should not be killed or seriously injured as a consequence of mobility. Vision

Zero recognizes that humans make mistakes and, therefore, that the transportation

system should be designed to minimize the consequences of those errors.

Vision Zero is based on a Safe Systems approach , equally reliant on safer roads,

safer vehicles, and safer road users to achieve zero roadway deaths.

Safer Roads

Roadways should be designed to protect their imperfect, human users by physically

limiting the range of possible dangerous acts those users can perform.

Safer Vehicles

Vehicle technology should be designed to compensate for natural human deficiencies of

attention, perception, reaction speed, etc. to prevent or mitigate crashes.

Safer Road Users

Outreach should be designed to encourage a sense of shared responsibility in all

road-users, motivating them always to make intelligent, courteous, and safe decisions

on the road.

NC Vision Zero Task Force Vision, Mission, and Goals

Vision: To eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries through collaborative,

data-driven interventions.

The purpose of the NC Vision Zero Task Force is to eliminate deaths and serious

injuries on all modes of ground transportation using data-driven prevention strategies

(with emphasis on a safe systems approach) in collaboration with local, regional, and

state partners.

Mission: To supply all safety stakeholders in North Carolina with effective resources,

tools, and information, enabling them to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force mission includes the following goals:

● Serve as a clearinghouse for North Carolina safety data, research, and

resources.

● Provide a bridge for collaboration by facilitating communications between traffic

safety stakeholders across the state.

● Encourage and promote safe systems designs, which prioritize safety over

speed.

● Inspire and encourage, support and amplify local, regional, and statewide Vision

Zero initiatives.

● Facilitate access to information regarding safety initiatives operating and

developing in North Carolina.

● Advocate for processes and outcomes which promote public health equity,

engage with populations disproportionately killed or seriously injured on North

Carolina roads, and protect the most vulnerable road users.

● Serve as conduit for advocates, concerned citizens, and traffic safety

professionals to present research, efforts, and proposed solutions for statewide

consideration and implementation.

● Provide updates and recommendations to ECHS.

● Establish criteria/guidelines/best practices for local Vision Zero initiatives.

● Promote policies and practices to account for the safety of all road users

regardless of mode of transportation, age, ability, race, or income.

● Promote a culture of traffic safety in North Carolina, in which roadway violence is

not tolerated or socially acceptable.

● Provide research, crash data, and stakeholder engagement for proposed

policies.

Long Term Goals

● Cut fatalities and serious injuries in North Carolina in half by 2030, as established

in the North Carolina Highway Safety Plan.

● Improve access, transparency, and public understanding of crash causes and

data.

● Educate and empower North Carolinians to speak up if someone is being unsafe

on the road.

● Engage researchers, practitioners, and invested community members toward

developing a deeper understanding of the contributing factors involved in road

user safety, and investigating ways to effectively implement proven

countermeasures and community-based interventions.

 

Contact: Miracle King, NCDOT Communications Specialist 919-814-3657 miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Raleigh, NC - On November 18, NC Vision Zero hosts the third annual World Day of Remembrance (WDR) event at the State Capitol. A memorial display featuring thousands of shoes will be open to the public from 10am-5pm. The press event at 3pm will include remarks from Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey, NCGHSP Director Mark Ezzell, and Tammy Garlock, who lost her son in a distracted driving crash.

The WDR memorial exhibit will display thousands of shoes, each pair representing a victim of traffic crashes on NC roads. Visitors to the exhibit can place yellow paper flowers on shoes to remember lost loved ones and honor their memory.

The annual exhibit is one of several WDR events around the globe, each focused on honoring the lives lost on our world’s roads and spreading awareness about preventable traffic violence.

About World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

The third Sunday of every November, the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims calls attention to the suffering and heartache felt by millions as a result of preventable traffic violence. Hundreds of events honoring the lives lost are hosted all over the world.

About NC Vision Zero

Last year, 1,412 people were killed another 4,500 were seriously injured on North Carolina roads. NC Vision Zero is a collaborative, data-driven program aimed at eliminating these preventable roadway deaths and serious injuries. For more information, visit ncvisionzero.org.

 

NC Vision Zero Task Force Mission & Vision

Background

1,412 people were killed on North Carolina roads in 2017. Year after year, traffic

violence destroys an unacceptable number of lives in North Carolina: North Carolinians

clearly face a public health crisis. People of conscience naturally resent paying such an

unnecessary and unjust price for mobility. Every death from traffic violence is

demonstrably preventable.

Motor vehicle crashes are also financially costly, as one of the leading causes of Years

of Productive Life Lost due to unintentional injury for all age groups below 65 (CDC). In

one year, crash-related deaths cost North Carolina residents $1.71 Billion in medical

costs and work loss costs (CDC).

Resolved that losing even one life to traffic violence is unacceptable, the North Carolina

Executive Committee for Highway Safety (ECHS) passed a resolution adopting a Vision

Zero initiative in May 2015. The NC ECHS concluded that overcoming the challenges

connected with transforming traffic safety culture and drastically reducing serious injury

and death on our roadways would require a sustained collaborative effort. It therefore

established the NC Vision Zero Task Force to facilitate collaboration and lead the zero

tolerance charge for the state.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force consists of public and private-sector stakeholders, as

well as experts in the fields of engineering, law enforcement, education, emergency

response, and public engagement from across North Carolina. Its intent is to assist with

the implementation of North Carolina’s statewide Vision Zero initiative. It provides an

adaptive ecosystem, in which all participating safety initiatives can share information

freely and fluidly.

NC Vision Zero Principles:

1. No loss of life on North Carolina roads is acceptable.

2. All road users deserve safe streets.

3. North Carolinians should not incur risk of death or serious injury in exchange for

mobility.

4. A safe systems approach is required to eliminate fatal and serious injuries.

What is Vision Zero?

Vision Zero is a transportation safety paradigm conceived in Sweden in the late 1990s

to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries by means of systemic interventions.

Through its Vision Zero efforts, Sweden has reduced traffic fatalities by half, making it

one of the safest places to travel in the world. A central tenet of Vision Zero is that

people should not be killed or seriously injured as a consequence of mobility. Vision

Zero recognizes that humans make mistakes and, therefore, that the transportation

system should be designed to minimize the consequences of those errors.

Vision Zero is based on a Safe Systems approach , equally reliant on safer roads,

safer vehicles, and safer road users to achieve zero roadway deaths.

Safer Roads

Roadways should be designed to protect their imperfect, human users by physically

limiting the range of possible dangerous acts those users can perform.

Safer Vehicles

Vehicle technology should be designed to compensate for natural human deficiencies of

attention, perception, reaction speed, etc. to prevent or mitigate crashes.

Safer Road Users

Outreach should be designed to encourage a sense of shared responsibility in all

road-users, motivating them always to make intelligent, courteous, and safe decisions

on the road.

NC Vision Zero Task Force Vision, Mission, and Goals

Vision: To eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries through collaborative,

data-driven interventions.

The purpose of the NC Vision Zero Task Force is to eliminate deaths and serious

injuries on all modes of ground transportation using data-driven prevention strategies

(with emphasis on a safe systems approach) in collaboration with local, regional, and

state partners.

Mission: To supply all safety stakeholders in North Carolina with effective resources,

tools, and information, enabling them to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force mission includes the following goals:

● Serve as a clearinghouse for North Carolina safety data, research, and

resources.

● Provide a bridge for collaboration by facilitating communications between traffic

safety stakeholders across the state.

● Encourage and promote safe systems designs, which prioritize safety over

speed.

● Inspire and encourage, support and amplify local, regional, and statewide Vision

Zero initiatives.

● Facilitate access to information regarding safety initiatives operating and

developing in North Carolina.

● Advocate for processes and outcomes which promote public health equity,

engage with populations disproportionately killed or seriously injured on North

Carolina roads, and protect the most vulnerable road users.

● Serve as conduit for advocates, concerned citizens, and traffic safety

professionals to present research, efforts, and proposed solutions for statewide

consideration and implementation.

● Provide updates and recommendations to ECHS.

● Establish criteria/guidelines/best practices for local Vision Zero initiatives.

● Promote policies and practices to account for the safety of all road users

regardless of mode of transportation, age, ability, race, or income.

● Promote a culture of traffic safety in North Carolina, in which roadway violence is

not tolerated or socially acceptable.

● Provide research, crash data, and stakeholder engagement for proposed

policies.

Long Term Goals

● Cut fatalities and serious injuries in North Carolina in half by 2030, as established

in the North Carolina Highway Safety Plan.

● Improve access, transparency, and public understanding of crash causes and

data.

● Educate and empower North Carolinians to speak up if someone is being unsafe

on the road.

● Engage researchers, practitioners, and invested community members toward

developing a deeper understanding of the contributing factors involved in road

user safety, and investigating ways to effectively implement proven

countermeasures and community-based interventions.

 

Contact: Miracle King, NCDOT Communications Specialist 919-814-3657 miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Raleigh, NC - On November 18, NC Vision Zero hosts the third annual World Day of Remembrance (WDR) event at the State Capitol. A memorial display featuring thousands of shoes will be open to the public from 10am-5pm. The press event at 3pm will include remarks from Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey, NCGHSP Director Mark Ezzell, and Tammy Garlock, who lost her son in a distracted driving crash.

The WDR memorial exhibit will display thousands of shoes, each pair representing a victim of traffic crashes on NC roads. Visitors to the exhibit can place yellow paper flowers on shoes to remember lost loved ones and honor their memory.

The annual exhibit is one of several WDR events around the globe, each focused on honoring the lives lost on our world’s roads and spreading awareness about preventable traffic violence.

About World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

The third Sunday of every November, the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims calls attention to the suffering and heartache felt by millions as a result of preventable traffic violence. Hundreds of events honoring the lives lost are hosted all over the world.

About NC Vision Zero

Last year, 1,412 people were killed another 4,500 were seriously injured on North Carolina roads. NC Vision Zero is a collaborative, data-driven program aimed at eliminating these preventable roadway deaths and serious injuries. For more information, visit ncvisionzero.org.

 

NC Vision Zero Task Force Mission & Vision

Background

1,412 people were killed on North Carolina roads in 2017. Year after year, traffic

violence destroys an unacceptable number of lives in North Carolina: North Carolinians

clearly face a public health crisis. People of conscience naturally resent paying such an

unnecessary and unjust price for mobility. Every death from traffic violence is

demonstrably preventable.

Motor vehicle crashes are also financially costly, as one of the leading causes of Years

of Productive Life Lost due to unintentional injury for all age groups below 65 (CDC). In

one year, crash-related deaths cost North Carolina residents $1.71 Billion in medical

costs and work loss costs (CDC).

Resolved that losing even one life to traffic violence is unacceptable, the North Carolina

Executive Committee for Highway Safety (ECHS) passed a resolution adopting a Vision

Zero initiative in May 2015. The NC ECHS concluded that overcoming the challenges

connected with transforming traffic safety culture and drastically reducing serious injury

and death on our roadways would require a sustained collaborative effort. It therefore

established the NC Vision Zero Task Force to facilitate collaboration and lead the zero

tolerance charge for the state.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force consists of public and private-sector stakeholders, as

well as experts in the fields of engineering, law enforcement, education, emergency

response, and public engagement from across North Carolina. Its intent is to assist with

the implementation of North Carolina’s statewide Vision Zero initiative. It provides an

adaptive ecosystem, in which all participating safety initiatives can share information

freely and fluidly.

NC Vision Zero Principles:

1. No loss of life on North Carolina roads is acceptable.

2. All road users deserve safe streets.

3. North Carolinians should not incur risk of death or serious injury in exchange for

mobility.

4. A safe systems approach is required to eliminate fatal and serious injuries.

What is Vision Zero?

Vision Zero is a transportation safety paradigm conceived in Sweden in the late 1990s

to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries by means of systemic interventions.

Through its Vision Zero efforts, Sweden has reduced traffic fatalities by half, making it

one of the safest places to travel in the world. A central tenet of Vision Zero is that

people should not be killed or seriously injured as a consequence of mobility. Vision

Zero recognizes that humans make mistakes and, therefore, that the transportation

system should be designed to minimize the consequences of those errors.

Vision Zero is based on a Safe Systems approach , equally reliant on safer roads,

safer vehicles, and safer road users to achieve zero roadway deaths.

Safer Roads

Roadways should be designed to protect their imperfect, human users by physically

limiting the range of possible dangerous acts those users can perform.

Safer Vehicles

Vehicle technology should be designed to compensate for natural human deficiencies of

attention, perception, reaction speed, etc. to prevent or mitigate crashes.

Safer Road Users

Outreach should be designed to encourage a sense of shared responsibility in all

road-users, motivating them always to make intelligent, courteous, and safe decisions

on the road.

NC Vision Zero Task Force Vision, Mission, and Goals

Vision: To eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries through collaborative,

data-driven interventions.

The purpose of the NC Vision Zero Task Force is to eliminate deaths and serious

injuries on all modes of ground transportation using data-driven prevention strategies

(with emphasis on a safe systems approach) in collaboration with local, regional, and

state partners.

Mission: To supply all safety stakeholders in North Carolina with effective resources,

tools, and information, enabling them to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force mission includes the following goals:

● Serve as a clearinghouse for North Carolina safety data, research, and

resources.

● Provide a bridge for collaboration by facilitating communications between traffic

safety stakeholders across the state.

● Encourage and promote safe systems designs, which prioritize safety over

speed.

● Inspire and encourage, support and amplify local, regional, and statewide Vision

Zero initiatives.

● Facilitate access to information regarding safety initiatives operating and

developing in North Carolina.

● Advocate for processes and outcomes which promote public health equity,

engage with populations disproportionately killed or seriously injured on North

Carolina roads, and protect the most vulnerable road users.

● Serve as conduit for advocates, concerned citizens, and traffic safety

professionals to present research, efforts, and proposed solutions for statewide

consideration and implementation.

● Provide updates and recommendations to ECHS.

● Establish criteria/guidelines/best practices for local Vision Zero initiatives.

● Promote policies and practices to account for the safety of all road users

regardless of mode of transportation, age, ability, race, or income.

● Promote a culture of traffic safety in North Carolina, in which roadway violence is

not tolerated or socially acceptable.

● Provide research, crash data, and stakeholder engagement for proposed

policies.

Long Term Goals

● Cut fatalities and serious injuries in North Carolina in half by 2030, as established

in the North Carolina Highway Safety Plan.

● Improve access, transparency, and public understanding of crash causes and

data.

● Educate and empower North Carolinians to speak up if someone is being unsafe

on the road.

● Engage researchers, practitioners, and invested community members toward

developing a deeper understanding of the contributing factors involved in road

user safety, and investigating ways to effectively implement proven

countermeasures and community-based interventions.

 

Contact: Miracle King, NCDOT Communications Specialist 919-814-3657 miracleking@ncdot.gov

Raleigh, NC - On November 18, NC Vision Zero hosts the third annual World Day of Remembrance (WDR) event at the State Capitol. A memorial display featuring thousands of shoes will be open to the public from 10am-5pm. The press event at 3pm will include remarks from Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey, NCGHSP Director Mark Ezzell, and Tammy Garlock, who lost her son in a distracted driving crash.

The WDR memorial exhibit will display thousands of shoes, each pair representing a victim of traffic crashes on NC roads. Visitors to the exhibit can place yellow paper flowers on shoes to remember lost loved ones and honor their memory.

The annual exhibit is one of several WDR events around the globe, each focused on honoring the lives lost on our world’s roads and spreading awareness about preventable traffic violence.

About World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

The third Sunday of every November, the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims calls attention to the suffering and heartache felt by millions as a result of preventable traffic violence. Hundreds of events honoring the lives lost are hosted all over the world.

About NC Vision Zero

Last year, 1,412 people were killed another 4,500 were seriously injured on North Carolina roads. NC Vision Zero is a collaborative, data-driven program aimed at eliminating these preventable roadway deaths and serious injuries. For more information, visit ncvisionzero.org.

 

NC Vision Zero Task Force Mission & Vision

Background

1,412 people were killed on North Carolina roads in 2017. Year after year, traffic

violence destroys an unacceptable number of lives in North Carolina: North Carolinians

clearly face a public health crisis. People of conscience naturally resent paying such an

unnecessary and unjust price for mobility. Every death from traffic violence is

demonstrably preventable.

Motor vehicle crashes are also financially costly, as one of the leading causes of Years

of Productive Life Lost due to unintentional injury for all age groups below 65 (CDC). In

one year, crash-related deaths cost North Carolina residents $1.71 Billion in medical

costs and work loss costs (CDC).

Resolved that losing even one life to traffic violence is unacceptable, the North Carolina

Executive Committee for Highway Safety (ECHS) passed a resolution adopting a Vision

Zero initiative in May 2015. The NC ECHS concluded that overcoming the challenges

connected with transforming traffic safety culture and drastically reducing serious injury

and death on our roadways would require a sustained collaborative effort. It therefore

established the NC Vision Zero Task Force to facilitate collaboration and lead the zero

tolerance charge for the state.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force consists of public and private-sector stakeholders, as

well as experts in the fields of engineering, law enforcement, education, emergency

response, and public engagement from across North Carolina. Its intent is to assist with

the implementation of North Carolina’s statewide Vision Zero initiative. It provides an

adaptive ecosystem, in which all participating safety initiatives can share information

freely and fluidly.

NC Vision Zero Principles:

1. No loss of life on North Carolina roads is acceptable.

2. All road users deserve safe streets.

3. North Carolinians should not incur risk of death or serious injury in exchange for

mobility.

4. A safe systems approach is required to eliminate fatal and serious injuries.

What is Vision Zero?

Vision Zero is a transportation safety paradigm conceived in Sweden in the late 1990s

to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries by means of systemic interventions.

Through its Vision Zero efforts, Sweden has reduced traffic fatalities by half, making it

one of the safest places to travel in the world. A central tenet of Vision Zero is that

people should not be killed or seriously injured as a consequence of mobility. Vision

Zero recognizes that humans make mistakes and, therefore, that the transportation

system should be designed to minimize the consequences of those errors.

Vision Zero is based on a Safe Systems approach , equally reliant on safer roads,

safer vehicles, and safer road users to achieve zero roadway deaths.

Safer Roads

Roadways should be designed to protect their imperfect, human users by physically

limiting the range of possible dangerous acts those users can perform.

Safer Vehicles

Vehicle technology should be designed to compensate for natural human deficiencies of

attention, perception, reaction speed, etc. to prevent or mitigate crashes.

Safer Road Users

Outreach should be designed to encourage a sense of shared responsibility in all

road-users, motivating them always to make intelligent, courteous, and safe decisions

on the road.

NC Vision Zero Task Force Vision, Mission, and Goals

Vision: To eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries through collaborative,

data-driven interventions.

The purpose of the NC Vision Zero Task Force is to eliminate deaths and serious

injuries on all modes of ground transportation using data-driven prevention strategies

(with emphasis on a safe systems approach) in collaboration with local, regional, and

state partners.

Mission: To supply all safety stakeholders in North Carolina with effective resources,

tools, and information, enabling them to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force mission includes the following goals:

● Serve as a clearinghouse for North Carolina safety data, research, and

resources.

● Provide a bridge for collaboration by facilitating communications between traffic

safety stakeholders across the state.

● Encourage and promote safe systems designs, which prioritize safety over

speed.

● Inspire and encourage, support and amplify local, regional, and statewide Vision

Zero initiatives.

● Facilitate access to information regarding safety initiatives operating and

developing in North Carolina.

● Advocate for processes and outcomes which promote public health equity,

engage with populations disproportionately killed or seriously injured on North

Carolina roads, and protect the most vulnerable road users.

● Serve as conduit for advocates, concerned citizens, and traffic safety

professionals to present research, efforts, and proposed solutions for statewide

consideration and implementation.

● Provide updates and recommendations to ECHS.

● Establish criteria/guidelines/best practices for local Vision Zero initiatives.

● Promote policies and practices to account for the safety of all road users

regardless of mode of transportation, age, ability, race, or income.

● Promote a culture of traffic safety in North Carolina, in which roadway violence is

not tolerated or socially acceptable.

● Provide research, crash data, and stakeholder engagement for proposed

policies.

Long Term Goals

● Cut fatalities and serious injuries in North Carolina in half by 2030, as established

in the North Carolina Highway Safety Plan.

● Improve access, transparency, and public understanding of crash causes and

data.

● Educate and empower North Carolinians to speak up if someone is being unsafe

on the road.

● Engage researchers, practitioners, and invested community members toward

developing a deeper understanding of the contributing factors involved in road

user safety, and investigating ways to effectively implement proven

countermeasures and community-based interventions.

 

Contact: Miracle King, NCDOT Communications Specialist 919-814-3657 miracleking@ncdot.gov

Raleigh, NC - On November 18, NC Vision Zero hosts the third annual World Day of Remembrance (WDR) event at the State Capitol. A memorial display featuring thousands of shoes will be open to the public from 10am-5pm. The press event at 3pm will include remarks from Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey, NCGHSP Director Mark Ezzell, and Tammy Garlock, who lost her son in a distracted driving crash.

The WDR memorial exhibit will display thousands of shoes, each pair representing a victim of traffic crashes on NC roads. Visitors to the exhibit can place yellow paper flowers on shoes to remember lost loved ones and honor their memory.

The annual exhibit is one of several WDR events around the globe, each focused on honoring the lives lost on our world’s roads and spreading awareness about preventable traffic violence.

About World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

The third Sunday of every November, the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims calls attention to the suffering and heartache felt by millions as a result of preventable traffic violence. Hundreds of events honoring the lives lost are hosted all over the world.

About NC Vision Zero

Last year, 1,412 people were killed another 4,500 were seriously injured on North Carolina roads. NC Vision Zero is a collaborative, data-driven program aimed at eliminating these preventable roadway deaths and serious injuries. For more information, visit ncvisionzero.org.

 

NC Vision Zero Task Force Mission & Vision

Background

1,412 people were killed on North Carolina roads in 2017. Year after year, traffic

violence destroys an unacceptable number of lives in North Carolina: North Carolinians

clearly face a public health crisis. People of conscience naturally resent paying such an

unnecessary and unjust price for mobility. Every death from traffic violence is

demonstrably preventable.

Motor vehicle crashes are also financially costly, as one of the leading causes of Years

of Productive Life Lost due to unintentional injury for all age groups below 65 (CDC). In

one year, crash-related deaths cost North Carolina residents $1.71 Billion in medical

costs and work loss costs (CDC).

Resolved that losing even one life to traffic violence is unacceptable, the North Carolina

Executive Committee for Highway Safety (ECHS) passed a resolution adopting a Vision

Zero initiative in May 2015. The NC ECHS concluded that overcoming the challenges

connected with transforming traffic safety culture and drastically reducing serious injury

and death on our roadways would require a sustained collaborative effort. It therefore

established the NC Vision Zero Task Force to facilitate collaboration and lead the zero

tolerance charge for the state.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force consists of public and private-sector stakeholders, as

well as experts in the fields of engineering, law enforcement, education, emergency

response, and public engagement from across North Carolina. Its intent is to assist with

the implementation of North Carolina’s statewide Vision Zero initiative. It provides an

adaptive ecosystem, in which all participating safety initiatives can share information

freely and fluidly.

NC Vision Zero Principles:

1. No loss of life on North Carolina roads is acceptable.

2. All road users deserve safe streets.

3. North Carolinians should not incur risk of death or serious injury in exchange for

mobility.

4. A safe systems approach is required to eliminate fatal and serious injuries.

What is Vision Zero?

Vision Zero is a transportation safety paradigm conceived in Sweden in the late 1990s

to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries by means of systemic interventions.

Through its Vision Zero efforts, Sweden has reduced traffic fatalities by half, making it

one of the safest places to travel in the world. A central tenet of Vision Zero is that

people should not be killed or seriously injured as a consequence of mobility. Vision

Zero recognizes that humans make mistakes and, therefore, that the transportation

system should be designed to minimize the consequences of those errors.

Vision Zero is based on a Safe Systems approach , equally reliant on safer roads,

safer vehicles, and safer road users to achieve zero roadway deaths.

Safer Roads

Roadways should be designed to protect their imperfect, human users by physically

limiting the range of possible dangerous acts those users can perform.

Safer Vehicles

Vehicle technology should be designed to compensate for natural human deficiencies of

attention, perception, reaction speed, etc. to prevent or mitigate crashes.

Safer Road Users

Outreach should be designed to encourage a sense of shared responsibility in all

road-users, motivating them always to make intelligent, courteous, and safe decisions

on the road.

NC Vision Zero Task Force Vision, Mission, and Goals

Vision: To eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries through collaborative,

data-driven interventions.

The purpose of the NC Vision Zero Task Force is to eliminate deaths and serious

injuries on all modes of ground transportation using data-driven prevention strategies

(with emphasis on a safe systems approach) in collaboration with local, regional, and

state partners.

Mission: To supply all safety stakeholders in North Carolina with effective resources,

tools, and information, enabling them to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force mission includes the following goals:

● Serve as a clearinghouse for North Carolina safety data, research, and

resources.

● Provide a bridge for collaboration by facilitating communications between traffic

safety stakeholders across the state.

● Encourage and promote safe systems designs, which prioritize safety over

speed.

● Inspire and encourage, support and amplify local, regional, and statewide Vision

Zero initiatives.

● Facilitate access to information regarding safety initiatives operating and

developing in North Carolina.

● Advocate for processes and outcomes which promote public health equity,

engage with populations disproportionately killed or seriously injured on North

Carolina roads, and protect the most vulnerable road users.

● Serve as conduit for advocates, concerned citizens, and traffic safety

professionals to present research, efforts, and proposed solutions for statewide

consideration and implementation.

● Provide updates and recommendations to ECHS.

● Establish criteria/guidelines/best practices for local Vision Zero initiatives.

● Promote policies and practices to account for the safety of all road users

regardless of mode of transportation, age, ability, race, or income.

● Promote a culture of traffic safety in North Carolina, in which roadway violence is

not tolerated or socially acceptable.

● Provide research, crash data, and stakeholder engagement for proposed

policies.

Long Term Goals

● Cut fatalities and serious injuries in North Carolina in half by 2030, as established

in the North Carolina Highway Safety Plan.

● Improve access, transparency, and public understanding of crash causes and

data.

● Educate and empower North Carolinians to speak up if someone is being unsafe

on the road.

● Engage researchers, practitioners, and invested community members toward

developing a deeper understanding of the contributing factors involved in road

user safety, and investigating ways to effectively implement proven

countermeasures and community-based interventions.

 

Contact: Miracle King, NCDOT Communications Specialist 919-814-3657 miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Raleigh, NC - On November 18, NC Vision Zero hosts the third annual World Day of Remembrance (WDR) event at the State Capitol. A memorial display featuring thousands of shoes will be open to the public from 10am-5pm. The press event at 3pm will include remarks from Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey, NCGHSP Director Mark Ezzell, and Tammy Garlock, who lost her son in a distracted driving crash.

The WDR memorial exhibit will display thousands of shoes, each pair representing a victim of traffic crashes on NC roads. Visitors to the exhibit can place yellow paper flowers on shoes to remember lost loved ones and honor their memory.

The annual exhibit is one of several WDR events around the globe, each focused on honoring the lives lost on our world’s roads and spreading awareness about preventable traffic violence.

About World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

The third Sunday of every November, the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims calls attention to the suffering and heartache felt by millions as a result of preventable traffic violence. Hundreds of events honoring the lives lost are hosted all over the world.

About NC Vision Zero

Last year, 1,412 people were killed another 4,500 were seriously injured on North Carolina roads. NC Vision Zero is a collaborative, data-driven program aimed at eliminating these preventable roadway deaths and serious injuries. For more information, visit ncvisionzero.org.

 

NC Vision Zero Task Force Mission & Vision

Background

1,412 people were killed on North Carolina roads in 2017. Year after year, traffic

violence destroys an unacceptable number of lives in North Carolina: North Carolinians

clearly face a public health crisis. People of conscience naturally resent paying such an

unnecessary and unjust price for mobility. Every death from traffic violence is

demonstrably preventable.

Motor vehicle crashes are also financially costly, as one of the leading causes of Years

of Productive Life Lost due to unintentional injury for all age groups below 65 (CDC). In

one year, crash-related deaths cost North Carolina residents $1.71 Billion in medical

costs and work loss costs (CDC).

Resolved that losing even one life to traffic violence is unacceptable, the North Carolina

Executive Committee for Highway Safety (ECHS) passed a resolution adopting a Vision

Zero initiative in May 2015. The NC ECHS concluded that overcoming the challenges

connected with transforming traffic safety culture and drastically reducing serious injury

and death on our roadways would require a sustained collaborative effort. It therefore

established the NC Vision Zero Task Force to facilitate collaboration and lead the zero

tolerance charge for the state.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force consists of public and private-sector stakeholders, as

well as experts in the fields of engineering, law enforcement, education, emergency

response, and public engagement from across North Carolina. Its intent is to assist with

the implementation of North Carolina’s statewide Vision Zero initiative. It provides an

adaptive ecosystem, in which all participating safety initiatives can share information

freely and fluidly.

NC Vision Zero Principles:

1. No loss of life on North Carolina roads is acceptable.

2. All road users deserve safe streets.

3. North Carolinians should not incur risk of death or serious injury in exchange for

mobility.

4. A safe systems approach is required to eliminate fatal and serious injuries.

What is Vision Zero?

Vision Zero is a transportation safety paradigm conceived in Sweden in the late 1990s

to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries by means of systemic interventions.

Through its Vision Zero efforts, Sweden has reduced traffic fatalities by half, making it

one of the safest places to travel in the world. A central tenet of Vision Zero is that

people should not be killed or seriously injured as a consequence of mobility. Vision

Zero recognizes that humans make mistakes and, therefore, that the transportation

system should be designed to minimize the consequences of those errors.

Vision Zero is based on a Safe Systems approach , equally reliant on safer roads,

safer vehicles, and safer road users to achieve zero roadway deaths.

Safer Roads

Roadways should be designed to protect their imperfect, human users by physically

limiting the range of possible dangerous acts those users can perform.

Safer Vehicles

Vehicle technology should be designed to compensate for natural human deficiencies of

attention, perception, reaction speed, etc. to prevent or mitigate crashes.

Safer Road Users

Outreach should be designed to encourage a sense of shared responsibility in all

road-users, motivating them always to make intelligent, courteous, and safe decisions

on the road.

NC Vision Zero Task Force Vision, Mission, and Goals

Vision: To eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries through collaborative,

data-driven interventions.

The purpose of the NC Vision Zero Task Force is to eliminate deaths and serious

injuries on all modes of ground transportation using data-driven prevention strategies

(with emphasis on a safe systems approach) in collaboration with local, regional, and

state partners.

Mission: To supply all safety stakeholders in North Carolina with effective resources,

tools, and information, enabling them to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force mission includes the following goals:

● Serve as a clearinghouse for North Carolina safety data, research, and

resources.

● Provide a bridge for collaboration by facilitating communications between traffic

safety stakeholders across the state.

● Encourage and promote safe systems designs, which prioritize safety over

speed.

● Inspire and encourage, support and amplify local, regional, and statewide Vision

Zero initiatives.

● Facilitate access to information regarding safety initiatives operating and

developing in North Carolina.

● Advocate for processes and outcomes which promote public health equity,

engage with populations disproportionately killed or seriously injured on North

Carolina roads, and protect the most vulnerable road users.

● Serve as conduit for advocates, concerned citizens, and traffic safety

professionals to present research, efforts, and proposed solutions for statewide

consideration and implementation.

● Provide updates and recommendations to ECHS.

● Establish criteria/guidelines/best practices for local Vision Zero initiatives.

● Promote policies and practices to account for the safety of all road users

regardless of mode of transportation, age, ability, race, or income.

● Promote a culture of traffic safety in North Carolina, in which roadway violence is

not tolerated or socially acceptable.

● Provide research, crash data, and stakeholder engagement for proposed

policies.

Long Term Goals

● Cut fatalities and serious injuries in North Carolina in half by 2030, as established

in the North Carolina Highway Safety Plan.

● Improve access, transparency, and public understanding of crash causes and

data.

● Educate and empower North Carolinians to speak up if someone is being unsafe

on the road.

● Engage researchers, practitioners, and invested community members toward

developing a deeper understanding of the contributing factors involved in road

user safety, and investigating ways to effectively implement proven

countermeasures and community-based interventions.

 

Contact: Miracle King, NCDOT Communications Specialist 919-814-3657 miracleking@ncdot.gov

Raleigh, NC - On November 18, NC Vision Zero hosts the third annual World Day of Remembrance (WDR) event at the State Capitol. A memorial display featuring thousands of shoes will be open to the public from 10am-5pm. The press event at 3pm will include remarks from Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey, NCGHSP Director Mark Ezzell, and Tammy Garlock, who lost her son in a distracted driving crash.

The WDR memorial exhibit will display thousands of shoes, each pair representing a victim of traffic crashes on NC roads. Visitors to the exhibit can place yellow paper flowers on shoes to remember lost loved ones and honor their memory.

The annual exhibit is one of several WDR events around the globe, each focused on honoring the lives lost on our world’s roads and spreading awareness about preventable traffic violence.

About World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

The third Sunday of every November, the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims calls attention to the suffering and heartache felt by millions as a result of preventable traffic violence. Hundreds of events honoring the lives lost are hosted all over the world.

About NC Vision Zero

Last year, 1,412 people were killed another 4,500 were seriously injured on North Carolina roads. NC Vision Zero is a collaborative, data-driven program aimed at eliminating these preventable roadway deaths and serious injuries. For more information, visit ncvisionzero.org.

 

NC Vision Zero Task Force Mission & Vision

Background

1,412 people were killed on North Carolina roads in 2017. Year after year, traffic

violence destroys an unacceptable number of lives in North Carolina: North Carolinians

clearly face a public health crisis. People of conscience naturally resent paying such an

unnecessary and unjust price for mobility. Every death from traffic violence is

demonstrably preventable.

Motor vehicle crashes are also financially costly, as one of the leading causes of Years

of Productive Life Lost due to unintentional injury for all age groups below 65 (CDC). In

one year, crash-related deaths cost North Carolina residents $1.71 Billion in medical

costs and work loss costs (CDC).

Resolved that losing even one life to traffic violence is unacceptable, the North Carolina

Executive Committee for Highway Safety (ECHS) passed a resolution adopting a Vision

Zero initiative in May 2015. The NC ECHS concluded that overcoming the challenges

connected with transforming traffic safety culture and drastically reducing serious injury

and death on our roadways would require a sustained collaborative effort. It therefore

established the NC Vision Zero Task Force to facilitate collaboration and lead the zero

tolerance charge for the state.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force consists of public and private-sector stakeholders, as

well as experts in the fields of engineering, law enforcement, education, emergency

response, and public engagement from across North Carolina. Its intent is to assist with

the implementation of North Carolina’s statewide Vision Zero initiative. It provides an

adaptive ecosystem, in which all participating safety initiatives can share information

freely and fluidly.

NC Vision Zero Principles:

1. No loss of life on North Carolina roads is acceptable.

2. All road users deserve safe streets.

3. North Carolinians should not incur risk of death or serious injury in exchange for

mobility.

4. A safe systems approach is required to eliminate fatal and serious injuries.

What is Vision Zero?

Vision Zero is a transportation safety paradigm conceived in Sweden in the late 1990s

to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries by means of systemic interventions.

Through its Vision Zero efforts, Sweden has reduced traffic fatalities by half, making it

one of the safest places to travel in the world. A central tenet of Vision Zero is that

people should not be killed or seriously injured as a consequence of mobility. Vision

Zero recognizes that humans make mistakes and, therefore, that the transportation

system should be designed to minimize the consequences of those errors.

Vision Zero is based on a Safe Systems approach , equally reliant on safer roads,

safer vehicles, and safer road users to achieve zero roadway deaths.

Safer Roads

Roadways should be designed to protect their imperfect, human users by physically

limiting the range of possible dangerous acts those users can perform.

Safer Vehicles

Vehicle technology should be designed to compensate for natural human deficiencies of

attention, perception, reaction speed, etc. to prevent or mitigate crashes.

Safer Road Users

Outreach should be designed to encourage a sense of shared responsibility in all

road-users, motivating them always to make intelligent, courteous, and safe decisions

on the road.

NC Vision Zero Task Force Vision, Mission, and Goals

Vision: To eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries through collaborative,

data-driven interventions.

The purpose of the NC Vision Zero Task Force is to eliminate deaths and serious

injuries on all modes of ground transportation using data-driven prevention strategies

(with emphasis on a safe systems approach) in collaboration with local, regional, and

state partners.

Mission: To supply all safety stakeholders in North Carolina with effective resources,

tools, and information, enabling them to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force mission includes the following goals:

● Serve as a clearinghouse for North Carolina safety data, research, and

resources.

● Provide a bridge for collaboration by facilitating communications between traffic

safety stakeholders across the state.

● Encourage and promote safe systems designs, which prioritize safety over

speed.

● Inspire and encourage, support and amplify local, regional, and statewide Vision

Zero initiatives.

● Facilitate access to information regarding safety initiatives operating and

developing in North Carolina.

● Advocate for processes and outcomes which promote public health equity,

engage with populations disproportionately killed or seriously injured on North

Carolina roads, and protect the most vulnerable road users.

● Serve as conduit for advocates, concerned citizens, and traffic safety

professionals to present research, efforts, and proposed solutions for statewide

consideration and implementation.

● Provide updates and recommendations to ECHS.

● Establish criteria/guidelines/best practices for local Vision Zero initiatives.

● Promote policies and practices to account for the safety of all road users

regardless of mode of transportation, age, ability, race, or income.

● Promote a culture of traffic safety in North Carolina, in which roadway violence is

not tolerated or socially acceptable.

● Provide research, crash data, and stakeholder engagement for proposed

policies.

Long Term Goals

● Cut fatalities and serious injuries in North Carolina in half by 2030, as established

in the North Carolina Highway Safety Plan.

● Improve access, transparency, and public understanding of crash causes and

data.

● Educate and empower North Carolinians to speak up if someone is being unsafe

on the road.

● Engage researchers, practitioners, and invested community members toward

developing a deeper understanding of the contributing factors involved in road

user safety, and investigating ways to effectively implement proven

countermeasures and community-based interventions.

 

Contact: Miracle King, NCDOT Communications Specialist 919-814-3657 miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Raleigh, NC - On November 18, NC Vision Zero hosts the third annual World Day of Remembrance (WDR) event at the State Capitol. A memorial display featuring thousands of shoes will be open to the public from 10am-5pm. The press event at 3pm will include remarks from Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey, NCGHSP Director Mark Ezzell, and Tammy Garlock, who lost her son in a distracted driving crash.

The WDR memorial exhibit will display thousands of shoes, each pair representing a victim of traffic crashes on NC roads. Visitors to the exhibit can place yellow paper flowers on shoes to remember lost loved ones and honor their memory.

The annual exhibit is one of several WDR events around the globe, each focused on honoring the lives lost on our world’s roads and spreading awareness about preventable traffic violence.

About World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

The third Sunday of every November, the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims calls attention to the suffering and heartache felt by millions as a result of preventable traffic violence. Hundreds of events honoring the lives lost are hosted all over the world.

About NC Vision Zero

Last year, 1,412 people were killed another 4,500 were seriously injured on North Carolina roads. NC Vision Zero is a collaborative, data-driven program aimed at eliminating these preventable roadway deaths and serious injuries. For more information, visit ncvisionzero.org.

 

NC Vision Zero Task Force Mission & Vision

Background

1,412 people were killed on North Carolina roads in 2017. Year after year, traffic

violence destroys an unacceptable number of lives in North Carolina: North Carolinians

clearly face a public health crisis. People of conscience naturally resent paying such an

unnecessary and unjust price for mobility. Every death from traffic violence is

demonstrably preventable.

Motor vehicle crashes are also financially costly, as one of the leading causes of Years

of Productive Life Lost due to unintentional injury for all age groups below 65 (CDC). In

one year, crash-related deaths cost North Carolina residents $1.71 Billion in medical

costs and work loss costs (CDC).

Resolved that losing even one life to traffic violence is unacceptable, the North Carolina

Executive Committee for Highway Safety (ECHS) passed a resolution adopting a Vision

Zero initiative in May 2015. The NC ECHS concluded that overcoming the challenges

connected with transforming traffic safety culture and drastically reducing serious injury

and death on our roadways would require a sustained collaborative effort. It therefore

established the NC Vision Zero Task Force to facilitate collaboration and lead the zero

tolerance charge for the state.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force consists of public and private-sector stakeholders, as

well as experts in the fields of engineering, law enforcement, education, emergency

response, and public engagement from across North Carolina. Its intent is to assist with

the implementation of North Carolina’s statewide Vision Zero initiative. It provides an

adaptive ecosystem, in which all participating safety initiatives can share information

freely and fluidly.

NC Vision Zero Principles:

1. No loss of life on North Carolina roads is acceptable.

2. All road users deserve safe streets.

3. North Carolinians should not incur risk of death or serious injury in exchange for

mobility.

4. A safe systems approach is required to eliminate fatal and serious injuries.

What is Vision Zero?

Vision Zero is a transportation safety paradigm conceived in Sweden in the late 1990s

to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries by means of systemic interventions.

Through its Vision Zero efforts, Sweden has reduced traffic fatalities by half, making it

one of the safest places to travel in the world. A central tenet of Vision Zero is that

people should not be killed or seriously injured as a consequence of mobility. Vision

Zero recognizes that humans make mistakes and, therefore, that the transportation

system should be designed to minimize the consequences of those errors.

Vision Zero is based on a Safe Systems approach , equally reliant on safer roads,

safer vehicles, and safer road users to achieve zero roadway deaths.

Safer Roads

Roadways should be designed to protect their imperfect, human users by physically

limiting the range of possible dangerous acts those users can perform.

Safer Vehicles

Vehicle technology should be designed to compensate for natural human deficiencies of

attention, perception, reaction speed, etc. to prevent or mitigate crashes.

Safer Road Users

Outreach should be designed to encourage a sense of shared responsibility in all

road-users, motivating them always to make intelligent, courteous, and safe decisions

on the road.

NC Vision Zero Task Force Vision, Mission, and Goals

Vision: To eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries through collaborative,

data-driven interventions.

The purpose of the NC Vision Zero Task Force is to eliminate deaths and serious

injuries on all modes of ground transportation using data-driven prevention strategies

(with emphasis on a safe systems approach) in collaboration with local, regional, and

state partners.

Mission: To supply all safety stakeholders in North Carolina with effective resources,

tools, and information, enabling them to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force mission includes the following goals:

● Serve as a clearinghouse for North Carolina safety data, research, and

resources.

● Provide a bridge for collaboration by facilitating communications between traffic

safety stakeholders across the state.

● Encourage and promote safe systems designs, which prioritize safety over

speed.

● Inspire and encourage, support and amplify local, regional, and statewide Vision

Zero initiatives.

● Facilitate access to information regarding safety initiatives operating and

developing in North Carolina.

● Advocate for processes and outcomes which promote public health equity,

engage with populations disproportionately killed or seriously injured on North

Carolina roads, and protect the most vulnerable road users.

● Serve as conduit for advocates, concerned citizens, and traffic safety

professionals to present research, efforts, and proposed solutions for statewide

consideration and implementation.

● Provide updates and recommendations to ECHS.

● Establish criteria/guidelines/best practices for local Vision Zero initiatives.

● Promote policies and practices to account for the safety of all road users

regardless of mode of transportation, age, ability, race, or income.

● Promote a culture of traffic safety in North Carolina, in which roadway violence is

not tolerated or socially acceptable.

● Provide research, crash data, and stakeholder engagement for proposed

policies.

Long Term Goals

● Cut fatalities and serious injuries in North Carolina in half by 2030, as established

in the North Carolina Highway Safety Plan.

● Improve access, transparency, and public understanding of crash causes and

data.

● Educate and empower North Carolinians to speak up if someone is being unsafe

on the road.

● Engage researchers, practitioners, and invested community members toward

developing a deeper understanding of the contributing factors involved in road

user safety, and investigating ways to effectively implement proven

countermeasures and community-based interventions.

 

Contact: Miracle King, NCDOT Communications Specialist 919-814-3657 miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Workers Using Technology to Increase Safety in Work Zones

 

GARNER – New tools are at the disposal of North Carolina Department of Transportation contractors around the state, and they’re not being used to construct roadways, but save the lives of countless workers.

 

“At interstate and freeway project sites our contractors have been given clearance to use new technologies to increase driver awareness in our work zones,” said State Work Zone Engineer Steve Kite.

 

At the Brevard Road Project off N.C. 191 in Asheville, Kite and Governor’s Highway Safety Program Assistant Director Dr. Cheryl Leonard kicked off the annual Work Zone Awareness Week which is underway this week (April 8-12).

 

“This year’s national theme is ‘Drive Like You Work Here’ and we need drivers to understand and respect our work space as they do their own,” Kite continued.

 

“We really need drivers to slow down, don’t drive distracted and use extra caution when behind the wheel,” said Dr. Leonard. “We are highlighting this message by educating drivers about some of the latest technologies we’ve been using over the last several months. We also need drivers to know that raising awareness includes increasing enforcement, which will be taking place throughout the entire week in area work zones.”

 

“Not all work zones are behind concrete barriers, sometimes the only barrier between workers and vehicles traveling at top speeds an hour are barrel cones,’ said NCDOT Division Engineer Mark Gibbs, who manages seven mountain-area regions. “We need drivers to act like they are behind the wheel of a deadly machine, because they can be if they are not following the rules of the road."

 

Recent technologies in place to help address challenges in work zones at all interstate and freeway locations include:

 

Digital Speed Limit Signs - Allow speed limits to be automatically adjusted for site conditions. These encourage motorists to look for the correct speed limit each time they pass through a work zone and to comply with the displayed limit.

Work Zone Presence Lights - Balloon type lights used to give the work zone a large visual footprint. These specifically target drowsy and distracted drivers as well as excessive speeders.

Sequential Flashing Lights - Installed on barrel cone drums forming the merging lane closure, they flash in sequence to alert drivers of a change in conditions as well as point out the direction to merge.

Connected Technologies - Navigational applications for commuters, which give them real time construction information like, OnStar, WAZE, Google Maps, HERE, etc.

“We need to ensure that our NCDOT workers and our contractor crews working to improve our state’s infrastructure are in a safe environment,” said NCDOT Division Engineer Pat Ivey, who manages a five-county construction region of the Triad.

 

One of his Division 9 projects is one of three locations around the state chosen to highlight some of the new technology being used to save workers. “Raising the level of consciousness of drivers is exactly what we need to keep pushing these projects forward and ultimately improve lives across North Carolina,” added Ivey.

 

Work Zone Safety Tips:

 

Plan ahead. Work zones account for an estimated 10 percent of overall congestion and nearly 24 percent of unexpected freeway delays. Expect delays, plan for them, and leave early to reach your destination on time. When you can, avoid work zones altogether by using alternate routes.

Obey road crews and signs. When approaching a work zone, watch for cones, barrels, signs, large vehicles, or workers in bright-colored vests to warn you and direct you where to go.

Slow down. Look for signs indicating the speed limit through the work zone. Keep a safe distance away from the vehicle ahead of you and follow the posted speed limit.

Move over. Most state move-over laws apply when passing work crews and official vehicles parked on the shoulder with flashing warning lights.

Avoid distractions. Keep your eyes on the road and off your phone.

Watch for sudden stoppages. In 2017, 25 percent of fatal work zone crashes involved rear-end collisions.

Watch for large vehicles. Don't make sudden lane changes in front of trucks that are trying to slow down. In 2017, 50 percent of fatal work zone crashes involving large trucks or buses occurred on rural roadways. Between 2013 and 2017, fatal work zone crashes involving large trucks increased by 43 percent.

 

The Work Zone Safety Awareness campaign complements NC Vision Zero initiative, which aims to save lives on North Carolina roadways. The goal is to reach zero traffic-related fatalities through coordinated agency-to-agency efforts that help reduce risky driving behaviors by changing the overall traffic safety culture. No loss of life is acceptable.

 

The Governor’s Highway Safety Program promotes highway safety awareness through grants and safe driving initiatives like: Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Please support these efforts by visiting ghsp.nc.gov and following @NCGHSP on Facebook and @NC_GHSP on Twitter and Instagram today and using these hashtags in social media posts: #WZAW, #Orange4Safety, #NWZAW, #NWZAW2019 , #NCDOT , #NCGHSP.

A nationwide campaign to raise awareness of the ‘Move Over Law’ is underway to coincide with national Peace Officers Memorial Day. Peace Officers Memorial Day pays tribute to local, state, and federal law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty. Many of them have been killed alongside state roads due a violation of the ‘Move Over Law.’

 

The North Carolina ‘Move Over Law’ requires motorists to move over one lane, if possible, or reduce speed for emergency and construction vehicles with flashing lights on the shoulder of the highway.

 

A campaign awareness event was held today at the Highway Patrol station in Johnston County; where collaborating agencies such as the State Highway Patrol, N.C. Department of Transportation's Incident Management Assistance Patrol (IMAP) program and the Governor’s Highway Safety Program, conducted a saturation patrol, citing drivers who did not adhere to the law.

 

“Violating the law could result in a $250 fine and more importantly it could result in the loss of life of any worker alongside the roadway,” said Captain Joseph Cotton NCSHP, Troop C Commander Johnston County.

 

“This isn’t a gotcha campaign, this is a ‘please spare our lives’ campaign,” said NCDOT Engineer Ronnie Keeter, who manages construction workers and contractors across the department’s Division Four, which encompasses Halifax, Nash, Edgecombe, Wilson, Wayne and Johnston Counties.

 

“First responders and roadway workers are placed in dangerous situations all the time, and drivers increase the risk to responders when they zoom by and ignore the flashing lights—and the law,” said Captain Cotton.

 

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, so far in 2019, there have been 14 law enforcement officers killed in traffic-related crashes nationwide.

 

“These tragedies can be avoided through awareness and compliance with the State’s “Move Over” law, which is why we are here today,” said Keeter.

 

“We need the public to change their driving behaviors by simply driving and following the rules of the road,” said Mark Ezzell, director of the Governor’s Highway Safety Program.

 

In conjunction with the campaign all state message boards will display the reminder message: ‘Move Over. It’s The Law.’

 

When you see flashing lights ahead, transportation officials advise motorists do the following:

 

Pay close attention to signs and work zone flaggers;

Move over one lane;

Turn on your headlights so workers and other motorists can see you;

Obey the posted speed limits;

​Avoid changing radio stations and using cell phones; and

Expect the unexpected: Keep an eye out for workers and their equipment.

The safety campaign was organized by the Governor’s Highway Safety Program, which promotes highway safety awareness through grants and safe driving initiatives like: Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Please support these efforts by visiting ghsp.nc.gov and following @NCGHSP on Facebook and @NC_GHSP on Twitter and Instagram today.

 

A nationwide campaign to raise awareness of the ‘Move Over Law’ is underway to coincide with national Peace Officers Memorial Day. Peace Officers Memorial Day pays tribute to local, state, and federal law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty. Many of them have been killed alongside state roads due a violation of the ‘Move Over Law.’

 

The North Carolina ‘Move Over Law’ requires motorists to move over one lane, if possible, or reduce speed for emergency and construction vehicles with flashing lights on the shoulder of the highway.

 

A campaign awareness event was held today at the Highway Patrol station in Johnston County; where collaborating agencies such as the State Highway Patrol, N.C. Department of Transportation's Incident Management Assistance Patrol (IMAP) program and the Governor’s Highway Safety Program, conducted a saturation patrol, citing drivers who did not adhere to the law.

 

“Violating the law could result in a $250 fine and more importantly it could result in the loss of life of any worker alongside the roadway,” said Captain Joseph Cotton NCSHP, Troop C Commander Johnston County.

 

“This isn’t a gotcha campaign, this is a ‘please spare our lives’ campaign,” said NCDOT Engineer Ronnie Keeter, who manages construction workers and contractors across the department’s Division Four, which encompasses Halifax, Nash, Edgecombe, Wilson, Wayne and Johnston Counties.

 

“First responders and roadway workers are placed in dangerous situations all the time, and drivers increase the risk to responders when they zoom by and ignore the flashing lights—and the law,” said Captain Cotton.

 

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, so far in 2019, there have been 14 law enforcement officers killed in traffic-related crashes nationwide.

 

“These tragedies can be avoided through awareness and compliance with the State’s “Move Over” law, which is why we are here today,” said Keeter.

 

“We need the public to change their driving behaviors by simply driving and following the rules of the road,” said Mark Ezzell, director of the Governor’s Highway Safety Program.

 

In conjunction with the campaign all state message boards will display the reminder message: ‘Move Over. It’s The Law.’

 

When you see flashing lights ahead, transportation officials advise motorists do the following:

 

Pay close attention to signs and work zone flaggers;

Move over one lane;

Turn on your headlights so workers and other motorists can see you;

Obey the posted speed limits;

​Avoid changing radio stations and using cell phones; and

Expect the unexpected: Keep an eye out for workers and their equipment.

The safety campaign was organized by the Governor’s Highway Safety Program, which promotes highway safety awareness through grants and safe driving initiatives like: Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Please support these efforts by visiting ghsp.nc.gov and following @NCGHSP on Facebook and @NC_GHSP on Twitter and Instagram today.

 

Law Enforcement: The Speed Limit is The Law

 

GARNER – The statewide ‘Speed A Little. Lose A Lot.’ campaign to raise awareness of the dangers of speeding is underway, which not only means water-cooler and dinner table discussions about the simple truths about speeding, but increased law enforcement and driver checkpoints.

  

“More blue lights, less yellow tape, that’s at the core of our mission,” said Mark Ezzell, director of the North Carolina Governor’s Highway Safety Program, which aims to eliminate preventable deaths on North Carolina roads.

  

“We hope that during this week, through a combination of enforcement, education and empowerment we can all help reach the goal of the Governor’s NC Vision Zero initiative: a coordinated effort to change traffic safety culture and bring North Carolina’s traffic deaths to zero,” Ezzell said.

  

NC GHSP held a kick-off event at Fort Bragg on Friday, April 12, in front of nearly 200 military and civilians. Fort Bragg is not only the largest military base in the country, but sits in a county that has fifth highest rate of speeding in North Carolina.

  

The message was simple: Speed A Little. Lose A Lot.

  

Ezzell told the crowd: “We’re rushing to work, school, to eat, to play. We’re rushing to get there first, and ultimately, we’re rushing to die. The rush is claiming too many lives on North Carolina roadways.”

  

Speed is the number one factor in preventable deaths and the statistics don’t lie.

  

Fast Facts:

  

Speed-related fatalities ranked by county in 2018:

  

Mecklenburg: 38

Wake: 16

Harnett (tied): 15

Cumberland (tied): 15

Forsyth: 11

Overall speed-related fatalities, 2014-2018:

  

2014: 349

2015: 322

2016: 370

2017: 336

2018: 313

Total reportable speed-related crashes, 2014-2018:

  

2014: 19,699

2015: 20,348

2016: 18,982

2017: 17,495

2018: 21,339

Governor’s Highway Safety Program Assistant Director Cheryl Leonard helped kicked off the annual anti-speeding event. “We really need drivers to slow down, they put their lives at risk and the lives of others when they go even a little beyond the posted speed limits,” Leonard said.

  

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging.

  

“Losing a lot doesn’t just mean life or death, people can lose their freedom, employment, respect, money and more,” Leonard added. “It’s just not worth it.”

  

Read here to brush up on guidelines for drivers, motorcyclists and bicyclists safely arrive at their destinations.

  

The Governor’s Highway Safety Program promotes highway safety awareness through grants and safe driving initiatives like: Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

  

Please support these efforts by visiting ghsp.nc.gov and following @NCGHSP on Facebook and @NC_GHSP on Twitter and Instagram today and using these hashtags in social media posts: #WZAW, #Orange4Safety, #NWZAW, #NWZAW2019 , #NCDOT , #NCGHSP.

Law Enforcement: The Speed Limit is The Law

 

GARNER – The statewide ‘Speed A Little. Lose A Lot.’ campaign to raise awareness of the dangers of speeding is underway, which not only means water-cooler and dinner table discussions about the simple truths about speeding, but increased law enforcement and driver checkpoints.

  

“More blue lights, less yellow tape, that’s at the core of our mission,” said Mark Ezzell, director of the North Carolina Governor’s Highway Safety Program, which aims to eliminate preventable deaths on North Carolina roads.

  

“We hope that during this week, through a combination of enforcement, education and empowerment we can all help reach the goal of the Governor’s NC Vision Zero initiative: a coordinated effort to change traffic safety culture and bring North Carolina’s traffic deaths to zero,” Ezzell said.

  

NC GHSP held a kick-off event at Fort Bragg on Friday, April 12, in front of nearly 200 military and civilians. Fort Bragg is not only the largest military base in the country, but sits in a county that has fifth highest rate of speeding in North Carolina.

  

The message was simple: Speed A Little. Lose A Lot.

  

Ezzell told the crowd: “We’re rushing to work, school, to eat, to play. We’re rushing to get there first, and ultimately, we’re rushing to die. The rush is claiming too many lives on North Carolina roadways.”

  

Speed is the number one factor in preventable deaths and the statistics don’t lie.

  

Fast Facts:

  

Speed-related fatalities ranked by county in 2018:

  

Mecklenburg: 38

Wake: 16

Harnett (tied): 15

Cumberland (tied): 15

Forsyth: 11

Overall speed-related fatalities, 2014-2018:

  

2014: 349

2015: 322

2016: 370

2017: 336

2018: 313

Total reportable speed-related crashes, 2014-2018:

  

2014: 19,699

2015: 20,348

2016: 18,982

2017: 17,495

2018: 21,339

Governor’s Highway Safety Program Assistant Director Cheryl Leonard helped kicked off the annual anti-speeding event. “We really need drivers to slow down, they put their lives at risk and the lives of others when they go even a little beyond the posted speed limits,” Leonard said.

  

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging.

  

“Losing a lot doesn’t just mean life or death, people can lose their freedom, employment, respect, money and more,” Leonard added. “It’s just not worth it.”

  

Read here to brush up on guidelines for drivers, motorcyclists and bicyclists safely arrive at their destinations.

  

The Governor’s Highway Safety Program promotes highway safety awareness through grants and safe driving initiatives like: Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

  

Please support these efforts by visiting ghsp.nc.gov and following @NCGHSP on Facebook and @NC_GHSP on Twitter and Instagram today and using these hashtags in social media posts: #WZAW, #Orange4Safety, #NWZAW, #NWZAW2019 , #NCDOT , #NCGHSP.

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Law Enforcement: The Speed Limit is The Law

 

GARNER – The statewide ‘Speed A Little. Lose A Lot.’ campaign to raise awareness of the dangers of speeding is underway, which not only means water-cooler and dinner table discussions about the simple truths about speeding, but increased law enforcement and driver checkpoints.

  

“More blue lights, less yellow tape, that’s at the core of our mission,” said Mark Ezzell, director of the North Carolina Governor’s Highway Safety Program, which aims to eliminate preventable deaths on North Carolina roads.

  

“We hope that during this week, through a combination of enforcement, education and empowerment we can all help reach the goal of the Governor’s NC Vision Zero initiative: a coordinated effort to change traffic safety culture and bring North Carolina’s traffic deaths to zero,” Ezzell said.

  

NC GHSP held a kick-off event at Fort Bragg on Friday, April 12, in front of nearly 200 military and civilians. Fort Bragg is not only the largest military base in the country, but sits in a county that has fifth highest rate of speeding in North Carolina.

  

The message was simple: Speed A Little. Lose A Lot.

  

Ezzell told the crowd: “We’re rushing to work, school, to eat, to play. We’re rushing to get there first, and ultimately, we’re rushing to die. The rush is claiming too many lives on North Carolina roadways.”

  

Speed is the number one factor in preventable deaths and the statistics don’t lie.

  

Fast Facts:

  

Speed-related fatalities ranked by county in 2018:

  

Mecklenburg: 38

Wake: 16

Harnett (tied): 15

Cumberland (tied): 15

Forsyth: 11

Overall speed-related fatalities, 2014-2018:

  

2014: 349

2015: 322

2016: 370

2017: 336

2018: 313

Total reportable speed-related crashes, 2014-2018:

  

2014: 19,699

2015: 20,348

2016: 18,982

2017: 17,495

2018: 21,339

Governor’s Highway Safety Program Assistant Director Cheryl Leonard helped kicked off the annual anti-speeding event. “We really need drivers to slow down, they put their lives at risk and the lives of others when they go even a little beyond the posted speed limits,” Leonard said.

  

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging.

  

“Losing a lot doesn’t just mean life or death, people can lose their freedom, employment, respect, money and more,” Leonard added. “It’s just not worth it.”

  

Read here to brush up on guidelines for drivers, motorcyclists and bicyclists safely arrive at their destinations.

  

The Governor’s Highway Safety Program promotes highway safety awareness through grants and safe driving initiatives like: Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

  

Please support these efforts by visiting ghsp.nc.gov and following @NCGHSP on Facebook and @NC_GHSP on Twitter and Instagram today and using these hashtags in social media posts: #WZAW, #Orange4Safety, #NWZAW, #NWZAW2019 , #NCDOT , #NCGHSP.

Law Enforcement: The Speed Limit is The Law

GARNER – The statewide ‘Speed A Little. Lose A Lot.’ campaign to raise awareness of the dangers of speeding is underway, which not only means water-cooler and dinner table discussions about the simple truths about speeding, but increased law enforcement and driver checkpoints.

  

“More blue lights, less yellow tape, that’s at the core of our mission,” said Mark Ezzell, director of the North Carolina Governor’s Highway Safety Program, which aims to eliminate preventable deaths on North Carolina roads.

  

“We hope that during this week, through a combination of enforcement, education and empowerment we can all help reach the goal of the Governor’s NC Vision Zero initiative: a coordinated effort to change traffic safety culture and bring North Carolina’s traffic deaths to zero,” Ezzell said.

  

NC GHSP held a kick-off event at Fort Bragg on Friday, April 12, in front of nearly 200 military and civilians. Fort Bragg is not only the largest military base in the country, but sits in a county that has fifth highest rate of speeding in North Carolina.

  

The message was simple: Speed A Little. Lose A Lot.

  

Ezzell told the crowd: “We’re rushing to work, school, to eat, to play. We’re rushing to get there first, and ultimately, we’re rushing to die. The rush is claiming too many lives on North Carolina roadways.”

  

Speed is the number one factor in preventable deaths and the statistics don’t lie.

  

Fast Facts:

  

Speed-related fatalities ranked by county in 2018:

  

Mecklenburg: 38

Wake: 16

Harnett (tied): 15

Cumberland (tied): 15

Forsyth: 11

Overall speed-related fatalities, 2014-2018:

  

2014: 349

2015: 322

2016: 370

2017: 336

2018: 313

Total reportable speed-related crashes, 2014-2018:

  

2014: 19,699

2015: 20,348

2016: 18,982

2017: 17,495

2018: 21,339

Governor’s Highway Safety Program Assistant Director Cheryl Leonard helped kicked off the annual anti-speeding event. “We really need drivers to slow down, they put their lives at risk and the lives of others when they go even a little beyond the posted speed limits,” Leonard said.

  

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging.

  

“Losing a lot doesn’t just mean life or death, people can lose their freedom, employment, respect, money and more,” Leonard added. “It’s just not worth it.”

  

Read here to brush up on guidelines for drivers, motorcyclists and bicyclists safely arrive at their destinations.

  

The Governor’s Highway Safety Program promotes highway safety awareness through grants and safe driving initiatives like: Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

  

Please support these efforts by visiting ghsp.nc.gov and following @NCGHSP on Facebook and @NC_GHSP on Twitter and Instagram today and using these hashtags in social media posts: #WZAW, #Orange4Safety, #NWZAW, #NWZAW2019 , #NCDOT , #NCGHSP.

A nationwide campaign to raise awareness of the ‘Move Over Law’ is underway to coincide with national Peace Officers Memorial Day. Peace Officers Memorial Day pays tribute to local, state, and federal law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty. Many of them have been killed alongside state roads due a violation of the ‘Move Over Law.’

 

The North Carolina ‘Move Over Law’ requires motorists to move over one lane, if possible, or reduce speed for emergency and construction vehicles with flashing lights on the shoulder of the highway.

 

A campaign awareness event was held today at the Highway Patrol station in Johnston County; where collaborating agencies such as the State Highway Patrol, N.C. Department of Transportation's Incident Management Assistance Patrol (IMAP) program and the Governor’s Highway Safety Program, conducted a saturation patrol, citing drivers who did not adhere to the law.

 

“Violating the law could result in a $250 fine and more importantly it could result in the loss of life of any worker alongside the roadway,” said Captain Joseph Cotton NCSHP, Troop C Commander Johnston County.

 

“This isn’t a gotcha campaign, this is a ‘please spare our lives’ campaign,” said NCDOT Engineer Ronnie Keeter, who manages construction workers and contractors across the department’s Division Four, which encompasses Halifax, Nash, Edgecombe, Wilson, Wayne and Johnston Counties.

 

“First responders and roadway workers are placed in dangerous situations all the time, and drivers increase the risk to responders when they zoom by and ignore the flashing lights—and the law,” said Captain Cotton.

 

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, so far in 2019, there have been 14 law enforcement officers killed in traffic-related crashes nationwide.

 

“These tragedies can be avoided through awareness and compliance with the State’s “Move Over” law, which is why we are here today,” said Keeter.

 

“We need the public to change their driving behaviors by simply driving and following the rules of the road,” said Mark Ezzell, director of the Governor’s Highway Safety Program.

 

In conjunction with the campaign all state message boards will display the reminder message: ‘Move Over. It’s The Law.’

 

When you see flashing lights ahead, transportation officials advise motorists do the following:

 

Pay close attention to signs and work zone flaggers;

Move over one lane;

Turn on your headlights so workers and other motorists can see you;

Obey the posted speed limits;

​Avoid changing radio stations and using cell phones; and

Expect the unexpected: Keep an eye out for workers and their equipment.

The safety campaign was organized by the Governor’s Highway Safety Program, which promotes highway safety awareness through grants and safe driving initiatives like: Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Please support these efforts by visiting ghsp.nc.gov and following @NCGHSP on Facebook and @NC_GHSP on Twitter and Instagram today.

 

Law Enforcement: The Speed Limit is The Law

  

GARNER – The statewide ‘Speed A Little. Lose A Lot.’ campaign to raise awareness of the dangers of speeding is underway, which not only means water-cooler and dinner table discussions about the simple truths about speeding, but increased law enforcement and driver checkpoints.

  

“More blue lights, less yellow tape, that’s at the core of our mission,” said Mark Ezzell, director of the North Carolina Governor’s Highway Safety Program, which aims to eliminate preventable deaths on North Carolina roads.

  

“We hope that during this week, through a combination of enforcement, education and empowerment we can all help reach the goal of the Governor’s NC Vision Zero initiative: a coordinated effort to change traffic safety culture and bring North Carolina’s traffic deaths to zero,” Ezzell said.

  

NC GHSP held a kick-off event at Fort Bragg on Friday, April 12, in front of nearly 200 military and civilians. Fort Bragg is not only the largest military base in the country, but sits in a county that has fifth highest rate of speeding in North Carolina.

  

The message was simple: Speed A Little. Lose A Lot.

  

Ezzell told the crowd: “We’re rushing to work, school, to eat, to play. We’re rushing to get there first, and ultimately, we’re rushing to die. The rush is claiming too many lives on North Carolina roadways.”

  

Speed is the number one factor in preventable deaths and the statistics don’t lie.

  

Fast Facts:

  

Speed-related fatalities ranked by county in 2018:

  

Mecklenburg: 38

Wake: 16

Harnett (tied): 15

Cumberland (tied): 15

Forsyth: 11

Overall speed-related fatalities, 2014-2018:

  

2014: 349

2015: 322

2016: 370

2017: 336

2018: 313

Total reportable speed-related crashes, 2014-2018:

  

2014: 19,699

2015: 20,348

2016: 18,982

2017: 17,495

2018: 21,339

Governor’s Highway Safety Program Assistant Director Cheryl Leonard helped kicked off the annual anti-speeding event. “We really need drivers to slow down, they put their lives at risk and the lives of others when they go even a little beyond the posted speed limits,” Leonard said.

  

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging.

  

“Losing a lot doesn’t just mean life or death, people can lose their freedom, employment, respect, money and more,” Leonard added. “It’s just not worth it.”

  

Read here to brush up on guidelines for drivers, motorcyclists and bicyclists safely arrive at their destinations.

  

The Governor’s Highway Safety Program promotes highway safety awareness through grants and safe driving initiatives like: Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

  

Please support these efforts by visiting ghsp.nc.gov and following @NCGHSP on Facebook and @NC_GHSP on Twitter and Instagram today and using these hashtags in social media posts: #WZAW, #Orange4Safety, #NWZAW, #NWZAW2019 , #NCDOT , #NCGHSP.

Raleigh, NC - On November 18, NC Vision Zero hosts the third annual World Day of Remembrance (WDR) event at the State Capitol. A memorial display featuring thousands of shoes will be open to the public from 10am-5pm. The press event at 3pm will include remarks from Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey, NCGHSP Director Mark Ezzell, and Tammy Garlock, who lost her son in a distracted driving crash.

The WDR memorial exhibit will display thousands of shoes, each pair representing a victim of traffic crashes on NC roads. Visitors to the exhibit can place yellow paper flowers on shoes to remember lost loved ones and honor their memory.

The annual exhibit is one of several WDR events around the globe, each focused on honoring the lives lost on our world’s roads and spreading awareness about preventable traffic violence.

About World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

The third Sunday of every November, the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims calls attention to the suffering and heartache felt by millions as a result of preventable traffic violence. Hundreds of events honoring the lives lost are hosted all over the world.

About NC Vision Zero

Last year, 1,412 people were killed another 4,500 were seriously injured on North Carolina roads. NC Vision Zero is a collaborative, data-driven program aimed at eliminating these preventable roadway deaths and serious injuries. For more information, visit ncvisionzero.org.

 

NC Vision Zero Task Force Mission & Vision

Background

1,412 people were killed on North Carolina roads in 2017. Year after year, traffic

violence destroys an unacceptable number of lives in North Carolina: North Carolinians

clearly face a public health crisis. People of conscience naturally resent paying such an

unnecessary and unjust price for mobility. Every death from traffic violence is

demonstrably preventable.

Motor vehicle crashes are also financially costly, as one of the leading causes of Years

of Productive Life Lost due to unintentional injury for all age groups below 65 (CDC). In

one year, crash-related deaths cost North Carolina residents $1.71 Billion in medical

costs and work loss costs (CDC).

Resolved that losing even one life to traffic violence is unacceptable, the North Carolina

Executive Committee for Highway Safety (ECHS) passed a resolution adopting a Vision

Zero initiative in May 2015. The NC ECHS concluded that overcoming the challenges

connected with transforming traffic safety culture and drastically reducing serious injury

and death on our roadways would require a sustained collaborative effort. It therefore

established the NC Vision Zero Task Force to facilitate collaboration and lead the zero

tolerance charge for the state.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force consists of public and private-sector stakeholders, as

well as experts in the fields of engineering, law enforcement, education, emergency

response, and public engagement from across North Carolina. Its intent is to assist with

the implementation of North Carolina’s statewide Vision Zero initiative. It provides an

adaptive ecosystem, in which all participating safety initiatives can share information

freely and fluidly.

NC Vision Zero Principles:

1. No loss of life on North Carolina roads is acceptable.

2. All road users deserve safe streets.

3. North Carolinians should not incur risk of death or serious injury in exchange for

mobility.

4. A safe systems approach is required to eliminate fatal and serious injuries.

What is Vision Zero?

Vision Zero is a transportation safety paradigm conceived in Sweden in the late 1990s

to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries by means of systemic interventions.

Through its Vision Zero efforts, Sweden has reduced traffic fatalities by half, making it

one of the safest places to travel in the world. A central tenet of Vision Zero is that

people should not be killed or seriously injured as a consequence of mobility. Vision

Zero recognizes that humans make mistakes and, therefore, that the transportation

system should be designed to minimize the consequences of those errors.

Vision Zero is based on a Safe Systems approach , equally reliant on safer roads,

safer vehicles, and safer road users to achieve zero roadway deaths.

Safer Roads

Roadways should be designed to protect their imperfect, human users by physically

limiting the range of possible dangerous acts those users can perform.

Safer Vehicles

Vehicle technology should be designed to compensate for natural human deficiencies of

attention, perception, reaction speed, etc. to prevent or mitigate crashes.

Safer Road Users

Outreach should be designed to encourage a sense of shared responsibility in all

road-users, motivating them always to make intelligent, courteous, and safe decisions

on the road.

NC Vision Zero Task Force Vision, Mission, and Goals

Vision: To eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries through collaborative,

data-driven interventions.

The purpose of the NC Vision Zero Task Force is to eliminate deaths and serious

injuries on all modes of ground transportation using data-driven prevention strategies

(with emphasis on a safe systems approach) in collaboration with local, regional, and

state partners.

Mission: To supply all safety stakeholders in North Carolina with effective resources,

tools, and information, enabling them to eliminate traffic fatalities and serious injuries.

The NC Vision Zero Task Force mission includes the following goals:

● Serve as a clearinghouse for North Carolina safety data, research, and

resources.

● Provide a bridge for collaboration by facilitating communications between traffic

safety stakeholders across the state.

● Encourage and promote safe systems designs, which prioritize safety over

speed.

● Inspire and encourage, support and amplify local, regional, and statewide Vision

Zero initiatives.

● Facilitate access to information regarding safety initiatives operating and

developing in North Carolina.

● Advocate for processes and outcomes which promote public health equity,

engage with populations disproportionately killed or seriously injured on North

Carolina roads, and protect the most vulnerable road users.

● Serve as conduit for advocates, concerned citizens, and traffic safety

professionals to present research, efforts, and proposed solutions for statewide

consideration and implementation.

● Provide updates and recommendations to ECHS.

● Establish criteria/guidelines/best practices for local Vision Zero initiatives.

● Promote policies and practices to account for the safety of all road users

regardless of mode of transportation, age, ability, race, or income.

● Promote a culture of traffic safety in North Carolina, in which roadway violence is

not tolerated or socially acceptable.

● Provide research, crash data, and stakeholder engagement for proposed

policies.

Long Term Goals

● Cut fatalities and serious injuries in North Carolina in half by 2030, as established

in the North Carolina Highway Safety Plan.

● Improve access, transparency, and public understanding of crash causes and

data.

● Educate and empower North Carolinians to speak up if someone is being unsafe

on the road.

● Engage researchers, practitioners, and invested community members toward

developing a deeper understanding of the contributing factors involved in road

user safety, and investigating ways to effectively implement proven

countermeasures and community-based interventions.

 

Contact: Miracle King, NCDOT Communications Specialist 919-814-3657 miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Law Enforcement: The Speed Limit is The Law

GARNER – The statewide ‘Speed A Little. Lose A Lot.’ campaign to raise awareness of the dangers of speeding is underway, which not only means water-cooler and dinner table discussions about the simple truths about speeding, but increased law enforcement and driver checkpoints.

  

“More blue lights, less yellow tape, that’s at the core of our mission,” said Mark Ezzell, director of the North Carolina Governor’s Highway Safety Program, which aims to eliminate preventable deaths on North Carolina roads.

  

“We hope that during this week, through a combination of enforcement, education and empowerment we can all help reach the goal of the Governor’s NC Vision Zero initiative: a coordinated effort to change traffic safety culture and bring North Carolina’s traffic deaths to zero,” Ezzell said.

  

NC GHSP held a kick-off event at Fort Bragg on Friday, April 12, in front of nearly 200 military and civilians. Fort Bragg is not only the largest military base in the country, but sits in a county that has fifth highest rate of speeding in North Carolina.

  

The message was simple: Speed A Little. Lose A Lot.

  

Ezzell told the crowd: “We’re rushing to work, school, to eat, to play. We’re rushing to get there first, and ultimately, we’re rushing to die. The rush is claiming too many lives on North Carolina roadways.”

  

Speed is the number one factor in preventable deaths and the statistics don’t lie.

  

Fast Facts:

  

Speed-related fatalities ranked by county in 2018:

  

Mecklenburg: 38

Wake: 16

Harnett (tied): 15

Cumberland (tied): 15

Forsyth: 11

Overall speed-related fatalities, 2014-2018:

  

2014: 349

2015: 322

2016: 370

2017: 336

2018: 313

Total reportable speed-related crashes, 2014-2018:

  

2014: 19,699

2015: 20,348

2016: 18,982

2017: 17,495

2018: 21,339

Governor’s Highway Safety Program Assistant Director Cheryl Leonard helped kicked off the annual anti-speeding event. “We really need drivers to slow down, they put their lives at risk and the lives of others when they go even a little beyond the posted speed limits,” Leonard said.

  

Speeding is more than just breaking the law. The consequences are far-ranging.

  

“Losing a lot doesn’t just mean life or death, people can lose their freedom, employment, respect, money and more,” Leonard added. “It’s just not worth it.”

  

Read here to brush up on guidelines for drivers, motorcyclists and bicyclists safely arrive at their destinations.

  

The Governor’s Highway Safety Program promotes highway safety awareness through grants and safe driving initiatives like: Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

  

Please support these efforts by visiting ghsp.nc.gov and following @NCGHSP on Facebook and @NC_GHSP on Twitter and Instagram today and using these hashtags in social media posts: #WZAW, #Orange4Safety, #NWZAW, #NWZAW2019 , #NCDOT , #NCGHSP.

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

Greenville — A group of college students, state officials and others converged Thursday, March 14, with a mission to prevent more drunk driving fatalities. The group of about 100 people, including 50 students, met at Sup Dogs, a popular eatery adjacent to the campus of East Carolina University.

 

Their call to action was timely. Drunk driving is more common on St. Patrick’s Day than at other times of the year and so, too, are deaths due to drunk driving.

 

“We had to be here, it’s our duty as leaders on the campus of ECU to help shine a light on this problem and actually do something about it,” said Gillian Smith, vice president of Recruitment for Panhellenic on the campus of ECU. “We’ve walked about a mile radius around 5th and Summit Streets, handing out fliers, posting anti-drunk-driving messages on our social media account and simply sounding the alarm.”

 

The community canvass kicked off The Governor’s Highway Safety Programs statewide ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign, where law enforcement from around all 100 counties began conducting saturation patrols. The goal was to remove impaired drivers from roadways and save lives over the St. Patrick’s Day weekend. The campaign runs today through Sunday, March 17.

 

“Whether it be via bus, cab, ride share or a buddy, we just want riders to get home alive and it’s going to take all of us, every time making the right decision,” said Governor’s Highway Safety Program Director Mark Ezzell. “We are grateful that the community of Greenville and beyond recognized the importance of this initiative and volunteered their time and resources today.”

 

The group was armed with many sobering statistics, including the fact that:

•On St. Patrick’s Day, on average, drunk driving deaths increase by 8 percent;

•Of the people who died in crashes on St. Patrick’s Day, 51 percent were alcohol-related;

•Drunk driving fatalities are seven times more likely at night on St. Patrick’s Day; and

•Of the people killed on St. Patrick’s Day due to drunk driving, 44 percent are between the ages of 21 and 34 years old.

 

“We want people to be aware of the repercussions of driving behaviors,” said Greenville Police Chief Mark Holtzman. “Our city has some of the worst drunk-driving records over the last few years and we are tired of our friends, children, co-workers dying this way.”

 

Chief Holztman and dozens of law enforcement, first responders, child advocates, health care workers from around Pitt County and Eastern Carolina joined volunteers who helped canvass several city blocks around one of the city’s most popular restaurants.

  

In addition to volunteers canvassing the community and walking about a mile around the downtown area, the ECU campus transit system changed their messaging on the front of all campus buses with the ‘Booze It & Lose It’ slogan. The City of Greenville, Pitt County schools, Vidant Health and a host of other organizations posted safety messaging on their social media accounts using the hashtags #keysfree and #NCGHSP.

 

The ‘Booze It & Lose It’ campaign is one of the many campaigns by The Governor’s Highway Safety Program which supports a myriad of safe-driving initiatives like Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Visit ghsp.nc.gov and follow NCGHSP on Facebook @NCGHSP, Instagram and Twitter @NC_GHSP. For media inquiries contact: GHSP Communications Specialist Miracle King miracleking@ncdot.gov

A nationwide campaign to raise awareness of the ‘Move Over Law’ is underway to coincide with national Peace Officers Memorial Day. Peace Officers Memorial Day pays tribute to local, state, and federal law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty. Many of them have been killed alongside state roads due a violation of the ‘Move Over Law.’

 

The North Carolina ‘Move Over Law’ requires motorists to move over one lane, if possible, or reduce speed for emergency and construction vehicles with flashing lights on the shoulder of the highway.

 

A campaign awareness event was held today at the Highway Patrol station in Johnston County; where collaborating agencies such as the State Highway Patrol, N.C. Department of Transportation's Incident Management Assistance Patrol (IMAP) program and the Governor’s Highway Safety Program, conducted a saturation patrol, citing drivers who did not adhere to the law.

 

“Violating the law could result in a $250 fine and more importantly it could result in the loss of life of any worker alongside the roadway,” said Captain Joseph Cotton NCSHP, Troop C Commander Johnston County.

 

“This isn’t a gotcha campaign, this is a ‘please spare our lives’ campaign,” said NCDOT Engineer Ronnie Keeter, who manages construction workers and contractors across the department’s Division Four, which encompasses Halifax, Nash, Edgecombe, Wilson, Wayne and Johnston Counties.

 

“First responders and roadway workers are placed in dangerous situations all the time, and drivers increase the risk to responders when they zoom by and ignore the flashing lights—and the law,” said Captain Cotton.

 

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, so far in 2019, there have been 14 law enforcement officers killed in traffic-related crashes nationwide.

 

“These tragedies can be avoided through awareness and compliance with the State’s “Move Over” law, which is why we are here today,” said Keeter.

 

“We need the public to change their driving behaviors by simply driving and following the rules of the road,” said Mark Ezzell, director of the Governor’s Highway Safety Program.

 

In conjunction with the campaign all state message boards will display the reminder message: ‘Move Over. It’s The Law.’

 

When you see flashing lights ahead, transportation officials advise motorists do the following:

 

Pay close attention to signs and work zone flaggers;

Move over one lane;

Turn on your headlights so workers and other motorists can see you;

Obey the posted speed limits;

​Avoid changing radio stations and using cell phones; and

Expect the unexpected: Keep an eye out for workers and their equipment.

The safety campaign was organized by the Governor’s Highway Safety Program, which promotes highway safety awareness through grants and safe driving initiatives like: Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Please support these efforts by visiting ghsp.nc.gov and following @NCGHSP on Facebook and @NC_GHSP on Twitter and Instagram today.

 

NC GHSP Safety City at the North Carolina State Fair.

NC GHSP Safety City at the North Carolina State Fair.

NC GHSP Safety City at the North Carolina State Fair.

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