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Having a bit of fun with NASA images..... The Earth meets a Spiral Galaxy

'Tis the season for holiday decorating and tree-trimming. Not to be left out, astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have photographed a festive-looking nearby planetary nebula called NGC 5189. The intricate structure of this bright gaseous nebula resembles a glass-blown holiday ornament with a glowing ribbon entwined.

 

Planetary nebulae represent the final brief stage in the life of a medium-sized star like our sun. While consuming the last of the fuel in its core, the dying star expels a large portion of its outer envelope. This material then becomes heated by the radiation from the stellar remnant and radiates, producing glowing clouds of gas that can show complex structures, as the ejection of mass from the star is uneven in both time and direction. To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/science/ngc5189.html

 

Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI)

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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Editor's Note: This image is a false color infrared image made from a modified digital SLR camera.

 

The Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket, with the Cygnus cargo spacecraft aboard, is seen in this false color infrared image, as it launches from Pad-0A of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS), Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia. Cygnus is on its way to rendezvous with the space station. The spacecraft will deliver about 1,300 pounds (589 kilograms) of cargo, including food and clothing, to the Expedition 37 crew.

Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

 

For the latest info from NASA on Hurricane Sandy go to: 1.usa.gov/Ti5SgS

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center!

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech - Processing: Elisabetta Bonora & Marco Faccin / aliveuniverse.today

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center!

Eric Litvin loves NASA! The brightly lit limb of a crescent Enceladus looks ethereal against the blackness of space. This image is a composite of images taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 29, 2017, using filters that allow infrared, green, and ultraviolet light. via NASA ift.tt/2y49TX6

This is an artist's concept of the young Earth being bombarded by asteroids. Scientists think these impacts could have delivered significant amounts of organic matter and water to Earth.

 

Image Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab

 

The Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security -- Regolith Explorer spacecraft (OSIRIS-REx) will travel to a near-Earth asteroid, called Bennu, and bring a sample back to Earth for study. The mission will help scientists investigate how planets formed and how life began, as well as improve our understanding of asteroids that could impact Earth.

 

OSIRIS-REx is scheduled for launch in late 2016. As planned, the spacecraft will reach its asteroid target in 2018 and return a sample to Earth in 2023.

 

Watch the full video: youtu.be/gtUgarROs08

 

Learn more about NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission and the making of Bennu’s Journey: www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/bennus-journey/

 

More information on the OSIRIS-REx mission is available at:

www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/osiris-rex/index.html

www.asteroidmission.org

 

NASA image use policy.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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via NASA Earth Observatory Image of the Day ift.tt/2wQri01

NASA's Cassini spacecraft gazed toward the northern hemisphere of Saturn to spy subtle, multi-hued bands in the clouds there. via NASA ift.tt/2jppZUF

Editor's note: Happy Friday, everyone! Today is National Umbrella Day, I've just learned, so I posted this image from pre-storm skies last week. Stay dry and warm, Flickr friends! :)

 

Mixed clouds and sun in the skies over Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This was a view looking south, taken mid-morning before a strong line of storms moved through the area.

 

Credit: NASA/MSFC/Brooke Boen

 

Part of the "Views Around Marshall" photoset:

www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05/sets/72157628769844777/

There are now two active tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and NASA is generating satellite imagery to monitor their march westward. Tropical Storm Issac is already bringing rainfall to the Lesser Antilles today, Aug. 22, Tropical Depression 10 formed in the eastern Atlantic, and another low fizzled in the western Gulf of Mexico.

 

Tropical Storm Isaac formed late on Aug. 21 from Tropical Depression 9 and immediately caused warnings and watches. Tropical Depression 10 formed during the morning hours on Aug. 22 in the central Atlantic, east of Isaac and appears to be following the tropical storm on NOAA's GOES-13 satellite imagery. NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Isaac over the Lesser Antilles, and newborn Tropical Depression 10 trailing behind on Aug. 22 at 1445 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT). The image was created by the NASA GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Both storms are showing good circulation.

 

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Isaac on Aug. 22 at 2:05 a.m. EDT, as it was bringing heavy rainfall to the Lesser Antilles. Strong thunderstorms appeared in a band of thunderstorms in Isaac's western quadrant that had cloud top temperatures as cold as -63F (-52C).

 

Watches and Warnings in Effect

 

The National Hurricane Center has posted Warnings and Watches for Tropical Storm Issac. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe and the surrounding islands, and St. Martin, St. Kitts, Nevis, Antigua, Barbuda, Montserrat, and Anguilla, Saba, St. Eustatius, and St. Maarten, British Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Vieques, Culebra, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

 

There are also hurricane and tropical storm watches in effect. A Hurricane Watch is in effect for Puerto Rico, Vieques, Culebra, and the U.S. and British Virgin Islands; the south coast of the Dominican Republic from Isla Saona westward to the Haiti-Domenican Republic southern border. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for the north coast of the Dominican Republic from the Haiti-Dominican Republic northern border eastward to north of Isla Saona.

 

Tropical Storm Isaac

 

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Aug. 22, Tropical Storm Isaac had maximum sustained winds near 45 mph (75 kmh), and the NHC said that strengthening is forecast. Isaac could become a hurricane by Thursday or Thursday night, Aug. 23. The center of Isaac was about 140 miles (230 km) east of Guadaloupe, near latitude 15.9 north and longitude 59.3 west. Isaac is moving westward near 21 mph (33 kmh) is expected to stay on this track over the next couple of days.

 

The NHC said, "On the forecast track the center of Isaac should move through the Leeward Islands this evening and pass near or south of the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico on Thursday (Aug. 23) and approach the Dominican Republic Thursday night and Friday (Aug. 24).

Tropical Depression 10 Forms

 

The tenth tropical depression seemed to take a cue from Issac, because soon after tropical depression 9 strengthened into Isaac, Tropical Depression 10 (TD10) was born.

 

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the western half of Tropical Depression 10 on Aug. 22 at 12:23 a.m. EDT, hours before it was named a depression. Scattered strong thunderstorms appeared in the western and northern quadrants of the storm, indicating strong uplift in the storm, that would later lead to its consolidation and strengthening into a depression.

 

TD10 came into being on Aug. 22 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. It was located about 860 miles (1,385 km) west-southwest of the Cape Verde Islands, near 12.4 North latitude and 36.3 West longitude. TD10 is moving toward the west-northwest near 16 mph (26 kmh) and this general motion is expected to continue during the next couple of days. TD10 has maximum sustained winds near 35 mph (55 kmh), and the National Hurricane Center expects TD10 to become a tropical storm Joyce.

 

System 95L Fizzles Out

 

The third low pressure area that forecasters had been watching for possible development has fizzled out, now that it moved inland in northeastern Mexico. The NHC gives it a "near zero percent" chance of development now.

 

Rob Gutro

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

 

Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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Selected as NASA Picture Of The Day 9/5/2014 Thanks to all at NASA apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140905.html

 

Captured over 5 nights during the month of August 2014 from my Backyard Observatory in Western Michigan using LRGB & H-Alpha filters with the QHY11 Mono CCD/Takahashi E-180.

 

The original image is 6676 x 4659 pixels and covers an area of sky equal to 6.8 x 4.75 degrees and includes quite a few Messier objects including M16, M17, M18, M24 and M25.

 

A much larger 50% annotated view of this image can be seen here

nova.astrometry.net/annotated_full/831359

  

Total Exposure 10 hours

  

Image details

Location: DownUnder Observatory, Fremont MI

Date of Shoot: August 2014

H-Alpha 360 min, 9 x 8 min bin 1x1 (for each panel)

LRGB 240 min, 6 x 2 min each bin 1x1 (for each panel)

QHY11 monochrome CCD cooled to -10C

Takahashi E-180 F2.8 Astrograph

Paramount GT-1100S German Equatorial Mount

Image Acquisition Maxim DL

Stacking and Calibrating: CCDStack

Post Processing Photoshop CS5

  

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Down Under Observatory

Eric Litvin loves NASA! With this view, Cassini captured one of its last looks at Saturn and its main rings from a distance. via NASA ift.tt/2eQeBMc

One of NASA's ER-2 research aircraft makes a appearance at the 2016 Los Angeles County Air Show.

Artist concept of SLS launching.

 

Image credit: NASA

 

Original image:

www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/multimedia/gallery/s...

 

More about SLS:

www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/index.html

 

Space Launch System Flickr photoset:

www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05/sets/72157627559536895/

 

_____________________________________________

These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin...

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech - Processing: Elisabetta Bonora & Marco Faccin / aliveuniverse.today

Eric Litvin loves NASA! Test Engineer Samantha O’Flaherty finalizes the set-up of the Quiet Supersonic Technology (QueSST) Preliminary Design Model inside the 14- by- 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The QueSST Preliminary Design is the initial design stage of NASA’s planned Low-Boom Flight Demonstration experimental airplane, or X-plane. via NASA ift.tt/2w9GhD4

An artist's concept of STEREO surrounding the sun.

 

Credit: NASA

 

To read more about STEREO go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/stereo/news/entire-sun.html

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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This image, made using the space telescope NASA / ESA «Hubble» (Hubble Space Telescope) shows an unusual galaxy UGC 12591. galaxy UGC 12591 classification takes an intermediate position between the lenticular and spiral galaxies. It lies at a distance of a little less than 400 million light-years away on the western edge of the galactic superclusters of Pisces-Perseus, a long chain of clusters of galaxies, which stretches for hundreds of millions of light-years away and is one of the largest known structures of the universe. This galaxy is fairly unusual in itself - it has an incredibly large mass. This galaxy and its halo together contain the order of several billion solar masses of matter - that is about four times greater than the mass of the Milky Way.

spacebestnews.blogspot.com/2017/03/blog-post_5.html

 

This NASA video shows a one-minute history of how humans have looked at the sun.

 

To learn more about the sun go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/stereo/main/index.html

  

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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NASA's Cassini spacecraft gazed toward the northern hemisphere of Saturn to spy subtle, multi-hued bands in the clouds there. via NASA ift.tt/2jppZUF

via NASA Earth Observatory Image of the Day ift.tt/2fpo15e

NASA's Cassini spacecraft gazed toward the northern hemisphere of Saturn to spy subtle, multi-hued bands in the clouds there. via NASA ift.tt/2jppZUF

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech - Processing: Elisabetta Bonora & Marco Faccin / aliveuniverse.today

Eric Litvin loves NASA! This striking image of Jupiter was captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft as it performed its eighth flyby of the gas giant planet. via NASA ift.tt/2xzDw1k

A winter storm that moved through the Mid-Atlantic on Feb. 16 and 17, 2015 extended the northeastern U.S. snowcover farther south. Until this storm hit, southern New Jersey and southeastern Pennsylvania appeared snow-free on satellite imagery from the previous week.

 

The overnight storm blanketed the entire states of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, as seen on this Feb. 16 image. The image was taken from the MODIS or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The snow cover from the storm actually extended even farther south than the image. Snowfall also blanketed West Virginia, Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware and Virginia, while freezing rain and icy conditions affected the Carolinas, Tennessee and Georgia.

 

On Feb. 17, 2015, NOAA's National Weather Service noted "The winter storm that brought widespread snow, sleet and freezing rain to parts of the south-central U.S. and Mid-Atlantic will wind down as it moves offshore Tuesday. Lingering snow and freezing rain is possible early Tuesday for parts of the Northeast and mid-Atlantic, with rain across parts of the Southeast."

 

Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

 

NASA image use policy.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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NASA's Cassini spacecraft gazed toward the northern hemisphere of Saturn to spy subtle, multi-hued bands in the clouds there. via NASA ift.tt/2jppZUF

Eric Litvin loves NASA! Gemini V command pilot Gordon Cooper (right) and Charles "Pete" Conrad, pilot, walk across the deck of the aircraft carrier USS Lake Champlain following their spacecraft's recovery from the ocean on Aug. 29, 1965. The eight-day Gemini V endurance mission doubled America's spaceflight record set two months earlier. via NASA ift.tt/2x1awPF

A fjord in southern Greenland, as seen during Operation IceBridge's last flight of the 2017 Arctic campaign, on May 12, 2017. This final full science flight, ICESat-2 South, was designed along the ground tracks of NASA’s upcoming ICESat-2, to fill in a gap in altimetry coverage of central southern Greenland. via NASA ift.tt/2qRUipN

NASA's Cassini spacecraft gazed toward the northern hemisphere of Saturn to spy subtle, multi-hued bands in the clouds there. via NASA ift.tt/2jppZUF

NASA's Mars bound Maven spacecraft launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Launch Complex-41 on an United Launch Alliance Atlas V. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN's

(MAVEN) prime mission is to study the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet.

 

February 2, 2012

 

The doors are open on NASA's Suomi NPP satellite and the newest version of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument is scanning Earth for the first time, helping to assure continued availability of measurements of the energy leaving the Earth-atmosphere system.

 

The CERES results help scientists to determine the Earth's energy balance, providing a long-term record of this crucial environmental parameter that will be consistent with those of its predecessors.

 

In the longwave image, heat energy radiated from Earth (in watts per square meter) is shown in shades of yellow, red, blue and white. The brightest-yellow areas are the hottest and are emitting the most energy out to space, while the dark blue areas and the bright white clouds are much colder, emitting the least energy. Increasing temperature, decreasing water vapor, and decreasing clouds will all tend to increase the ability of Earth to shed heat out to space.

 

To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/NPP/news/npp-ceres-firstlight....

 

Credit: NASA/NOAA/CERES Team

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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Seaweed and Light

 

A type of seaweed called Sargassum, common in the Sargasso Sea, floats by an instrument deployed here on July 26, 2014, as part of NASA's SABOR experiment. Scientists from the City College of New York use the data to study the way light becomes polarized in various conditions both above and below the surface of the ocean.

 

NASA's Ship-Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR) experiment is a coordinated ship and aircraft observation campaign off the Atlantic coast of the United States, an effort to advance space-based capabilities for monitoring microscopic plants that form the base of the marine food chain.

 

Read more: 1.usa.gov/WWRVzj

 

Credit: NASA/SABOR/Wayne Slade, Sequoia Scientific

.NASA image use policy.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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The brightly lit limb of a crescent Enceladus looks ethereal against the blackness of space. This image is a composite of images taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 29, 2017, using filters that allow infrared, green, and ultraviolet light. via NASA ift.tt/2y49TX6

Total lunar eclipse captured January 20-21, 2000. (Mr. Eclipse/Fred Espenak)

 

Editor's Note: Hey Flickr friends -- this will be a good one!

 

On the night of Dec. 20 and into the morning of Dec. 21, the moon will have a beautiful total eclipse, coinciding with the winter solstice. NASA astronomers will host two live Web chats to take your questions, including an all-night Web chat with real-time observation of the eclipse. For more information, visit this link: www.nasa.gov/connect/chat/lunar_eclipse.html

 

Really hope to see all of you there!

Neil Armstrong trained for the Apollo 11 mission at NASA Langley's Lunar Landing Research Facility on equipment that cancelled all but one-sixth of Earth's gravitational force. Armstrong offered perhaps the greatest tribute to the importance of his training when asked what it was like to land on the moon, replying, "Like Langley." via NASA ift.tt/2tjeylH

 

Click Here to view NASA Goddard's Flickr page with images, visualizations and videos!

 

www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc

  

To view an animation of this image go here:

 

www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/4401845574/

 

For another view of the "Blue Marble" go here:

 

www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/4392965590/

 

Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Image by Reto Stöckli (land surface, shallow water, clouds). Enhancements by Robert Simmon (ocean color, compositing, 3D globes, animation). Data and technical support: MODIS Land Group; MODIS Science Data Support Team; MODIS Atmosphere Group; MODIS Ocean Group Additional data: USGS EROS Data Center (topography); USGS Terrestrial Remote Sensing Flagstaff Field Center (Antarctica); Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (city lights).

 

This spectacular “blue marble” image is the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. These images are freely available to educators, scientists, museums, and the public. This record includes preview images and links to full resolution versions up to 21,600 pixels across.

 

Much of the information contained in this image came from a single remote-sensing device-NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. Flying over 700 km above the Earth onboard the Terra satellite, MODIS provides an integrated tool for observing a variety of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric features of the Earth. The land and coastal ocean portions of these images are based on surface observations collected from June through September 2001 and combined, or composited, every eight days to compensate for clouds that might block the sensor’s view of the surface on any single day. Two different types of ocean data were used in these images: shallow water true color data, and global ocean color (or chlorophyll) data. Topographic shading is based on the GTOPO 30 elevation dataset compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey’s EROS Data Center. MODIS observations of polar sea ice were combined with observations of Antarctica made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s AVHRR sensor—the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The cloud image is a composite of two days of imagery collected in visible light wavelengths and a third day of thermal infra-red imagery over the poles. Global city lights, derived from 9 months of observations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, are superimposed on a darkened land surface map.

 

For more information related to NASA's Blue Marble go to:

 

earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/BlueMarble/BlueMarble_...

NASA image acquired September 5, 2011

 

On September 5, 2011, Katia was a Category 2 hurricane according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC). At 11:00 a.m. Atlantic Standard Time (AST) on September 5, the NHC reported that Katia had maximum sustained winds of 110 miles (175 kilometers) per hour with higher gusts.

 

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this natural-color image at 11:30 a.m. AST on September 5. Filling the right half of the image, Katia hovers over the ocean northeast of the Turks and Caicos Islands.

 

By 5:00 a.m. AST on September 6, Katia had strengthened to a Category 3 hurricane, with maximum sustained winds of 125 miles (205 kilometers) per hour, the NHC reported. Five-day projections of the storm track, however, showed Katia likely stopping short of the U.S. East Coast and turning toward the northeast. The most significant hazards affecting land were large ocean swells. The NHC warned that the swells could cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.

 

NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption by Michon Scott.

 

Instrument: Terra - MODIS

 

To view more images from this event go here: earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=52013

 

Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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Credits:

NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration

Again...can't decide which crop is better...

Share YOUR still images and videos from the launch in our ATREX Flickr Group: www.flickr.com/groups/atrex/

 

NASA plans to launches five rockets in approximately five minutes to study the high-altitude jet stream from its Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

 

The Anomalous Transport Rocket Experiment (ATREX), a heliophysics mission, will gather information needed to better understand the process responsible for the high-altitude jet stream located 60 to 65 miles above the surface of the Earth.

 

The rockets being used for the ATREX mission are two Terrier-Improved Orions (left), one Terrier-Oriole (center) and two Terrier-Improved Malemutes (right).

 

The ATREX launches will take place between March 14 and April 4. The five rockets will release a chemical tracer that will form milky, white tracer clouds that allow scientists and the public to "see" the winds in space.

 

ATREX launch info: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/missions/atrex-launch...

 

Credit: NASA/Wallops

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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NASA's Mars bound Maven spacecraft launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Launch Complex-41 on an United Launch Alliance Atlas V. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN's

(MAVEN) prime mission is to study the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet.

 

NASA's Mars bound Maven spacecraft launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Launch Complex-41 on an United Launch Alliance Atlas V. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN's

(MAVEN) prime mission is to study the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet.

 

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured this false-colored night-time image of Cyclone Felleng during the night on Jan. 28, 2013. Felleng is located in the Southern Indian Ocean, and is northwest of Madagascar. The image revealed some pretty cold overshooting tops, topping at ~170K. The image shows some interesting gravity waves propagating out from the storm in both the thermal and visible imagery.

 

For full storm history on NASA's Hurricane Web Page, visit: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/archives/2013/h2013...

 

Credit: William Straka, UWM/NASA/NOAA

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

Follow us on Twitter

 

Like us on Facebook

 

Find us on Instagram

NASA's Mars bound Maven spacecraft launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Launch Complex-41 on an United Launch Alliance Atlas V. The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN's

(MAVEN) prime mission is to study the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet.

 

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