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Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech - Processing: Elisabetta Bonora & Marco Faccin / aliveuniverse.today

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, captured this solar image on March 16, 2015, which clearly shows two dark patches, known as coronal holes. The larger coronal hole of the two, near the southern pole, covers an estimated 6- to 8-percent of the total solar surface. While that may not sound significant, it is one of the largest polar holes scientists have observed in decades. The smaller coronal hole, towards the opposite pole, is long and narrow. It covers about 3.8 billion square miles on the sun - only about 0.16-percent of the solar surface.

 

Coronal holes are lower density and temperature regions of the sun’s outer atmosphere, known as the corona. Coronal holes can be a source of fast solar wind of solar particles that envelop the Earth.

 

The magnetic field in these regions extends far out into space rather than quickly looping back into the sun’s surface. Magnetic fields that loop up and back down to the surface can be seen as arcs in non-coronal hole regions of the image, including over the lower right horizon.

 

The bright active region on the lower right quadrant is the same region that produced solar flares last week.

 

Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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Editor's Note: This image is a false color infrared image made from a modified digital SLR camera.

 

The Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket, with the Cygnus cargo spacecraft aboard, is seen in this false color infrared image, as it launches from Pad-0A of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS), Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia. Cygnus is on its way to rendezvous with the space station. The spacecraft will deliver about 1,300 pounds (589 kilograms) of cargo, including food and clothing, to the Expedition 37 crew.

Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

 

For the latest info from NASA on Hurricane Sandy go to: 1.usa.gov/Ti5SgS

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center!

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center!

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech - Processing: Elisabetta Bonora & Marco Faccin / aliveuniverse.today

NASA provider SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft are vertical at Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Liftoff of SpaceX's tenth Commercial Resupply Services cargo mission to the International Space Station is scheduled for 10:01 a.m. EST on Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017. via NASA ift.tt/2lr9OFB

NASA provider SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft are vertical at Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Liftoff of SpaceX's tenth Commercial Resupply Services cargo mission to the International Space Station is scheduled for 10:01 a.m. EST on Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017. via NASA ift.tt/2lr9OFB

This is an artist's concept of the young Earth being bombarded by asteroids. Scientists think these impacts could have delivered significant amounts of organic matter and water to Earth.

 

Image Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab

 

The Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security -- Regolith Explorer spacecraft (OSIRIS-REx) will travel to a near-Earth asteroid, called Bennu, and bring a sample back to Earth for study. The mission will help scientists investigate how planets formed and how life began, as well as improve our understanding of asteroids that could impact Earth.

 

OSIRIS-REx is scheduled for launch in late 2016. As planned, the spacecraft will reach its asteroid target in 2018 and return a sample to Earth in 2023.

 

Watch the full video: youtu.be/gtUgarROs08

 

Learn more about NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission and the making of Bennu’s Journey: www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/bennus-journey/

 

More information on the OSIRIS-REx mission is available at:

www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/osiris-rex/index.html

www.asteroidmission.org

 

NASA image use policy.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

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One of NASA's ER-2 research aircraft makes a appearance at the 2016 Los Angeles County Air Show.

Editor's note: Happy Friday, everyone! Today is National Umbrella Day, I've just learned, so I posted this image from pre-storm skies last week. Stay dry and warm, Flickr friends! :)

 

Mixed clouds and sun in the skies over Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This was a view looking south, taken mid-morning before a strong line of storms moved through the area.

 

Credit: NASA/MSFC/Brooke Boen

 

Part of the "Views Around Marshall" photoset:

www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05/sets/72157628769844777/

Selected as NASA Picture Of The Day 9/5/2014 Thanks to all at NASA apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140905.html

 

Captured over 5 nights during the month of August 2014 from my Backyard Observatory in Western Michigan using LRGB & H-Alpha filters with the QHY11 Mono CCD/Takahashi E-180.

 

The original image is 6676 x 4659 pixels and covers an area of sky equal to 6.8 x 4.75 degrees and includes quite a few Messier objects including M16, M17, M18, M24 and M25.

 

A much larger 50% annotated view of this image can be seen here

nova.astrometry.net/annotated_full/831359

  

Total Exposure 10 hours

  

Image details

Location: DownUnder Observatory, Fremont MI

Date of Shoot: August 2014

H-Alpha 360 min, 9 x 8 min bin 1x1 (for each panel)

LRGB 240 min, 6 x 2 min each bin 1x1 (for each panel)

QHY11 monochrome CCD cooled to -10C

Takahashi E-180 F2.8 Astrograph

Paramount GT-1100S German Equatorial Mount

Image Acquisition Maxim DL

Stacking and Calibrating: CCDStack

Post Processing Photoshop CS5

  

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Down Under Observatory

NASA provider SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft are vertical at Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Liftoff of SpaceX's tenth Commercial Resupply Services cargo mission to the International Space Station is scheduled for 10:01 a.m. EST on Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017. via NASA ift.tt/2lr9OFB

Does this strange dark ball look somehow familiar? If so, that might be because it is our Sun. In the featured image from 2012, a detailed solar view was captured originally in a very specific color of red light, then rendered in black and white, and then color inverted. Once complete, the resulting image was added to a starfield, then also color inverted. Visible in the image of the Sun are long light filaments, dark active regions, prominences peeking around the edge, and a moving carpet of hot gas. The surface of our Sun can be a busy place, in particular during Solar Maximum, the time when its surface magnetic field is wound up the most. Besides an active Sun being so picturesque, the plasma expelled can also become picturesque when it impacts the Earth's magnetosphere and creates auroras. via NASA ift.tt/2kMhDlo

Crediti: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Processing: Elisabetta Bonora & Marco Faccin / aliveuniverse.today

An artist's concept of STEREO surrounding the sun.

 

Credit: NASA

 

To read more about STEREO go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/stereo/news/entire-sun.html

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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This NASA video shows a one-minute history of how humans have looked at the sun.

 

To learn more about the sun go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/stereo/main/index.html

  

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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Again...can't decide which crop is better...

NASA

(National Aeronautics and Space Administration)

N992NA

Gulfstream G-1159A Gulfstream III

C/n 309

Prestwick Airport

Scotland

11th September 2014

February 2, 2012

 

The doors are open on NASA's Suomi NPP satellite and the newest version of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument is scanning Earth for the first time, helping to assure continued availability of measurements of the energy leaving the Earth-atmosphere system.

 

The CERES results help scientists to determine the Earth's energy balance, providing a long-term record of this crucial environmental parameter that will be consistent with those of its predecessors.

 

In the longwave image, heat energy radiated from Earth (in watts per square meter) is shown in shades of yellow, red, blue and white. The brightest-yellow areas are the hottest and are emitting the most energy out to space, while the dark blue areas and the bright white clouds are much colder, emitting the least energy. Increasing temperature, decreasing water vapor, and decreasing clouds will all tend to increase the ability of Earth to shed heat out to space.

 

To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/NPP/news/npp-ceres-firstlight....

 

Credit: NASA/NOAA/CERES Team

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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Total lunar eclipse captured January 20-21, 2000. (Mr. Eclipse/Fred Espenak)

 

Editor's Note: Hey Flickr friends -- this will be a good one!

 

On the night of Dec. 20 and into the morning of Dec. 21, the moon will have a beautiful total eclipse, coinciding with the winter solstice. NASA astronomers will host two live Web chats to take your questions, including an all-night Web chat with real-time observation of the eclipse. For more information, visit this link: www.nasa.gov/connect/chat/lunar_eclipse.html

 

Really hope to see all of you there!

Credits:

NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration

 

Click Here to view NASA Goddard's Flickr page with images, visualizations and videos!

 

www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc

  

To view an animation of this image go here:

 

www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/4401845574/

 

For another view of the "Blue Marble" go here:

 

www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/4392965590/

 

Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Image by Reto Stöckli (land surface, shallow water, clouds). Enhancements by Robert Simmon (ocean color, compositing, 3D globes, animation). Data and technical support: MODIS Land Group; MODIS Science Data Support Team; MODIS Atmosphere Group; MODIS Ocean Group Additional data: USGS EROS Data Center (topography); USGS Terrestrial Remote Sensing Flagstaff Field Center (Antarctica); Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (city lights).

 

This spectacular “blue marble” image is the most detailed true-color image of the entire Earth to date. Using a collection of satellite-based observations, scientists and visualizers stitched together months of observations of the land surface, oceans, sea ice, and clouds into a seamless, true-color mosaic of every square kilometer (.386 square mile) of our planet. These images are freely available to educators, scientists, museums, and the public. This record includes preview images and links to full resolution versions up to 21,600 pixels across.

 

Much of the information contained in this image came from a single remote-sensing device-NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. Flying over 700 km above the Earth onboard the Terra satellite, MODIS provides an integrated tool for observing a variety of terrestrial, oceanic, and atmospheric features of the Earth. The land and coastal ocean portions of these images are based on surface observations collected from June through September 2001 and combined, or composited, every eight days to compensate for clouds that might block the sensor’s view of the surface on any single day. Two different types of ocean data were used in these images: shallow water true color data, and global ocean color (or chlorophyll) data. Topographic shading is based on the GTOPO 30 elevation dataset compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey’s EROS Data Center. MODIS observations of polar sea ice were combined with observations of Antarctica made by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s AVHRR sensor—the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. The cloud image is a composite of two days of imagery collected in visible light wavelengths and a third day of thermal infra-red imagery over the poles. Global city lights, derived from 9 months of observations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, are superimposed on a darkened land surface map.

 

For more information related to NASA's Blue Marble go to:

 

earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/BlueMarble/BlueMarble_...

A United Launch Alliance Delta II rockets lifts off on it's 153rd mission since being introduced in 1989, from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The workhorse lifted NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Satellite into orbit to study the Earth's soil moisture every 2-3 days over the next three years.

NASA astronaut Kjell Lindgren took this photograph on Nov. 11, 2015 from the International Space Station. Lindgren wrote, "The delicate fingerprints of water imprinted on the sand. The #StoryOfWater." via NASA ift.tt/1Mxtpaz

Nasas y aparejos de pesca en la Ría de Avilés.

Diana F+ y Rollei 400

 

View On Black

NASA #3, an EMD SW1500, sits outside the maintenance shop at Kennedy Space Center. The former Toledo, Peoria & Western Railway EMD SW1500 switcher engine is one of three that serves the 38 mile shortline which runs throughout Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

'Tis the season for holiday decorating and tree-trimming. Not to be left out, astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have photographed a festive-looking nearby planetary nebula called NGC 5189. The intricate structure of this bright gaseous nebula resembles a glass-blown holiday ornament with a glowing ribbon entwined.

 

Planetary nebulae represent the final brief stage in the life of a medium-sized star like our sun. While consuming the last of the fuel in its core, the dying star expels a large portion of its outer envelope. This material then becomes heated by the radiation from the stellar remnant and radiates, producing glowing clouds of gas that can show complex structures, as the ejection of mass from the star is uneven in both time and direction. To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/science/ngc5189.html

 

Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI)

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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Esta foto fue realizada en una mañana soleada en la Dársena (A Coruña) hace un par de semanas. Tiene un tratamiento HDR así como un cierto desaturado de los colores, buscaba algo antiguo pero no demasiado, algo intemporal en el tiempo, ni pasado, ni presente...

 

Esta semana no tengo nada de tiempo, siento no poder pasarme por las galerías, espero poder solucionarlo hacia el fin de semana...

 

Nasas, la Dársena (A Coruña), abril de 2010

 

Gracias por vuestras visitas y comentarios...

NASA image release March 20, 2012

 

Studies using X-ray and ultraviolet observations from NASA's Swift satellite provide new insights into the elusive origins of an important class of exploding star called Type Ia supernovae.

 

Three types of systems, illustrated here, may host Type Ia supernovae. The first two panels depict a white dwarf in a binary system accumulating matter transferred from a red supergiant companion many times the sun's mass (left) or similar to the sun (middle). The transferred matter is thought to accumulate on the white dwarf and ultimately cause it to explode. Swift data on dozens of supernovae essentially eliminate the first model. Mounting evidence suggests that some Type Ia supernovae occur when binary white dwarfs (right) merge and collide.

 

Credit: NASA/Swift/ Aurore Simonnet, Sonoma State Univ.

 

To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/swift/bursts/supernova-narrowi...

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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February 17, 2012: Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope may have found evidence for a cluster of young, blue stars encircling HLX-1, one of the first intermediate-mass black holes ever discovered. Astronomers believe the black hole may once have been at the core of a now-disintegrated dwarf galaxy. The discovery of the black hole and the possible star cluster has important implications for understanding the evolution of supermassive black holes and galaxies

 

To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/science/shredded-relic....

 

Credit: NASA, ESA, and S. Farrell (Sydney Institute for Astronomy, University of Sydney)

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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NASA Shuttle Bus- April 30th, 2014-

We live right outside of NASA here in Houston, They retired the 747 used to ferry the Space Shuttles after their flights. They retired the Jumbo Bus and hauled it in pieces to its final resting spot at the Space Museum on the NASA Grounds. They had to move all the pieces at night and it came right by my neighborhood last night! What an event They had everything shut down! It as quite a sight. It was stopped here for 30 minutes while utility companies moved overhead wires at an upcoming intersection, making for a great photo-op!

for the full story... go to www.chron.com/default/article/Clear-Lake-highway-set-to-c...

My version of the NASA Orion, from October 2012, which was before the decision to go with ESA x-wing-type solar panels. In the fictional narrative it is called 'Aetos'. The variety of colors facilitates identifying who is who in the photography. See bricklaunch.com.

NASA image captured January 11, 2012

 

WALLOPS ISLAND, VA – A flight test of a NASA Terrier-Improved Malemute suborbital sounding rocket was successfully conducted today from NASA’s launch range at the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Launch time was 8:25 a.m. The launch vehicle is being developed to support NASA science missions.

 

The next rocket launch from Wallops Island is currently scheduled for no earlier than March 15.

 

For information on NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, visit the web at: www.nasa.gov/wallops

 

Credit: NASA/Wallops

 

NASA image use policy.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

 

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On April 21, 2010, NASA released the first-light images from its newest sun-monitoring mission, the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The mission’s high-speed, IMAX-quality photography will improve predictions of solar activity that can disrupt everything from GPS satellites to high-voltage power lines.

 

This image was captured by the new observatory’s Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on March 30, 2010. The sensor views the lower atmosphere of the Sun in ultraviolet wavelengths, and it captured this view as a massive plume of dense, cool (only compared to the rest of the solar atmosphere) plasma erupted on the Sun’s surface. The plasma flows in a loop along a magnetic field line.

 

When these ribbons of plasma appear against the black backdrop of space, as in this image, they appear bright, and they are called solar prominences. Compared to the size and mass of the Sun, the prominence seems insubstantial. But a small white circle at the lower left corner of the image dispels the misperception: ten Earths could be stacked in a line between the Sun and the top of the loop.

What are those streaks of light in the sky? First and foremost, the arching structure is the central band of our Milky Way galaxy. Visible in this galactic band are millions of distant stars mixed with numerous lanes of dark dust. Harder to discern is a nearly vertical beam of light rising from the horizon, just to the right of the image center. This beam is zodiacal light, sunlight scattered by dust in our Solar System that may be surprisingly prominent just after sunset or just before sunrise. In the foreground are several telescopes of the Bosque Alegre Astrophysical Station of the National University of Cordoba in Argentina. The station schedules weekend tours and conducts research into the nature of many astronomical objects including comets, active galaxies, and clusters of galaxies. The featured image was taken early this month. via NASA ift.tt/1WeYpCs

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