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The Mitrella mesnyi or Rumdul is the National Flower of the Kingdom of Cambodia.

(澳洲)-舌形麥螺 (中文名暫定)

Mitrella ligula (Duclos, 1840)-(Australia)

 

Annonaceae.

 

syn. Mitrella mesnyi (Pierre) Bân. Cambodian National Flower, rumdul or romduol.

 

If you're using any of my pics, just drop me a message here on Flickr or my email. Thanks!

Annonaceae.

 

syn. Mitrella mesnyi (Pierre) Bân. Cambodian National Flower, rumdul or romduol.

 

If you're using any of my pics, just drop me a message here on Flickr or my email. Thanks!

Identifier: zoologicalillust02swain

Title: Zoological illustrations, or, Original figures and descriptions of new, rare, or interesting animals, selected chiefly from the classes of ornithology, entomology, and conchology, and arranged according to their apparent affinities

Year: 1829 (1820s)

Authors: Swainson, William, 1789-1855 Bayfield, George Dall, William Healey, 1845-1927, former owner. DSI

Subjects: Birds Insects Mollusks Shells Zoology

Publisher: London : Baldwin & Cradock

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

he 2nd type, to which our present species strictlybelongs. The representation of this group among theVolutes, will be found in Voluta Zebra and its allies. Mitrella fusca is small, and of great rarity ; our ownspecimen, beautifully perfect, is the only one we have yetseen. MITRELLA ocellata. Shell icliitcish, the lotvcr half of the principal ichorl brown, tcitha band of alternate rifous and white spots, and tnarkcd tcithreticulated white lines, and remote sulcalcd stria?, internallypunctxired; spire, and upper part of the body ichorl, delicatelyplaited, the plates crossed by transverse lines of excavateddots. This species has probably been overlooked as a variety ofM. Fissurella ; its markings, indeed, are partially the same,but its sculpture, and even its form, proves it to be distinct.The alternate white and rufous spots bear a fanciful resem-blance to eyes. The description of M. Olivixformis hasalready been given at PI. 48, in the first volume of ourforjiier Series.Mitrannc, PI. 6.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

MA H <iAR Ir A 11 +■. Tl | MARGARITA crocata.Oranye Pearl-Oyster. Order Acepbala. Family Margaritadoe. Nob. MargaritaD.E. Animal byssiferous, attached to marine bodies bya fascicle of tendinous filaments. Shell fbliaceous, tlie centreinternally pearly and iridescent: the form irregular; the mar-gins fragile and transparent. Nob. Genera. Margarita. Malleus. Perna. Pinna. (Vulsella ?) Lam. Sub-genera? Avicula. Crenatula. Inoceramus. Auct. Generic Character. Margarita. See Leach. Zool. Miss. 1. p. 107. (1814.) (Meleagrina. Lam. Syst. 1819.^ Specific Character. Shell subquodrate, sqiiamose, fulvous or yelloii, the ear oj^ the rightvalve diluted and scarcely sinualed, that of the left valve verysmall: inside silvery blue, hinge smooth. It is the animal of this j^enus of Shells, which in sicknessand disease, produces the true oriental Pearl : the costlyornament of sovereig-ns, and the chaste foil of beauty. Aninteresting account of the Pearl fisliery of Ceylon, will befound in Mr. Wood

  

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Size approx 8mm.

 

Superdomain: Neomura

Domain: Eukaryota

(unranked): Opisthokonta

(unranked) Holozoa

(unranked) Filozoa

Kingdom: Animalia

Subkingdom: Eumetazoa

(unranked): Bilateria

(unranked): Protostomia

Superphylum: Lophotrochozoa

Phylum: Mollusca

Subphylum: Conchifera

Class: Gastropoda

Subclass: Orthogastropoda

Order: Neogastropoda

Superfamily: Buccinoidea

Family: Columbellidae

Subfamily: Atiliinae

Genus: Mitrella

Subgenus: Graphicomassa

Species: M. ligula

Annonaceae.

 

syn. Mitrella mesnyi (Pierre) Bân. Cambodian National Flower, rumdul or romduol.

 

If you're using any of my pics, just drop me a message here on Flickr or my email. Thanks!

Title: American malacological bulletin

Identifier: americanmal4519861987amer

Year: 1983 (1980s)

Authors: American Malacological Union

Subjects: Mollusks; Mollusks

Publisher: [Hattiesburg, Miss. ?] : [American Malacological Union]

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

  

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CAMPBELL AND CAMPBELL: LEA'S NEOGENE SPECIES 41 Status: The listings of H. C. Lea (1848), Bronn (1848) and Sherbourne (1922-1933) appear to be the only subse- quent references to this species. The type lot consists of three specimens glued to a card. Each is a distinctly different species, and both the original description and figure are com- posites. Lea (Fig. 226) shows the spire form of the left speci- men, the canal of the middle, and the sculpture of the right- hand specimen. The specimen on the left was at first judged to be specifically indeterminate mangelid; the specimen to the right is another indeterminate juvenile turrid. The center specimen is a broken but recognizable juvenile of the com- mon, often cited, and widespread Mitrella communis (Con- rad, 1862). Restricting the type of F. pumilus to this second (middle) specimen would have the advantage of establishing a certain identity, but Mitrella communis is well entrenched in the literature, and stability would not be served by such action.

 

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Fig. 1A. Left syntype of Fususpumilus I. Lea, 1833, herein designated lectotype of Oenopota pumilus (I. Lea, 1833). Length 1.9 mm. B. Center syntype of Fusus pumilus I. Lea, 1833, a juvenile specimen of Mitrella communis (Conrad, 1862). C. Right syntype of Fusus pumilus I. Lea, 1833, a juvenile turrid of uncertain species. Figure drawn by Carol Jones. At my request (1982), Virginia Orr Maes examined the lot and determined that the specimen shown here as Figure 1A belonged to Oenopota, a boreal genus of small mangelid turrids. This specimen is designated herein as the lectotype of Fusus pumilus. So restricted, Oenopota pumilus (I. Lea, 1833) L. Campbell, 1985 is a minute turrid with a small smooth protoconch, and a total of five whorls. The shell is relatively broad, with a slight angulation of the periphery. Visible sculpture (the type is varnished) consists of about eighteen narrow, axial riblets per whorl which are most prominent just above and below the angulation of the whorl. Aperture is large, the outer lip broken. Size: 1.9 mm. Type locality: Virginia. Type: ANSP 13827a. This is the first record of Oenopota in the Neogene of Eastern North America. It has escaped detection because it is very small, easily confused with juveniles of the many other Yorktown Formation turrid species, and finally, as a Boreal genus, it is out of habitat in the warm-temperate to subtropical Yorktown fauna, and therefore predictably rare. 5. Miliola marylandica. "Description. Shell elliptical, depressed in the middle, rounded at the edges, lobes in contact; mouth small, round, terminal, furnished with a large tooth. Length 1-20th, Breadth nearly 1-20th, of an inch." (LEA, 1833:215) ANSP unnumbered. Status: Bagg, 1904, correctly synonymized this species with Quniqueloculina seminula (Linne,1767), a common York- town and recent species also found in the St. Marys Formation. CONCLUSIONS The Virginia source demonstrated by Ward and Blackwelder (1975) for Thomas Say's (1824) "John Finch, St. Mary's" species can now be applied to all species of the John Finch collection which were described by contemporary American systematists. These include Conus marylandicus Green, 1830, unknown in Maryland but locally common in the Virginia Yorktown Formation; Spisula confraga (Conrad, 1833) which is reported from Maryland but is more common in the Yorktown; Crepidula costata Morton, 1829 (not C. costata Sowerby, 1824) which is locally abundant in the Yorktown; and five of the six new species described by Isaac Lea (1833). Lea's Finch collection species are Concavus fin- chii, a valid species of barnacle known only from Virginia and North Carolina; Mactra clathrodon, a junior synonym of Spisula modicella (Conrad, 1833); Teinostoma nana, a valid microgastropod species; Fusus pumilus, a previously unre- vised composite species herein placed in Oenopota, a turrid genus; and Miliola marylandica, a foraminiferan and junior synonym of Ouinqueloculina seminula (Linne,1767). Oenopota pumilus is presently known only from the unique lectotype, but the remaining four Lea taxa are common and are unique to, or more common in, the Yorktown Formation. Acteon wetherilli Lea, 1833, was not a part of the Finch collection, but rather came from the Pleistocene of Deal, New Jersey. Lea misidentified a Deal juvenile Mulinia lateralis (Say, 1822) as conspecific with his Mactra clathrodon, therefore presum- ing the New Jersey and St. Marys Miocene (actually Virginia Pliocene) faunas to be contemporaneous. A. wetherilli is a Pleistocene junior synonym of Acteocina canaliculata (Say, 1822). In "New Tertiary Fossil Shells from Maryland and New Jersey" Isaac Lea thus committed two errors: his New Jersey fossils were not Tertiary, and his Tertiary fossils were not from Maryland. After one hundred and fifty years of con- fusion, recognition of true provenance allows accurate inter- pretation of these species for the first time. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We would particularly like to recognize the informative and helpful assistance of Victor Zullo on the Balanus finchii problem and of Virginia Orr Maes in helping resolve the status of Oenopota pumilus. Paul Mikkelsen discussed Acteocina at length and pro- vided some key references. We would like to thank the curators and staff of the Academy of Natural Sciences for the loan of types, and especially Carol Jones, curator, for the excellent line drawings. We appreciate the helpful criticism of our reviewers, especially the com- ments by Jeanne Kowalczyk. Our thanks also to Hazel Bradley, who typed the final manuscript.

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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