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Journaling the Work and Life in Chicago, one of the most beautiful cities in the midwest.

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Fuji Pro 800Z

pushed 2 stops

Desaturated

Holga 120N

Fuji Pro 800Z --> 1600

Desaturated

Holga 120N

Kodak Tri-X

pushed one stop

 

My sleeve/hand got in the frame here. Something is telling me though that I subconciously wanted it there.

Museum of Contemporary Photography

 

Journaling the Work and Life in Chicago, one of the most beautiful cities in the midwest.

Holga 120N

Fomapan Classic 400

Critic, mentor, teacher, and influential photographer, Minor White is known for his sharply detailed photographs of architectural elements, landscape, and nude figures. His technically perfect prints reflect his engagement with the spiritual in the aesthetic. The contemplative quality of his work is evident in the multiple image Lighthouse and Wood, with its gestural sweeps of painted wood, a small but clearly defined moon, and blurred buildings in the background.

Influenced by close personal relationships with Ansel Adams, Alfred Stieglitz, and Edward Weston, Minor White is best known for sharply focused, tonally beautiful black-and-white prints which function as metaphors. First hired as a creative photographer for the US government’s Works Progress Administration, White became a teacher of photography, a curator, and a founding member of the Society for Photographic Education. His works are in the collections of The Art Institute of Chicago; Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; International Museum of Photography, George Eastman House, Rochester, New York; and the New York Public Library, among many other prestigious institutions. Born in Minneapolis in 1908, White died in 1976; his archive is located at the Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

I’m always mentally photographing everything as practice. – Minor White

archive.mocp.org/collections/permanent/white_minor.php

Holga 120N

Fuji Pro 800Z

800 --> 1600 ISO

desaturated

While passing through Stanley, I could not resist trying to reconstruct one of the great O. Winston Link's photographs of the last days of steam railroading on the Norfolk and Western, many of which were taken at night using a sophisticated array of lighting and a 4x5 format camera. One of his better known images was "Ghost Town" taken on January 31, 1957 showing the southbound N&W51 passing Main St. while policeman Weldon Painter patrols his beat.

 

While diesel Norfolk Southern trains still use the crossing at night, I had no hope of freezing their passage with the long exposure necessary without complex lighting. So, the taillights of passing automobiles and the lighted Christmas decorations had to stand in. Although taken on Christmas night 2014, my photograph also had to make allowances for the increased traffic and shoot from the street corner, rather than in the street itself as Link did. While this alters the perspective slightly, it is amazing how little has changed in Stanley in the 57 years between the images.

 

O. Winston Link's classic original can be seen at:

 

www.mocp.org/detail.php?t=objects&type=browse&f=m...

  

Work inspired by the great American photogrpaher Ray K. Metzker and his book Light Lines

 

At the entrance of the New Benaki Museum.

  

Αφιερωμένη στον zisskar γιααυτό

 

RX,2.8/28,HP5+

Holga 120N

Ilford Delta 3200 Pro

best when it's large

 

Oh those Columbia College students, always so artsy. It sounds like i'm making fun, but trust me, I'm not. I love this pac-man building. I assume this is a dorm/apartment building? It's on State just at Polk.

 

Another Columbia College/south loop/art association - Francesca and I saw some amazing photographs by Michael Wolf at the Columbia photography museum when we met up a little while ago. (sadly, the exhibition is now over.) There were a ton of photographs that Wolf had taken around Chicago of buildings like this one, and you could look at these things on a number of levels. On one hand, the side of the building always made a really interesting geometric texture. On the other hand, you could kind of look at it on the micro-level and see what people were up to in a number of different windows in each photograph. It was strangely voyeuristic. We saw someone's TV playing the Simpsons in one shot.

 

Anyway, the side of this building really reminded me of those. But it also made me wish I could be a few stories up in the air so I could get a shot of the building straight on, without the looking up angle. Interesting, nonetheless, and a new way to think about things.

My friend Hibiscusroto was generous enough to send me a Holga N for no apparent reason at all, which is of course, the best reason of all.

 

My deepest gratitude.

Hasselblad 500cm/ 80mm f2.8/ Kodak Portra 160/ Epson V600

"To Edith:

My heart and mind follow her at the pace of her gestures, of the rooms and the days.

During the night, we huddled against each other, like foxes in heat quest."

Emmet Gowin

www.mocp.org/detail.php?type=related&kv=7183&t=pe...

I have decided after many requests to purchase this image to put it on this website - thomcase.imagekind.com/

 

You may go here to purchase a print in many different sizes... Enjoy!

Holga 120N

Kodak Tri-X

Pushed 2 stops

Holga 120N

Ilford Delta Pro 3200

pinhole

*********

I always wanted to be a photographer. I was fascinated with the materials. But I never dreamed I would be having this much fun. I imagined something much less elusive, much more mundane. - Lee Friedlander

Journaling the Work and Life in Chicago, one of the most beautiful cities in the midwest.

One of my favourite photographers André Kertész has a book and the photo exhibition with the theme "On Reading".

 

Here is the link about his exhibition.

 

www.mocp.org/exhibitions/2006/06/andr%C3%A9-kert%C3%A9sz-...

 

We know reading is one of the most interesting activities (private or public). And I mean reading paper books and media like newspaper. And this will be no longer there in may be 10 years I am guessing as people will move to ebooks.

 

My images will be much less appealing compared to the ones of André Kertész. But still I would like to pay tribute to the great master.

 

This is a reading scene I saw in Minoru Park.

 

Happy Monday!

 

Nikon D300

Nikon 70-300mm F4-5.6 lens

Holga 120N

Kodak Portra 800

Next time, I am going to try ISO 50 for these multiple exposures...

 

Holga 120N

Kodak 400tx

i wish more people felt that photography was an adventure, the same as life itself, and felt that their individual feelings are worth expressing. to me, that makes photography more exciting. ~ harry callahan

 

click on image for best view

 

oloneo photoengine

Holga 120N

Ilford Delta Pro 3200

 

Good day collectors! It's Sara again. Today Jen's wrapping things up at NEXT in Chicago and is finally on her way back home. The next month or so looks relatively low-key and travel-free so you can look forward to your usual dose of JB art goodness in your inbox. But for today, you're stuck with me as I introduce two new works from Jeff Lewis: Contact High and Organic Oval.

 

Moments after we released Jeff's first edition, Inloveness Revisited, press inquiries started streaming in. Everyone wanted a little Inloveness. But after seeing how quickly the prints were disappearing, a couple of the requests fell through — editors realized they should feature works that would be around for their readers to acquire once their pages came to print. Lewis' print was featured in amNY and we figured the best thing to do was not let anyone else be disappointed. So, we got to work selecting new paintings for Jeff's next editions.

 

Jeff's website features mostly newer work but he's been fixated on ovals for at least the last decade, yielding the shape plenty of time to dictate his work. Given the scale of his canvases, it's easy to see how they might, in their monolithic presence, overtake the artist, allowing him to work intuitively and spontaneously, much like his predecessors from the New York School. Peek at Jeff's pic; he's a small but dedicated presence in front of his paintings.

 

As we were oohing and ahhing over all of Jeff's ovals and their gorgeous palettes, Jen and I were joined by Jane Mount who mentioned something along the lines of, "my brain certainly does not work the way his does!" which is really a great comment, not only in the context of Jeff vs. Jane's differing approaches to making art, but also in recognition of all the work we've featured on 20x200. Browse the archives and you'll see, we've been able to work with an incredible range of artists with diverse interests and approaches. Consider Beth Dow's work next to Donald Weber's, for example. And often, as in the case of Weber in particular, we have the opportunity to present work that might otherwise have a hard time finding its way into the hands of collectors, despite receiving some of the most prestigious awards for artists.

 

A lot of the artists we work with are featured in major collections; Ann Toebbe is a West Prize finalist, along with Hot Shot Georg Parthen (we have 20x200 editions with Georg in the works too!), putting 20x200 in good company. Since the West Collection brought the work of the finalists to NEXT, Ann and Georg were in attendance and paid visit to Jen and Jeffrey. Midwesterner Kevin Miyazaki also stopped by, along with Sarah McKenzie, of course, making team JBG feel right at home in the Windy City with 20x200 friends and family.

 

Jen is making one last stop in Chicago to meet and greet a few new friends at the Museum of Contemporary Photography. We're all fans of their print program which gives collectors the opportunity to acquire some incredible photography and support MoCP. I know Jen's already snagged Amy Stein's Hillside from her series Domesticated.

 

For today, we'll leave you with MoCP's photography as our own Hey, Hot Shot! is, unfortunately, offline and unavailable due to some very mysterious and poorly-timed hosting snafus. If you've tried to visit the site and/or apply for the Hey, Hot Shot! competition in the last 24 hours and have been denied access with the unfriendly "forbidden" notice, do not fear, we'll extend the competition deadline once the site is back up. Nobody who's tried to submit images will miss their chance. And we'll be featuring the best of the best contenders on the blog again in no time. More on that later! Tomorrow Youngna Park will tide you over with a sweet photography edition from a brand-new-to-20x200 artist. Until then!

For Utata's weekend project, Utata Pays Homage... my first attempt to emulate Victor Skrebneski.

Critic, mentor, teacher, and influential photographer, Minor White is known for his sharply detailed photographs of architectural elements, landscape, and nude figures. His technically perfect prints reflect his engagement with the spiritual in the aesthetic. The contemplative quality of his work is evident in the multiple image Lighthouse and Wood, with its gestural sweeps of painted wood, a small but clearly defined moon, and blurred buildings in the background.

Influenced by close personal relationships with Ansel Adams, Alfred Stieglitz, and Edward Weston, Minor White is best known for sharply focused, tonally beautiful black-and-white prints which function as metaphors. First hired as a creative photographer for the US government’s Works Progress Administration, White became a teacher of photography, a curator, and a founding member of the Society for Photographic Education. His works are in the collections of The Art Institute of Chicago; Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; International Museum of Photography, George Eastman House, Rochester, New York; and the New York Public Library, among many other prestigious institutions. Born in Minneapolis in 1908, White died in 1976; his archive is located at the Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

I’m always mentally photographing everything as practice. – Minor White

archive.mocp.org/collections/permanent/white_minor.php

 

Good day collectors! It's Sara again. Today Jen's wrapping things up at NEXT in Chicago and is finally on her way back home. The next month or so looks relatively low-key and travel-free so you can look forward to your usual dose of JB art goodness in your inbox. But for today, you're stuck with me as I introduce two new works from Jeff Lewis: Contact High and Organic Oval.

 

Moments after we released Jeff's first edition, Inloveness Revisited, press inquiries started streaming in. Everyone wanted a little Inloveness. But after seeing how quickly the prints were disappearing, a couple of the requests fell through — editors realized they should feature works that would be around for their readers to acquire once their pages came to print. Lewis' print was featured in amNY and we figured the best thing to do was not let anyone else be disappointed. So, we got to work selecting new paintings for Jeff's next editions.

 

Jeff's website features mostly newer work but he's been fixated on ovals for at least the last decade, yielding the shape plenty of time to dictate his work. Given the scale of his canvases, it's easy to see how they might, in their monolithic presence, overtake the artist, allowing him to work intuitively and spontaneously, much like his predecessors from the New York School. Peek at Jeff's pic; he's a small but dedicated presence in front of his paintings.

 

As we were oohing and ahhing over all of Jeff's ovals and their gorgeous palettes, Jen and I were joined by Jane Mount who mentioned something along the lines of, "my brain certainly does not work the way his does!" which is really a great comment, not only in the context of Jeff vs. Jane's differing approaches to making art, but also in recognition of all the work we've featured on 20x200. Browse the archives and you'll see, we've been able to work with an incredible range of artists with diverse interests and approaches. Consider Beth Dow's work next to Donald Weber's, for example. And often, as in the case of Weber in particular, we have the opportunity to present work that might otherwise have a hard time finding its way into the hands of collectors, despite receiving some of the most prestigious awards for artists.

 

A lot of the artists we work with are featured in major collections; Ann Toebbe is a West Prize finalist, along with Hot Shot Georg Parthen (we have 20x200 editions with Georg in the works too!), putting 20x200 in good company. Since the West Collection brought the work of the finalists to NEXT, Ann and Georg were in attendance and paid visit to Jen and Jeffrey. Midwesterner Kevin Miyazaki also stopped by, along with Sarah McKenzie, of course, making team JBG feel right at home in the Windy City with 20x200 friends and family.

 

Jen is making one last stop in Chicago to meet and greet a few new friends at the Museum of Contemporary Photography. We're all fans of their print program which gives collectors the opportunity to acquire some incredible photography and support MoCP. I know Jen's already snagged Amy Stein's Hillside from her series Domesticated.

 

For today, we'll leave you with MoCP's photography as our own Hey, Hot Shot! is, unfortunately, offline and unavailable due to some very mysterious and poorly-timed hosting snafus. If you've tried to visit the site and/or apply for the Hey, Hot Shot! competition in the last 24 hours and have been denied access with the unfriendly "forbidden" notice, do not fear, we'll extend the competition deadline once the site is back up. Nobody who's tried to submit images will miss their chance. And we'll be featuring the best of the best contenders on the blog again in no time. More on that later! Tomorrow Youngna Park will tide you over with a sweet photography edition from a brand-new-to-20x200 artist. Until then!

I recently taught myself to crochet but this is the only thing I've made since, so I took a different angle of it.

Holga 120N

Kodak Tri-X

pushed one stop

Critic, mentor, teacher, and influential photographer, Minor White is known for his sharply detailed photographs of architectural elements, landscape, and nude figures. His technically perfect prints reflect his engagement with the spiritual in the aesthetic. The contemplative quality of his work is evident in the multiple image Lighthouse and Wood, with its gestural sweeps of painted wood, a small but clearly defined moon, and blurred buildings in the background.

Influenced by close personal relationships with Ansel Adams, Alfred Stieglitz, and Edward Weston, Minor White is best known for sharply focused, tonally beautiful black-and-white prints which function as metaphors. First hired as a creative photographer for the US government’s Works Progress Administration, White became a teacher of photography, a curator, and a founding member of the Society for Photographic Education. His works are in the collections of The Art Institute of Chicago; Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; International Museum of Photography, George Eastman House, Rochester, New York; and the New York Public Library, among many other prestigious institutions. Born in Minneapolis in 1908, White died in 1976; his archive is located at the Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

I’m always mentally photographing everything as practice. – Minor White

archive.mocp.org/collections/permanent/white_minor.php

Critic, mentor, teacher, and influential photographer, Minor White is known for his sharply detailed photographs of architectural elements, landscape, and nude figures. His technically perfect prints reflect his engagement with the spiritual in the aesthetic. The contemplative quality of his work is evident in the multiple image Lighthouse and Wood, with its gestural sweeps of painted wood, a small but clearly defined moon, and blurred buildings in the background.

Influenced by close personal relationships with Ansel Adams, Alfred Stieglitz, and Edward Weston, Minor White is best known for sharply focused, tonally beautiful black-and-white prints which function as metaphors. First hired as a creative photographer for the US government’s Works Progress Administration, White became a teacher of photography, a curator, and a founding member of the Society for Photographic Education. His works are in the collections of The Art Institute of Chicago; Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; International Museum of Photography, George Eastman House, Rochester, New York; and the New York Public Library, among many other prestigious institutions. Born in Minneapolis in 1908, White died in 1976; his archive is located at the Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, New Jersey.

 

I’m always mentally photographing everything as practice. – Minor White

archive.mocp.org/collections/permanent/white_minor.php

Title: Prodigiorvm ac ostentorvm chronicon : quae praeter naturae ordinem, motum, et operationem, et in svperioribus & his inferioribus mundi regionibus, ab exordio mundi usque ad haec nostra tempora, acciderunt ...

Identifier: gri_prodigiorvma00lyko

Year: 1557 (1550s)

Authors: Lykosthenes, Konrad, 1518-1561 Kandel, David, d. 1587 Manuel, Hans Rudolf, 1525-1571

Subjects: Monsters Animals, Mythical Curiosities and wonders

Publisher: Basileae : Per Henricvm Petri

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

ceperat,tri<umphans inueclus^omen ui&oriac hoftibus oftendit:quia triumphus in urbem uiclricem,nonui<ftam>induci fo*let.Proximo pr£lio,amiffoexercitu occifus.Mithrida*ti aduerfusfocios bellu pa*ranti,prodigiaapparuerut»Stratopedo,ubi fenatus haberi folet, corui uulturemtundendo roftris occide*runt. In eundem locum R*dus inges coclodemiffum.Ifidis fpecies uifa, fulminepctere. Lucum Furiarumcum Mithridates fuccenderet, rifus exauditus inges,fineaurhore, Cumarufpf*cum iuffu uirginem Fu*rrjs immolaret, e iugulopucllae rifus ortus, turba*uit facrifidum.ClaffisMithridatis inThcffalia a Romanis in praelio amiffa»Cinna 8c* Mario per bellaciuilia crudeliter faruienti*bus,Rompin caftris GneiPomperj coclum ruere ui*fum,armafignaquetac1:a,militesexanimati.IpfePompeiusaffla«tus fidere,interrjt. Leclum eius populus diripuit, corpus un*cotraxit, qu6d difcrimineciuiliperfeueraffet periclitantipatriaenofuccurrere:cum&imperium,& maximoshaberet exercitus. Peire;um Ante Chirftum.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

mno muni. & oftentis: 207 m*>af. Peirattim Sylla cum oppugnarct, unus miles cius aggeirem fercs,e^animatusfulmine.ArufpexrefpO!fdit,Diuturnolabore5quodcaputiacentis inoppidum uerfum effet,introitum &C ui&oriamRomanis fignificare, Poft breue tempus Athencc cV Pcirseunra | Sylla capta. IlioaC. Fim* I bria incefo,cum aedes quo* i que Minerua? deflagratfet, J| inter ruinas fimulachru an* g tiquiflimum inuiolatum fte tit,fpemc£ reftitutionis op* j| pido portendit. 1 n agroMu ^ tinenfi duomontesintcr fe* fe concurreruntjcrepituma ximo affultantes > receden* __ tescpj intcr eosflamma fu* =S mocp in coclum exeunte. eo concurfuuillac omneselifa?,

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Holga 120N

Fuji Pro 800Z --> 1600

Desaturated

"Inside Out" was a one-night exhibition of audio and visual installations in the future home of the National Public Housing Museum, the former Jane Addams Homes, 1322-24 West Taylor Street, Chicago.

 

Set in the former residential units, interviews with public housing residents were paired with photographs by Jack Bridges, John Brooks, Patricia Evans, Scott Fortino, Bridget Montgomery, Bob Natkin, Jason Reblando and me, David Schalliol. Friday, April 17, 2009

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