new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged Luxembourg+Grand+Duchy

The Ardennes (/ɑrˈdɛn/; Luxembourgish: Ardennen; also known as Ardennes Forest) is a region of extensive forests, rough terrain, rolling hills and ridges formed by the geological features of the Ardennes mountain range and the Moselle and Meuse River basins. Geologically, the range is a western extension of the Eifel and both were raised during the Givetian stage, of the Devonian (419.2 ± 3.2 to about 358 million years ago) as were several other named ranges of the same greater range.

 

Primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into Germany and France (lending its name to the Ardennes department and the Champagne-Ardenne région), and geologically into the Eifel—the eastern extension of the Ardennes Forest into Bitburg-Prüm, Germany, most of the Ardenne proper consists of southeastern Wallonia, the southern and more rural part of the Kingdom of Belgium (away from the coastal plain but encompassing over half the kingdoms total area). The eastern part of the Ardennes forms the northernmost third of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, also called "Oesling" (Luxembourgish: Éislek), and on the southeast the Eifel region continues into Rhineland-Palatinate (German state).

 

The trees and rivers of the Ardenne provided the underlying charcoal industry assets that enabled the great industrial period of Wallonia in the 18th, 19th centuries, when it was arguably the second great industrial region of the world, after England. The greater region maintained an industrial eminence into the 20th century after coal replaced charcoal in metallurgy.

 

Allied generals in World War II felt the region was impenetrable to massed vehicular traffic and especially armor, so the area was effectively "all but undefended" during the war, leading to the German Army twice using the region as an invasion route into Northern France and Southern Belgium via Luxembourg in the Battle of France and the later Battle of the Bulge.

 

source: Wikipedia

we've had an one day trip to luxembourg yesterday. it was very cloudy when we started but luckily the weather wasn't that bad there.

few more shots will follow soon!

 

better viewed large on black

 

_________________________

Exposure: 0.001 sec (1/1250)

Aperture: f/5.0

Focal Length: 17 mm

ISO Speed: 200

Vous avez déjà vu le petit château d'eau sur d'autres photos, mais vu depuis la Belgique. Le voici vu de l'autre côté au Grand-Duché de Luxembourg.

 

You saw already the watertower from the Belgium side. Here it is at the other side, seen from the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg.

 

View Large - Voir en grand

We made a trip this weekend to the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. One day we also visited the 'Mullerthal'; a very nice place with great opportunities for people with a camera...

 

I created this shot with a tripod; polariser filter and 2 seconds-timer...

 

I wish you all a great day!

The chairlift to the amazing viewpoint at Vianden.

Ciudad de Luxemburgo. Stadt Luxemburg. City of Luxembourg Luxemburgo. Luxemburg. Luxembourg

______________

es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxemburgo_(ciudad)

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxemburg_(Stadt)

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxembourg_(city)

 

_______________

Copyright Notice

 

Please do not use my images without my permission. This includes blogging them without my consent. All my photos are my copyright and may not be used or reproduced in any way without my express permission.

 

es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxemburgo_(ciudad)

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxemburg_(Stadt)

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxembourg_(city)

 

_______________

Copyright Notice

 

Please do not use my images without my permission. This includes blogging them without my consent. All my photos are my copyright and may not be used or reproduced in any way without my express permission.

 

The Ardennes (/ɑrˈdɛn/; Luxembourgish: Ardennen; also known as Ardennes Forest) is a region of extensive forests, rough terrain, rolling hills and ridges formed by the geological features of the Ardennes mountain range and the Moselle and Meuse River basins. Geologically, the range is a western extension of the Eifel and both were raised during the Givetian stage, of the Devonian (419.2 ± 3.2 to about 358 million years ago) as were several other named ranges of the same greater range.

 

Primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into Germany and France (lending its name to the Ardennes department and the Champagne-Ardenne région), and geologically into the Eifel—the eastern extension of the Ardennes Forest into Bitburg-Prüm, Germany, most of the Ardenne proper consists of southeastern Wallonia, the southern and more rural part of the Kingdom of Belgium (away from the coastal plain but encompassing over half the kingdoms total area). The eastern part of the Ardennes forms the northernmost third of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, also called "Oesling" (Luxembourgish: Éislek), and on the southeast the Eifel region continues into Rhineland-Palatinate (German state).

 

The trees and rivers of the Ardenne provided the underlying charcoal industry assets that enabled the great industrial period of Wallonia in the 18th, 19th centuries, when it was arguably the second great industrial region of the world, after England. The greater region maintained an industrial eminence into the 20th century after coal replaced charcoal in metallurgy.

 

Allied generals in World War II felt the region was impenetrable to massed vehicular traffic and especially armor, so the area was effectively "all but undefended" during the war, leading to the German Army twice using the region as an invasion route into Northern France and Southern Belgium via Luxembourg in the Battle of France and the later Battle of the Bulge.

 

source: Wikipedia

The Ardennes (/ɑrˈdɛn/; Luxembourgish: Ardennen; also known as Ardennes Forest) is a region of extensive forests, rough terrain, rolling hills and ridges formed by the geological features of the Ardennes mountain range and the Moselle and Meuse River basins. Geologically, the range is a western extension of the Eifel and both were raised during the Givetian stage, of the Devonian (419.2 ± 3.2 to about 358 million years ago) as were several other named ranges of the same greater range.

 

Primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into Germany and France (lending its name to the Ardennes department and the Champagne-Ardenne région), and geologically into the Eifel—the eastern extension of the Ardennes Forest into Bitburg-Prüm, Germany, most of the Ardenne proper consists of southeastern Wallonia, the southern and more rural part of the Kingdom of Belgium (away from the coastal plain but encompassing over half the kingdoms total area). The eastern part of the Ardennes forms the northernmost third of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, also called "Oesling" (Luxembourgish: Éislek), and on the southeast the Eifel region continues into Rhineland-Palatinate (German state).

 

The trees and rivers of the Ardenne provided the underlying charcoal industry assets that enabled the great industrial period of Wallonia in the 18th, 19th centuries, when it was arguably the second great industrial region of the world, after England. The greater region maintained an industrial eminence into the 20th century after coal replaced charcoal in metallurgy.

 

Allied generals in World War II felt the region was impenetrable to massed vehicular traffic and especially armor, so the area was effectively "all but undefended" during the war, leading to the German Army twice using the region as an invasion route into Northern France and Southern Belgium via Luxembourg in the Battle of France and the later Battle of the Bulge.

 

source: Wikipedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxembourg

_____________________________

 

© 2013 Andreas Dengs - All rights reserved.

 

Please contact us if you are interested in one of our images.

_____________________________

 

Please push "F" key on your keybord to favour this image and "C" key to leave a comment :-)

Thank you!

 

Andreas's most interesting | recent photos on Flickriver

 

Lara's most interesting | recent photos on Flickriver

 

Twitter | Tumblr | Wordpress | Redbubble | Facebook Andreas | Facebook Lara

The Ardennes (/ɑrˈdɛn/; Luxembourgish: Ardennen; also known as Ardennes Forest) is a region of extensive forests, rough terrain, rolling hills and ridges formed by the geological features of the Ardennes mountain range and the Moselle and Meuse River basins. Geologically, the range is a western extension of the Eifel and both were raised during the Givetian stage, of the Devonian (419.2 ± 3.2 to about 358 million years ago) as were several other named ranges of the same greater range.

 

Primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into Germany and France (lending its name to the Ardennes department and the Champagne-Ardenne région), and geologically into the Eifel—the eastern extension of the Ardennes Forest into Bitburg-Prüm, Germany, most of the Ardenne proper consists of southeastern Wallonia, the southern and more rural part of the Kingdom of Belgium (away from the coastal plain but encompassing over half the kingdoms total area). The eastern part of the Ardennes forms the northernmost third of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, also called "Oesling" (Luxembourgish: Éislek), and on the southeast the Eifel region continues into Rhineland-Palatinate (German state).

 

The trees and rivers of the Ardenne provided the underlying charcoal industry assets that enabled the great industrial period of Wallonia in the 18th, 19th centuries, when it was arguably the second great industrial region of the world, after England. The greater region maintained an industrial eminence into the 20th century after coal replaced charcoal in metallurgy.

 

Allied generals in World War II felt the region was impenetrable to massed vehicular traffic and especially armor, so the area was effectively "all but undefended" during the war, leading to the German Army twice using the region as an invasion route into Northern France and Southern Belgium via Luxembourg in the Battle of France and the later Battle of the Bulge.

 

source: Wikipedia

After a long absence, here is a second image from this small series of Long Exposure architectural shots of the of the Philharmonie building in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, and was taken in March this year.

This is a building designed by Christian de Portzamparc.

You can see some more information on his site here.

www.portzamparc.com/en/projects/philharmonie-luxembourg/

As well as his other works.

This is a beautiful building to both visit and especially photograph, their are so many facets and angles and the changing light can change so much in the overall splendor of the buildings design.

 

This is part of a small series from here.

 

Canon 550D

Tamron 10-24mm

Lee Filters Big Stopper 10 Stop

Lee Filters Neutral Density 3 Stop

90 second exposure

Photoshop CS5

Silver Efex Pro 2

Using this image without my permission is illegal !!

 

© 2011 Elisabeth0320 All Rights Reserved

The Ardennes (/ɑrˈdɛn/; Luxembourgish: Ardennen; also known as Ardennes Forest) is a region of extensive forests, rough terrain, rolling hills and ridges formed by the geological features of the Ardennes mountain range and the Moselle and Meuse River basins. Geologically, the range is a western extension of the Eifel and both were raised during the Givetian stage, of the Devonian (419.2 ± 3.2 to about 358 million years ago) as were several other named ranges of the same greater range.

 

Primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into Germany and France (lending its name to the Ardennes department and the Champagne-Ardenne région), and geologically into the Eifel—the eastern extension of the Ardennes Forest into Bitburg-Prüm, Germany, most of the Ardenne proper consists of southeastern Wallonia, the southern and more rural part of the Kingdom of Belgium (away from the coastal plain but encompassing over half the kingdoms total area). The eastern part of the Ardennes forms the northernmost third of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, also called "Oesling" (Luxembourgish: Éislek), and on the southeast the Eifel region continues into Rhineland-Palatinate (German state).

 

The trees and rivers of the Ardenne provided the underlying charcoal industry assets that enabled the great industrial period of Wallonia in the 18th, 19th centuries, when it was arguably the second great industrial region of the world, after England. The greater region maintained an industrial eminence into the 20th century after coal replaced charcoal in metallurgy.

 

Allied generals in World War II felt the region was impenetrable to massed vehicular traffic and especially armor, so the area was effectively "all but undefended" during the war, leading to the German Army twice using the region as an invasion route into Northern France and Southern Belgium via Luxembourg in the Battle of France and the later Battle of the Bulge.

 

source: Wikipedia

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 79 80