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The Ardennes (/ɑrˈdɛn/; Luxembourgish: Ardennen; also known as Ardennes Forest) is a region of extensive forests, rough terrain, rolling hills and ridges formed by the geological features of the Ardennes mountain range and the Moselle and Meuse River basins. Geologically, the range is a western extension of the Eifel and both were raised during the Givetian stage, of the Devonian (419.2 ± 3.2 to about 358 million years ago) as were several other named ranges of the same greater range.

 

Primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into Germany and France (lending its name to the Ardennes department and the Champagne-Ardenne région), and geologically into the Eifel—the eastern extension of the Ardennes Forest into Bitburg-Prüm, Germany, most of the Ardenne proper consists of southeastern Wallonia, the southern and more rural part of the Kingdom of Belgium (away from the coastal plain but encompassing over half the kingdoms total area). The eastern part of the Ardennes forms the northernmost third of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, also called "Oesling" (Luxembourgish: Éislek), and on the southeast the Eifel region continues into Rhineland-Palatinate (German state).

 

The trees and rivers of the Ardenne provided the underlying charcoal industry assets that enabled the great industrial period of Wallonia in the 18th, 19th centuries, when it was arguably the second great industrial region of the world, after England. The greater region maintained an industrial eminence into the 20th century after coal replaced charcoal in metallurgy.

 

Allied generals in World War II felt the region was impenetrable to massed vehicular traffic and especially armor, so the area was effectively "all but undefended" during the war, leading to the German Army twice using the region as an invasion route into Northern France and Southern Belgium via Luxembourg in the Battle of France and the later Battle of the Bulge.

 

source: Wikipedia

we've had an one day trip to luxembourg yesterday. it was very cloudy when we started but luckily the weather wasn't that bad there.

few more shots will follow soon!

 

better viewed large on black

 

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Exposure: 0.001 sec (1/1250)

Aperture: f/5.0

Focal Length: 17 mm

ISO Speed: 200

Vous avez déjà vu le petit château d'eau sur d'autres photos, mais vu depuis la Belgique. Le voici vu de l'autre côté au Grand-Duché de Luxembourg.

 

You saw already the watertower from the Belgium side. Here it is at the other side, seen from the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg.

 

View Large - Voir en grand

Le canal de Meuse et Moselle ou canal de l'Ourthe est un projet industriel entrepris au début du XIXe siècle, dans une région qui correspond aujourd’hui à la Belgique et au Luxembourg, pour relier par voie d'eau la Meuse et la Moselle.

Le projet est soutenu par Guillaume Ier des Pays-Bas et mis au point par Remi De Puydt1. Il prévoit la canalisation de 300 à 400 kilomètres de voie navigable et la construction de 205 écluses ainsi qu'un tunnel de plus de deux kilomètres. Le canal aurait permis de relier les bassins de la Meuse et du Rhin, permettant le passage de petites embarcations (betchetes dans la région de Liège) par le massif ardennais. L'entreprise, lancée en 1827, sera affectée par des problèmes de financement. Les incertitudes liées à l'avenir géopolitique de la région après la révolution belge de 1830 et l'invention du chemin de fer mineront le projet. L'indépendance reconnue du Grand-Duché du Luxembourg au terme du Traité des XXIV articles en 1839 provoquera son arrêt définitif.

Comme le projet du canal Meuse-Moselle qui était conçu comme canal à bief de partage a dû être abandonné pour les raisons citées plus haut, on a quand même redémarré le chantier pour construire un canal latéral à l'Ourthe qui fut mis en service en 1847.

Sur ce canal 17 écluses furent construites entre Angleur et Comblain-au-Pont. L'exploitation entre Tilff et Comblain est abandonnée à l'époque de la Première Guerre mondiale, et la section restante régulièrement utilisée jusque 1948. Le canal en amont d'Angleur sera alors progressivement remblayé

 

The Meuse and Moselle canal or the Ourthe canal is an industrial project undertaken in the early 19th century in a region that now corresponds to Belgium and Luxembourg, to connect by water Meuse and Moselle .

The project is supported by William I of the Netherlands and developed by Remi De Puydt1. It plans to channel 300 to 400 kilometers of waterway and build 205 locks and a tunnel of more than two kilometers. The canal would have made it possible to connect the basins of the Meuse and the Rhine, allowing the passage of small boats (betchetes in the region of Liège) by the Ardennes massif. The company, launched in 1827, will be affected by funding problems. The uncertainties linked to the geopolitical future of the region after the Belgian revolution of 1830 and the invention of the railway will undermine the project. The recognized independence of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg under the terms of the Treaty of XXIV Articles in 1839 will bring about its definitive arrest.

Since the project of the Meuse-Moselle canal, which was designed as a canal with a shared reach, had to be abandoned for the reasons mentioned above, it was nevertheless restarted to construct a lateral canal at the Ourthe which was put into service in 1847.

On this canal 17 locks were built between Angleur and Comblain-au-Pont. The operation between Tilff and Comblain was abandoned during the First World War and the remaining section was regularly used until 1948. The canal upstream of Angleur was then gradually filled

 

We made a trip this weekend to the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. One day we also visited the 'Mullerthal'; a very nice place with great opportunities for people with a camera...

 

I created this shot with a tripod; polariser filter and 2 seconds-timer...

 

I wish you all a great day!

The chairlift to the amazing viewpoint at Vianden.

Ciudad de Luxemburgo. Stadt Luxemburg. City of Luxembourg Luxemburgo. Luxemburg. Luxembourg

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es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxemburgo_(ciudad)

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxemburg_(Stadt)

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxembourg_(city)

 

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Copyright Notice

 

Please do not use my images without my permission. This includes blogging them without my consent. All my photos are my copyright and may not be used or reproduced in any way without my express permission.

 

The Ardennes (/ɑrˈdɛn/; Luxembourgish: Ardennen; also known as Ardennes Forest) is a region of extensive forests, rough terrain, rolling hills and ridges formed by the geological features of the Ardennes mountain range and the Moselle and Meuse River basins. Geologically, the range is a western extension of the Eifel and both were raised during the Givetian stage, of the Devonian (419.2 ± 3.2 to about 358 million years ago) as were several other named ranges of the same greater range.

 

Primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into Germany and France (lending its name to the Ardennes department and the Champagne-Ardenne région), and geologically into the Eifel—the eastern extension of the Ardennes Forest into Bitburg-Prüm, Germany, most of the Ardenne proper consists of southeastern Wallonia, the southern and more rural part of the Kingdom of Belgium (away from the coastal plain but encompassing over half the kingdoms total area). The eastern part of the Ardennes forms the northernmost third of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, also called "Oesling" (Luxembourgish: Éislek), and on the southeast the Eifel region continues into Rhineland-Palatinate (German state).

 

The trees and rivers of the Ardenne provided the underlying charcoal industry assets that enabled the great industrial period of Wallonia in the 18th, 19th centuries, when it was arguably the second great industrial region of the world, after England. The greater region maintained an industrial eminence into the 20th century after coal replaced charcoal in metallurgy.

 

Allied generals in World War II felt the region was impenetrable to massed vehicular traffic and especially armor, so the area was effectively "all but undefended" during the war, leading to the German Army twice using the region as an invasion route into Northern France and Southern Belgium via Luxembourg in the Battle of France and the later Battle of the Bulge.

 

source: Wikipedia

The Ardennes (/ɑrˈdɛn/; Luxembourgish: Ardennen; also known as Ardennes Forest) is a region of extensive forests, rough terrain, rolling hills and ridges formed by the geological features of the Ardennes mountain range and the Moselle and Meuse River basins. Geologically, the range is a western extension of the Eifel and both were raised during the Givetian stage, of the Devonian (419.2 ± 3.2 to about 358 million years ago) as were several other named ranges of the same greater range.

 

Primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into Germany and France (lending its name to the Ardennes department and the Champagne-Ardenne région), and geologically into the Eifel—the eastern extension of the Ardennes Forest into Bitburg-Prüm, Germany, most of the Ardenne proper consists of southeastern Wallonia, the southern and more rural part of the Kingdom of Belgium (away from the coastal plain but encompassing over half the kingdoms total area). The eastern part of the Ardennes forms the northernmost third of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, also called "Oesling" (Luxembourgish: Éislek), and on the southeast the Eifel region continues into Rhineland-Palatinate (German state).

 

The trees and rivers of the Ardenne provided the underlying charcoal industry assets that enabled the great industrial period of Wallonia in the 18th, 19th centuries, when it was arguably the second great industrial region of the world, after England. The greater region maintained an industrial eminence into the 20th century after coal replaced charcoal in metallurgy.

 

Allied generals in World War II felt the region was impenetrable to massed vehicular traffic and especially armor, so the area was effectively "all but undefended" during the war, leading to the German Army twice using the region as an invasion route into Northern France and Southern Belgium via Luxembourg in the Battle of France and the later Battle of the Bulge.

 

source: Wikipedia

es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxemburgo_(ciudad)

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxemburg_(Stadt)

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxembourg_(city)

 

_______________

Copyright Notice

 

Please do not use my images without my permission. This includes blogging them without my consent. All my photos are my copyright and may not be used or reproduced in any way without my express permission.

 

The Ardennes (/ɑrˈdɛn/; Luxembourgish: Ardennen; also known as Ardennes Forest) is a region of extensive forests, rough terrain, rolling hills and ridges formed by the geological features of the Ardennes mountain range and the Moselle and Meuse River basins. Geologically, the range is a western extension of the Eifel and both were raised during the Givetian stage, of the Devonian (419.2 ± 3.2 to about 358 million years ago) as were several other named ranges of the same greater range.

 

Primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into Germany and France (lending its name to the Ardennes department and the Champagne-Ardenne région), and geologically into the Eifel—the eastern extension of the Ardennes Forest into Bitburg-Prüm, Germany, most of the Ardenne proper consists of southeastern Wallonia, the southern and more rural part of the Kingdom of Belgium (away from the coastal plain but encompassing over half the kingdoms total area). The eastern part of the Ardennes forms the northernmost third of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, also called "Oesling" (Luxembourgish: Éislek), and on the southeast the Eifel region continues into Rhineland-Palatinate (German state).

 

The trees and rivers of the Ardenne provided the underlying charcoal industry assets that enabled the great industrial period of Wallonia in the 18th, 19th centuries, when it was arguably the second great industrial region of the world, after England. The greater region maintained an industrial eminence into the 20th century after coal replaced charcoal in metallurgy.

 

Allied generals in World War II felt the region was impenetrable to massed vehicular traffic and especially armor, so the area was effectively "all but undefended" during the war, leading to the German Army twice using the region as an invasion route into Northern France and Southern Belgium via Luxembourg in the Battle of France and the later Battle of the Bulge.

 

source: Wikipedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luxembourg

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The Ardennes (/ɑrˈdɛn/; Luxembourgish: Ardennen; also known as Ardennes Forest) is a region of extensive forests, rough terrain, rolling hills and ridges formed by the geological features of the Ardennes mountain range and the Moselle and Meuse River basins. Geologically, the range is a western extension of the Eifel and both were raised during the Givetian stage, of the Devonian (419.2 ± 3.2 to about 358 million years ago) as were several other named ranges of the same greater range.

 

Primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into Germany and France (lending its name to the Ardennes department and the Champagne-Ardenne région), and geologically into the Eifel—the eastern extension of the Ardennes Forest into Bitburg-Prüm, Germany, most of the Ardenne proper consists of southeastern Wallonia, the southern and more rural part of the Kingdom of Belgium (away from the coastal plain but encompassing over half the kingdoms total area). The eastern part of the Ardennes forms the northernmost third of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, also called "Oesling" (Luxembourgish: Éislek), and on the southeast the Eifel region continues into Rhineland-Palatinate (German state).

 

The trees and rivers of the Ardenne provided the underlying charcoal industry assets that enabled the great industrial period of Wallonia in the 18th, 19th centuries, when it was arguably the second great industrial region of the world, after England. The greater region maintained an industrial eminence into the 20th century after coal replaced charcoal in metallurgy.

 

Allied generals in World War II felt the region was impenetrable to massed vehicular traffic and especially armor, so the area was effectively "all but undefended" during the war, leading to the German Army twice using the region as an invasion route into Northern France and Southern Belgium via Luxembourg in the Battle of France and the later Battle of the Bulge.

 

source: Wikipedia

Using this image without my permission is illegal !!

 

© 2011 Elisabeth0320 All Rights Reserved

After a long absence, here is a second image from this small series of Long Exposure architectural shots of the of the Philharmonie building in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, and was taken in March this year.

This is a building designed by Christian de Portzamparc.

You can see some more information on his site here.

www.portzamparc.com/en/projects/philharmonie-luxembourg/

As well as his other works.

This is a beautiful building to both visit and especially photograph, their are so many facets and angles and the changing light can change so much in the overall splendor of the buildings design.

 

This is part of a small series from here.

 

Canon 550D

Tamron 10-24mm

Lee Filters Big Stopper 10 Stop

Lee Filters Neutral Density 3 Stop

90 second exposure

Photoshop CS5

Silver Efex Pro 2

(taken from Luxembourg City 2010)

Luxembourg City is a commune with city status, and the capital of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. It is located at the confluence of the Alzette and Pétrusse Rivers in southern Luxembourg. The city contains the historic Luxembourg Castle, established by the Franks in the Early Middle Ages, around which a settlement developed.

 

Luxembourg, communément appelée d’Stad (« la Ville » en luxembourgeois) et plus rarement surnommée « Gibraltar du Nord » ou le « Cœur vert de l'Europe » (en raison de ses fortifications et de sa verdure), est la capitale du Luxembourg et la 5e place financière d'Europe[1]. Elle est située au confluent de l'Alzette et de la Pétrusse.

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[ Grand Garden Atrium in the HEART OF EUROPE ] The Sofitel Europe Luxembourg : Grand Duchy of Luxembourg

 

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An other version of the Alzette river in Luxembourg City near the abbaye de Neumünster, Grund

a cavement in an industrial building in the south of Luxembourg

Autumnal shot of the Moselle river and surroundings.

The city of Luxembourg (Luxembourgish: Lëtzebuerg, German: Luxemburg), also known as Luxembourg City (Luxembourgish: Stad Lëtzebuerg, French: Ville de Luxembourg, German: Luxemburg Stadt), is a commune with city status, and the capital of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. It is located at the confluence of the Alzette and Pétrusse Rivers in southern Luxembourg. The city contains the historic Luxembourg Castle, established by the Franks in the Early Middle Ages, around which a settlement developed.

 

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Luxembourg City lies at the heart of Western Europe, situated 213 km (132 mi) by road from Brussels, 372 km (231 mi) from Paris, 209 km (130 mi) from Cologne, and 65 km (40 mi) from Metz in northeast France.

 

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In 2009, Luxembourg was ranked as having the third highest GDP - per capita at $79,600 (US Dollars) with the city having developed into a banking and administrative centre. It is a seat of several institutions of the European Union, including the European Court of Justice, the European Court of Auditors, and the European Investment Bank.

 

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Luxembourg City is the Seat for the Luxembourg Government. The Grand Ducal Family of Luxembourg lives in Colmar-Berg.

 

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For more unique insights into the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, please consult the following link and enjoy the journey:

 

WIKIPEDIA = Luxembourg City = Unique in the WORLD

 

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Vision is the art of seeing what is invisible to others.

 

----- Jonathan Swift

 

Now the snow has gone here in Eastern France it's time to come back to my other love in Long Exposure photography, Architecture.

 

This is an image of the Philharmonie building in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, and was taken on a shoot with +Stany KUSTER in March this year.

This is a building designed by Christian de Portzamparc.

You can see some more information on his site here.

www.portzamparc.com/en/projects/philharmonie-luxembourg/

As well as his other works.

This is a beautiful building to both visit and especially photograph, their are so many facets and angles and the changing light can change so much in the overall splendor of the buildings design.

 

This is part of a small series from here.

 

Canon 550D

Tamron 10-24mm

Lee Filters Big Stopper 10 Stop

Lee Filters Neutral Density 3 Stop

76 second exposure

Photoshop CS5

Silver Efex Pro 2

Post processing time 47hrs

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 79 80