new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged Luime

This is Peppers' best friend Luimes. They grew up together and together they wrecked my garden more then once. Now both Pepper and Luimes are 'grown ups' and their friendship has cooled a little, both being macho males ... Still, whenever we meet, Luimes comes running to Pep and they behave like puppies for 10 seconds before they remember to behave like cool dudes.

 

2 nov 2008

#dagaanbieding Handgemaakte Luimes en Luimes ovale vazenset: van 69,95 voor 29,95 dagkoopje.eu/#buythistoday

In slechts drie en een half jaar meer dan 190 concerten over heel het Iberische schiereiland en Frankrijk. Bongo Botrako is een band van de hand van Uri Giné en vindt deels zijn oorsprong op Placa de la Alergria in Tarrogona. De voetafdruk van de straat is nog zeer duidelijk in de muziek terug te vinden. In oktober 2010 was daar het eerste album: "Todos los dias sale el sol" of te wel "Elke dag komt de zon" en zo klinkt het ook. Een mix van rumba, reggae, ska, punk en vooral veel vreugde.

 

Note:

Live echt een feest. Super enthousiast, energiek, vrolijk, passievol.

Identifier: railwaylocomotiv18newy

Title: Railway and locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock

Year: 1901 (1900s)

Authors:

Subjects: Railroads Locomotives

Publisher: New York : A. Sinclair Co

Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

a Sate and Sane Ifi Majority Really Rules Where IC Inventors and Poets 17 Locomotive Engineer. Responsibility of... 18Open Hearth Furnace, Picture of Creation IS Mechanical Stokers. Opposition to 18 Sfoel Cars: for New England 20 June Conventions. The 80 R!!£l>^i;:.EiRiiKeriii$ Copyright by Angus Sinclair Co.—1905 A Practical Journal of Railway Motive Power and Rolling Stock Vol. XVIII. 136 Liberty Street. New York, February, 1905 No. 2 Cars and Carriages. ;nc the luimes coach, chariot, cart and a was a development of the humble char-On the .■\niencan continent a railway srcat variety of foreign words used to ette, still to be seen in Mexico, in Cen-train is composed of various kinds of denote a wheeled vehicle. tral Africa, in India and in other easterncars, day, Pullman, chair and a great va- Tracing the growth of the car is an countries that have been little influencedriety of freight vehicles, but all called interesting study. Those who have en- by progressive tendencies.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

PiiNNSVLVANIA RAII.RO.^l) TKAIX CROSSING FAIRMOINT IARK ISRIDCE, PHILADELPHIA cars. In Europe and other parts of the joyed the privilege of examining Egyp- For long centuries the car remained world they have carriages and coaches tian and Assyrian slab sculptures would a two wheeled vehicle, the four wheeled for passengers and wagons for freight, notice that the war chariot was used in carriage being a comparatively recent Our word car comes from shortening those early periods of the worlds his- invention. It may have been that the the word carriage. Besides the car there tory. It is likely that the war chariot fimeral procession for Jacob that went 52 RAILWAY AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERING February, 1905. ^out of the land of Egypt contained fourwheeled vehicles, but history gives noinformation to this effect, as sculpturedown even to Roman times tells nothingabout the development of the car repre-sented by the addition of another pairof wheels. This was strange, for we aretold that Solom

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

"workshop concert fotografie Joop Luimes" Foto gemaakt op Epop.

 

"Blue Labeled"

Bluesy Rock groep rond gitarist Paul Crezee. De vier bandleden hebben ieder meer dan 20 jaar ervaring in uiteenlopende live en studio projecten. Debuut EP "Naked" is in februari 2011 in de Mailmen studio in Utrecht opgenomen. Ze hebben de Battle of the Bands gewonnen.

www.bluelabeled.com

Medio 2011 bracht Andre Manuel de solo-cd Dollekamp uit. Om het materiaal van de plaat live te kunnen spelen formeerde hij de band "Dancing Dollekamp". Hiervoor werden uit alle hoeken en gaten artiesten tevoorschijn gehaald: Theun Supheert (o.a. De Ketterse Fanfare), Adri Karsenberg (o.a. Fratsen), Ottoboy (fameus eenmanspunkorkest), Bert Kuipers (o.a. Quasimodo), DJ DNA (o.a. Urban Dance Squad) en Henk-Jan Hoekjen (o.a. De Stilletto's). Dit bonte gezelschap brengt behalve (Twentstalig) materiaal van de cd Dollekamp ook nieuw Duits- en Engelstalig materiaal ten gehore. Overal volgen lovende recenties. Niet samen te vatten in muziekstijl, niet te plaatsen in een hokje, niet te evenaren. Dat moet je meemaken.

 

www.dancingdollekamp.com

Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_25_1

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

.lAM .\i;v _'7, I'.nit. The Weekly Florists^ Review* 25 !(liiiit tliiit tlicy il(t not iilrciidy know all licn^ is about it. 'I'Ik! cariKitiou, or, to cxincss tlui iiaiiio II sti'ii-tl.v l)otanit-al terms. Diautluis aryopliyliiis, is. according to l>oii(lon, a .itivc of Hoiitlicrn Europe, and lias Ijccu lund growing naturally in Kngland. Tlu^ genoric name, diantlms, is coni- ■ lundt'd of two (ireok words, meaning ic llower of the gods, or the Deity, which IS led certain writers to cnil it the i\ine llower. a name tlint might well be -.rlianged for one more simph' and com- rehensive. The s[»ecitic luime, (.'aryo- hyllus, has refei'cnce tn llie ch)\e like lagrance of tiie (lowers, wliilo the coni- i(in name, carnation, lias for its base If Latin word carnis, meaning llesli, in liision to the pink or tlesli color of the ■ iwci's in their wild state. 'I'lier*' iire many ditlermt sjx-cies in 'e genus dianthus, including the f;i- ■:ili:ir Sweet William; hut the onti that iiisl nearly resenddes the cai'nation in '■|)earauce is the pink, with its several .11 iet ies. Where it gr ilinuged its (diaracter that flowers four nihes in diameter are now jiroduced, a\iMi; a great luindier i>\' jietnls. Evolution of the Carnation. The ordinary garden carnation is a II iidy perennial that blooms but once a ;-ar, and the Ihnists' carnation of today I- undoubtedly the resull ot' (diangi'S that 'ia\e taken place in its haliits through ■i-lcctiug anil cultixating the most promis- ill;; plants produced by natural \aiiation, iiiilil now it may be had in bloom during ilic entire year. In the e\ olut iouar.v "|H'ratiou. however, it has lost a portion I its hai'diness, probably because ot' the iiiL;her temperature to which it has liccii subjected for generations during the cohl -i;isi)u of the yt^ar. although this loss 'Mild perha[)s be regained by reveising ■lie process that brought about the ' iiange, and gradually hardening the I'i.iiil until it could withstniid the rigors ■'I oiir severe w inters. This change from summer bloomiu'^ to |"ipetu;d blooming is not conliiied to the 'H nation, but has lieen accomplislieil in '!"• i-ase iif utiier pl.ants. < lirysauthe "iiiiiis have been grown from seeil that ^* I-- saved from the UKuith in the year, and the rose is " • of the most famili:ir exam|iles of a I' int that has been changecl Ifom an an d to a continuous bloomer, thiough the atnient ;iccorded t'l it under modern ' liods (it culture. ' I"' cain.ition llower today, and cspc- l\ in this i-ouulrv, is ijie most jiopular '■r proiluced by the lloiist. Iniviiig 'aken .'ind p.asscl the nidtime favoi- 'he rose, in the race for ]iopulai' I. and iliste;ii| nt' beill!' reteirecl to ■ 'I'' div ine llower. il iiiiglil I nilli be called the | pie "s lloWer. Good Reasons for Popularity. beciune really pojiiilar. a llower I'ossess several i|ualilic;it iiuis. the "' vvhicli is be.auty. a somewhat in 'ble ;iiid elusive (|iiality. In addi !' should have ;i pleasant odor. ,ind pable of being used in a. variet.v of and I'lir various purposes, its text ■tioiild be su( h thill it will remain in ^ ^odil ciindlt inn tor a reasonable '' "• time. ;ind its SIK-Cessllll clllli vation should be so simple that il can be grown ami sold profitalily at such ii jirice that the ordinary (lower user can atford to buy it freely. -Ml these various recjuiremeiils are pos sessed by the carnation, and, in a<ldili<m, il may lie procured at ;iiiy time iluring the entii'e year. Koses, violets, lilies of the valley, chrvsantheniunis and many other Mowers will continue to have their admirers, and will always be in demand, when in sea son, but some of them are dillicull to pro du<-e with profit, and most of them are more expensive, bulk tor bulk, than are carnations. Several years ago. at one of llie con- ventions of the S. A. I"., ail essayist seemed to think that, in a few years, orchids would bec(uiie as plentiful and popular as roses, but the prediction has not been verified and |)ridiably will not be, for two leasons; lirst, they are more dillicull to cultivate and produce, and second, because of this diiliciilty, tlu'ir prices v\ill m'v er become |io|inlar. The develo|iinent ami improvement ot' the carnation have taken place within a conipai'at ivi'ly recent liiiie, both as I'e- gards the size, ccdor and (|u;ility ot' its llowers and the number of desirable va- riet ios. Thirt.v or forty years ago the florist was confined mainly to such kiinls as Ivl- wardsii, |)egraw. La I'nrite. .Miss .bdifl'e and Ast(uia. Hnttercup. one of the best I'avLireak, originated and disseminated by Simmons, of (leiieva, ().. was one .it' t h(; best and most prolitable carnations of its day, which is now over, and v\as probably (me of the |irogeiiitors ol' ihe line variety. Ln(diant ress, and other kinds having the Daybreak shacle of pink William Scott was .■inolher easily gmwii and iisi.'f'ul sort, but it. too, is now eclipsed. Superiority of American Sorts. While tiie carnation is not a native of this continent, certain writers speak of the varieties now in cultivation here, coll<'ctiv(dy, as the American carn.ation, but a better term would be the American varieties of carnations, ;is they nejiily all originated here. At the royal show, held at Xcwi-astle- on-Tvne, l']nglainl, in lU'i^. and |U'ac- ti<-ally open to all e.\hibit(ns, many \ases of Hritish carnations were shown, h.av- ing. in the main, stitf stems ami lai-:^e llowers, but the llowers were iii'aily all of coarse texture and tue most of them had split calyxes, and decid(,'dly the tin- est carr.titicms in the great show were those lit .\merican origin. t'arnation llowers may be appnipnaie- ly used on many occasions and in a va riety ot ways. I'rom a single llower mi a cnat l.Mpel to the most elaborate lliii;il design or ether form ot' decor;it ion. They are wtdcomed in tin' sick louin or till' liosjiilal ward, and are suitable t")-

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Jcseph H. Hill. Ill' the eai'lier yellows, allliongh. like ' the pLaci'ineiii s nr the i-eiil erpice tnr 'lie most of the l;iter kinds ot' tli.at coler. lie dinner lable. ' lii^iei'^ m- spiavs ,it' llie cidedly bi/arre. came later, .and was I'ld ilnweis. when arranged with lasie and lowed by (irace Wilder, Alberlini. .Mrs. skill, in cmiii'i iia I ion with :i s|iili,ient llradt, and a host of nlher slowlv im .ininiini el smialile eieeiierv. .-iie much pi'oving kinds, until the list ,il' aspir ,iskrd I'oi .-ind appreiiated t"r I'liiieral ;ints I'lir a pl.ace mi the c-irnalimi siaee i ncc-isjnns. \.i llower c:in i le used to reached Well lip iiiIm the hiiin beds. ' I.eller a'|\aiila^;e in :i pli';isin_; ariaiii;''

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

"workshop concert fotografie Joop Luimes" Foto gemaakt op Epop.

 

"Blue Labeled"

Bluesy Rock groep rond gitarist Paul Crezee. De vier bandleden hebben ieder meer dan 20 jaar ervaring in uiteenlopende live en studio projecten. Debuut EP "Naked" is in februari 2011 in de Mailmen studio in Utrecht opgenomen. Ze hebben de Battle of the Bands gewonnen.

www.bluelabeled.com

Identifier: historyofgamebir00for

Title: A history of the game birds, wild fowl and shore birds of Massachusetts and adjacent states, including those used for food which have disappeared since the settlement of the country, and those which are now hunted for food or sport, with observations on their former abundance and recent decrease in numbers; also the means for conserving those still in existence

Year: 1916 (1910s)

Authors: Forbush, Edward Howe, 1858-1929 Massachusetts. State Board of Agriculture

Subjects: Game and game-birds Game and game-birds Birds Birds

Publisher: [Boston, Wright & Potter Printing Company, State Printers

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

taken in West Newbury, in October, 1893, by J. W. Pray,and is now in the Peabody Academy Collection.^° This bird feeds on insects, worms, mollusks, snails andother small aquatic animals, and on fruit, seeds and othervegetable productions. 1 Dutcher, William: Auk, 1893, p. 272. 2 Peabody, W. B. O.: Report on the Ornithology of Mass., 1839, p. 258. Putnam, F. W.: Proc. Essex Inst., 1856, Vol. 1, p. 224. < Baird, S. F., Brewer, T. M., and Ridgeway, R.: Water Birds, 1884, Vol. 1, p. 385. 5 Brewer, T. M.: Proc. Bost. Soc. Nat. Hist., 1879, Vol. XX, p. 105. 6 Whitman, G. P.: Amer. Nat., October, 1875, Vol. LX., No. 10, p. 573. 7 Farley, J. A.: Auk, 1901, p. 190. 8 Ornithologist and Oologist, May, 1892, Vol. XVII, No. 5, p. 72.« Auk, 1901, p. 398. 1 Townsend, C. W.: Memoirs of the Nuttall Orn. Club, the Birds of Essex Countv, Mass., No. 3,p. 161. BIRDS HUNTED FOR FOOD OR SPORT. 219 FLORIDA GALLINULE {Gallinula galcuta).Common or local luimes: Mud-hen; Red-billed Mud-hen; Water-chicken.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Length. — 13.50 inches. Adult. — Head and neck blackish slate; body slate gray, brownish on theback and washed on the belly with whitish; nnder tail coverts white;bill and plate on forehead bright red, the former tipped with greenishyellow; edge of wing and a stripe on flank white; toes not lobcd. Young. — Similar, but duller; whitish below; throat sometimes wholly white;bill and forehead brownish. Field Marks. — The plate of bright red on front of head, the red bill and awhite stripe on flank (sometimes covered or wanting) distinguish itfrom the Coot. Tail, when carried erect, shows a patch of white be-neath it. Notes. — Chuck, and many loud calls, suggesting a hen brooding or squaw^king. Nest. — Like that of the Coot. Eggs. — Eight to fourteen, 1.75 by l.-^O, buff or brown, variable, spottedwith dark brown. Season.—^ Rare migrant and local summer resident; late April to earlyNovember. Range. — Tropical and temperate America. Breeds from central CaliforniaArizona, N

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Madonna van Hannelieke van de Beek www.hanneliekevandebeek.exto.nl

 

tent van Charlotte Luimes en Maron Hilverda.

www.atelier3x3.nl

Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_40_1

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

JlnV14, 1917. The Florists' Review 15

 

Text Appearing After Image:

When a Person of Means Builds a Conservatory it Results in Purchase, Not Production, of Plants. AMERICAN PEONY SOCIETY. 'I'lie uunuiil iiicotiiig and oxliibition the Ainerii'.'ui Peony Society, orij^iu- ; (V set for Philadelphia, June 4 and 5, : id postponed to June 11 and 12, was .i_;ain postponed last week, too late for !.otice to a2)pear. The latest iK)sti)one- iMt'nt was to June 13 and 14, the exhi- I'ition being in conjunction Avith the June show of the rennsylvania Ilorti- 1 (iltural Society. ENCOURAGE THE AMATEUR. An elaborate example of the private ' iinservatorics the wealthier ])eoplc are \\out to build in connection with their liomes is that recentlv constructed for Kaniel Good at liuffalO, X. Y. As will lie seen by the accompanying illustra- tions, the conservatory is uni(pie in its >liape and in the manner in which it fits into a recess of the residence. Keeping conservatories of this kind stocked with jilants provides an outlet for much llorists' stock, as the owners rarely can jiroduce the ])lants needed. Consequently llorists, when they are asked by their well to-do ])atrons con- cerning conservatories, as they fre- quently are, should encourage their con- struction. The conservatory at the Good home fits into a U-shai)ed opening made by the dining-room on the oiie side and the main hall and music room on the other. It is thirty feet long and twenty feet wide, with a semicircular bay of a 9- foot radius. The construction is of gal- vanized steel members, with coi)per gut- ters, and the wood is especially selected for its fine grain and susceptibility to linish. The glass is all i^-inch polished plate. Many of the roof lights are bent two ways, each taking a separate tem[tlate. Special treatment was given the roof glass to make it oj.aque. Over tlio whole roof lieavy snow guards have been placed. The interior is done priiicifially in ivory white, to conform with the colo- nial effect in the dining-room and hall, the latticework on the sides, how- ever, is of the light green that was used for all the fmisliings of the inte- rior. The floor is of tile and the coping base and fountain are of pink marble. The doli'liin fountain over the rock- ery, together with the rockery frames, is of terra cotta, a peculiar finish being employed. The rockery is of tufa- stone and is j)lanted with ferus and aquatii' phints. The main fountain is of tlie siunc stoiu' and is e(iuipjieil with fU'ctric liglits arranged to shine thi'ough tlie water. The ]ilant tables are of liron/.e and coj)per, all the lieatiag radi- ators being concealed undei'ueath. Tlie conservatory is considered one (jf the linest in Buffalo. It was con- structed by the l^ord & Burnham Co., tliroutih II. K. liates, of the Kochestc, \. Y., ollice. H. J. II. to die. The boxes were about lSx.'5(3 inches an luimes ami colors, thanks to tho JKUises that issue catalogues giving such information, Mr. Clark finds that jdain, descriptive labels greatly facili- tate sales at this busy time. The seed trade is most satisfactory.

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Identifier: opdycketigers12500clar

Title: Opdycke tigers, 125th O. V. I., a history of the regiment and of the campaigns and battles of the Army of the Cumberland

Year: 1895 (1890s)

Authors: Clark, Charles T., 1845-

Subjects: United States. Army. Ohio Infantry Regiment, 125th (1862-1865) United States -- History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories United States -- History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories Army of the Cumberland

Publisher: Columbus, O., Spahr & Glenn

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

o-s intilt l_>th so far in killed am! woumKil is forty-1i^.lit. I wrote yesterday un-U-r lire, l.ove to Pa, Ma, ami the chiMren. Kvcr voiir ••!>.• Tlie Co!|ioi-al rotrn\Ml t(» \v;is I,. .S. C:ilviii. An oiiikh-l»all oiiterid liis lietul at tlu left tniiplo, [)a.ssi!i*( douiiwanlshatttieil hlHi right lower Jaw, and jiassiiig out struck tlieColonel, as stated in tiie letter. Calvin was left on the field,>ui>iiosed ti) he deail. Ne.xt day Lieutenant lilystoni. inehaiue of the And)ulanee Cor[is, found Calvin sitting- upagainst a roek and sent liitu to the hos[>ital. Ili- still lives. An eUort was made to secure the luimes ot the menwho got nearest to the works, and the list was rt-ad to theregiments next day. With ColonelMoores s<juad was ne man of the Goth(Hiio, A. C. Matthias. Company K, wli >was certainly good on a charge, his regi-ment being in the rear of ours. Sergt.Jiieoh Jewell, of F, had chaige of a sijuadspecially mentioned. A FLANK MdVKMKNT.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

•AMI Kl. tiCKK.N. 1. Mclhersun had found Snake Crcrk(iap unguarded, (hi the night of May S.Johnston sent Fergusons brigade of cavalry to occupy the(iap, hut after marching all night Ferguson arrived at day-light on tlie !Hii to find himself too late. lie attacked theIth Illinois, hut so(Ui discovered the presence of infantry,and was compelled to fall hack to liesaca, followed hy Dodgescorjts, the GtJth Illinois on the skirmish line doing its workso well that the head of column marched the entire distance,eight miles, without detention. 232 OPDYCKE TIGERS, Dodge, under the personal direction of McPherson,advanced to within a mile of Resaca, fully developing tlieenemys line of works, and sent a small detachment of cav-alry—all he had—northeast, to scout the country and try toreach the railway. The cavalry detachment reached therailway near Tilton, but only succeeded in breaking the tele-graph line. General Logan advanced to the Rome andDalton cross roads, about two miles from Resa

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

12'x6' lattice structure with 18 cubbies, 24 removable/interchangable frames.

 

Taylor Greenfield/Heather Luimes 2007

Identifier: farmpoultry272unse

Title: The Farm-poultry

Year: 1916 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Poultry Northeastern States Periodicals Poultry Industry Northeastern States Periodicals

Publisher: Boston, Mass. : I.S. Johnson and Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

termilk tastes good to them. Practicalpoultrymen regard it as an ideal baby chick food because itis an aid to digestion and helps to make robust chicks. The Buttermilk portion of 100 pounds of BUTTERMILK STARTING FOOD : Cet a sample from ymir dialer, or send 4c in stamps ami ynur dealers luime for contains m a sanitary con- venient form the digestiveand food elements of 50pounds of good buttermilk.The water, about 90^^ of thebuttermilk, has been remov-ed. The buttermilk elementshave been mixed with a bal-anced combination of clean,wholesome grains, just rightlor the digestive tract of thegrowing chick. Thats whyConkeys Buttermilk Start-ing Food is the only toodneeded for the first three weeks. Packages 10c; 25c; 50c; 14-lb.bag $1.00; 25-lb. bag $1.65; 50-lb. bag$3.00; 100-lb. bag $5.75, and largersizes. CONKEYS POULTRY REMEDIES A specific Remedy for each poultry disease.Conkeys White Diarrhea Remedy —conquers the springtime terror, THE G. E. CONKEY CO. lowconkey uuie. Cleveland, O..

 

Text Appearing After Image:

or nothing of the practical feeding ofpoultry. The book exclusive of the appendixcontains 82 pages. So small a book doesnot usually require an appendix. Of the82 pages, 8 pages are devoted to the ene-mies and diseases of poultry. These 8pages are solid text. The other 74contain many illustrations, so that as amatter of fact the proportion of the bookdevoted to enemies and diseases is muchmore than one-tenth—and at that theauthor does not say very much abouteither. He tells us that rats do moredamage to poultry than any other enemyexcepting lice, yet, he has not a wordabout how to prevent such damage ex-cept the general suggestion to build housesand coop so that these and other enemiescannot get in. A poultryman who defersto rats in this fashion will always havetrouble with them. In the chapter on diseases we are told SANDS S. C. White Leghorns. A Few Cine Cockerels for sale at $3 to $5All from Hieh Prodncinir UaiUH Day old chicks from my own stock exclusively,after March 1st, 1916.

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Gertie Schuurmans, Tim Luimes, Meike teGroenhuis, Tim Bleeker, ?, ?, Roseanne Dentz, ?

from back:

1-

2-

3-

4- Jim Heuving

5 - Tim Bleeker?

6 - Ray Geurkink

7 - Alison

8- Tim Luimes

9 - Gertie Schuurmans

Title: Boddington's quality bulbs, seeds and plants / Arthur T. Boddington.

Identifier: boddingtonsquali1904bodd

Year: (s)

Authors: Boddington, Arthur T. (Firm); Boddington, Arthur T. (Firm)

Subjects: Nursery Catalogue

Publisher: Arthur T. Boddington

Contributing Library: New York Botanical Garden, LuEsther T. Mertz Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

14 Arthur T. Boddington. 342 West 14th St.. New Vork A Few English Favorite Sweet Peas The fol!(jwing varieties of Sweet Peas marked with a star (*) are the best orchid-flowering and other types of the English novelties for the past year, and are highly recommended to us by a leading Sweet Pea specialist of England. IM. B.-THE PACKETS OF THE FOLLOWING VARIETIES ARE MUCH LARGER THAN THE PRECEDING NOVELTIES »COUNTESS OF POWIS. For e.xqnisite beauty and delicate fin- ish, this lovely variety is unequaled. The color being a glowing orange, suffused with light purple, with a beautiful satin polish, novel in the extreme. In size and color this flower is really unique. Fkt. 25 cts., 5 for $1.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Sweet Pea, Her Majesty -DORA BREADMORE. Standard, buff and primrose ; wings, light primrose ; large size ; hooded form. Pkt. lo cts., oz. 40 cts., k'Ib. $1.50. «ETTA DYKE. An extraordinary fine, pure white of the Spencer type. Pkt. 25 cts., 5 for $1. EVELYN HEMDS. Cream, shading to vellow terra-cotta points; standards full waved. Pkt. 25 cts., 5 for $1. â HER MAJESTY. Rose-crimson, practically self-colored; the wings are frequently soiuewhat lighter; large size; hooded form. A very vigorous grower and generallv bears four blossoms to the stem. Pkt. 5 cts., oz. 15 cts., j^lb. 35 cts., lb. $1. â JAMES GRIEVE. This is announced the nearest approach to yelKnv, anil while we would not like to ask the public to accept it as a yellow, it is certainly another step in that direction, and will be much in demand. It is best described as a fine three-flowered sulphur self, with a bold upright standard. It is a strong grower and gives plenty of stem. Pkt. 25 cts., 5 for $1. HENRY ECKFORD. This is an extremely handsome and dis- tinct flower, and has caused great excitement amongst lovers and admirers of the Sweet Pea. Perfection in shape and size, and unique in color, it is needless to say that it has received recogni- tion wherever shown, also first-class certificate and medal from the National Sweet Pea Society. Color an 'ntense bright, shining orange self, quite unique and absolutely distinct. Its three flowers are borne on long, stout stems, and beautifully placed. Pkt. 10 cts., oz. 25 cts., '/iU>. 75 cts., lb. $2. «MRS. BIEBERSTEDT. The largest of the lavender types ; color a beautiful self; wings hooded; large flowers, borne three or four on a 15-inch stem. Pkt. 25 cts., 5'for $1. «MRS. HARDCASTLE SYKES. A charming waved flower of pink standard, flushed a beautiful shade; wings clear blush; strong grower ; fine stem. Pkt. 25 cts., 5 for $1. «NELL GWYNNE A grand variety of the Spencer type. Lovely pink, with buff ground. Pkt. 50 cts., 3 for $1.25. S'SUTTON'S QUEEN. The magnificent frilled flowers measure over 2 inches across, and the unrivaled combination of pure pink on deep cream ground gives the richest and most refined coloring attained in Sweet Peas. This variety gained an award of merit from the National Sweet Pea Society and a first-class certificate at the Wolverhampton Floral Fete, 1907. Pkt. 35 cts., 3 forfi. The above collection of 11 varieties, English Favorites, for $3.50 For an alphabetical and full list of Sweet Peas, under color heads, see pages 51 to 54 Sweet William "Newport Pink." p.) nov *^ elty, oS A dis- tinct new color in this favorite hardy plant. In color it is what florists call watermelon pink or salmony rose. Strikingly beautiful ; the habit of the plant is perfect, being well-formed, neat and compact, the flowers borne in massive heads on stems 18 inches high. For midseason mass beddiTig it has no equal. It is also very eflective as a pot plant and for cutting. Perfectly hardy in any part of the country. Pkt. 15 cts., 2 pkts. 25 cts. Verbena hybrida compacta lutescens. ^?,J^Jn'''^ '09. Compact, dwarf variety, with erect flower stems, bearing round trusses of creamy yellow flowers, standing well above the foliage. Pkt. 25 cts., 5 pkts. $1. Verbena hybrida pumila "Meteor." h. p.) ^ ' Novelty, og. New miniature Verbena, forming very dwarf bushes of 6 to .S inches in height by 10 to 12 inches in breadth. Flowers of faultless form, of an intense deep scarlet ; excellent for carpet or ribbon borders. Pkt. 2,5 cts., 5 pkts. $1. Verbena hybrida compacta. Rosamond. ^^.^^ 'oS. Very dwarf bush Verbcn.-i, with the trusses of pure rosecolnred flowers. ExccllcrU for bedding and edging on account of its uniform, low, spreading growth. Pkt. 15 cts., 2 pkts. 25 cts. Zinnia. Boddington's Lilliput. Scarlet Gem. (H. A.) .Novelty, '08. One of the most charnniig iiilriKhn tions, the plants fairly bristling with double blooms of intense, dazzling scarlet. A grand variety for borders or edging. Pkt. 10 cts , 3 pkts. 25 cts., 34oz. 25 cts. For other Lilliput Zinnias, see page 45. Zinnia elegans plenissima, Savoja. (H A ) Novelty, ° * =â 09. If the name of this Zinnia should be characteristic of a new race, it ought to be called Zinnia ele^ans robiisia ffrandiflora plenissima ⢠analiciila/a. The shorter luime, Savoja, is doubtless more fitting to facilitate the introduction of this splendid novelty, as it brings with it such good qualities, which appeal to everybody at first sight. Tall and robust in growth, with good foliage, extremely large, double globular flow- ers, with petals turned upward, and form little channels. The color of the flowers is a singular mixture of yellow and red, the outer petals a nice dark red, graduating to the center in golden yellow. This wonderful color may best be termed salmon-orange. A sterling novelty. Pkt. 25 cts., 5 for $1. Zinnias. Boddington's Quality. (H. A.) when our 2 Eâ â representative was m Europe, the past summer, he took particni.ir pains to inspect the growing crops of Dwarf Zinnias, and secured a stock of the fine.st strain he saw in England, flowers measured to 4 and sometimes 5 inches in diameter, and he counted nearlv .son petals upon .some of the flowers. The singles had been thoroughly ' rogued." I'pon page 5S are the cream of the v.'U'ieties and (olors sek'cled with special care as to their distiiu tness :ind habit. It is not gem r.illy known th.it so- called Dwarf Zinnias will reach nearly ,â¢! feet some seasons. Cu.sto- luers desiring a rc.il Du.nf Zinnia for bedding should select the Lilliput on page yi, which does not exceed mor<.' than 12 inches. FOR OTHER VARIETIES OF ZINNIAS. SEE PAGES 58 AND 59

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Title: American bee journal

Identifier: americanbeejourn2084hami

Year: 1861 (1860s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bee culture; Bees

Publisher: [Hamilton, Ill. , etc. , Dadant & Sons]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

 

Text Appearing After Image:

u Journal, DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE PRODUCERS OF HONEY. VOL. XX. CHICAGO, ILL., APRIL 16, 1884. No. 16. Published every Wednesday, by THOMAS G. NEWMAN, Kditob and Propkietor, Bee-Seeping in New Zealand. By the Xew Zealand Herald of Feb. 26, we learn that the first convention of bee-keepers in tl)at colony was held on Feb. ii, at Pukekohe, Auckland. The Herald gives the following as a report of the meeting. It may be stated that the project has been under consideration for some time; many persons interested in bee- keeping having expressed a wish that a society might be commenced. Ac- cordingly, a short time since, Dr. Dal- ziel, an enthusiast in bees, sent out a number of circulars, calling a meet- ing for the express purpose or starting such an association. This meeting was held last Saturday afternoon, the 23d inst., in a large hall belonging to Mr. Buchanan. Though the attend- ance was not very numerous, those present took up the matter with a good deal of earnestness, and seemed fully alive to the benetits which might arise by associating together with a view to promote the advance of the bee in- dustry. Mr. William Morgan was called upon to take the chair, and in doing so, expressed the pleasure he had in presiding over such an assembly. He called upon the convener of the meet- ing to explain tlie particular object for which they had been called to- gether. Dr. Dalziel stated that the object of the meeting was to commence a bee-keepers' association, of the ad- vantages of which it was hardly nec- essary for him to speak. The princi- pal advantage would be that a society of the kind would give an impulse to scientific bee-keeping, and at the same time be the means of diffusing tlie knowledge and information required by those wlio were desirous of enter- ing upon the industry. Between the members of the association there would be, of course, an interchange of ideas, and so, by mutual communica- tion of facts and experiences bearing upon the subject of bee-keeping, might be made, at the same time, a source of profit and pleasure. The following resolutions were then passed : Tliat a Bee-Keeepers' Association be formed; that the luime be the Auckland Provincial Bee Keepers' Association; that the association be managed by an execu- tive committee, comprising the presi- dent, vice-presidents, treasurer, sec- retary, and three members of the general committee ; that the subscrip- tion'be.5s per year ; that J. C. Firth, Esq., be requested to accept tlie of- fice of Presulent; that the following oflScers be elected : Vice-Presidents, Captain Hamlin, M. II. R., Captain Jackson, R. M., Messrs. Proude, Bag- nail and Hopkins ; Treasurer, Mr. J. Collins; Secretary, Dr. Dalziel. It was proposed that the following constitute the general committee, with power to add to their number : Messrs. Allen, Beloe, Brown, Elliott, Jamieson, Morgan, Savage, and Sproul. 1^ We have received Vol. Ill of the "Proceedings of the Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences." This is a volume of over 100 pages, nicely printed, illustrated, and bound, and contiiins a lithograph of Prof. Joseph D. Putnam, late President of the Academy, and an eminent contribu- tor to the progress of science. His untimely death wasan irreparable loss to the Academy as well as to the world of science. ^' The first two numbers of " The Family Circle" now published in this country, have been received. The Family Circle is an attractive IG-page weekly, liandsomely illustrated ; full of interesting matter, and containing no advertisements. The first six num- bers will be sent fkee to all who have not applied,by sending apostal card to The Family Circle, Detroit, Mich. 1^ Our readers will find the hand- somely-illustrated Manual, published by the American Manufacturing Co., Waynesboro,Pa.,on evaporating fruit, valuable and interesting, Sent free. 1^ It will probably be welcome news to Canadians to learn that E. L. CtOoW & Co., Brantford, Out., keep a stock of Binders for the Bee Jour- nal, on hand, which can be sent by mail to those who wish them. They cannot be sent by mail across the lines from the United States. 1^ In a good article on the "Spring Management of Bees," in the London, Out., Free Press, Mr. W. H. Weston remarks as follows: If April proves to be as cold this year as it was last, there is almost sure to be a serious loss of bees. The warm sun of noon tempts the indus- trious bees to fiy out, and many are caught in the cold winds that spring up, and die. This is true in a sense of human life in spring. The only safeguard against this is to keep the hive shaded from the sun, so that its deceptive rays may not decoy tlie bees out into the chilling air. In a few more weeks this danger will be past. 1^ From the edition of Messrs. Geo. P. Rowell & Co's American News- paper Directory, now in press, it appears that the newspapers and peri- odicals of all kinds at present issued In the United States and Canada, reach a grand total of 13,402. This is a net gain of precisely 1,600 during the last 12 months, and exhibits an in- crease of 5,6is over the total number published just 10 years since. 1^" We have received the Catalogue of Arthur Todd, Germantown, Pa.—1 pages—Bees and Apiarian Supplies. ^' We acknowledge, with thanks, the receipt of a copy of the Report of the Commissioner of Agriculture for the year 1883, sent us by Commissioner Loring. 1^ "The Wife OF Monte-Cristo," just published by T. B Peterson & Brothers, is a remarkable novel that will surely attain immense popularity, and that immediately, for never has a romance of greater interest or power been published. It teems with excite- ment and adventure, absolutely brist- les with thrilling incidents, and has an element of mystery that vastly aug- ments its wonderful fascination. It is a continuation of Alexander Dumas' world-renowiied creation, " The Count of Monte-Cristo," and is fully worthy of being associated with that master- work. Price, 75 cents.

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Identifier: pictorialhistory01kitt

Title: The pictorial history of Palestine and the Holy land including a complete history of the Jews

Year: 1844 (1840s)

Authors: Kitto, John, 1804-1854

Subjects: Jews -- History Palestine -- History

Publisher: London C. Knight

Contributing Library: Princeton Theological Seminary Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

hed his tent. Bethel, which still bore tlie luime ofBethizella, was situated aljout half a le;igue to the west of this, at the foot of the hill, in a very fertile district. We shall pre-sently have further occasion to notice Bethel. 32 HISTORY OF PALESTINE. [Book I. infirmities, as all men are, and tempted, as all men are, by their passions, doubts, or fears;and by such temptation too often drawn aside from the right path. The whole of the sacredbook offers to us not a single character exempt from temptation; and it tells us of only Onewhom all temptation left without sin. It appears that Abram did not over-estimate the effect which the beauty of Sarai was likelyto produce upim the sensitive Egyptians. The attractions of the fair Mesopotamian strangerwere speedily discovered, and became the theme of many tongues. She was at last seen bysome of the princes of Pharaoh ; and the report of her beauty becoming, through them, thetalk of the court, soon reached the ears of the Egyptian king.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

Title: Annual report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution

Identifier: annualreportofbo1896smit

Year: 1846 (1840s)

Authors: Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents; United States National Museum. Report of the U. S. National Museum; Smithsonian Institution. Report of the Secretary

Subjects: Smithsonian Institution; Smithsonian Institution. Archives; Discoveries in science

Publisher: Washington : Smithsonian Institution

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

0-:» REPORT OF NATIONAL MUSEUM, 18%. The Arabic luime for tlic bones is kdh ((Uiiib hihatain, plural, h(bat), meaning "ankle,'' referring- to their source. Two bones are now com- monly used—one from the right and the other from the left leg of a sheep.' I regard them as the direct ancestors of cubical dotted dice, the name of which in Arabic is the same as that of the bones. The dice used in Arabic countries are made in pairs (see Xo. 16), and the most popular and universal game is one with two dice, Mhatain.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Dutch Land & seascapes - Zuid-Holland -

 

De Eurokotter OD-3 is de eerste pulsvisser met rolsloffen.

in 1981 gebouwd bij Scheepswerf Veldthuis "Groningen" in Zuidbroek en afgebouwd bij Padmos in Stellendam, ingebouwd met een 300 pk.,

221 kw. Mitsubishi uit 1981, 1981 ingeschreven als KG 2 Maris Stella van A.J.C. Minneboo uit Colijnsplaat, afm 24,45 x 6,00 x 2,70, BRT

83,43, roepletters: PFWH, 8-1986 hermeten: BRT gewijzigd in 69,98 en opgave GT 88, 1-9-1989 opgave id nr. NLD198100181, 23-9-1997

OD 3 Adrianne van Visserijbedrijf Luime & zn. C.V. uit Ouddorp, 1999 nieuwe 300 pk., 221 kw. Mitsubishi uit 1999, 3-12-1999 loa. gewijzigd

in 23,85, 4-2001 tenaamstelling vof. Visserijbedrijf Luime & zn. uit Ouddorp.

....................................................................................................................

Dutch Land & seascapes - South Holland -

 

The Eurobeamer OD-3 is the first pulse fishing with rolsloffen.

built in 1981 Shipyard Field Home "Groningen" in Zuidbroek and finished at Padmos in Stellendam, built with a 300 hp.,

221 kw. Mitsubishi 1981, 1981 registered as KG 2 Maris Stella A.J.C. Minneboo from Colijnsplaat, size 24,45 x 6,00 x 2,70 BRT

83.43, call sign: PFWH, 8-1986 remeasured: BRT changed to 69.98 and task GT 88 1-9-1989 task id no NLD198100181, 23-9-1997.

OD 3 Adrianne Fisheries Company Luime & zn. CV. from Ouddorp 1999 new 300 hp., 221 kw. Mitsubishi's 1999 3-12-1999 loa. amended

at 23.85, 4-2001 ascription VOF. Fishing company Luime & zn. from Ouddorp.

Title: How plants grow [microform] : a simple introduction to structural botany with a popular flora, or an arrangement and description of common plants, both wild and cultivated

Identifier: cihm_06348

Year: 1889 (1880s)

Authors: Gray, Asa, 1810-1888; Lawson, George, 1827-1895

Subjects: Botany; Ferns; Botanique; Fougères

Publisher: Halifax, N. S. : A. & W. MacKinlay

Contributing Library: www.flickr.com/search/?tags=bookcontributorCanadiana_org

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Alberta Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

AM» \VII\r IIIKIK I'AUrs AHK.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

11. The Flower. Kls\ iiitrrstiii^» to till' lintanist, who not only nd* niiros < In-Ill for tlirir ln'inity,tli«'«'Xit«')iiriiM^'«'iiu'iit M?nlfonn>of th»'ii|iMits,aiitl tlu' woiulcitiil VMiicty tli«'y «'\liil)it, Imt iils«» srcs in tlir IdoxsiuiiH iiiucli of lli«' iia tiiri'oi-cliiiDicttMMtf Du'li plant, an*I tiinis in tlicin the Ix'sf nuirks foi- (listin^Mii^liiriLr thescirts of plants and the family tht'V Ix'lon;,' to. So h«t the ^t^(k•^t Iniiii ul oncii 12. What the Farts of a Flower are. A i\uwrv, with all tin- parts prrscnt. <'onsists of <'<ihf.i\ Cornlla, Sfdiii'-ni', n\]t\ I'lftilx. (hit- from tin* .Mornin;; lnff'^^ or the leaves of the flower. They coser in the hiid, and protect the stamens and pistils, whidi are the J'jUientidi Oi'i/uiiH of tin* Mower, lecause hoth of these alt' necessary to foriiiin;,' the seed. 13. The Calyx a Latin luime for'• llowerctip "— is the cnp or otiter coxfi ini.' of the Mos>om {Vi}'. 6). It is ;ipt to lie <:reen Jii '. leaf-like. 14. The Corolla is the inner (Mip, or inner set of h avos, of tho Mower. It is very sel<h)m ^'i-et'ii, as thec.tlyx commonly i-Jmt is "colonred," /.'., of someother citlonr than ^M'eon, and of a delicate text me. So it is the most sliowy jiait of the lilossom. Fi;.'. 5 shows th.e corolla of the .Moinin;;- (Jlory whole. Kijif. 7 is the same, split down and s])road open to show 15. The Stamens. These in this Mower ^M'ow fast to the holtom of tHie corolla. There .-ire five stamens in the Moi-nin^'- (llorv. Kach stamen consists of twf) parts, namely, a fi/tdnrnf and an Anf/iir. TJie Filainetit is the stalk ; tlie Aiitli< r is ,1 little case, or hollow hody, l)()nie on the top of the Mlainont. It is filled with Ji powdery matter, called Polh'n. Fi<;. 9 shows a sejiarate st;iiiien on a lar<,'er scale : /", the lilanu'nt ; a, the anther, out of which pollen is fallin/i,' from a slit or lon<; o[)ening down eucli side.

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Identifier: handbookofmeatin00osteuoft

Title: Handbook of meat inspection

Year: 1904 (1900s)

Authors: Ostertag, Robert von, 1864-1940

Subjects: Cattle Meat inspection

Publisher: London : Baillière, Tindall and Cox

Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Bovine small intestine with subraiieousnematode tubercles. Larva of AncliyJoslomum bovis froma siibraucous tubercle of the bovineintestine (after Ströse) X 25 diam. tine in varyiug uumbers. The spherical, often somewhat flattened,tubercles lie under the mucosa. They consist of a couuective tissuewall and a green or yellowish-brown, caseous, crumbly content. Thesize of the tubercles varies from that of a pin head to tliat of a pea.The larger tubercles, even before the intestines are cleaued, maybe seen from the outside through the muscular and serous coats. The uematodes (Fig. 58) which were isolated from the tuberclesTiy Ströse were 2.83 to 3.85 mm. long and 0.16 mm. wide. In the small intestine of American sheep and cattle, Curticealso demonstrated nematode tubercles. In tubercles 1 cm. in diam- DIGESXnE APPARATÜS 283 eter, Curtico fouud larvte aiul sexiiallj-mafcure rouuJ worms towhi(;li he ^Mve tha luime iE-iophwjostinmini cohuahianum. Furtheriiivestij^atiüus are required to de

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

1 3 4