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#dagaanbieding Handgemaakte Luimes en Luimes ovale vazenset: van 69,95 voor 29,95 dagkoopje.eu/#buythistoday

Medio 2011 bracht Andre Manuel de solo-cd Dollekamp uit. Om het materiaal van de plaat live te kunnen spelen formeerde hij de band "Dancing Dollekamp". Hiervoor werden uit alle hoeken en gaten artiesten tevoorschijn gehaald: Theun Supheert (o.a. De Ketterse Fanfare), Adri Karsenberg (o.a. Fratsen), Ottoboy (fameus eenmanspunkorkest), Bert Kuipers (o.a. Quasimodo), DJ DNA (o.a. Urban Dance Squad) en Henk-Jan Hoekjen (o.a. De Stilletto's). Dit bonte gezelschap brengt behalve (Twentstalig) materiaal van de cd Dollekamp ook nieuw Duits- en Engelstalig materiaal ten gehore. Overal volgen lovende recenties. Niet samen te vatten in muziekstijl, niet te plaatsen in een hokje, niet te evenaren. Dat moet je meemaken.

 

www.dancingdollekamp.com

"workshop concert fotografie Joop Luimes" Foto gemaakt op Epop.

 

"Blue Labeled"

Bluesy Rock groep rond gitarist Paul Crezee. De vier bandleden hebben ieder meer dan 20 jaar ervaring in uiteenlopende live en studio projecten. Debuut EP "Naked" is in februari 2011 in de Mailmen studio in Utrecht opgenomen. Ze hebben de Battle of the Bands gewonnen.

www.bluelabeled.com

Madonna van Hannelieke van de Beek www.hanneliekevandebeek.exto.nl

 

tent van Charlotte Luimes en Maron Hilverda.

www.atelier3x3.nl

Identifier: railwaylocomotiv18newy

Title: Railway and locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock

Year: 1901 (1900s)

Authors:

Subjects: Railroads Locomotives

Publisher: New York : A. Sinclair Co

Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

  

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a Sate and Sane Ifi Majority Really Rules Where IC Inventors and Poets 17 Locomotive Engineer. Responsibility of... 18Open Hearth Furnace, Picture of Creation IS Mechanical Stokers. Opposition to 18 Sfoel Cars: for New England 20 June Conventions. The 80 R!!£l>^i;:.EiRiiKeriii$ Copyright by Angus Sinclair Co.—1905 A Practical Journal of Railway Motive Power and Rolling Stock Vol. XVIII. 136 Liberty Street. New York, February, 1905 No. 2 Cars and Carriages. ;nc the luimes coach, chariot, cart and a was a development of the humble char-On the .■\niencan continent a railway srcat variety of foreign words used to ette, still to be seen in Mexico, in Cen-train is composed of various kinds of denote a wheeled vehicle. tral Africa, in India and in other easterncars, day, Pullman, chair and a great va- Tracing the growth of the car is an countries that have been little influencedriety of freight vehicles, but all called interesting study. Those who have en- by progressive tendencies.

 

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PiiNNSVLVANIA RAII.RO.^l) TKAIX CROSSING FAIRMOINT IARK ISRIDCE, PHILADELPHIA cars. In Europe and other parts of the joyed the privilege of examining Egyp- For long centuries the car remained world they have carriages and coaches tian and Assyrian slab sculptures would a two wheeled vehicle, the four wheeled for passengers and wagons for freight, notice that the war chariot was used in carriage being a comparatively recent Our word car comes from shortening those early periods of the worlds his- invention. It may have been that the the word carriage. Besides the car there tory. It is likely that the war chariot fimeral procession for Jacob that went 52 RAILWAY AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERING February, 1905. ^out of the land of Egypt contained fourwheeled vehicles, but history gives noinformation to this effect, as sculpturedown even to Roman times tells nothingabout the development of the car repre-sented by the addition of another pairof wheels. This was strange, for we aretold that Solom

  

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Identifier: alabamaherresour00alab

Title: Alabama: her resources and what she is doing with them

Year: 1901 (1900s)

Authors: Alabama. Dept of agriculture. [from old catalog]

Subjects:

Publisher: [Montgomery, Ala.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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ect to utilize the vast volume of water that flows around tlie locks on the Tennessee, is an old one,and will \ et be cairied out when industrial devel-cjimcnt in that \ alley has gained more strength.1 he A\ arrior is a ri\ er of falls and high banks.I he Sipsey and other tributaries of the \\arriorare large enough to he dignified with the luimes ofii\ ers. The Tallapoosa, above the head of naviga-tion, turns (0,000 spindles with hardly an impres-sion on its capacity. The same stream has beenutilized to liring an unlimited supply of electricpo«er to Montgomery, a distance of forty miles.The great power of the Chattahoochee, which turnsthe spindles at Columbus, Ga., is the line betweenthe States, and some of the mills are on the Ala-lianui side. J he Conecuh, the < hoctawhatchie andthe Pea arc long ri\ ers of Southeast Alabama, nav-igalile far down, but capable above the head ofnavigation of sujjplying power to spin all the cot-ton raised in the State. Outside the prairie levels,.

 

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there is hardly a neighborhood without water power to grind its coin and gin its cotton. A hundred creeksruafrom the hills with power to operate the largest cotton mills of the country. Coming long distances through thewooded hills and mountains, the streams of Alabama do not go dry in summer, and reserve reservoirs have notbeen found necessary-. These could be made to increase the water power of the State to an indefinite and limit-less amount. If it be true that the long tendency to give steam the preference over water, has aliout run its coiuse, andthat natures power is coming into its own again, then Alabama is the most inviting of all the States for manu-facturing in which cheap power is a consideration. If it l)e true that cotton mills do best when off siniiewhat tothemselves, the numerous sites by the rivers of Ala-bama invite the mill builders attention, sites reachedby a few miles of branch railroad. IMMIGRATION. Alabama has a cordial welcome lor the iKinicseeker. Ihe object

  

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Identifier: lesenchantements00theuuoft

Title: Les enchantements de la forêt. With grammatical, historical, and geographical notes by H. Lallemand

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: Theuriet, André, 1833-1907 Lallemand, H

Subjects:

Publisher: London Hachette

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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CEST LE HOUGE-UORGK, OUVIIEZ-LUI.KNCUANT. DE LA FORÊT li OISEADX ET PLANTES DES BOIS. ._.|, pirs, mais le plus souvent elle est voilée et câline comme unecaresse. Il chante depuis la prime aube jusquaux dernière?lueurs du crépuscule ; parfois mêmela nuit est déjà venue quonentend encore résonner sa sérénade. Le rouge-gorge est le pre-mier levé et le dernier couché des oiseaux chanteurs. Dès le finmalin, il va se baigner et boire à la source voisine, puis, sesablutions faites, il songe à son déjeuner et à celui de sa fa-mille.

 

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LA NUIT EST VENUE ftUON ENTEND ENCOKE RÉSONNER SA SÉRÉNADE. Au printemps et en été, le menu se compose surtout de vers,de mouches et de papillons minuscules; maisàmesure que lau-tomne approche, la nourriture devient plus variée et plusrafraîchissante. Le rouge-gorge trouve partout la table mise :cornouilles, alises, baies de sorbier, mûres de ronces, tout luiest bon. On prétend même quil ne dédaigne pas le raisin, eton laccuse de se sustenter aux dépens de la vendange —Grisé par tous ces fruits juteux et capiteux, il chante de plusbelle, devient familier et va donner étourdiment dans les piègestendus par lengeance des preneurs doiseaux. 212 LES ENCHANTEMENTS DE LA FORKT. En Anglelene du moins celle aimable familiarilé ne lui eslpas fatale. Le peuple anglais a pour cet oiseau un culte tendre-ment superstitieux. Le rouge-gorge, Robin redbreast, est po-pulaire chez nos voisins; il est le héros de maintes légendes,on luime et on le respecte, comme chez nous lhirondell

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_25_1

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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.lAM .\i;v _'7, I'.nit. The Weekly Florists^ Review* 25 !(liiiit tliiit tlicy il(t not iilrciidy know all licn^ is about it. 'I'Ik! cariKitiou, or, to cxincss tlui iiaiiio II sti'ii-tl.v l)otanit-al terms. Diautluis aryopliyliiis, is. according to l>oii(lon, a .itivc of Hoiitlicrn Europe, and lias Ijccu lund growing naturally in Kngland. Tlu^ genoric name, diantlms, is coni- ■ lundt'd of two (ireok words, meaning ic llower of the gods, or the Deity, which IS led certain writers to cnil it the i\ine llower. a name tlint might well be -.rlianged for one more simph' and com- rehensive. The s[»ecitic luime, (.'aryo- hyllus, has refei'cnce tn llie ch)\e like lagrance of tiie (lowers, wliilo the coni- i(in name, carnation, lias for its base If Latin word carnis, meaning llesli, in liision to the pink or tlesli color of the ■ iwci's in their wild state. 'I'lier*' iire many ditlermt sjx-cies in 'e genus dianthus, including the f;i- ■:ili:ir Sweet William; hut the onti that iiisl nearly resenddes the cai'nation in '■|)earauce is the pink, with its several .11 iet ies. Where it gr ilinuged its (diaracter that flowers four nihes in diameter are now jiroduced, a\iMi; a great luindier i>\' jietnls. Evolution of the Carnation. The ordinary garden carnation is a II iidy perennial that blooms but once a ;-ar, and the Ihnists' carnation of today I- undoubtedly the resull ot' (diangi'S that 'ia\e taken place in its haliits through ■i-lcctiug anil cultixating the most promis- ill;; plants produced by natural \aiiation, iiiilil now it may be had in bloom during ilic entire year. In the e\ olut iouar.v "|H'ratiou. however, it has lost a portion I its hai'diness, probably because ot' the iiiL;her temperature to which it has liccii subjected for generations during the cohl -i;isi)u of the yt^ar. although this loss 'Mild perha[)s be regained by reveising ■lie process that brought about the ' iiange, and gradually hardening the I'i.iiil until it could withstniid the rigors ■'I oiir severe w inters. This change from summer bloomiu'^ to |"ipetu;d blooming is not conliiied to the 'H nation, but has lieen accomplislieil in '!"• i-ase iif utiier pl.ants. < lirysauthe "iiiiiis have been grown from seeil that ^* I-- saved from the UKuith in the year, and the rose is " • of the most famili:ir exam|iles of a I' int that has been changecl Ifom an an d to a continuous bloomer, thiough the atnient ;iccorded t'l it under modern ' liods (it culture. ' I"' cain.ition llower today, and cspc- l\ in this i-ouulrv, is ijie most jiopular '■r proiluced by the lloiist. Iniviiig 'aken .'ind p.asscl the nidtime favoi- 'he rose, in the race for ]iopulai' I. and iliste;ii| nt' beill!' reteirecl to ■ 'I'' div ine llower. il iiiiglil I nilli be called the | pie "s lloWer. Good Reasons for Popularity. beciune really pojiiilar. a llower I'ossess several i|ualilic;it iiuis. the "' vvhicli is be.auty. a somewhat in 'ble ;iiid elusive (|iiality. In addi !' should have ;i pleasant odor. ,ind pable of being used in a. variet.v of and I'lir various purposes, its text ■tioiild be su( h thill it will remain in ^ ^odil ciindlt inn tor a reasonable '' "• time. ;ind its SIK-Cessllll clllli vation should be so simple that il can be grown ami sold profitalily at such ii jirice that the ordinary (lower user can atford to buy it freely. -Ml these various recjuiremeiils are pos sessed by the carnation, and, in a<ldili<m, il may lie procured at ;iiiy time iluring the entii'e year. Koses, violets, lilies of the valley, chrvsantheniunis and many other Mowers will continue to have their admirers, and will always be in demand, when in sea son, but some of them are dillicull to pro du<-e with profit, and most of them are more expensive, bulk tor bulk, than are carnations. Several years ago. at one of llie con- ventions of the S. A. I"., ail essayist seemed to think that, in a few years, orchids would bec(uiie as plentiful and popular as roses, but the prediction has not been verified and |)ridiably will not be, for two leasons; lirst, they are more dillicull to cultivate and produce, and second, because of this diiliciilty, tlu'ir prices v\ill m'v er become |io|inlar. The develo|iinent ami improvement ot' the carnation have taken place within a conipai'at ivi'ly recent liiiie, both as I'e- gards the size, ccdor and (|u;ility ot' its llowers and the number of desirable va- riet ios. Thirt.v or forty years ago the florist was confined mainly to such kiinls as Ivl- wardsii, |)egraw. La I'nrite. .Miss .bdifl'e and Ast(uia. Hnttercup. one of the best I'avLireak, originated and disseminated by Simmons, of (leiieva, ().. was one .it' t h(; best and most prolitable carnations of its day, which is now over, and v\as probably (me of the |irogeiiitors ol' ihe line variety. Ln(diant ress, and other kinds having the Daybreak shacle of pink William Scott was .■inolher easily gmwii and iisi.'f'ul sort, but it. too, is now eclipsed. Superiority of American Sorts. While tiie carnation is not a native of this continent, certain writers speak of the varieties now in cultivation here, coll<'ctiv(dy, as the American carn.ation, but a better term would be the American varieties of carnations, ;is they nejiily all originated here. At the royal show, held at Xcwi-astle- on-Tvne, l']nglainl, in lU'i^. and |U'ac- ti<-ally open to all e.\hibit(ns, many \ases of Hritish carnations were shown, h.av- ing. in the main, stitf stems ami lai-:^e llowers, but the llowers were iii'aily all of coarse texture and tue most of them had split calyxes, and decid(,'dly the tin- est carr.titicms in the great show were those lit .\merican origin. t'arnation llowers may be appnipnaie- ly used on many occasions and in a va riety ot ways. I'rom a single llower mi a cnat l.Mpel to the most elaborate lliii;il design or ether form ot' decor;it ion. They are wtdcomed in tin' sick louin or till' liosjiilal ward, and are suitable t")-

 

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Jcseph H. Hill. Ill' the eai'lier yellows, allliongh. like ' the pLaci'ineiii s nr the i-eiil erpice tnr 'lie most of the l;iter kinds ot' tli.at coler. lie dinner lable. ' lii^iei'^ m- spiavs ,it' llie cidedly bi/arre. came later, .and was I'ld ilnweis. when arranged with lasie and lowed by (irace Wilder, Alberlini. .Mrs. skill, in cmiii'i iia I ion with :i s|iili,ient llradt, and a host of nlher slowlv im .ininiini el smialile eieeiierv. .-iie much pi'oving kinds, until the list ,il' aspir ,iskrd I'oi .-ind appreiiated t"r I'liiieral ;ints I'lir a pl.ace mi the c-irnalimi siaee i ncc-isjnns. \.i llower c:in i le used to reached Well lip iiiIm the hiiin beds. ' I.eller a'|\aiila^;e in :i pli';isin_; ariaiii;''

  

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Identifier: historyofgamebir00for

Title: A history of the game birds, wild fowl and shore birds of Massachusetts and adjacent states, including those used for food which have disappeared since the settlement of the country, and those which are now hunted for food or sport, with observations on their former abundance and recent decrease in numbers; also the means for conserving those still in existence

Year: 1916 (1910s)

Authors: Forbush, Edward Howe, 1858-1929 Massachusetts. State Board of Agriculture

Subjects: Game and game-birds Game and game-birds Birds Birds

Publisher: [Boston, Wright & Potter Printing Company, State Printers

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

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taken in West Newbury, in October, 1893, by J. W. Pray,and is now in the Peabody Academy Collection.^° This bird feeds on insects, worms, mollusks, snails andother small aquatic animals, and on fruit, seeds and othervegetable productions. 1 Dutcher, William: Auk, 1893, p. 272. 2 Peabody, W. B. O.: Report on the Ornithology of Mass., 1839, p. 258. Putnam, F. W.: Proc. Essex Inst., 1856, Vol. 1, p. 224. < Baird, S. F., Brewer, T. M., and Ridgeway, R.: Water Birds, 1884, Vol. 1, p. 385. 5 Brewer, T. M.: Proc. Bost. Soc. Nat. Hist., 1879, Vol. XX, p. 105. 6 Whitman, G. P.: Amer. Nat., October, 1875, Vol. LX., No. 10, p. 573. 7 Farley, J. A.: Auk, 1901, p. 190. 8 Ornithologist and Oologist, May, 1892, Vol. XVII, No. 5, p. 72.« Auk, 1901, p. 398. 1 Townsend, C. W.: Memoirs of the Nuttall Orn. Club, the Birds of Essex Countv, Mass., No. 3,p. 161. BIRDS HUNTED FOR FOOD OR SPORT. 219 FLORIDA GALLINULE {Gallinula galcuta).Common or local luimes: Mud-hen; Red-billed Mud-hen; Water-chicken.

 

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Length. — 13.50 inches. Adult. — Head and neck blackish slate; body slate gray, brownish on theback and washed on the belly with whitish; nnder tail coverts white;bill and plate on forehead bright red, the former tipped with greenishyellow; edge of wing and a stripe on flank white; toes not lobcd. Young. — Similar, but duller; whitish below; throat sometimes wholly white;bill and forehead brownish. Field Marks. — The plate of bright red on front of head, the red bill and awhite stripe on flank (sometimes covered or wanting) distinguish itfrom the Coot. Tail, when carried erect, shows a patch of white be-neath it. Notes. — Chuck, and many loud calls, suggesting a hen brooding or squaw^king. Nest. — Like that of the Coot. Eggs. — Eight to fourteen, 1.75 by l.-^O, buff or brown, variable, spottedwith dark brown. Season.—^ Rare migrant and local summer resident; late April to earlyNovember. Range. — Tropical and temperate America. Breeds from central CaliforniaArizona, N

  

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Gezien op een tentoonstelling van moderne religieuze kunst "Jezus verbeeld" in Hardegarijp.

 

op een tent van kalkpapier, een kunstwerk van Charlotte Luimes en Maron Hilverda.

www.atelier3x3.nl

Esta imagem é de um cartão postal que comprei em uma loja em Monte Verde, distrito de Camanducaia (MG), no dia 8 de agosto, para dar para minha esposa Rosa. O trabalho está assinado por Luime, uma artista de Belo Horizonte (MG) que usa fotos da família e frases de poemas ou provérbios para compor vários trabalhos que assina como quadros, marcadores de livros e fotos postais como esta imagem descolada...

Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_40_1

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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When a Person of Means Builds a Conservatory it Results in Purchase, Not Production, of Plants. AMERICAN PEONY SOCIETY. 'I'lie uunuiil iiicotiiig and oxliibition the Ainerii'.'ui Peony Society, orij^iu- ; (V set for Philadelphia, June 4 and 5, : id postponed to June 11 and 12, was .i_;ain postponed last week, too late for !.otice to a2)pear. The latest iK)sti)one- iMt'nt was to June 13 and 14, the exhi- I'ition being in conjunction Avith the June show of the rennsylvania Ilorti- 1 (iltural Society. ENCOURAGE THE AMATEUR. An elaborate example of the private ' iinservatorics the wealthier ])eoplc are \\out to build in connection with their liomes is that recentlv constructed for Kaniel Good at liuffalO, X. Y. As will lie seen by the accompanying illustra- tions, the conservatory is uni(pie in its >liape and in the manner in which it fits into a recess of the residence. Keeping conservatories of this kind stocked with jilants provides an outlet for much llorists' stock, as the owners rarely can jiroduce the ])lants needed. Consequently llorists, when they are asked by their well to-do ])atrons con- cerning conservatories, as they fre- quently are, should encourage their con- struction. The conservatory at the Good home fits into a U-shai)ed opening made by the dining-room on the oiie side and the main hall and music room on the other. It is thirty feet long and twenty feet wide, with a semicircular bay of a 9- foot radius. The construction is of gal- vanized steel members, with coi)per gut- ters, and the wood is especially selected for its fine grain and susceptibility to linish. The glass is all i^-inch polished plate. Many of the roof lights are bent two ways, each taking a separate tem[tlate. Special treatment was given the roof glass to make it oj.aque. Over tlio whole roof lieavy snow guards have been placed. The interior is done priiicifially in ivory white, to conform with the colo- nial effect in the dining-room and hall, the latticework on the sides, how- ever, is of the light green that was used for all the fmisliings of the inte- rior. The floor is of tile and the coping base and fountain are of pink marble. The doli'liin fountain over the rock- ery, together with the rockery frames, is of terra cotta, a peculiar finish being employed. The rockery is of tufa- stone and is j)lanted with ferus and aquatii' phints. The main fountain is of tlie siunc stoiu' and is e(iuipjieil with fU'ctric liglits arranged to shine thi'ough tlie water. The ]ilant tables are of liron/.e and coj)per, all the lieatiag radi- ators being concealed undei'ueath. Tlie conservatory is considered one (jf the linest in Buffalo. It was con- structed by the l^ord & Burnham Co., tliroutih II. K. liates, of the Kochestc, \. Y., ollice. H. J. II. to die. The boxes were about lSx.'5(3 inches an luimes ami colors, thanks to tho JKUises that issue catalogues giving such information, Mr. Clark finds that jdain, descriptive labels greatly facili- tate sales at this busy time. The seed trade is most satisfactory.

 

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The More There Are of These the More Plants and Flowers Will be Needed. \

  

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Identifier: opdycketigers12500clar

Title: Opdycke tigers, 125th O. V. I., a history of the regiment and of the campaigns and battles of the Army of the Cumberland

Year: 1895 (1890s)

Authors: Clark, Charles T., 1845-

Subjects: United States. Army. Ohio Infantry Regiment, 125th (1862-1865) United States -- History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories United States -- History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories Army of the Cumberland

Publisher: Columbus, O., Spahr & Glenn

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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o-s intilt l_>th so far in killed am! woumKil is forty-1i^.lit. I wrote yesterday un-U-r lire, l.ove to Pa, Ma, ami the chiMren. Kvcr voiir ••!>.• Tlie Co!|ioi-al rotrn\Ml t(» \v;is I,. .S. C:ilviii. An oiiikh-l»all oiiterid liis lietul at tlu left tniiplo, [)a.ssi!i*( douiiwanlshatttieil hlHi right lower Jaw, and jiassiiig out struck tlieColonel, as stated in tiie letter. Calvin was left on the field,>ui>iiosed ti) he deail. Ne.xt day Lieutenant lilystoni. inehaiue of the And)ulanee Cor[is, found Calvin sitting- upagainst a roek and sent liitu to the hos[>ital. Ili- still lives. An eUort was made to secure the luimes ot the menwho got nearest to the works, and the list was rt-ad to theregiments next day. With ColonelMoores s<juad was ne man of the Goth(Hiio, A. C. Matthias. Company K, wli >was certainly good on a charge, his regi-ment being in the rear of ours. Sergt.Jiieoh Jewell, of F, had chaige of a sijuadspecially mentioned. A FLANK MdVKMKNT.

 

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•AMI Kl. tiCKK.N. 1. Mclhersun had found Snake Crcrk(iap unguarded, (hi the night of May S.Johnston sent Fergusons brigade of cavalry to occupy the(iap, hut after marching all night Ferguson arrived at day-light on tlie !Hii to find himself too late. lie attacked theIth Illinois, hut so(Ui discovered the presence of infantry,and was compelled to fall hack to liesaca, followed hy Dodgescorjts, the GtJth Illinois on the skirmish line doing its workso well that the head of column marched the entire distance,eight miles, without detention. 232 OPDYCKE TIGERS, Dodge, under the personal direction of McPherson,advanced to within a mile of Resaca, fully developing tlieenemys line of works, and sent a small detachment of cav-alry—all he had—northeast, to scout the country and try toreach the railway. The cavalry detachment reached therailway near Tilton, but only succeeded in breaking the tele-graph line. General Logan advanced to the Rome andDalton cross roads, about two miles from Resa

  

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Rika (Hendrika Johanna), dochter van Gerrit Jan Heezen en Johanna Geertruida Luimes. Geboren 29-03-1911 te Sinderen. Overleden 14-12-1979 te Doetinchem.

Ze is op 22-10-1942 getrouwd met Frits (Frederik Alex) Veldhuis, kleermaker te Aalten.

12'x6' lattice structure with 18 cubbies, 24 removable/interchangable frames.

 

Taylor Greenfield/Heather Luimes 2007

The frame juts out 6' from the wall, and is backlit with four bare bulb light fixtures.

 

Taylor Greenfield/Heather Luimes 2007

Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_23_2

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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30 The Weekly Florists' Review. Ai'itiri' any of (Mir colder slates, own nnii i-oscs are for <int' mornrnt tn lie ((nniiaii-il witli luiddcd Htock for entdoor ciilturf. 1 have had no exiK'iicncc with liiiddcd roses, eitiier for cieu (ir (hmieslic, in N'nrth ('ar(diiia. as Mr. Lynch lias, Iml in New f'.niil.and own root rtises are of sn litth' \alue (oitdoois ihat I do nut know of a oiowcr wlio woiihl |ihinl thein. The hnro|ierly |danled. \i/.., two or tliree inclies helow the Imd, will make more oriiwlh in one year than tl w n root pl.ants will in thrh-e that period. When ])hintero duced on the Manetti or tiriar stoi'k. thus insuring greater viyor in the plant. The diih' olijectinn whi(di can lie raised to liuddecj stock is that in ignorant or careless hands the Manetti snckeis an' not lemn\cd when they a]ipear, liut I h;i\'e vet U' see in New MnLjlanil outdocir roses on theii' ewn rnets, either liylnid l)erpetuals or liyloid teas, wididi will lioar any comiiarison with llewers pio- re Imddi'd. I wcmld lie i;lad to ha\c the opinions of other <;rowers on this subject, which i^ an iinpoi-tant one. Ow n root roses at a low prii-ior in every way. In (ireat iliitain, where undoubtedly the finest e\am|i|e>- ot' oll<- i|oor ro-c~. Ill the World .•iic- lo be seen. lar better th.-in tlie be-t we c;i|i ploclnce under the movi t';i\ oiable conditiioi^ in New l-'.nylaiiii. iio one \\oiild think ot plantitii;' other than budded stock. 1 liave had con^idei'abh- e.\|ierieiice. liotli there and here, with haid\ lo-iev, utnl where hardiness, \i<j;or. l()n<Te\ity and (|nality ai'e luime coiisi(h-'ra1ioii.s I \\(puhl always plant budded stock. J'erhaps, lio\ve\ei-, in stales witli balmier cliinatic conditions, own root stock inav succeed belter. \V. X". Cr.vh;. ROSES FOR A GRAVE. I should like to know wiiaf kind of a nioiithly rose would lie best to put on a f^rave—some ^ariety tiuit would bloom most of the summer. ,1. W, ,F. If not particular as to color, tlier*! is no better lose, so far as hardiness and free liioominc; are concerned, than Mine, i'lantier. This is also called Memorial lose, Clothilde SoujK'rt is also a desir- able rose for this piir[)ose. K'ibks, FLORICULTURAL EDUCATION. Ill ccuiiu'ction with the recent discus si(.n of lloriculfural e(lncati(m, the work bi'iny done by the stat<' of Minnesota is woi'ihy of nuMition. .\t <)\\atonna the stale of Minnesota maintains a juihlic school for dependent children. It corresponds closely to the oridian homes t liroiio^hout the country, ()ne of the ilcpartiiiciils is devoted to the lea<-liinj; of lloriculture under the ^ax- doner, who is I'"(hv;u'd W. Schuster. The children arc laufilit liow to prepare, |)lant and cultivato ;ill sorts of plants :ind tlowcrs; tliey ai"o tniijflit to make hotbetis and how to propa<i!ite. T'iiere is a greenhouse in connection with the Sidiool and a larjre law ii. which the pupils keep (dip])e(] \vitli tlio ])uny mowers and small haiol mowers. They have two pony teams for (loiii}jj the work. The llower beds shown in tlio acc<inipanyin;f illustra- tion wi're ]ilanteHl last spiin<jj by the chil- dren and cared for tliroiij^li the siuniner. In the triiinini;- makes jiractieal gardeners and llorists of nny lads having a[)titude for the work. ^-•r:,<<•.,.v<-.::■..-v,»^v,»-v.»)--/,»-- ■.»• ■.»^--■»••,■■ »s-v,»>--v.»^£ SEASONABLE

 

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Mike en Justin Keuben uit Wehl rijdend op een Zabel voor Rick Wiegerinck/Marco Luimes Hengelo Gld op een BSU Zabel.

Identifier: farmpoultry272unse

Title: The Farm-poultry

Year: 1916 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Poultry Northeastern States Periodicals Poultry Industry Northeastern States Periodicals

Publisher: Boston, Mass. : I.S. Johnson and Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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termilk tastes good to them. Practicalpoultrymen regard it as an ideal baby chick food because itis an aid to digestion and helps to make robust chicks. The Buttermilk portion of 100 pounds of BUTTERMILK STARTING FOOD : Cet a sample from ymir dialer, or send 4c in stamps ami ynur dealers luime for contains m a sanitary con- venient form the digestiveand food elements of 50pounds of good buttermilk.The water, about 90^^ of thebuttermilk, has been remov-ed. The buttermilk elementshave been mixed with a bal-anced combination of clean,wholesome grains, just rightlor the digestive tract of thegrowing chick. Thats whyConkeys Buttermilk Start-ing Food is the only toodneeded for the first three weeks. Packages 10c; 25c; 50c; 14-lb.bag $1.00; 25-lb. bag $1.65; 50-lb. bag$3.00; 100-lb. bag $5.75, and largersizes. CONKEYS POULTRY REMEDIES A specific Remedy for each poultry disease.Conkeys White Diarrhea Remedy —conquers the springtime terror, THE G. E. CONKEY CO. lowconkey uuie. Cleveland, O..

 

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or nothing of the practical feeding ofpoultry. The book exclusive of the appendixcontains 82 pages. So small a book doesnot usually require an appendix. Of the82 pages, 8 pages are devoted to the ene-mies and diseases of poultry. These 8pages are solid text. The other 74contain many illustrations, so that as amatter of fact the proportion of the bookdevoted to enemies and diseases is muchmore than one-tenth—and at that theauthor does not say very much abouteither. He tells us that rats do moredamage to poultry than any other enemyexcepting lice, yet, he has not a wordabout how to prevent such damage ex-cept the general suggestion to build housesand coop so that these and other enemiescannot get in. A poultryman who defersto rats in this fashion will always havetrouble with them. In the chapter on diseases we are told SANDS S. C. White Leghorns. A Few Cine Cockerels for sale at $3 to $5All from Hieh Prodncinir UaiUH Day old chicks from my own stock exclusively,after March 1st, 1916.

  

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Thick stone walls that must have orginally used a luime mix to stick together- building people check this!

Gertie Schuurmans, Tim Luimes, Meike teGroenhuis, Tim Bleeker, ?, ?, Roseanne Dentz, ?

from back:

1-

2-

3-

4- Jim Heuving

5 - Tim Bleeker?

6 - Ray Geurkink

7 - Alison

8- Tim Luimes

9 - Gertie Schuurmans

Gallery view from back wall

Identifier: historyofpilgrim00knig

Title: The history of pilgrimage of Washington Commandery, No. 1, Knights Templar, Hartford, Conn. to the twenty-ninth Triennial Conclave of the Grand Encampment of Knights Templar of the United States of America, held in the city of San Francisco, California, September fourth to September tenth, nineteen hundred and four

Year: 1905 (1900s)

Authors: Knights Templar (Masonic order). Washington Commandery, No. 1 (Hartford, Conn.)

Subjects: Knights Templar (Masonic order). Washington Commandery, No. 1 (Hartford, Conn.) Knights Templar (Masonic order). Conclave 1904 : San Francisco, Calif.)

Publisher: [Hartford, Conn. : The Commandery]

Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

  

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act;and in June and July, when the tuna-fishing is on.fish as large as a man are exhibited. One can thenl)elieve almost (itii/ fish story. The steamer whistled and. each holding his ownticket, we made cmr way down the crowded jiier tothe steamer bound for San Pedro, greatly anticijiat-ing another sail on the beautiful Pacific and a chanceto watch the nuuiy gulls and (|ueer looking flying fish. 30 (Elimatniun. ^an Ifvmxtma Esther J. Cady, in Hart fori] Hif/Ji School Cliroiiiclc. A city within a city. That is what Ciiinatownreally is, for it is as distinctly separated from therest of San Francisco as if stone walls enclosed it. At all lioius of the day one can see |)arties ofthese visitors acconipanied by guides on tlie waythrougii (hinatown; hut in Ihc cxciiiiiii- there is moreto see and conseciuently tiiat is the i>oiiuhir time forgoing. However, if a i)arty wishes to visit Cliina-town in the evening, it is advisid)h^ to start ont earlyand to engage a good guide heforehand. For al-

 

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and tor tliat reasoii are received in eertain jilaeeswithout a siyn oi resentment, where otiieis would notbe aHowed to eiitei- at all. Invariably a finide will first take his party downDujjont Street, where the Chinese stores and bazarsaie located. Sing Fats, the largest and most pre-tentious of these, is esi)e(ially interesting. Every-one receives a little yellow Chinese flaii as he entersthe door. Inside he can wander ahout as he )>leases,looking at the beautiful Chinese arts anil curios. Theprice of each article is written in English ujmn it,and all one has to do is to wait u])on ones self andthen |iay for the article. ()! course if anyone is luckyenough to know just w hat he wants he can ask one ofthe (hiuanien to get it for him, but usually it is hardto luime e\actl\ what is wauted in a curio shop. Itwould be by no means dull to s|>en(l the whole even-ing in these shops, but of course the guide caniuttgive so much time, and fifteen or twenty minutes fiasto suffice. Down the

  

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Title: De Dierentuin van het Koninklijk Zoologisch Genootschap Natura Artis Magistra te Amsterdam

Identifier: dedierentuinvanh00schl

Year: 1872 (1870s)

Authors: Schlegel, H. (Hermann), 1804-1884; Witkamp, Pieter Harme, 1816-1892; Es, Gerard W. H. van

Subjects: Zoos; Birds

Publisher: Amsterdam : Van Es.

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

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Ii(?t gematigde Noord-AiiieriUa. Eiii'opa en Siberië. Iii de oostelijlio staten van Noord-Anierika is liij iiitiissclien, even als in vele streken van Europa, geheel of bijkans uitgeroeid. In Holland werden de laatsten in het begin dezer eeuyv waargenomen. De bever voedt zich met schors, de wortels en bladen van boomon. Hij is vooral beroemd om de woningen, welke hij tdt zijn winterverblijf o])rigt. Deze zijn, volgens den aard der plaatsen, welke hij bewoont, en de bouwstoflen, over welke hij beschikken kan, niet zelden zeer verschillend. Zij bestaan gewoonlijk uit eenen G tot iO voet hoogen hoop van groote boomtakken of boomstanimetjes, welke deze dieren met hunne scherpe snijtanden gemakkelijk vellen en wegsiepen, of ze, met de voorpooten tegen de borst dndd<ende, in het water voortstuwen, ten einde ze (ligt aan den oever, of op den oever zelven, opeen te stapelen. Deze woning is meestal door dwarsliggende takken in verscheidene andere ruimten verdeeld, welke alsdan aan de verschillende individus, die gezamenlijk de woning aanleggen, tot verblijfplaats dienen en hare afzonderlijke uitgangen hebben. Digt bij deze woningen maken zij in de aar-de gangen van 30 tot 40 voet lengte, ieder met ver.schillende uitgangen, gedeeltelijk ondei-, gedeeltelijk bovenden waterspiegel. Wanneer deze holen aan de oevers van beekjes of liviertjes liggen, en de waterstand zoo laag woi'dt, dat alle uitgangen boven den waterspiegel te .staan komen, dan dammen zij het water beneden deze uitgangen af, door een dijk dwars door het bed van het riviertje te leggen. Deze dijk, die uit takken, riet en modder met de voorpooten en niet met den staart, zoo als men dikwerf leest, gemaakt wordt, doet liet water tot de gewenschte hoogte rijzen. In Labrador gebruiken zij de aarde, die zij uit hunne gangen giaven, om de wanden en het dak hunner woningen te versterken. Elke woning dient een kleiner of grooter getal bevers tot verblijf. Zij slepen er, gedurende den winter, meestal takken of stammetjes van boomen in, wier .schors hun alsdan tot voedsel dient. In het voorjaar zonderen zij zich, paarsgewijze, van elkander af en slapen in de bosschen. De twee tot vier jongen, welke zij werpen, leven, tot zij zelve voorttelen, gemeenschappelijk met de ouden. De bev(MS woi'den voornamelijk om hini fijn haar gejaagd, en er werden vroeger vele bevervellen, bijkans uitsluitend uit Amerika, in den handel gebragt. Deze handel heeft intusschen schier geheel opgehouden, sedert de castoorhoeden. welke van beverharen gemaakt werden, uit de mode geraakt en door zijden hoeden vervangen zijn. De ratleiibever, Myiopolamus Cotpu, evenaart den bever in grootte, heeft als deze zwemvliezen aan de achterpooten, en is geheel bruin van kleur; maai'zijn staart is rond, dun en van enkele haren voorzien. Dit dier bewoont Zuid-Amerika, bezuiden den keerkring van den Steenbok. • Het lioiult ziih aan de oevers <lei- rivieren, beken en meren op, waar het luime gangen graaft. In deze werpt het wijfje hare 4 tot 5 jongen. Het voedt zich voornamelijk van waterplanten, en zwemt en duikt uitmuntend. Het haar is bijkans even fijn als dat van den bever, weshalve de huiden dezer soort vroeger een niet onaanzienlijk handels-aitikel uitmaakten. In de gevangenschap worden deze dieren zeer mak. DE STEKELVARKENS HYSTRIX.

 

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Hijstrix Jfricana. De stekelvarkens, die men niet met de egels en stekelratten moet verwisselen, behooren onder de grootste knaagdieren, en zijn vooial kennelijk aan hun met stekels gewapend ligchaam, hun .stevig maaksel, hunnen dikken romp, hunne korte pooten en ooren, hunnen langwerpigen, maar afgeronden kop en hun tandenstelsel. De pooten zijn van vier of vijf teenen voorzien en deze met stevige nagels gewapend, en zij hebben aan weerszijde van elke kaak vijf kiezen, waarvan er intusschen, bij oude voorwerpen. niet zelden een aan elke kaakzijde uitvalt. Hunne tong is met stekelachtige schubben gewapend. Zij' hebben eenen blinden daim, maar het sleutelbeen is onvolmaakt. Men ontwaart tusschen de stekels, die volgens de soorten velschillend zijn, lange borstelachtige haren. De stekelvaikens worden in Amerika, Africa. Zuidelijk Europa en het warme Azië tot op de Soenda-eilanden aangetroffen. Zij vormen, volgens de beide halfronden, te weten het oostelijke en westelijke, twee onderafdeelingen. De stekelvarkens dei' Onde Wereld klimmen niet op boomen, maar leven op den grond, waarin zij holen graven, die hun tot woning verstrekken. Zij zijn kennelijk aan hunne gladde voetzolen en scherpe, weinig gekromde nagels. Zij hebben aan eiken poot vijf teenen. maar de duim der voorpooten vertoont zich

  

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Title: American bee journal

Identifier: americanbeejourn2084hami

Year: 1861 (1860s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bee culture; Bees

Publisher: [Hamilton, Ill. , etc. , Dadant & Sons]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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u Journal, DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE PRODUCERS OF HONEY. VOL. XX. CHICAGO, ILL., APRIL 16, 1884. No. 16. Published every Wednesday, by THOMAS G. NEWMAN, Kditob and Propkietor, Bee-Seeping in New Zealand. By the Xew Zealand Herald of Feb. 26, we learn that the first convention of bee-keepers in tl)at colony was held on Feb. ii, at Pukekohe, Auckland. The Herald gives the following as a report of the meeting. It may be stated that the project has been under consideration for some time; many persons interested in bee- keeping having expressed a wish that a society might be commenced. Ac- cordingly, a short time since, Dr. Dal- ziel, an enthusiast in bees, sent out a number of circulars, calling a meet- ing for the express purpose or starting such an association. This meeting was held last Saturday afternoon, the 23d inst., in a large hall belonging to Mr. Buchanan. Though the attend- ance was not very numerous, those present took up the matter with a good deal of earnestness, and seemed fully alive to the benetits which might arise by associating together with a view to promote the advance of the bee in- dustry. Mr. William Morgan was called upon to take the chair, and in doing so, expressed the pleasure he had in presiding over such an assembly. He called upon the convener of the meet- ing to explain tlie particular object for which they had been called to- gether. Dr. Dalziel stated that the object of the meeting was to commence a bee-keepers' association, of the ad- vantages of which it was hardly nec- essary for him to speak. The princi- pal advantage would be that a society of the kind would give an impulse to scientific bee-keeping, and at the same time be the means of diffusing tlie knowledge and information required by those wlio were desirous of enter- ing upon the industry. Between the members of the association there would be, of course, an interchange of ideas, and so, by mutual communica- tion of facts and experiences bearing upon the subject of bee-keeping, might be made, at the same time, a source of profit and pleasure. The following resolutions were then passed : Tliat a Bee-Keeepers' Association be formed; that the luime be the Auckland Provincial Bee Keepers' Association; that the association be managed by an execu- tive committee, comprising the presi- dent, vice-presidents, treasurer, sec- retary, and three members of the general committee ; that the subscrip- tion'be.5s per year ; that J. C. Firth, Esq., be requested to accept tlie of- fice of Presulent; that the following oflScers be elected : Vice-Presidents, Captain Hamlin, M. II. R., Captain Jackson, R. M., Messrs. Proude, Bag- nail and Hopkins ; Treasurer, Mr. J. Collins; Secretary, Dr. Dalziel. It was proposed that the following constitute the general committee, with power to add to their number : Messrs. Allen, Beloe, Brown, Elliott, Jamieson, Morgan, Savage, and Sproul. 1^ We have received Vol. Ill of the "Proceedings of the Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences." This is a volume of over 100 pages, nicely printed, illustrated, and bound, and contiiins a lithograph of Prof. Joseph D. Putnam, late President of the Academy, and an eminent contribu- tor to the progress of science. His untimely death wasan irreparable loss to the Academy as well as to the world of science. ^' The first two numbers of " The Family Circle" now published in this country, have been received. The Family Circle is an attractive IG-page weekly, liandsomely illustrated ; full of interesting matter, and containing no advertisements. The first six num- bers will be sent fkee to all who have not applied,by sending apostal card to The Family Circle, Detroit, Mich. 1^ Our readers will find the hand- somely-illustrated Manual, published by the American Manufacturing Co., Waynesboro,Pa.,on evaporating fruit, valuable and interesting, Sent free. 1^ It will probably be welcome news to Canadians to learn that E. L. CtOoW & Co., Brantford, Out., keep a stock of Binders for the Bee Jour- nal, on hand, which can be sent by mail to those who wish them. They cannot be sent by mail across the lines from the United States. 1^ In a good article on the "Spring Management of Bees," in the London, Out., Free Press, Mr. W. H. Weston remarks as follows: If April proves to be as cold this year as it was last, there is almost sure to be a serious loss of bees. The warm sun of noon tempts the indus- trious bees to fiy out, and many are caught in the cold winds that spring up, and die. This is true in a sense of human life in spring. The only safeguard against this is to keep the hive shaded from the sun, so that its deceptive rays may not decoy tlie bees out into the chilling air. In a few more weeks this danger will be past. 1^ From the edition of Messrs. Geo. P. Rowell & Co's American News- paper Directory, now in press, it appears that the newspapers and peri- odicals of all kinds at present issued In the United States and Canada, reach a grand total of 13,402. This is a net gain of precisely 1,600 during the last 12 months, and exhibits an in- crease of 5,6is over the total number published just 10 years since. 1^" We have received the Catalogue of Arthur Todd, Germantown, Pa.—1 pages—Bees and Apiarian Supplies. ^' We acknowledge, with thanks, the receipt of a copy of the Report of the Commissioner of Agriculture for the year 1883, sent us by Commissioner Loring. 1^ "The Wife OF Monte-Cristo," just published by T. B Peterson & Brothers, is a remarkable novel that will surely attain immense popularity, and that immediately, for never has a romance of greater interest or power been published. It teems with excite- ment and adventure, absolutely brist- les with thrilling incidents, and has an element of mystery that vastly aug- ments its wonderful fascination. It is a continuation of Alexander Dumas' world-renowiied creation, " The Count of Monte-Cristo," and is fully worthy of being associated with that master- work. Price, 75 cents.

  

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Liverpool`s Luime Street

Identifier: pictorialhistory01kitt

Title: The pictorial history of Palestine and the Holy land including a complete history of the Jews

Year: 1844 (1840s)

Authors: Kitto, John, 1804-1854

Subjects: Jews -- History Palestine -- History

Publisher: London C. Knight

Contributing Library: Princeton Theological Seminary Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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hed his tent. Bethel, which still bore tlie luime ofBethizella, was situated aljout half a le;igue to the west of this, at the foot of the hill, in a very fertile district. We shall pre-sently have further occasion to notice Bethel. 32 HISTORY OF PALESTINE. [Book I. infirmities, as all men are, and tempted, as all men are, by their passions, doubts, or fears;and by such temptation too often drawn aside from the right path. The whole of the sacredbook offers to us not a single character exempt from temptation; and it tells us of only Onewhom all temptation left without sin. It appears that Abram did not over-estimate the effect which the beauty of Sarai was likelyto produce upim the sensitive Egyptians. The attractions of the fair Mesopotamian strangerwere speedily discovered, and became the theme of many tongues. She was at last seen bysome of the princes of Pharaoh ; and the report of her beauty becoming, through them, thetalk of the court, soon reached the ears of the Egyptian king.

 

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Title: Annual report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution

Identifier: annualreportofbo1896smit

Year: 1846 (1840s)

Authors: Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents; United States National Museum. Report of the U. S. National Museum; Smithsonian Institution. Report of the Secretary

Subjects: Smithsonian Institution; Smithsonian Institution. Archives; Discoveries in science

Publisher: Washington : Smithsonian Institution

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

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Fig. 198. TLINGIT TABLETS. Lengths, 2i, 3J, and 4J inches. Cat. No. 1G837-2A, i, k, U.S.N.W. 64, Tanzaku. a narrow strip of tliick cardboard, 2| by 14.J iuclies, used for writing verses ou. Japan. The usual size of the tanzahu is about 2h by 144 inches. They are frequently made of a thin strip of wood. The luime is a Japanese transcription of the Chinese tiin chHil- " a short list or memoranda,"^ and the object itself may be regarded as a survival from the time when books were engraved on simi- lar strips of bamboo, like existing Buddhist scriptures in Siam. The temple lots, mikuji (No. 08), and the Korean cards (No. 77) cor- respond with a bundle of tfoizabu, which are still rep- resented on and give name to certain card-pieces in the Japanese pack (No. 81). The ancestry of the book in Eastern Asia may be traced, not only to the engraved strips of bamboo (Chinese ch^ak), but,

  

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Identifier: scottishnationor01ande

Title: The Scottish nation; or, The surnames, families, literature, honours, and biographical history of the people of Scotland

Year: 1877 (1870s)

Authors: Anderson, William, 1805-1866

Subjects:

Publisher: Edinburgh [etc.] : A. Fullarton & co.

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

  

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w in May1639. [See Leven and SIelvii.lk, earl of.] The lands otlialgonie, in the parish of Markinch, Fife, originally belongedto the family of Sibbald. [See Sibbald, suniame of.] SirAndrew Sibbald of Balgonie, sherilV of Fife, in 1457, andagain in 14GG, had an only daughter, Helen, who mairie,!Robert Lundin, second son of Sir John Lundin of LundinTheir son. Sir Robert Lundin of Balgonie, was lord high trea-surer of Scotland. His descendant, Robert Lundin, sold thelands of Balgonie in the sixteenth century, to General Alex-ander Leslie, the first earl of Leven, whose tirst title was LordBalgonie, as already stated. They continued in possession o)the Leven family till 1823, when they were purchased for thesum of one hundred and four thousand pounds, by J.ames Bal-four, Esq. of Wbittingh.am, brother gf the late General Bal-four of Balbimie. Balgonie castle, on the south bank of thoriver Leven, is of gre.at antiquity The following woodcutrepresentation of it is from Nattcs Scotia Depicta:

 

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BALIOL, 220 JOHN. B.VI loi., or Bai-liol, the luime of a Norman baron, whosedescendant was declared king of Scotland in 1-292. He waspossessor of Balleul, llm-onrt, and other manors m Norman-dy, from the former of which he derived his name. His son.Guy dc Baliol, came over to England with the ConquerorsBon, William Knfns, who appointed him lord of the forest ofTeesdalo and Marwood, and bestowed on him the lauds ofMiddleton and Biwell in Northnmberl.and. He had alsolands in Yorkshire. His son, Bern.u-d de Baliol, built tliestrong castle on the Tees, in the county of Durli.am, calledBernard Castle, and was forced by Darid the First of Scot-land, in 1135, to swear fidcUty to Matilda. Pre\ious to thebattle of the Standard, in 1138, the English sent Robertde Bruce and Bernard dc Baliol to the Scottish army un-der David the First, to endeavour to procure peace, butthe proposal was rejected with disdain, when Bruce re-nounced the homage which he had performed to David fora barony in G.allowa

  

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Identifier: historyofamerica01perr

Title: The history of the American Episcopal Church, 1587-1883

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: Perry, William Stevens, 1832-1898

Subjects: Episcopal Church Autographs

Publisher: Boston : J. R. Osgood

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

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dassisted at the Conununion in the morning. Dined with one of theChurch Wardens, and preached in the afternoon to a large congrega-tion.^ He read prayers and preached in Christ Chuich daily for aweek, and on the following Sunday. On his return from a journey • PvCliquifC ncraiansu, n., p. 257. The Two Fii-st P»ita of Jlr. WhitefieWs « Hawksg Eccl. CoQUibutioua, li., p. 1S3. Lile, p. .iC?. 238 HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN EPISCOPAL CHCKCH. northward, at tlio close of the month, lie asain availed himself of thechurch for prayers and sermons, being driven on occasion of his fare-well discourse to adjourn to the fields, as the church could not containa fourth part of the people. On his third visit, after he had openlyaffiliated with the dissenters, the journal records a ditlercnt reception : Went to the Commissarys House. mIio Mas not at home : but after-wards speaking to him on the street he soon told me that he could lendme his Church no more. T/ianl-s he to God the fields are qpen.^- On

 

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INTEUIOK 01- CHRIST CIirHCH,IMIII.AKKl.lMUA. the foUowins: Sundav, the second afterEaster, Aprir20,174(), Wiiilcfield attendedchurch morninir and evening; and heard Mr. preach a sermon ujjou rluslilicalion by ^\orks, from James ii. 18.^ In the evening the great evangelist jn-eached from the samewords to about 1.^)00 people and endea\ourd to show the errors con-tained in the Coimnissarys discourse. • It could not i)e otherwise thanthat the church should be closed In him from this time. Later, underdate of August 2;), 171u, Ihi commi.s.sary writes to the secretary ofthe venerable societv sis follows : — The Two Firet Parte of Mr. Whilcficlds Life, p. 339. Ibid., p. 342. lUd. THE CHURCH IX PENNSYLVANIA AND DELAWARE. 239 The Hisliops Commissary (^Mr. (Jardon), in S. Canilina lins lately |)ii).socutedthe famous SI. \Vli—d thfie upon the liSth Canon ; but. lie has aiipealed luime. Ihope the Soeiety will use theif intefcst to have jnstie(^ thuw him. His eharaeter asa clerjrynian enable

  

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