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Identifier: historyofgamebir00for

Title: A history of the game birds, wild fowl and shore birds of Massachusetts and adjacent states, including those used for food which have disappeared since the settlement of the country, and those which are now hunted for food or sport, with observations on their former abundance and recent decrease in numbers; also the means for conserving those still in existence

Year: 1916 (1910s)

Authors: Forbush, Edward Howe, 1858-1929 Massachusetts. State Board of Agriculture

Subjects: Game and game-birds Game and game-birds Birds Birds

Publisher: [Boston, Wright & Potter Printing Company, State Printers

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

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taken in West Newbury, in October, 1893, by J. W. Pray,and is now in the Peabody Academy Collection.^° This bird feeds on insects, worms, mollusks, snails andother small aquatic animals, and on fruit, seeds and othervegetable productions. 1 Dutcher, William: Auk, 1893, p. 272. 2 Peabody, W. B. O.: Report on the Ornithology of Mass., 1839, p. 258. Putnam, F. W.: Proc. Essex Inst., 1856, Vol. 1, p. 224. < Baird, S. F., Brewer, T. M., and Ridgeway, R.: Water Birds, 1884, Vol. 1, p. 385. 5 Brewer, T. M.: Proc. Bost. Soc. Nat. Hist., 1879, Vol. XX, p. 105. 6 Whitman, G. P.: Amer. Nat., October, 1875, Vol. LX., No. 10, p. 573. 7 Farley, J. A.: Auk, 1901, p. 190. 8 Ornithologist and Oologist, May, 1892, Vol. XVII, No. 5, p. 72.« Auk, 1901, p. 398. 1 Townsend, C. W.: Memoirs of the Nuttall Orn. Club, the Birds of Essex Countv, Mass., No. 3,p. 161. BIRDS HUNTED FOR FOOD OR SPORT. 219 FLORIDA GALLINULE {Gallinula galcuta).Common or local luimes: Mud-hen; Red-billed Mud-hen; Water-chicken.

 

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Length. — 13.50 inches. Adult. — Head and neck blackish slate; body slate gray, brownish on theback and washed on the belly with whitish; nnder tail coverts white;bill and plate on forehead bright red, the former tipped with greenishyellow; edge of wing and a stripe on flank white; toes not lobcd. Young. — Similar, but duller; whitish below; throat sometimes wholly white;bill and forehead brownish. Field Marks. — The plate of bright red on front of head, the red bill and awhite stripe on flank (sometimes covered or wanting) distinguish itfrom the Coot. Tail, when carried erect, shows a patch of white be-neath it. Notes. — Chuck, and many loud calls, suggesting a hen brooding or squaw^king. Nest. — Like that of the Coot. Eggs. — Eight to fourteen, 1.75 by l.-^O, buff or brown, variable, spottedwith dark brown. Season.—^ Rare migrant and local summer resident; late April to earlyNovember. Range. — Tropical and temperate America. Breeds from central CaliforniaArizona, N

  

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#dagaanbieding Handgemaakte Luimes en Luimes ovale vazenset: van 69,95 voor 29,95 dagkoopje.eu/#buythistoday

In slechts drie en een half jaar meer dan 190 concerten over heel het Iberische schiereiland en Frankrijk. Bongo Botrako is een band van de hand van Uri Giné en vindt deels zijn oorsprong op Placa de la Alergria in Tarrogona. De voetafdruk van de straat is nog zeer duidelijk in de muziek terug te vinden. In oktober 2010 was daar het eerste album: "Todos los dias sale el sol" of te wel "Elke dag komt de zon" en zo klinkt het ook. Een mix van rumba, reggae, ska, punk en vooral veel vreugde.

 

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Live echt een feest. Super enthousiast, energiek, vrolijk, passievol.

Medio 2011 bracht Andre Manuel de solo-cd Dollekamp uit. Om het materiaal van de plaat live te kunnen spelen formeerde hij de band "Dancing Dollekamp". Hiervoor werden uit alle hoeken en gaten artiesten tevoorschijn gehaald: Theun Supheert (o.a. De Ketterse Fanfare), Adri Karsenberg (o.a. Fratsen), Ottoboy (fameus eenmanspunkorkest), Bert Kuipers (o.a. Quasimodo), DJ DNA (o.a. Urban Dance Squad) en Henk-Jan Hoekjen (o.a. De Stilletto's). Dit bonte gezelschap brengt behalve (Twentstalig) materiaal van de cd Dollekamp ook nieuw Duits- en Engelstalig materiaal ten gehore. Overal volgen lovende recenties. Niet samen te vatten in muziekstijl, niet te plaatsen in een hokje, niet te evenaren. Dat moet je meemaken.

 

www.dancingdollekamp.com

Identifier: alabamaherresour00alab

Title: Alabama: her resources and what she is doing with them

Year: 1901 (1900s)

Authors: Alabama. Dept of agriculture. [from old catalog]

Subjects:

Publisher: [Montgomery, Ala.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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ect to utilize the vast volume of water that flows around tlie locks on the Tennessee, is an old one,and will \ et be cairied out when industrial devel-cjimcnt in that \ alley has gained more strength.1 he A\ arrior is a ri\ er of falls and high banks.I he Sipsey and other tributaries of the \\arriorare large enough to he dignified with the luimes ofii\ ers. The Tallapoosa, above the head of naviga-tion, turns (0,000 spindles with hardly an impres-sion on its capacity. The same stream has beenutilized to liring an unlimited supply of electricpo«er to Montgomery, a distance of forty miles.The great power of the Chattahoochee, which turnsthe spindles at Columbus, Ga., is the line betweenthe States, and some of the mills are on the Ala-lianui side. J he Conecuh, the < hoctawhatchie andthe Pea arc long ri\ ers of Southeast Alabama, nav-igalile far down, but capable above the head ofnavigation of sujjplying power to spin all the cot-ton raised in the State. Outside the prairie levels,.

 

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there is hardly a neighborhood without water power to grind its coin and gin its cotton. A hundred creeksruafrom the hills with power to operate the largest cotton mills of the country. Coming long distances through thewooded hills and mountains, the streams of Alabama do not go dry in summer, and reserve reservoirs have notbeen found necessary-. These could be made to increase the water power of the State to an indefinite and limit-less amount. If it be true that the long tendency to give steam the preference over water, has aliout run its coiuse, andthat natures power is coming into its own again, then Alabama is the most inviting of all the States for manu-facturing in which cheap power is a consideration. If it l)e true that cotton mills do best when off siniiewhat tothemselves, the numerous sites by the rivers of Ala-bama invite the mill builders attention, sites reachedby a few miles of branch railroad. IMMIGRATION. Alabama has a cordial welcome lor the iKinicseeker. Ihe object

  

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Identifier: lesenchantements00theuuoft

Title: Les enchantements de la forêt. With grammatical, historical, and geographical notes by H. Lallemand

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: Theuriet, André, 1833-1907 Lallemand, H

Subjects:

Publisher: London Hachette

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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CEST LE HOUGE-UORGK, OUVIIEZ-LUI.KNCUANT. DE LA FORÊT li OISEADX ET PLANTES DES BOIS. ._.|, pirs, mais le plus souvent elle est voilée et câline comme unecaresse. Il chante depuis la prime aube jusquaux dernière?lueurs du crépuscule ; parfois mêmela nuit est déjà venue quonentend encore résonner sa sérénade. Le rouge-gorge est le pre-mier levé et le dernier couché des oiseaux chanteurs. Dès le finmalin, il va se baigner et boire à la source voisine, puis, sesablutions faites, il songe à son déjeuner et à celui de sa fa-mille.

 

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LA NUIT EST VENUE ftUON ENTEND ENCOKE RÉSONNER SA SÉRÉNADE. Au printemps et en été, le menu se compose surtout de vers,de mouches et de papillons minuscules; maisàmesure que lau-tomne approche, la nourriture devient plus variée et plusrafraîchissante. Le rouge-gorge trouve partout la table mise :cornouilles, alises, baies de sorbier, mûres de ronces, tout luiest bon. On prétend même quil ne dédaigne pas le raisin, eton laccuse de se sustenter aux dépens de la vendange —Grisé par tous ces fruits juteux et capiteux, il chante de plusbelle, devient familier et va donner étourdiment dans les piègestendus par lengeance des preneurs doiseaux. 212 LES ENCHANTEMENTS DE LA FORKT. En Anglelene du moins celle aimable familiarilé ne lui eslpas fatale. Le peuple anglais a pour cet oiseau un culte tendre-ment superstitieux. Le rouge-gorge, Robin redbreast, est po-pulaire chez nos voisins; il est le héros de maintes légendes,on luime et on le respecte, comme chez nous lhirondell

  

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Gezien op een tentoonstelling van moderne religieuze kunst "Jezus verbeeld" in Hardegarijp.

 

op een tent van kalkpapier, een kunstwerk van Charlotte Luimes en Maron Hilverda.

www.atelier3x3.nl

Thick stone walls that must have orginally used a luime mix to stick together- building people check this!

Title: De Dierentuin van het Koninklijk Zoologisch Genootschap Natura Artis Magistra te Amsterdam

Identifier: dedierentuinvanh00schl

Year: 1872 (1870s)

Authors: Schlegel, H. (Hermann), 1804-1884; Witkamp, Pieter Harme, 1816-1892; Es, Gerard W. H. van

Subjects: Zoos; Birds

Publisher: Amsterdam : Van Es.

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

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Ii(?t gematigde Noord-AiiieriUa. Eiii'opa en Siberië. Iii de oostelijlio staten van Noord-Anierika is liij iiitiissclien, even als in vele streken van Europa, geheel of bijkans uitgeroeid. In Holland werden de laatsten in het begin dezer eeuyv waargenomen. De bever voedt zich met schors, de wortels en bladen van boomon. Hij is vooral beroemd om de woningen, welke hij tdt zijn winterverblijf o])rigt. Deze zijn, volgens den aard der plaatsen, welke hij bewoont, en de bouwstoflen, over welke hij beschikken kan, niet zelden zeer verschillend. Zij bestaan gewoonlijk uit eenen G tot iO voet hoogen hoop van groote boomtakken of boomstanimetjes, welke deze dieren met hunne scherpe snijtanden gemakkelijk vellen en wegsiepen, of ze, met de voorpooten tegen de borst dndd<ende, in het water voortstuwen, ten einde ze (ligt aan den oever, of op den oever zelven, opeen te stapelen. Deze woning is meestal door dwarsliggende takken in verscheidene andere ruimten verdeeld, welke alsdan aan de verschillende individus, die gezamenlijk de woning aanleggen, tot verblijfplaats dienen en hare afzonderlijke uitgangen hebben. Digt bij deze woningen maken zij in de aar-de gangen van 30 tot 40 voet lengte, ieder met ver.schillende uitgangen, gedeeltelijk ondei-, gedeeltelijk bovenden waterspiegel. Wanneer deze holen aan de oevers van beekjes of liviertjes liggen, en de waterstand zoo laag woi'dt, dat alle uitgangen boven den waterspiegel te .staan komen, dan dammen zij het water beneden deze uitgangen af, door een dijk dwars door het bed van het riviertje te leggen. Deze dijk, die uit takken, riet en modder met de voorpooten en niet met den staart, zoo als men dikwerf leest, gemaakt wordt, doet liet water tot de gewenschte hoogte rijzen. In Labrador gebruiken zij de aarde, die zij uit hunne gangen giaven, om de wanden en het dak hunner woningen te versterken. Elke woning dient een kleiner of grooter getal bevers tot verblijf. Zij slepen er, gedurende den winter, meestal takken of stammetjes van boomen in, wier .schors hun alsdan tot voedsel dient. In het voorjaar zonderen zij zich, paarsgewijze, van elkander af en slapen in de bosschen. De twee tot vier jongen, welke zij werpen, leven, tot zij zelve voorttelen, gemeenschappelijk met de ouden. De bev(MS woi'den voornamelijk om hini fijn haar gejaagd, en er werden vroeger vele bevervellen, bijkans uitsluitend uit Amerika, in den handel gebragt. Deze handel heeft intusschen schier geheel opgehouden, sedert de castoorhoeden. welke van beverharen gemaakt werden, uit de mode geraakt en door zijden hoeden vervangen zijn. De ratleiibever, Myiopolamus Cotpu, evenaart den bever in grootte, heeft als deze zwemvliezen aan de achterpooten, en is geheel bruin van kleur; maai'zijn staart is rond, dun en van enkele haren voorzien. Dit dier bewoont Zuid-Amerika, bezuiden den keerkring van den Steenbok. • Het lioiult ziih aan de oevers <lei- rivieren, beken en meren op, waar het luime gangen graaft. In deze werpt het wijfje hare 4 tot 5 jongen. Het voedt zich voornamelijk van waterplanten, en zwemt en duikt uitmuntend. Het haar is bijkans even fijn als dat van den bever, weshalve de huiden dezer soort vroeger een niet onaanzienlijk handels-aitikel uitmaakten. In de gevangenschap worden deze dieren zeer mak. DE STEKELVARKENS HYSTRIX.

 

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Hijstrix Jfricana. De stekelvarkens, die men niet met de egels en stekelratten moet verwisselen, behooren onder de grootste knaagdieren, en zijn vooial kennelijk aan hun met stekels gewapend ligchaam, hun .stevig maaksel, hunnen dikken romp, hunne korte pooten en ooren, hunnen langwerpigen, maar afgeronden kop en hun tandenstelsel. De pooten zijn van vier of vijf teenen voorzien en deze met stevige nagels gewapend, en zij hebben aan weerszijde van elke kaak vijf kiezen, waarvan er intusschen, bij oude voorwerpen. niet zelden een aan elke kaakzijde uitvalt. Hunne tong is met stekelachtige schubben gewapend. Zij' hebben eenen blinden daim, maar het sleutelbeen is onvolmaakt. Men ontwaart tusschen de stekels, die volgens de soorten velschillend zijn, lange borstelachtige haren. De stekelvaikens worden in Amerika, Africa. Zuidelijk Europa en het warme Azië tot op de Soenda-eilanden aangetroffen. Zij vormen, volgens de beide halfronden, te weten het oostelijke en westelijke, twee onderafdeelingen. De stekelvarkens dei' Onde Wereld klimmen niet op boomen, maar leven op den grond, waarin zij holen graven, die hun tot woning verstrekken. Zij zijn kennelijk aan hunne gladde voetzolen en scherpe, weinig gekromde nagels. Zij hebben aan eiken poot vijf teenen. maar de duim der voorpooten vertoont zich

  

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Title: American bee journal

Identifier: americanbeejourn2084hami

Year: 1861 (1860s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bee culture; Bees

Publisher: [Hamilton, Ill. , etc. , Dadant & Sons]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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u Journal, DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF THE PRODUCERS OF HONEY. VOL. XX. CHICAGO, ILL., APRIL 16, 1884. No. 16. Published every Wednesday, by THOMAS G. NEWMAN, Kditob and Propkietor, Bee-Seeping in New Zealand. By the Xew Zealand Herald of Feb. 26, we learn that the first convention of bee-keepers in tl)at colony was held on Feb. ii, at Pukekohe, Auckland. The Herald gives the following as a report of the meeting. It may be stated that the project has been under consideration for some time; many persons interested in bee- keeping having expressed a wish that a society might be commenced. Ac- cordingly, a short time since, Dr. Dal- ziel, an enthusiast in bees, sent out a number of circulars, calling a meet- ing for the express purpose or starting such an association. This meeting was held last Saturday afternoon, the 23d inst., in a large hall belonging to Mr. Buchanan. Though the attend- ance was not very numerous, those present took up the matter with a good deal of earnestness, and seemed fully alive to the benetits which might arise by associating together with a view to promote the advance of the bee in- dustry. Mr. William Morgan was called upon to take the chair, and in doing so, expressed the pleasure he had in presiding over such an assembly. He called upon the convener of the meet- ing to explain tlie particular object for which they had been called to- gether. Dr. Dalziel stated that the object of the meeting was to commence a bee-keepers' association, of the ad- vantages of which it was hardly nec- essary for him to speak. The princi- pal advantage would be that a society of the kind would give an impulse to scientific bee-keeping, and at the same time be the means of diffusing tlie knowledge and information required by those wlio were desirous of enter- ing upon the industry. Between the members of the association there would be, of course, an interchange of ideas, and so, by mutual communica- tion of facts and experiences bearing upon the subject of bee-keeping, might be made, at the same time, a source of profit and pleasure. The following resolutions were then passed : Tliat a Bee-Keeepers' Association be formed; that the luime be the Auckland Provincial Bee Keepers' Association; that the association be managed by an execu- tive committee, comprising the presi- dent, vice-presidents, treasurer, sec- retary, and three members of the general committee ; that the subscrip- tion'be.5s per year ; that J. C. Firth, Esq., be requested to accept tlie of- fice of Presulent; that the following oflScers be elected : Vice-Presidents, Captain Hamlin, M. II. R., Captain Jackson, R. M., Messrs. Proude, Bag- nail and Hopkins ; Treasurer, Mr. J. Collins; Secretary, Dr. Dalziel. It was proposed that the following constitute the general committee, with power to add to their number : Messrs. Allen, Beloe, Brown, Elliott, Jamieson, Morgan, Savage, and Sproul. 1^ We have received Vol. Ill of the "Proceedings of the Davenport Academy of Natural Sciences." This is a volume of over 100 pages, nicely printed, illustrated, and bound, and contiiins a lithograph of Prof. Joseph D. Putnam, late President of the Academy, and an eminent contribu- tor to the progress of science. His untimely death wasan irreparable loss to the Academy as well as to the world of science. ^' The first two numbers of " The Family Circle" now published in this country, have been received. The Family Circle is an attractive IG-page weekly, liandsomely illustrated ; full of interesting matter, and containing no advertisements. The first six num- bers will be sent fkee to all who have not applied,by sending apostal card to The Family Circle, Detroit, Mich. 1^ Our readers will find the hand- somely-illustrated Manual, published by the American Manufacturing Co., Waynesboro,Pa.,on evaporating fruit, valuable and interesting, Sent free. 1^ It will probably be welcome news to Canadians to learn that E. L. CtOoW & Co., Brantford, Out., keep a stock of Binders for the Bee Jour- nal, on hand, which can be sent by mail to those who wish them. They cannot be sent by mail across the lines from the United States. 1^ In a good article on the "Spring Management of Bees," in the London, Out., Free Press, Mr. W. H. Weston remarks as follows: If April proves to be as cold this year as it was last, there is almost sure to be a serious loss of bees. The warm sun of noon tempts the indus- trious bees to fiy out, and many are caught in the cold winds that spring up, and die. This is true in a sense of human life in spring. The only safeguard against this is to keep the hive shaded from the sun, so that its deceptive rays may not decoy tlie bees out into the chilling air. In a few more weeks this danger will be past. 1^ From the edition of Messrs. Geo. P. Rowell & Co's American News- paper Directory, now in press, it appears that the newspapers and peri- odicals of all kinds at present issued In the United States and Canada, reach a grand total of 13,402. This is a net gain of precisely 1,600 during the last 12 months, and exhibits an in- crease of 5,6is over the total number published just 10 years since. 1^" We have received the Catalogue of Arthur Todd, Germantown, Pa.—1 pages—Bees and Apiarian Supplies. ^' We acknowledge, with thanks, the receipt of a copy of the Report of the Commissioner of Agriculture for the year 1883, sent us by Commissioner Loring. 1^ "The Wife OF Monte-Cristo," just published by T. B Peterson & Brothers, is a remarkable novel that will surely attain immense popularity, and that immediately, for never has a romance of greater interest or power been published. It teems with excite- ment and adventure, absolutely brist- les with thrilling incidents, and has an element of mystery that vastly aug- ments its wonderful fascination. It is a continuation of Alexander Dumas' world-renowiied creation, " The Count of Monte-Cristo," and is fully worthy of being associated with that master- work. Price, 75 cents.

  

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Liverpool`s Luime Street

Identifier: historyofamerica01perr

Title: The history of the American Episcopal Church, 1587-1883

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: Perry, William Stevens, 1832-1898

Subjects: Episcopal Church Autographs

Publisher: Boston : J. R. Osgood

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

  

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dassisted at the Conununion in the morning. Dined with one of theChurch Wardens, and preached in the afternoon to a large congrega-tion.^ He read prayers and preached in Christ Chuich daily for aweek, and on the following Sunday. On his return from a journey • PvCliquifC ncraiansu, n., p. 257. The Two Fii-st P»ita of Jlr. WhitefieWs « Hawksg Eccl. CoQUibutioua, li., p. 1S3. Lile, p. .iC?. 238 HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN EPISCOPAL CHCKCH. northward, at tlio close of the month, lie asain availed himself of thechurch for prayers and sermons, being driven on occasion of his fare-well discourse to adjourn to the fields, as the church could not containa fourth part of the people. On his third visit, after he had openlyaffiliated with the dissenters, the journal records a ditlercnt reception : Went to the Commissarys House. mIio Mas not at home : but after-wards speaking to him on the street he soon told me that he could lendme his Church no more. T/ianl-s he to God the fields are qpen.^- On

 

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INTEUIOK 01- CHRIST CIirHCH,IMIII.AKKl.lMUA. the foUowins: Sundav, the second afterEaster, Aprir20,174(), Wiiilcfield attendedchurch morninir and evening; and heard Mr. preach a sermon ujjou rluslilicalion by ^\orks, from James ii. 18.^ In the evening the great evangelist jn-eached from the samewords to about 1.^)00 people and endea\ourd to show the errors con-tained in the Coimnissarys discourse. • It could not i)e otherwise thanthat the church should be closed In him from this time. Later, underdate of August 2;), 171u, Ihi commi.s.sary writes to the secretary ofthe venerable societv sis follows : — The Two Firet Parte of Mr. Whilcficlds Life, p. 339. Ibid., p. 342. lUd. THE CHURCH IX PENNSYLVANIA AND DELAWARE. 239 The Hisliops Commissary (^Mr. (Jardon), in S. Canilina lins lately |)ii).socutedthe famous SI. \Vli—d thfie upon the liSth Canon ; but. lie has aiipealed luime. Ihope the Soeiety will use theif intefcst to have jnstie(^ thuw him. His eharaeter asa clerjrynian enable

  

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Title: Insects affecting domestic animals [microform] : an account of the species of importance in North America, with mention of related forms occurring on other animals

Identifier: cihm_35141

Year: 1896 (1890s)

Authors: Osborn, Herbert, b. 1856

Subjects: Parasites; Insects, Injurious and beneficial; Animaux domestiques; Insectes nuisibles

Publisher: Washington : G. P. O.

Contributing Library: www.flickr.com/search/?tags=bookcontributorCanadiana_org

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Alberta Libraries

  

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214 INSECTS AFPECTINQ DOMESTIC ANIMALS. (Icscribod it in I.S18 under tho name wliicli lias b(M'n universally adojtlcil since, and it has rcteived iVeciuent mention since that time. It is vci y similar to the Trlnoion Iiirifhim, l)nt may {•enerally be easily separated by the more dilVuse col<»rin}f and its larj^er size, beiiij;' (J mm. (.'i lims aceordiiiff to Denny) in length. The two species are not known in infest the same kinds of birds. Tliis louse oc<'urs on a number ^r spec»'3S of geese and swans, and on om^ gnll; accordinj;'to Denny, on the common tloniestie goose, on the l.niiis chhuh^ and Ciffjiinshcirichii; on ('l/l(n\ iU'ronVu\}>; to Ilurmcister; on T. m?^s•/c».s• and «/or, ace<mlin- to IMaget; and on Aii.scr rnjicollis, a for examining geese have been lindted. liOlT.SI'; OF 'I UK (ioosK. {Triiiolon litiirolinii Mt/scli.) This quiti^ distinct spetMcs of louse has been known to (Mitomologists since ISIS, when it was described by Nit/.sch. Denny, however, did not recognize the a])i)lication of the des(;rii)tion to this form and rede scribed it under tiie luime of Trinofmi s(jii(iliihnii. Later writers, how _ ever, have adopted the earlier name, and there will ]>iobably be no fur ther confusion regarding it. It is (piite easily distinguished from the other species of TriiH)ton. Ix'ing considerably shorti'r, smaller, and of a nearly white color. It occurs, according to Denny, on Auficr alhi/ronN, \]n\ domestic goose, arid on Anas clinx'tita. It is also referred to tiie Smew, ;nd Piaget states that it has been taken fiom IhndrovjifiuK arhorcd ami Aiiser iilhi- frons, TlIK IMlJKON liOr.SK. (l'i)lji(i(Tiihilhiiii loiiiliidiiilinil Nit/sell.)

 

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Kid. KiS.— Tiiiinliin litiiniliim^v\\\i\r>i (autliDi's illiiHlnitiiiiil. Nitzs(^h desciibed this form, whicli o<-curson ])igeons, in ISIS, but it was again described by Denny in 184L', who gave it the name of fiirhiiKitnni. (Jiebel retained both these names, evidently considering that they referred to distinct species, but IMaget has ]»laced them together. The species would not seem to be so abundant as some of the other

  

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The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

The Soul Snatchers - Jazz Comes To Epe 2016

Title: American homes and gardens

Identifier: americanhomesga41907newy

Year: 1905 (1900s)

Authors:

Subjects: Architecture, Domestic; Landscape gardening

Publisher: New York : Munn and Co

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

  

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Hartshorn Shade Rollers Dear the script luime of Stew urt Wood Rollers iiansiiuru on label. Jin Rollers Get "ImNroved," no tacks reauired. BURLINGTON

 

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Venetian ^ Sliding BLINDS Screens and screen D oors ^ Equal 500 miles northward. Perfect privacy witti doors and windowg open. Darkness and breezes in sleeping rooms. ^ Write for our catalogue, price-list and proposition to YOU.

  

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Title: The illustrated natural history [microform]

Identifier: cihm_50038

Year: 1863 (1860s)

Authors: Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889

Subjects: Birds; Natural history; Oiseaux; Sciences naturelles

Publisher: London : Routledge, Warne, and Routledge

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Digitizing Sponsor: University of Alberta Libraries

  

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1^ I* .'': 12:, 'I B\" iiU 'n 132 THE WHITE-BELLIKD SWIET. The following interesting account of the hiiliits of this bird is Thompson :— given by .Mr. "The first pltice I met with the Alpine Swift was almost teu miles to the north of Xaples, on the 12th of vVngust, 182(1, when a great number were observed associated together in iliglit, at a high elevation. Their evohitions in the air were sinular to those of a common Swift. Independently of their superior size, which at once distinguishcis them from that bird, the w]ut(! colour of a portion of the under jdumnge, from which they have received the name of White-bellied Swift, is conspicuous, even when the bird ia at a considerable altitude. When on the continent in IS+l witli my friend Professor E. Forbes, this species was first seen by us on tlie 9(h of Ai)ril, as we descended the Ifhoue, from L;,ons to Avignon. About half way between these cities, several ajipeared ilying over the river, and a few at tall suitable places thence to Avignon. On the morning of the 28th of April, as \\'e entered the si)]endid bay of Navarino, great nundjers ap])eared careering high over- head. When walking through the pretty town of the same luime, later in the day, Alpine

 

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WHITE-BKM.UCD SWUT-Ci/jw/iM Mella. I' , i'!it"^fc < t '' H " If J M If- Swifts were ooserved fiying very low over the streets and houses, though the weather was delightfully warm and fine. On my visitin- tliu island of Sphacteria the western boundary of the bay, on the 2!)th, these biids were very abundant. Tlie attraction here was a range of noble precipitous cliffs rising directlv above the sea, at the western side of the island. These Swifts inhabited the cliils, which are similar to those tenaided by the common species in the north of Scotland. _ Although the day was as fine an.l as warm as our norlliei'ii summers ever are, tlies(i birds, as 1 walked along tlie top of the dills, swept about low and in numbers, occasionally within a few yards of my head. This remark is made from the ciivumstanee of tlie common Swift being generally high in the air in fine Meather ; we do, liowever neeasionally obsen-e it sweej-mg near Die earlli at sueli tim.'s. Tliou-h Jai-er. they in gvueral inniearaiiw' and fiigiit strongly re.sembje the e.,iiimon Swift: they are very noisv, almost constnntlv uttering a loud twitter, beside which, they occasionally give a brief scream, uowisf msembling the long drawn and .shrill cry of the comiiKi'n sju'eies. Towards the end of May, I .saw a few Alpine Swifts at (.'(.nstanlin(i])le, wheeliiiu' aliout tlie heLdils of I'era and near the liigli tower of Oalafa, in wliich they juobabiv build. In Hie month of June i met with Hus spenes at tlie i.s!and of Vavus, and alMiui the Ari,.p,,l,s ,,f Alliens

  

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Title: Flora Americae Septentrionalis, or, A systematic arrangement and description of the plants of North America [electronic resource] : containing, besides what have been described by preceding authors, many new and rare species, collected during twelve years travels and residence in that country

Identifier: cihm_49786

Year: 1814 (1810s)

Authors: Pursh, Frederick, 1774-1820

Subjects: Botany

Publisher: London : Printed for White, Cochrane, and co.

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^-, i: ) I

 

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306 BERENGARIA OP NAVARRE. and since I cannot deliver it from the hands of thine enemies!' Richard could do nothing more than return to his queen and sister at Acre. " You must know that this king Richard performed such deeds of prowess when he was in the Holy Land, that the Saracens, on seeing their horses frightened at a shadow or a bush, cried out to them, *What! dost think Melec-Ric is there?' This they were accustomed to say from the many times he had vanquished them. In hke manner, when the children of Turks or Saracens cried, their mothers said to them, ' Hush, hush! or I will give you to king Richard/ and from the terror of these words the babes were instantly quiet."' The final truce between Richard and Saladin was concluded in a fair flowery meadow'^ near Mount Tabor, where Richard was so much charmed with the gallant bearing of the ' prince of Miscreants,' as Saladin is civilly termed in the crusading treaties, that he declared he would rather be the frierid of that brave and honest pagan, than the ally of the crafty Plulip or the brutal Leopold. It is a tradition, often cited in modem romance, but without historical foundation, that Richard offered the hand of his sister, queen Joanna, to Saladin's brother, Melee Adhel. The autumn of 1192 had commenced when king Richard concluded his peace ^nth. Saladin, and prepared to return, covered with fruitless glory, to his native dominions. A mys- terious estrangement had, at this time, taken place between him and Berengaria; yet the chroniclers do not mention that any rival liad supplanted the queen, but merely that accidents of war had divided liim from her company. As for the Cypriot princess, if he were estranged from his queen, he must like- â wise have been separated from the fair captive, since she always remaii.ed with Berengaria. The king bade farewell to his queen and sister, and saw them embark the very evening of his own departure. The queens, accompanied by the Cypriot * Joinville's words are thus parni>hrased by Drydcn:â " No more Sebiistian's formidable luime ; r I Is longer iised to still the crying babe." ; ' Piers Langtoft. :'^i

  

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Identifier: historyofpilgrim00knig

Title: The history of pilgrimage of Washington Commandery, No. 1, Knights Templar, Hartford, Conn. to the twenty-ninth Triennial Conclave of the Grand Encampment of Knights Templar of the United States of America, held in the city of San Francisco, California, September fourth to September tenth, nineteen hundred and four

Year: 1905 (1900s)

Authors: Knights Templar (Masonic order). Washington Commandery, No. 1 (Hartford, Conn.)

Subjects: Knights Templar (Masonic order). Washington Commandery, No. 1 (Hartford, Conn.) Knights Templar (Masonic order). Conclave 1904 : San Francisco, Calif.)

Publisher: [Hartford, Conn. : The Commandery]

Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

  

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act;and in June and July, when the tuna-fishing is on.fish as large as a man are exhibited. One can thenl)elieve almost (itii/ fish story. The steamer whistled and. each holding his ownticket, we made cmr way down the crowded jiier tothe steamer bound for San Pedro, greatly anticijiat-ing another sail on the beautiful Pacific and a chanceto watch the nuuiy gulls and (|ueer looking flying fish. 30 (Elimatniun. ^an Ifvmxtma Esther J. Cady, in Hart fori] Hif/Ji School Cliroiiiclc. A city within a city. That is what Ciiinatownreally is, for it is as distinctly separated from therest of San Francisco as if stone walls enclosed it. At all lioius of the day one can see |)arties ofthese visitors acconipanied by guides on tlie waythrougii (hinatown; hut in Ihc cxciiiiiii- there is moreto see and conseciuently tiiat is the i>oiiuhir time forgoing. However, if a i)arty wishes to visit Cliina-town in the evening, it is advisid)h^ to start ont earlyand to engage a good guide heforehand. For al-

 

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and tor tliat reasoii are received in eertain jilaeeswithout a siyn oi resentment, where otiieis would notbe aHowed to eiitei- at all. Invariably a finide will first take his party downDujjont Street, where the Chinese stores and bazarsaie located. Sing Fats, the largest and most pre-tentious of these, is esi)e(ially interesting. Every-one receives a little yellow Chinese flaii as he entersthe door. Inside he can wander ahout as he )>leases,looking at the beautiful Chinese arts anil curios. Theprice of each article is written in English ujmn it,and all one has to do is to wait u])on ones self andthen |iay for the article. ()! course if anyone is luckyenough to know just w hat he wants he can ask one ofthe (hiuanien to get it for him, but usually it is hardto luime e\actl\ what is wauted in a curio shop. Itwould be by no means dull to s|>en(l the whole even-ing in these shops, but of course the guide caniuttgive so much time, and fifteen or twenty minutes fiasto suffice. Down the

  

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from back:

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3-

4- Jim Heuving

5 - Tim Bleeker?

6 - Ray Geurkink

7 - Alison

8- Tim Luimes

9 - Gertie Schuurmans

The frame juts out 6' from the wall, and is backlit with four bare bulb light fixtures.

 

Taylor Greenfield/Heather Luimes 2007

12'x6' lattice structure with 18 cubbies, 24 removable/interchangable frames.

 

Taylor Greenfield/Heather Luimes 2007

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