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Has a reputation for being venomous. It probably only causes contact dermatitis, especially in people prone to allergies. I'm not curious enough to find out.

 

Thank you to everyone who visits, faves, and comments.

This Hickory Tussock Moth, or Hickory Halisidota, is a moth in the family Arctiidae, widely distributed in the eastern half of North America. This adult was bred from eggs laid by wild adult females in Milford, Ohio, USA, and emerged on 14 March 2016.

 

The caterpillars feed in a group and are leaf skeletonizers (they eat the green stuff in-between the leaf veins). Nut trees are their main host plant; this one fed on Walnut.

 

The forewing is yellow with brown shading and bands of translucent white spots representing usual lines. The hindwing is very pale, translucent yellow and unmarked.

Wingspan: 3.7-5.5 cm.

 

Females lay batches of eggs. Early instars stay together in clusters; later instars are not found in groups. Flight period is usually May-June.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photographs is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

Hickory tussock moth caterpillar (Lophocampa caryae) found in my new backyard in Lakefield, Ontario, Canada.

This cocoon is 25mm long and has been spun on the underside of a Walnut leaf. The caterpillar was bred from an egg laid by a wild adult female moth in Milford, Ohio, USA.

 

Thanks for taking the time to view and comment on my photographs – it is greatly appreciated and encouraging!

 

© Roger Wasley 2015 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

This Hickory Tussock Moth, or Hickory Halisidota, is a moth in the family Arctiidae, widely distributed in the eastern half of North America. This adult was bred from eggs laid by wild adult females in Milford, Ohio, USA, and emerged on 14 March 2016.

 

The caterpillars feed in a group and are leaf skeletonizers (they eat the green stuff in-between the leaf veins). Nut trees are their main host plant; this one fed on Walnut.

 

The forewing is yellow with brown shading and bands of translucent white spots representing usual lines. The hindwing is very pale, translucent yellow and unmarked.

 

Wingspan: 3.7-5.5 cm.

 

Females lay batches of eggs. Early instars stay together in clusters; later instars are not found in groups. Flight period is usually May-June.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photographs is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

This Hickory Tussock Moth, or Hickory Halisidota, is a moth in the family Arctiidae, widely distributed in the eastern half of North America. This adult was bred from eggs laid by wild adult females in Milford, Ohio, USA, and emerged on 14 March 2016.

 

The caterpillars feed in a group and are leaf skeletonizers (they eat the green stuff in-between the leaf veins). Nut trees are their main host plant; this one fed on Walnut.

 

The forewing is yellow with brown shading and bands of translucent white spots representing usual lines. The hindwing is very pale, translucent yellow and unmarked.

Wingspan: 3.7-5.5 cm.

 

Females lay batches of eggs. Early instars stay together in clusters; later instars are not found in groups. Flight period is usually May-June.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photographs is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

 

The hickory tussock moth (Lophocampa caryae) is not an uncommon moth. I have certainly seen my share of these beauties, sometimes almost at nuisance levels, but somehow never in my own yard, even after almost 14 years of photographing insects. But last night, for whatever reason, I had three at the sheet.

 

(As you can see, they are fairly docile :-))

Hickory Tussok Moth caterpillar [Lophocampa caryae]

 

Peace Valley Park

Doylestown, PA

Found this little caterpillar inside the house yesterday afternoon. Relocated it to a patio table on the deck and took some macro shots. I finally realized it was looking for something to eat, so I picked a leaf off a tree near the deck and maneuvered it under the caterpillar, who immediately began eating the leaf. I'm glad I was careful not to touch it, because I read later that these caterpillars have a venomous substance in the long black tufts that cause allergic reactions in some people.

The Hickory Tussock Moth or Hickory Halisidota is a moth in the family Arctiidae. Like most species in its family, the caterpillars acquire chemical defenses from their host plants. These 8mm captive bred caterpillars hatched in early July 2015 and are feeding on Walnut (Juglans regia).

 

Thanks for your visit and any comment you make on my photographs – it is greatly appreciated and encouraging!

 

© Roger Wasley 2015 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

Family: Erebidae. Species: Lophocampa caryae (Harris, 1841). Hodges #8211. (Marlow, NH)

I know the big thing now is to be off the grid.

This hickory tussock caterpillar seems to be content to be fully on the grid.

Actually it is the screen door that opens onto the deck.

Gives you an idea of how small it is.

 

Lophocampa caryae

 

The hairs of the hickory tussock caterpillar spell trouble, especially the longer “lashes,” which are connected to poison glands. These hollow tubes allow the pokee to introduce a chemical into the poker.

 

For most of us, a close encounter of the hickory tussock caterpillar kind results in a burning, nettle-type, itchy rash. Cleaning the sting with soap and water, dabbing on some ammonia or calamine lotion, and topping it off with some ice should handle the problem.

More sensitive souls can experience swelling and nausea and may have to see a doctor. The fuzzy setae that cover the caterpillar’s body are barbed and are mechanically irritating, especially if accidentally rubbed in the eyes.

 

source - University of Wisconsin.

This caterpillar fell on me when I was reading, and this is just after I restored it to the vine.

Lophocampa caryae. These are venomous, so don't let the kids play with them.

 

Interesting specimen, and me without the macro lens, of course. This is just about closest focusing distance with this zoom lens. The critter is about 1 1/2 inches long.

 

I hope everyone has a great week.

 

Let me explain...a photographer friend and I went to my wildlife project, taking the golfcart to go to the swamp. Upon entering the clearing I notice 4 white Caterpillars dangling on their thread 15' down from branches above. The breeze was constant but one was breaking the plane of a sunbeam from time to time. I took the challenge. Used my macro and flowed with the insect trying to keep focus and when it crossed the plane clicked. It was crazy! I did this for 10 mins and clicked a couple doz times and 6 shots were pretty good. Had to share with my clicking friends.

One of my favourite cats to come across, I think rather subtly beautiful. Completely covered in long, hairlike setae arranged in spreading tufts and approx' 35mm in length.

Macro Mondays...Member's Choice: Texture...HMM

 

Hickory Tussok Moth caterpillar [Lophocampa caryae]

 

Peace Valley Park

Doylestown, PA

Lors de mes sorties, je suis toujours à la recherche de chenilles ou de papillons. Celle-ci est venimeuse car son contact peut causer une éruption de la peau semblable à celle que causent l'ortie et l'herbe à puce.

I have found the caterpillar but this is the first time for the moth

Hickory Tussok Moth caterpillar [Lophocampa caryae]

 

Peace Valley Park

Doylestown, PA

 

1775*

Hickory Tussok Moth caterpillar [Lophocampa caryae]

 

Peace Valley Park

Doylestown, PA

 

2117*

It spent the day on the front storm door.

This was an early and unexpected Christmas present today... This Hickory Tussock Moth, or Hickory Halisidota, is a moth in the family Arctiidae, widely distributed in the eastern half of North America. This adult was bred from eggs laid by wild adult females in Milford, Ohio, USA.

 

The caterpillars feed in a group and are leaf skeletonizers (they eat the green stuff in-between the leaf veins). Nut trees are their main host plant; this one fed on Walnut.

 

The forewing is yellow with brown shading and bands of translucent white spots representing usual lines. The hindwing is very pale, translucent yellow and unmarked.

 

Wingspan: 3.7-5.5 cm.

 

Females lay batches of eggs. Early instars stay together in clusters; later instars are not found in groups. Flight period is May-June.

 

To see the caterpillar go to: www.flickr.com/photos/rogerwasley/20713730245/in/photolis...

 

Thanks for your visit and any comment you make on my photographs – it is greatly appreciated and encouraging!

 

© Roger Wasley 2015 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

One of these two Hickory Tussock Moth caterpillars is spinning a cocoon on the underside of a Walnut leaf. These caterpillars are bred from eggs laid by wild adult females in Milford, Ohio, USA.

 

Thanks for taking the time to view and comment on my photographs – it is greatly appreciated and encouraging!

 

© Roger Wasley 2015 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

Sparks Maryland

Despite its name, this moth can be found feeding on a variety of woody species. Hickory, pecan and walnuts are amongst its favorites.

See larva in the comments.

This was an early and unexpected Christmas present today... This Hickory Tussock Moth, or Hickory Halisidota, is a moth in the family Arctiidae, widely distributed in the eastern half of North America. This adult was bred from eggs laid by wild adult females in Milford, Ohio, USA.

 

The caterpillars feed in a group and are leaf skeletonizers (they eat the green stuff in-between the leaf veins). Nut trees are their main host plant; this one fed on Walnut.

 

The forewing is yellow with brown shading and bands of translucent white spots representing usual lines. The hindwing is very pale, translucent yellow and unmarked.

 

Wingspan: 3.7-5.5 cm.

 

Females lay batches of eggs. Early instars stay together in clusters; later instars are not found in groups. Flight period is May-June.

 

To see the caterpillar go to: www.flickr.com/photos/rogerwasley/20713730245/in/photolis...

 

Thanks for your visit and any comment you make on my photographs – it is greatly appreciated and encouraging!

 

© Roger Wasley 2015 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

This 30mm final instar Hickory Tussock Moth caterpillar is one of 60 larvae feeding on Walnut leaves from a neighbour's garden. Every three days I prune fresh leaves from the huge tree, much to the amusement of the local residents who probably think I'm stealing the Walnuts to eat or pickle in vinegar! What they don't know is that the owners have given me their permission.

 

The caterpillars feed in a group and are leaf skeletonizers (they eat the green stuff in-between the leaf veins). Nut trees are their main host plant, but they also nibble on elm, willow, ash, aspen, and oak. Even though they are communal feeders, they generally disperse before they damage trees. The adult moths don’t eat anything.

 

Each caterpillar is completely covered in long, hairlike setae arranged in spreading tufts. Most are white, but there are black tufts along the middle of the back, and four long black hair pencils, two near the front, and two near the back. These hairs cause itchy rashes in some people. They are microscopically barbed and may cause serious medical complications if they are transferred from the hands to the eyes. There are black spots along the sides, and the head capsule is black.

 

I hope the caterpillars will soon form cocoons and overwinter in the leaf litter. The adult moth flies in May and June. The forewings are yellowish-brown marked with white splotches, reminiscent of stained glass. The hindwings are mostly white. The body is hairy and pale brown.

 

These caterpillars are bred from eggs laid by wild adult females in Milford, Ohio, USA.

 

Thanks for taking the time to view and comment on my photographs – it is greatly appreciated and encouraging!

 

© Roger Wasley 2015 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

Detail of the scales on the wing.

 

Full body shot in the first comment.

Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar (Lophocampa caryae) on a newly blooming Kidney-leaf Grass-of-Parnassus (Parnassia asarifolia)

I found this caterpillar along Sugar Creek at Turkey Run State Park. It is looks sort of like a Hickory Tussock moth (Lophocampa caryae) caterpillar, but the black markings just do not look right.

 

Photographed using a Sony A7R with a Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 tilt shift lens, a Fujinon closeup lens, and a Sony Flash.

A poisonous beauty one should not touch. While the adult moth may feed on nut trees (we have hickory trees out back), the caterpillar have their own choices. My neighbor found one on his milkweed. Mine was on a crocosmia leaf (crocosmia is listed as deer and rabbit resistant).

Gunpowder Falls State Park Sweet Air, Sweet Air, Maryland. A tiger moth.

This 30mm final instar Hickory Tussock Moth caterpillar is one of 60 larvae feeding on Walnut leaves from a neighbour's garden. Every three days I prune fresh leaves from the huge tree, much to the amusement of the local residents who probably think I'm stealing the Walnuts to eat or pickle in vinegar! What they don't know is that the owners have given me their permission.

 

The caterpillars feed in a group and are leaf skeletonizers (they eat the green stuff in-between the leaf veins). Nut trees are their main host plant, but they also nibble on elm, willow, ash, aspen, and oak. Even though they are communal feeders, they generally disperse before they damage trees. The adult moths don’t eat anything.

 

Each caterpillar is completely covered in long, hairlike setae arranged in spreading tufts. Most are white, but there are black tufts along the middle of the back, and four long black hair pencils, two near the front, and two near the back. These hairs cause itchy rashes in some people. They are microscopically barbed and may cause serious medical complications if they are transferred from the hands to the eyes. There are black spots along the sides, and the head capsule is black.

 

I hope the caterpillars will soon form cocoons and overwinter in the leaf litter. The adult moth flies in May and June. The forewings are yellowish-brown marked with white splotches, reminiscent of stained glass. The hindwings are mostly white. The body is hairy and pale brown.

 

These caterpillars are bred from eggs laid by wild adult females in Milford, Ohio, USA.

 

Thanks for taking the time to view and comment on my photographs – it is greatly appreciated and encouraging!

 

© Roger Wasley 2015 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

The Hickory Tussock Moth (Lophocampa caryae) live in the eastern United States. If you are prone to allergies, such as myself, don't touch these guys! The will cause a nasty rash. They look pretty neat though.

Who knows, but they have some lovely chemical defenses, and you should just let it. (Lophocampa caryae)

This guy was hanging on a silk thread at eye level approximately 15 feet below the branches above.

 

Peace Valley Park

Doylestown, PA

Moth on ornemental allium in my garden.

Lophocampa caryae, Beaver Marsh Boardwalk, Cuyahoga Valley National Park.

This cluster of tiny larvae most likely belong to the Tussock family.

Probably Hickory Tussock (Lophocampa caryae)

 

Frederick County, Maryland

July 12, 2015

This is the caterpillar stage of the hickory tussock moth (Lophocampa caryae.) This is a stinging caterpillar. Found in the Moraine Nature Preserve.

 

Photographed using a Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 tilt shift lens on a Sony A7R with a Sony flash.

Ok, Please enjoy this gorgeous Hickory Tussock Moth (Lophocampa caryae) from Dave Small’s annual Moth Ball, which was last night. Last year there were several of these, but I never managed to get a good enough shot. Glad I scored this year!

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