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This cute little flycatcher has a large round head and a distinct white eye ring. It calls out "che-bek". They might nest here in northeastern Iowa woodlands but more likely move a ways further north.

White Head Island

2017-05-20

The verditer flycatcher is an Old World flycatcher widespread in Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent, especially in the Lower Himalaya.

Scientific name: Eumyias thalassinus,

 

This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Major problems with exports from Lightroom today. At least my downloads to Flickr worked.

 

Los Quetzales National Park, Costa Rica

An over the shoulder look from an Acadian Flycatcher. These species (Empidonax) are much to difficult for me to ID, but fortunately this one called a few times and we were able to match up the calls to confirm the ID.

Not the most artistic image in the world, but a good look at a species that I don't see often, or at least can't CONFIRM often.

Southern NJ 2017

The verditer flycatcher is an Old World flycatcher widespread in Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent, especially in the Lower Himalaya.

Scientific name: Eumyias thalassinus,

 

This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

The verditer flycatcher is an Old World flycatcher widespread in Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent, especially in the Lower Himalaya.

Scientific name: Eumyias thalassinus,

 

This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Willow flycatchers are common nesters at Cardinal Marsh, where there are acres and acres of shrubby willows for them to choose from. They are larger than least flycatchers and have a flatter forehead. Also note there is no distinct white ring around this bird's eye. They call out "fitz-bew".

The Ash-throated Flycatcher - at least around here - seems to come and go by year. 2012 and 2016 were great years for this beauty: other years I can go without seeing any. Almost all of my shots are of the ATF perched on barbed wire, probably because they hunt the grasses in the adjacent fields. I'm still hoping for one on a tree in the same fields.

Least Flycatcher--LRGV TX

To conclude my review of the year, it has to be the fabulous Red-breasted Flycatcher.

 

I had never seen a Red-breasted Flycatcher before this year and saw my first in Shetland in June. Just tantalising glimpses of a juvenile/female. Then in September, I managed my first shots of another juvenile/female at Flamborough Head whilst in Yorkshire for the weekend. At the time I was pretty pleased with that. Then on 22 October came news of this stunning male rather closer to home. It spent 7 days at Beachy Head.

 

Sussex has hosted three other birds this autumn that previously I had only managed record shots of. A Barred Warbler at Seafod Head showed well if briefly on 28 September and a Tundra Bean Goose was on the Adur for 9 days from 5 December before moving onto to Climping and last but certainly not least the fabulous Rough-legged Buzzard remains at Jevington where it was first reported on 9 November 2014.

 

My favourite images from 2014 can be seen here

Blue-fronted Redstart (Phoenicurus frontalis), Qinghai, China

 

Ebird checklist:

ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37979612

 

The blue-fronted redstart (Phoenicurus frontalis) is a species of bird in the family Muscicapidae, the Old World flycatchers. It breeds in central China and the Himalayas (where it winters in the southern foothills, as well as in Yunnan, Northeast India and northern Southeast Asia). Its natural habitat is temperate forests. The female is brownish-grey, with paler underparts.

 

Source: Wikipedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue-fronted_redstart

Williamson, NY, 5-15-17

Good morning everyone. I'm pleased to present today a new bird for yours truly. Being a Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus).

 

While trying to photograph hummingbirds feeding at a trumpet vine growing on the trunk of large pin oak this bird made an unexpected appearance. It perched nearby just briefly, but since I had the camera set for "continuous shooting" I was able to get three quick shots off before it flew away, of which the above is the best.

 

Unfortunately it was a long ways off at the time, at least 50 feet or more, so I had to crop this pic quite a bit. The good news is, it perched at about eye level and out in the open.

 

When I saw the bird I immediately thought "flycatcher" because of its lemon-yellow breast coloring, but wasn't sure at first because of the bird's large size.

 

The Great Crested Flycatcher is a large bird for a flycatcher with fairly long and lean proportions. Overall length is between 6.7 - 8.3 inches (17 - 21 cm) with a wing span of 13.4 inches (34 cm). And despite its name, this bird’s crest is not especially prominent, or in many cases as seen above, all but non-existent.

 

Great Crested Flycatcher is a common bird in summer of deciduous woodlands in the eastern half of the United States and southern Canada. Although considered common, its habit of hunting high in the tree canopy means it’s not particularly conspicuous. More often it's heard, not seen. The best way to describe it is a bird of the treetops where it's a sit-and-wait predator of large insects such as cicadas. It spends very little time on the ground, and does not hop or walk. It prefers to fly from place to place when on the ground rather than walk.

 

Thank you for stopping by...and I hope you're having a truly nice week.

 

Lacey

 

ISO1600, aperture f/6.3, exposure .001 seconds (1/800) focal length 450mm

   

Sometimes for months on end, you don't see anything but the same birds, and you start wondering if it is the migration, the weather, or something else that's screwing up the mojo. And then you see a flick of a tail, the puffed out chest with his best bib and tucker (or maybe a Packard), and you forget about what might be, and take a lot of pleasure in seeing an old friend. In this case, mine is the Black Phoebe. And I'm so lucky that at the top of my favorites list inhabits the west coast and is a resident. So I can go out almost any day, and there will be at least one of them. This guy's a flycatcher, and has the wonderful habit of fying to and from one perch and allowing me to get some pretty good shots of him (or her). Today, between storms, a black phoebe was flitting between the roof of a utility building and my fence post. I'm beginning to think I know him. The Black Phoebe may be plain, but as I said last week, it may be an oxymoron, but he's plainly beautiful.

 

He's no Painted Bunting, Roadrunner, Grosbeak, or even a Steller's Jay. But he's got personality, and he lightens up the cloudiest day. I saved this shot, my last of 2016, and it's time to share him with you especially the 90% of the country that doesn't have such good fortune.

Least Flycatchers (I think) at John Heinz

Horseshoe Pond, Concord NH

Horseshoe Pond, Concord NH

Île Sainte -Marie à Carignan IMG_4054.JPG

This picture has been taken from Simon's Seat, at the top of Barden Fell in the Yorkshire Dales, providing a view of Drebley, towards south-east.

 

The total walk from the Cavendish Pavilion in the Bolton Abbey through the Valley of Desolation is 20 km making an ascent to 435m. Simon's Seat is at an elevation of 485m from sea-level. These summits offer a grandstand view over a large part of the Yorkshire Dales. The return is via Howgill from where the Dales Way is followed back to the start passing the dramatic waters of the Strid. The total walk-time is 7-8 hours at medium pace.

 

One is likely to see the Red Grouse, Stonechats, Cuckoos, Dippers, Meadow Pippits, Pied Flycatchers, Pied Wagtails, Redstarts, Common Pheasants, Goosanders, Mallards and Hen Harriers during the course of walk in sheer wilderness.

 

One is also likely to stay in bed at least for three days after this walk!

God turns you from one feeling to another and teaches you by means of opposites, so that you will have two wings to fly - not one. -- RUMI

  

This picture has been taken from Simon's Seat, at the top of Barden Fell in the Yorkshire Dales, providing a view of Upper Wharfdale, towards North-east.

 

The total walk from the Cavendish Pavilion in the Bolton Abbey through the Valley of Desolation is 20 km making an ascent to 435m. Simon's Seat is at an elevation of 485m from sea-level. These summits offer a grandstand view over a large part of the Yorkshire Dales. The return is via Howgill from where the Dales Way is followed back to the start passing the dramatic waters of the Strid. The total walk-time is 7-8 hours at medium pace.

 

One is likely to see Red Grouse, Stonechats, Cuckoos, Dippers, Meadow Pippits, Pied Flycatchers, Pied Wagtails, Redstarts, Common Pheasants, Goosanders, Mallards and Hen Harriers during the course of walk in sheer wilderness.

 

One is also likely to stay in bed at least for three days after this walk!

A member of the so-called tyrant flycatcher family (Tyrannidae), the least flycatcher is very small and very similar to some of the other small tyrant flycatchers. This one was spotted at Paradise Pond in Port Aransas, Texas.

Mosquero Minimo - Moucherolle tchebec

 

Rondeau, Ontario

February 16, 2017, at Jamundi, Valle del Cauca, Colombia.

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Pied water tyrant

Fluvicola pica.jpg

Conservation status

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Class:Aves

Order:Passeriformes

Family:Tyrannidae

Genus:Fluvicola

Species:F. pica

Binomial name

Fluvicola pica

(Boddaert, 1783)

The pied water tyrant (Fluvicola pica) is a small passerine bird in the tyrant flycatcher family. It breeds in tropical South America from Panama and Trinidad south to Bolivia and Argentina.

 

This species is found in marshy savannahs and the edges of mangrove swamps. The nest is a feather-lined oval ball of grasses and other plant material, with a side entrance. It is placed at the end of a branch near or over water. Both sexes incubate the typical clutch of two or three creamy-white eggs, which are marked with a few brown spots. Cowbirds sometimes parasitise the nest.

 

The pied water tyrant is 13.5 cm long and weighs 13g. Adults are mainly white with a black nape, back, wings and tail. Sexes are similar, although the female may have some brown mixed with the black, and immature birds are brown where the adult is black. The call is a nasal djweeooo.

 

Pied water tyrants often bob up and down when perched, and have a fluttering “butterfly” display flight. They forage for insects, their staple diet, in low waterside vegetation."

Photographed at the Yampa River TNC Preserve. Willow Flys are common (at least locally) breeders along a fair stretch of the Yampa River. The bird is rather brown above and wings are not as contrasting as Eastern Willow Flys. This bird has moderate length primary extension, but not as long as is typical for Eastern Willows

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