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White Head Island

2017-05-20

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A crested songbird of the deserts and arid woodlands of the southwestern United States and Mexico, the Phainopepla is unique in taxonomy, distribution, and behavior. It is particularly notable for its enigmatic pattern of breeding twice each year, in two different habitats. And are very adapt at catching insects out of midair! Thus the aka name of Silky Flycatcher.

 

The Phainopepla, when pursued by predators or handled by humans, mimics the calls of other birds; imitations of at least 13 species have been recorded.

An individual Phainopepla eats at least 1,100 mistletoe berries per day, when they are available. They are a very big reason for the spread of mistletoe.

 

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This cute little flycatcher has a large round head and a distinct white eye ring. It calls out "che-bek". They might nest here in northeastern Iowa woodlands but more likely move a ways further north.

Least Flycatcher--LRGV TX

Major problems with exports from Lightroom today. At least my downloads to Flickr worked.

 

Los Quetzales National Park, Costa Rica

I think a firsttimer for me, at least I cann't remember if I saw this species before. In the cloudforest of San Gerardo de Dota one week ago.

Please click for the larger image to see all details! Thank you for your visit, comments and fav. It is very much appreciated! Use of this image on websites, blogs or other media without explicit permission is not permitted. :copyright: Jan H. Boer 2017

The verditer flycatcher is an Old World flycatcher widespread in Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent, especially in the Lower Himalaya.

Scientific name: Eumyias thalassinus,

 

This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Williamson, NY, 5-15-17

The verditer flycatcher is an Old World flycatcher widespread in Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent, especially in the Lower Himalaya.

Scientific name: Eumyias thalassinus,

 

This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (Extent of Occurrence 30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size has not been quantified, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.

Sometimes for months on end, you don't see anything but the same birds, and you start wondering if it is the migration, the weather, or something else that's screwing up the mojo. And then you see a flick of a tail, the puffed out chest with his best bib and tucker (or maybe a Packard), and you forget about what might be, and take a lot of pleasure in seeing an old friend. In this case, mine is the Black Phoebe. And I'm so lucky that at the top of my favorites list inhabits the west coast and is a resident. So I can go out almost any day, and there will be at least one of them. This guy's a flycatcher, and has the wonderful habit of fying to and from one perch and allowing me to get some pretty good shots of him (or her). Today, between storms, a black phoebe was flitting between the roof of a utility building and my fence post. I'm beginning to think I know him. The Black Phoebe may be plain, but as I said last week, it may be an oxymoron, but he's plainly beautiful.

 

He's no Painted Bunting, Roadrunner, Grosbeak, or even a Steller's Jay. But he's got personality, and he lightens up the cloudiest day. I saved this shot, my last of 2016, and it's time to share him with you especially the 90% of the country that doesn't have such good fortune.

Horseshoe Pond, Concord NH

A member of the so-called tyrant flycatcher family (Tyrannidae), the least flycatcher is very small and very similar to some of the other small tyrant flycatchers. This one was spotted at Paradise Pond in Port Aransas, Texas.

Base de plein aire de Sainte-foy. Enfin ma première photo de moucherolle!

Willow flycatchers are common nesters at Cardinal Marsh, where there are acres and acres of shrubby willows for them to choose from. They are larger than least flycatchers and have a flatter forehead. Also note there is no distinct white ring around this bird's eye. They call out "fitz-bew".

A more abstract shot of a Least Flycatcher taken in Fort St. John, BC, on July 1st 2015.

“An eye-catching bird with ashy gray and lemon-yellow plumage, the Western Kingbird is a familiar summertime sight in open habitats across western North America. This large flycatcher sallies out to capture flying insects from conspicuous perches on trees or utility lines, flashing a black tail with white edges. Western Kingbirds are aggressive and will scold and chase intruders (including Red-tailed Hawks and American Kestrels) with a snapping bill and flared crimson feathers they normally keep hidden under their gray crowns….. Easily found perched upright on fences and utility lines, Western Kingbirds hawk insects from the air or fly out to pick prey from the ground. They ferociously defend their territories with wing-fluttering, highly vocal attacks. Vocalizations include long series of squeaky, bubbling calls as well as single, accented kip notes….. Western Kingbirds live in open habitats, where they perch on utility lines, fences, and trees. They prefer valleys and lowlands, including grasslands, deserts, sagebrush, agricultural fields, and open woodlands. They are typically found below about 7,000 feet in elevation.”

 

Status : Least Concern

Source : Cornell University Lab of Ornithology

 

Emigrant Creek – Jackson County – Oregon - USA

 

This bird has a particular song resembling its name (in french tchébec) . It is then easy enough to recognize it. But to photograph him it is far from obvious. But here it is this little flycatcher!

 

Cet oiseau à un chant particulier ressemblant à son nom. Il est alors assez facile à le reconnaitre. Par compte le photographier est loin d'être évident. Mais bon le voilà ce petit moucherolle!

Silvery checkerspots, much rarer than our common Pearl crescents, were out at the wetlands this weekend. This male checkerspot was attempting to, or did mate with, this female crescent. He chased her right out of my photos and we left them still in the chase.

 

>> two different small butterflies in courtship, on wild blackberry blossoms at the wetlands - this weekend

 

We got at least 1 1/2 inches of rain yesterday and may get a bit more today. Great crested flycatchers have arrived in the yard and are very noisy! Love having them back to join the Blue-gray gnatcatchers. Next up: Wood thrush with their beautiful songs.

 

btw the Viceroy chrysalis in our backyard has eclosed and I missed it - haven't actually seen a Viceroy yet this season. Back to dragonflies tomorrow. Happy Butterfly Monday!

 

Least Flycatchers migrate from Mexico every spring, as far north as Yukon. This bird was already banded when it was caught - usually it was banded at the same site but birds banded as far away as Veracruz, Mexico have been identified here.

February 16, 2017, at Jamundi, Valle del Cauca, Colombia.

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Pied water tyrant

Fluvicola pica.jpg

Conservation status

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Class:Aves

Order:Passeriformes

Family:Tyrannidae

Genus:Fluvicola

Species:F. pica

Binomial name

Fluvicola pica

(Boddaert, 1783)

The pied water tyrant (Fluvicola pica) is a small passerine bird in the tyrant flycatcher family. It breeds in tropical South America from Panama and Trinidad south to Bolivia and Argentina.

 

This species is found in marshy savannahs and the edges of mangrove swamps. The nest is a feather-lined oval ball of grasses and other plant material, with a side entrance. It is placed at the end of a branch near or over water. Both sexes incubate the typical clutch of two or three creamy-white eggs, which are marked with a few brown spots. Cowbirds sometimes parasitise the nest.

 

The pied water tyrant is 13.5 cm long and weighs 13g. Adults are mainly white with a black nape, back, wings and tail. Sexes are similar, although the female may have some brown mixed with the black, and immature birds are brown where the adult is black. The call is a nasal djweeooo.

 

Pied water tyrants often bob up and down when perched, and have a fluttering “butterfly” display flight. They forage for insects, their staple diet, in low waterside vegetation."

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