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PLEASE ... NO HUGE AWARD ICONS (flashing or not) and INVITES WITH RESTRICTIONS or COMMENT REQUESTS ... THANKS SO MUCH!

ⓒMonica Roberts .... All Rights Reserved

Please do not copy or reproduce, in any

manner, without prior permission.

 

I'M LINKING THIS TO THE MAN I'LL ASK TO TAKE IT FOR A TEST DRIVE ONCE IT'S BEEN RESTORED .... www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpVeNtem5Yk

 

Another great link ... takes a minute for this one to get down to business, but well worth the wait ... www.youtube.com/watch?v=sz9PsaTmZzI

 

I bought this old, worn fiddle from the granddaughter of a man who survived the horrors of Auschwitz and Buchenwald ... I was never given much more history than that, but what I can tell you, is that it remains in the condition I found it, as I feel restoration might affect the soul of it, and the story it has to tell ... although I do long to play it and hear its sweet voice, realising too, that it's hard to tell your story if you can't speak. The violin came to me in a beautiful alligator case, a bit worn and tattered on the outside, but the interior remains in immaculate condition, lined in the most incredible midnight blue velvet. There is, as well, an embroidered (monogrammed A.R.) protective felt fiddle cover, decorated with punch-work and hand applied flowers, made by, I'm sure, someone who loved its owner. The original horsehair bow, secured inside the case, along with several never-used gut strings, plus a well worn cake of rosin were carefully tucked inside the lidded interior box. And, touchingly hand carved on the back of the violin are, again, the initials A.R. This instrument is one of my greatest treasures, and perhaps someday I will find the heart to have it restored knowing the rosin build-up on the wood isn't particularly good for it, and too, just to hear it ache out the lament written below.

 

THE MAPLE'S LAMENT

 

When I was alive

The birds would nest upon my boughs

And all through long winter nights

The storms would round me howl

And when the day would come

I’d raise my branches to the sun

I was the child of earth, of sky

And all the world was one

 

But now that I am dead

The birds no longer sing in me

And I feel no more the wind and rain

As when I was a tree

For bound so tight in wire strings

I have no room to grow

And I am but the slave who sings

When the master draws the bow

 

But sometimes from my memories

I can sing the birds in flight

And I can sing of sweet dark earth

And then the starry nights

But oh my favorite song of all

I truly do believe

Is the song the sunlight sang to me

While dancing on my leaves

 

ⓒLaurie Lewis .... I do believe you can find this on iTunes.

Just Pinned to Monogram Stamps:

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I have a whole pile of these sleepy, snoozy, resting Geisha photos.

 

Just in case you might have missed them, here's two more :

 

www.flickr.com/photos/okinawa-soba/2701942219/

 

www.flickr.com/photos/okinawa-soba/2401941343/

 

By the way, please notice the photographer's signed initials in the image.

 

Although easy to remove (and you may do so for your own graphic use purposes), I have let these initials remain on the photo for this Flickr post.

 

The photographer obviously considered his portraits to be artistic works, and proudly put his intertwined S N monogram right on the negative.

 

On the back of the photo, he calls his studio S.N. BANSHUDO, in the SHIBA district of TOKYO.

 

In the Japanese Photographer database published in 2000 by Torin Boyd and Naomi Izakura, there is only one Meiji-era Photographer working in Shiba with the initials S N --- SHISUI NARUSE.

 

Okinawa Soba will leave you with that attribution, feeling satisfied that I have connected the dots.

 

♥ Here's a more conventional pose of a once-famous Geisha taken by the same photographer : www.flickr.com/photos/okinawa-soba/4407605367/

  

*

 

The Okinawa Soba photostream is filled with old photos of Meiji-era Japan, and most of those are hand-colored images.

 

However, although MONOCHROME COLLOTYPES images are also found throughout the stream, even the single-pass inks used to produce them are usually colored.

 

♥ EXAMPLES OF MONOCHROME PHOTOS [USING COLORED INK] FROM JAPAN'S TAISHO ERA (1912-1926) : www.flickr.com/photos/okinawa-soba/sets/72157604286802916/

 

PURE BLACK & WHITE IN A WORLD OF HAND-COLORING

 

It's easy to imagine that photographers back then were loathe to offer their images for sale with anything less than handy work of the artists and colorists who brush-applied their palette of transparent colors to the photos.

 

After all, Japanese hand-colored photos were all the rage, and every tourist could not leave Japan without at least a handfuls of them.

 

On the other hand, the ability to render a fine composition in grey-scale loveliness also took some skill, and those who "had the touch" sold their black-and-white images as is, often finding an appreciative audience for their work.

 

The MEIJI ERA (1868-1912) images posted here were originally all photographed and sold in the COLLOTYPE POSTCARD format between 1903-05 --- this was during the last decade of the Meiji era.

 

I'm sad to say that this particular photographer left his work unsigned (as many did in old Japan), and the models names are also unknown to me.

 

The photographer was commissioned (or, his offered portfolio accepted) by postcard publisher NANIWA & CO. located in the Kanda district of Tokyo.

 

GEISHA OUT OF CHARACTER

 

The models are all GEISHA. Probably taken by arrangement with the particular Geisha House (Okiya) they were attached to, for these studio sessions they were stripped of their kimono, and their normal, classic hair-dos completely washed out.

 

With that, the photographer placed them in his own world of dreams, using some twigs, flowers and lacy gauze.

 

LIGHTING A STUDIO FOR A GEISHA DREAM

 

To obtain the lighting effects in a world without electric studio lamps, he manipulated both skylight and window-light by means of blinds and partitions.

 

Back at the Geisha House, I'm sure they had a few tales to tell about what the photographer put them through.

 

110 years later, here they are.

 

♥ MORE GEISHA WITH THEIR HAIR DOWN : www.flickr.com/photos/okinawa-soba/sets/72157605633613347/

 

*

 

NOTE : Yes, I know I could have cheated, and simply converted hand-colored postcards to black-and-white ones with a post-processing touch of a button. You can do anything digitally these days. However, these are all genuine, original, black-and-white postcards.

 

I posted two or three of these many years ago, but never got around to posting any others of this type. I still have a few more in my old postcard box, and should post them all just to get it out of the way.

 

Replacing the images at the original Flickr pages breaks the link that Bloggers are using for the few former posts, so, I'm re-posting here in larger format for any artsy-crafty-etsy types who might want to download and use one (or all) to incorporate into their artsy-crafty creative things.

 

As is usual around here, please feel free under Flickr rules to re-Blog the images for your own decorative or story-telling use.

 

♥ For Flickr males interested in dating any of these women, sorry, but you are too late.

 

Cheers !

This is a leaf from a Book of Hours that was produced in France, probably Paris, c. 1510-1520.

 

The text is from the Hours of the Blessed Virgin Mary, at the Hour of Vespers, beginning in verse 3 of Psalm 121 and followed by the Antiphon “Nigra sum”, Psalm 26, the Antiphon “Speciosa”, Psalm 147, the Capitulum “Ab initio” and most of the Hymn “Ave maris stella”.

 

The total size of the leaf as presented is 190mm x 132mm (7 1/2ins. X 5 1/10ins.).

The max. size of what remains of the original leaf is 150mm x 68mm (5 9/10ins. X 2 7/10ins.).

The size of the text block on the verso is 109mm x 48mm (4 3/10ins. x 1 9/10ins.).

 

PROVENANCE: -

1. From a Book of Hours that belonged to John Boykett Jarman (c.1781-1864); it was seriously damaged in the freak hailstorm that flooded his collection on 1 August 1846.

2. Repaired and re-margined by Caleb William Wing (1801-75) who was first employed by Jarman to retouch minor areas of his manuscripts that were water-damaged.

3. The Book of Hours to which this leaf belonged was sold at Jarman’s sale at Sotheby's on 13 June 1864, lot 30.

4. The complete manuscript was offered by Maggs, Cat. 397, 1920, no. 198, and was broken up shortly afterwards. Single leaves were in Maggs, Cat. 437, 1923, Nos.1 137-8, 1142-5, 1150-3, 1155, 1157-8, and 1163.

5. This leaf was sent by “Rossie and A.J.” a calligrapher, to Bernard Inzel, a master engraver, as a Christmas gift in 1980. Bernard Inzel was born in Philadelphia on 13th. July 1922 and died in Seattle on 12 June 2002. He served in the US Navy in WWII and was an accomplished jewellery artist engraving heraldic coats of arms, family crests and monograms. It has not been possible to find out anything about “Rossie and A.J.”.

 

OTHER LEAVES: -

Ref 468 is from the same Book of Hours.

A list of identifiable leaves from the Book of Hours is contained in Manion, Vines and de Hamel, Manuscripts in New Zealand, 1989, no. 98.

 

GENERAL CONDITION: -

Having been repaired and re margined by Caleb Wing, the remains of the original vellum leaf have been set within new vellum. It is possible that there has been a little retouching to the leaf. Several of the initials and line fillers are quite worn. Looking at the original vellum, the stain of the water damage is very self evident. The new vellum surrounding the original leaf clean but appears to have yellowed.

 

GENERAL COMMENTS: -

Considering the serious damage that occurred to the Book of Hours from which this leaf came, the repair undertaken by Caleb Wing has resulted in a superb leaf being saved to enable it to be enjoyed by future generations. It is a very nice item with superb provenance and worthy of any collection.

 

JOHN BOYKETT JARMAN: -

Born c.1781, John Boykett Jarman was in business as a goldsmith and jeweller at various addresses in London over the years until he established himself at 83, Grosvenor Street in 1841. He was a serious collector of medieval illuminated manuscripts. A freak storm in 1846 caused serious water damage to some, if not all, of his manuscripts and these were repaired and retouched by Caleb Wing. Jarman died in 1864.

 

WILLIAM CALEB WING: -

First recorded in 1826, died in 1875, William Caleb Wing is now best known for “medieval and renaissance” illumination that he produced in the middle of the 19th. century. His talent was recognised by John Boykett Jarman who employed him to restore his illuminated manuscripts that had been severely damaged in a flood. He soon found himself adding new miniatures and additional decoration to genuine medieval books. His work was to a very high standard and has frequently been regarded as genuine although it is not known if his additions were deliberately intended to deceive.

This is a leaf from a Book of Hours that was produced in France, probably Paris, c. 1510-1520.

 

The text is from the Hours of the Blessed Virgin Mary, at the Hour of Vespers, beginning in verse 3 of Psalm 121 and followed by the Antiphon “Nigra sum”, Psalm 26, the Antiphon “Speciosa”, Psalm 147, the Capitulum “Ab initio” and most of the Hymn “Ave maris stella”.

 

The total size of the leaf as presented is 190mm x 132mm (7 1/2ins. X 5 1/10ins.).

The max. size of what remains of the original leaf is 150mm x 68mm (5 9/10ins. X 2 7/10ins.).

The size of the text block on the verso is 109mm x 48mm (4 3/10ins. x 1 9/10ins.).

 

PROVENANCE: -

1. From a Book of Hours that belonged to John Boykett Jarman (c.1781-1864); it was seriously damaged in the freak hailstorm that flooded his collection on 1 August 1846.

2. Repaired and re-margined by Caleb William Wing (1801-75) who was first employed by Jarman to retouch minor areas of his manuscripts that were water-damaged.

3. The Book of Hours to which this leaf belonged was sold at Jarman’s sale at Sotheby's on 13 June 1864, lot 30.

4. The complete manuscript was offered by Maggs, Cat. 397, 1920, no. 198, and was broken up shortly afterwards. Single leaves were in Maggs, Cat. 437, 1923, Nos.1 137-8, 1142-5, 1150-3, 1155, 1157-8, and 1163.

5. This leaf was sent by “Rossie and A.J.” a calligrapher, to Bernard Inzel, a master engraver, as a Christmas gift in 1980. Bernard Inzel was born in Philadelphia on 13th. July 1922 and died in Seattle on 12 June 2002. He served in the US Navy in WWII and was an accomplished jewellery artist engraving heraldic coats of arms, family crests and monograms. It has not been possible to find out anything about “Rossie and A.J.”.

 

OTHER LEAVES: -

Ref 468 is from the same Book of Hours.

A list of identifiable leaves from the Book of Hours is contained in Manion, Vines and de Hamel, Manuscripts in New Zealand, 1989, no. 98.

 

GENERAL CONDITION: -

Having been repaired and re margined by Caleb Wing, the remains of the original vellum leaf have been set within new vellum. It is possible that there has been a little retouching to the leaf. Several of the initials and line fillers are quite worn. Looking at the original vellum, the stain of the water damage is very self evident. The new vellum surrounding the original leaf clean but appears to have yellowed.

 

GENERAL COMMENTS: -

Considering the serious damage that occurred to the Book of Hours from which this leaf came, the repair undertaken by Caleb Wing has resulted in a superb leaf being saved to enable it to be enjoyed by future generations. It is a very nice item with superb provenance and worthy of any collection.

 

JOHN BOYKETT JARMAN: -

Born c.1781, John Boykett Jarman was in business as a goldsmith and jeweller at various addresses in London over the years until he established himself at 83, Grosvenor Street in 1841. He was a serious collector of medieval illuminated manuscripts. A freak storm in 1846 caused serious water damage to some, if not all, of his manuscripts and these were repaired and retouched by Caleb Wing. Jarman died in 1864.

 

WILLIAM CALEB WING: -

First recorded in 1826, died in 1875, William Caleb Wing is now best known for “medieval and renaissance” illumination that he produced in the middle of the 19th. century. His talent was recognised by John Boykett Jarman who employed him to restore his illuminated manuscripts that had been severely damaged in a flood. He soon found himself adding new miniatures and additional decoration to genuine medieval books. His work was to a very high standard and has frequently been regarded as genuine although it is not known if his additions were deliberately intended to deceive.

   

St Giles, Matlock, Derbyshire.

East Window (detail : signature).

Designed and made by Lawrence Lee and installed in 1969.

To the memory of the Bailey family of the Butts, Matlock, 1838-1938.

 

Lawrence Stanley Lee (1909-2011).

Janet Christopherson.

 

Lawrence Stanley Lee was born in 1909 and studied art at the Royal College of Art where he later became Head of Stained Glass. With two of his students, Keith New and Geoffrey Clark, he masterminded the design of the ten nave windows at Coventry Cathedral. He also has windows at Guildford and Southwark Cathedrals. In 1974 he was elected Master of the Worshipful Company of Stained Glass Artists.He recognised the work of his many assistants over the years by including their initials within his own monogram on his windows, as here for Janet Christopherson. Lawrence Lee continued to work as a stained glass artist until the early 1990s. He celebrated his 100th birthday in September 2009.

 

This replaces a Victorian window which in 1930 had been coated in black paint, an act of barbarism explained by the then general hostility to High Victorian art.

 

LAWRENCE STANLEY LEE 1909-2011. The Times Obituaries 30 Apr 2011.

Lawrence Lee was head of stained glass at the Royal College of Art for 20 years, and led the design team for the ten nave windows in the new Coventry Cathedral in the early 1950s, a project that showed the possibilities of truly modern stained glass, and resulted in new commissions far removed from what had traditionally been acceptable in ecclesiastical buildings.

Lee’s work is found in churches across Britain, in windows at Guildford and Southwark Cathedrals, and as far afield as New Zealand, Canada, South Africa and Trinidad. He operated consciously in the tradition that can be traced to the great medieval cathedrals and their glorious stained-glass windows, taking on “apprentices” who worked in his studio before setting out on their own. His assistants remember him for his unfailing generosity and support; he in turn paid tribute to their contribution by adding their initials to his own signature at the bottom of most of his windows.

Lee was fascinated by the possibilities for using glass in new ways that had been opened up by improvements in modern adhesive; and in all forms of glass, including thick slab glass that could be set in concrete.

Lawrence Stanley Lee was born in 1909 in the Chelsea Hospital for Women and brought up in Weybridge, Surrey, where his father, William Henry Lee, a chauffeur and engineer, owned a garage near the newly opened Brooklands racetrack. From his mother, Rose, who was deeply religious, Lee gained the knowledge of biblical symbolism central to his work.

He left school at 14, but his talent had been recognised by one of his teachers who secured him a place at Kingston School of Art. From there he won a scholarship in 1927 to the Royal College of Art (RCA), where he was taught — and greatly influenced — by Martin Travers, an architect by training and a designer of stained glass and church furnishings who had joined the RCA in 1925 to oversee work in stained glass. After graduating in 1930 Lee was invited to join Travers’s studio as a stained-glass assistant; he also taught part-time at Bromley School of Art.

Lee was attracted to the monastic life, and in 1938 spent a year at a Franciscan retreat in Dorset, only leaving to join the war effort. He served as an anti-aircraft gunner and fought in North Africa and Italy. At the end of the war he was transferred to the Army Educational Corps as an expert in artistic and cultural affairs in Italy. At one point he captured on canvas an eruption of Vesuvius. Some of his paintings are in the Imperial War Museum, others in the Ashmolean.

On his demobilisation Lee was invited to join Travers’ studio as chief assistant in the stained-glass department, for which war-damaged church windows provided a steady flow of work. On Travers’ sudden death in 1948 Lee succeeded him as head of a new and independent department of stained glass at the RCA — a position he held until 1968. Travers’ death also propelled Lee into establishing his own studio, and he inherited and completed many of Travers’ commissions. Initially Lee set up a studio in Sutton, Surrey, and then in New Malden, eventually establishing his studio in Penshurst, Kent, in 1963.

In 1950 a comprehensive exhibition of the work of RCA students in the galleries of the Royal Society of British Artists attracted a great deal of attention. A large room was set aside for the display of stained glass, and there the work of Lee and his students Keith New and Geoffrey Clarke caught the eye of the architect Basil Spence. The three were then awarded the prestigious commission to design windows for the nave of the new Coventry Cathedral, the earlier structure having been destroyed by bombs in 1940

The old mural studio that joined the RCA to the Victoria and Albert Museum was made available for Lee, Clarke and New to create ten 70ft windows based on “Man’s progress from birth to death and from death to resurrection and transfiguration”. Spence’s concept for the windows was that the opposite pairs would represent a pattern of growth from birth to old age, culminating in heavenly glory nearest the altar — one side representing human, the other the divine.

Lee was asked to mastermind the design of the windows, set at angles. Spence had orientated the new cathedral with the altar facing north to south, and it is a controversial feature of the design that the nave windows face away from the congregation and can only be seen fully from the altar. Lee designed three lights; Clarke and New three each and the final light was a collaboration. The project took six years: after the first four years, six of the giant windows were exhibited at the V&A. It was the first time that they had been seen complete, and they caused a sensation. Some of the windows were entirely abstract, some semi-abstract and others symbolic.

For the rest of his career Lee designed windows that could not be pigeonholed as either “modern” or “traditional”. Although many were entirely abstract, he went on to produce windows that were a fusion of figurative, symbolic and abstract principles in a style all his own, and which was flexible enough to encompass a wide variety of concepts and subjects. The best examples are at Abinger Common and Byfleet in Surrey; Belmont (Sutton) and Cuddington in Greater London; Matlock in Derbyshire; Gobowen in Shropshire; Sutton-in-Ely and Attleborough in East Anglia and Mears Ashby in Northamptonshire; and in a series made for the Royal Military Academy Chapel at Sandhurst.

His largest commission after Coventry was for the Church of St Andrew and St Paul in Montreal: ten large clerestory windows with a common overall design, but each magnificent in its own right. At the other end of the scale, the Church of the Holy Cross at Binstead on the Isle of Wight has a striking pair of small west windows featuring a phoenix and a peacock, as well as a fluttering dove by the altar. His treatment of this symbol of the Holy Spirit is worth a study in itself, for doves occur in many of his windows, each different and each arising from his appreciation of bird anatomy and informed by a spirituality not fettered by conventional religiosity.

Secular commissions were less frequent, but excellent examples are the windows he made for the Chemical Society in Burlington House in 1967, and for Montreal General Hospital.

Throughout, he drew his inspiration from the great medieval glaziers and particularly from his English forerunners, such as John Thornton, of York Minster. He worked hard to ensure that the traditions of stained glass continued in the next generation. To this end he persuaded the Company of Glaziers and Painters of Glass, of which he was elected master in 1973, to introduce practising stained-glass artists into its ranks at affordable rates.

Lee wrote three books. The first, Stained Glass (1967), was a paperback handbook for artists. The second, Stained Glass, An Illustrated Guide to the World of Stained Glass (1976), which he co-wrote with George Seddon and Francis Stephens, was illustrated with almost 500 colour photographs by Sonia Halliday and Laura Lushington. His third book was The Appreciation of Stained Glass (1977).

Lee completed his last big church window in 1991 at St Martin’s in Brasted, Kent. His final window, a memorial to his grandson Alex, who died in a car crash aged 17, is in Chew Valley School, Somerset, and was completed in 1994. Several former assistants attended his 100th birthday party in 2009.

He is survived by two sons; his wife, Dorothy Tucker, whom he married in 1940, predeceased him.

Lawrence Lee, stained-glass artist, was born on September 18, 1909. He died on April 25, 2011, aged 101.

 

... is for Valentine.

Identifier: baltimoreohioemp07balt

Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company

Subjects: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company

Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]

Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park

Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

titch. This design isexceptionally attractive for use on linen pillowcases or fancy huckaback towels. The second toMel measures 11 j inches high by23| inches wide, including scallops. The best ef-fect may be achieved by carrying out the basket,tiny flowers and leaves in eyelet stitch and thebowknots, large flowers and leaves in raised satinstitch. The scallops should be buttonholed. When there are three open spaces, or ratherone full and two half spaces as appear in thedesign of this towel an initial is sometimesadded and placed in the right hand corner ofthe towel instead of in the center, as is usuallythe case. One is allowed as much latitude inmarking as in designing. A plain script letterseems best suited for this purpose, as it doesnot take up as much room as a monogram. Itshould be well padded with rows of outlining,following the lines of the outline of the latter.Embroider cross-wise witli s;ititi slitcli (:ikiny;close, even stitches. 60 THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE

 

Text Appearing After Image:

No. 12535—Towel with Monogram Embroidery Design No. 12535. TransferPattern, blue, price, 20 cents. Embroidery Design No. 12536. Transferblue, price, 20 cents. Pictorial Review patterns on sale by localagents. Some Good Recipes By M. Alice HamiltonWilmington, Del., Freight Offices Ginger Cake One-half cup sugar, five tablespoonfulsmelted shortening, a little salt, one-half cupmolasses, two cups flour, ginger to suit taste,two-thirds cupful water, one teaspoonful salera-tus. Bake in a greased pan. Quince Honey-Grate two large quinces and one large apple,and add three pounds white sugar, one quart ofwater and boil until like honey. Four small quinces may be used instead of two large onesif desired. Apple may be omitted if preferred. Beet Relish One quart cooked beets, one small cabbage,one cupful grated hof-seradish, two cupfulssugar, two tablespoonfuls salt, two teaspoon-fuls mustard, two teaspoonfuls celery seed, onepint vinegar. . Put the beets and cabbagethrough food chopper. Add t

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Although easy to remove (and you may do so for your own graphic use purposes), I have let the photographer's initials remain on the photo.

 

He obviously considered his portraits to be artistic works, and proudly put his intertwined S N monogram right on the negative.

 

On the back of the photo, he calls his studio S.N. BANSHUDO, in the SHIBA district of TOKYO.

 

In the Japanese Photographer database published in 2000 by Torin Boyd and Naomi Izakura, there is only one Meiji-era Photographer working in Shiba with the initials S N --- SHISUI NARUSE.

 

Okinawa Soba will leave you with that attribution, feeling satisfied that I have connected the dots.

 

Ca.1910 Hand-colored gelatin silver print.

  

The main Caption for this HAMAYUU set of 12 Meiji-era photographs is found here : www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/4408376406/

  

RANDOM SOBA : www.flickriver.com/photos/24443965@N08/random/

My wife found this leaf with the initial for my daughter's first name while we were camping. Amazing what you can see when you slow down for a while.

EIRYU is on the left, looking right at you.

 

Although easy to remove (and you may do so for your own graphic use purposes), I have preserved the photographer's initials in the dark folds of the tablecloth.

 

He obviously considered his portraits to be artistic works, and proudly put his intertwined S N monogram right on the negative.

 

On the back of the photo, he calls his studio S.N. BANSHUDO, in the SHIBA district of TOKYO.

 

In the Japanese Photographer database published in 2000 by Torin Boyd and Naomi Izakura, there is only one Meiji-era Photographer working in Shiba with the initials S N --- SHISUI NARUSE.

 

Okinawa Soba will leave you with that attribution, feeling satisfied that I have connected the dots.

  

Ca.1908-12 gelatin silver print.

  

Main Caption for this EIRYU set of Meiji-era photographs is found at the first picture here : www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/4426773216/

   

RANDOM SOBA : www.flickriver.com/photos/24443965@N08/random/

She doesn't look like a happy camper. Probably sick and tired of so many photographers telling her to "....hold the flower and look pretty !...."

 

Although easy to remove (and you may do so for your own graphic use purposes), I have let the photographer's initials remain on the photo.

 

He obviously considered his portraits to be artistic works, and proudly put his intertwined S N monogram right on the negative.

 

On the back of the photo, he calls his studio S.N. BANSHUDO, in the SHIBA district of TOKYO.

 

In the Japanese Photographer database published in 2000 by Torin Boyd and Naomi Izakura, there is only one Meiji-era Photographer working in Shiba with the initials S N --- SHISUI NARUSE.

 

Okinawa Soba will leave you with that attribution, feeling satisfied that I have connected the dots.

 

Ca.1910 Hand-colored gelatin silver print.

  

Main Caption for this HAMAYUU set of 12 Meiji-era photographs is found here : www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/4408376406/

  

RANDOM SOBA : www.flickriver.com/photos/24443965@N08/random/

ⓒMonica Roberts .... All Rights Reserved

 

I bought this old fiddle from the granddaughter of a man who survived the horrors of Auschwitz / Buchenwald ... I was never given much more history than that, but what I can tell you is ... that it remains in the condition I found it, as I feel restoration might affect the soul of it, and the story it has to tell ... although I do long to hear its sweet voice. It came to me in a beautiful alligator case, a bit worn on the outside, but with an interior that remains in immaculate condition, lined in the most incredible midnight blue velvet. There is , as well, a hand embroidered (monogrammed A.R.) protective felt fiddle cover, decorated with punch-work and hand applied flowers, fashioned by someone who honoured this fiddler with her gift of love. The original horsehair bow, secured inside the case, along with several never-used gut strings and a well worn cake of rosin, is also in fairly good shape. And, touchingly hand carved on the back of the violin are, again, the initials A.R. This instrument is one of my greatest treasures, and perhaps someday I'll find the heart to have it restored just to hear it sing the lament ... written below.

  

THE MAPLES LAMENT

 

When I was alive

The birds would nest upon my boughs

And all through long winter nights

The storms would round me howl

And when the day would come

I’d raise my branches to the sun

I was the child of earth, of sky

And all the world was one

 

But now that I am dead

The birds no longer sing in me

And I feel no more the wind and rain

As when I was a tree

For bound so tight in wire strings

I have no room to grow

And I am but the slave who sings

When the master draws the bow

 

But sometimes from my memories

I can sing the birds in flight

And I can sing of sweet dark earth

And then the starry nights

But oh my favorite song of all

I truly do believe

Is the song the sunlight sang to me

While dancing on my leaves

 

ⓒLaurie Lewis .... I do believe you can find this on iTunes.

A cabinet card photo featuring a decorative mask that forms a tennis-themed border, with two crossed tennis rackets and three tennis balls at the bottom, netting along the bottom and sides, and leaves and vines at the top. This appears to be the same mask (although flipped horizontally) used in Photo_History's Woman with Tennis Racket Decorative Mask - Cabinet Card (see below).

Elegant, sweet, original and personalized Heart wedding cake topper for decorating your own cake or for a unique handmade in Italy wedding gift!

 

The light support heart-shaped, covered with a special paint, seams to be wood but is very light: only 24gr! One side is handpainted with the initials, elegant swirls and pretty clay flowers.

 

The heart is completely customizable to match your wedding palette or you favorite colors!

 

~✿ For orders and more informations about my shop, please visit my profile www.flickr.com/people/passionarte or send me a mail to passionarte.handmade@yahoo.it

 

here it is!

 

the 2009 rikrak stocking collection!

 

handmade from eco friendly recycled felt with lots of cute little additions!

 

and i'd love to hear which one is your fave! :)

 

::::: so a wee little VOTE ! :::::

 

just leave me a comment or note telling me which one is your favourite stocking. thanks for playing!

 

interested in your own rikrak ecospun felt stockings? please see my profile for more details on these and other fun sustainable handmade goodies!

 

and p.s. there are lots of other colour combos available, too!! come see!

 

Memorial to MPs fallen in action, etc, House of Commons, over the door behind the Speaker's Chair. Signwriting enamels and gold leaf on a Puginesque oak escutcheon carved c.1949. Photo taken before the gilded signwrtiting was scewed off and burnished, and final detailing added to the martlets.

All MPs who died during the two world wars are commemorated with their arms on small shields in the Commons Chamber when it was rebuilt after the blitz. These are on flat engraved brass escutcheons filled with enamel, kiln fired, and set into wooden surrounds on the end walls. In every case, if the MP was not armigerous, a monogram of his initials was used on a blue background instead. These are all featured in a separate album here.

In 2010 it was decided to add the MPs who died at the hands of the IRA. Anthony Berry had inherited arms from his father, Viscount Kemsley, the tiny martlet in chief showing he was the sixth son. He was killed in the Brighton hotel bombing.

Elegant, sweet, original and personalized Heart wedding cake topper for decorating your own cake or for a unique handmade in Italy wedding gift!

 

The light support heart-shaped, covered with a special paint, seams to be wood but is very light: only 24gr! One side is handpainted with the initials, elegant swirls and pretty clay flowers.

 

The heart is completely customizable to match your wedding palette or you favorite colors!

 

~✿ For orders and more informations about my shop, please visit my profile www.flickr.com/people/passionarte or send me a mail to passionarte.handmade@yahoo.it

Although easy to remove (and you may do so for your own graphic use purposes), I have let the photographer's initials remain on the photo.

 

He obviously considered his portraits to be artistic works, and proudly put his intertwined S N monogram right on the negative.

 

On the back of the photo, he calls his studio S.N. BANSHUDO, in the SHIBA district of TOKYO.

 

In the Japanese Photographer database published in 2000 by Torin Boyd and Naomi Izakura, there is only one Meiji-era Photographer working in Shiba with the initials S N --- SHISUI NARUSE.

 

Okinawa Soba will leave you with that attribution, feeling satisfied that I have connected the dots.

 

Ca.1910 Gelatin silver print.

 

♥ See a fine, hand-colored version HERE : www.flickr.com/photos/blue_ruin_1/5965811334/

 

*

 

Main Caption for this HAMAYUU set of 12 Meiji-era photographs is found here : www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/4408376406/

  

RANDOM SOBA : www.flickriver.com/photos/24443965@N08/random/

Foxhurst, Bronx, New York City, New York, United States

 

The 62nd Police Precinct Station House, with its monumental ground-story arcade of bold, bull-nosed rustication and contrasting upper stories of smooth-faced ashlar limestone, was built in 1912-14 for a new police precinct in the West Farms area of the Bronx, then undergoing rapid development and increase in population. Designed by the architectural Srm of Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden in the neo-Renaissance style considered appropriate for an arm of municipal government, the station house reflects the vision of the City Beautiful movement. The three-story limestone Simpson Avenue facade is surmounted by a richly ornamented terra-cotta cornice and broad-eaved hipped roof (originally of green tile) evoking the fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century palaces of Florence and Rome. Submitted for the approval of the New York City Art Commission (itself founded in response to City Beautiful ideals), the design received subsequent academic refinement in the architecture committee, headed by Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes. This station house, commissioned by Rhinelander Waldo, the new Commissioner of the Police Department as part of an ambitious building program for the department, appears to have been intended as a model for others. But contemporary political reverses made it the only example of Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden's work conveying the image city government wished to project in the recently urbanized boroughs beyond Manhattan just before World War I.

 

The former 62nd Precinct and the 41st Precinct

 

In 1913 when the new station house opened, the 1.80 square miles of the precinct contained a population of 48,000 people along its thirty-three miles of streets. The full complement of the precinct force in 1916 consisted of one captain, three lieutenants, nine sergeants, seventy patrolmen, and three matrons. An elderly resident remembered not only the opening of the new precinct station house but the vestiges of the gardens and orchards of old West Farms. The residents of the Fox's Comers area, took great pride in their neighborhood. Relatives from lower Manhattan came for a few weeks in the summer months.

 

Entries from the police "blotters" of 1920-21 attest to an almost suburban ambience. Summons were issued for an unmuzzled dog, for violations to the Sabbath Law (selling on Sunday -many in the neighborhood were Jewish), for violations of the Sanitary Code (uncovered fruit), and for throwing garbage into a rear lot. Summons were issued to speeders, clocked at twenty-eight, twenty-nine and thirty-two miles per hour, on Southern Boulevard. There were routine raids on three speakeasies, at 935 and 1011 Southern Boulevard and 989 Westchester Avenue. Six neighborhood boys, thirteen to fifteen years of age, were brought in for playing in the street at Tiffany and 163rd Street. They were admonished and sent home with their parents. On the rare occasion, patrolmen's weapons were discharged -to destroy a crippled horse at the request of the owner and to shoot a mad dog, again at the owner's request. Every day there were deliveries to the station house's commissary, eighty pounds of butter from Blue Valley Creamery, five cases of eggs, 100 pounds of bacon from Swift & Co., 100 pounds of coffee, and from the National Biscuit Co., two dozen fig newtons, three dozen graham crackers, three dozen Loma Doones, one dozen marshmellows, and a half dozen ginger snaps.

 

In 1920 the 62nd Precinct became the 47th but four years later it was renumbered and became the 20th. In 1929 the renumbering of precincts reoccurred and the 20th became the 41st, which number it has had ever since. In an effort to facilitate trade regulation in the same year Traffic Precinct 'G* was assigned to the 41st Precinct station house at 1086 Simpson Street.

 

The area began to change with World War U when the factories in the Port Morris section of The Bronx drew thousands into war-related industry. The war effort attracted large migrations from the southern part of this country and from Puerto Rico. Following the war public projects were constructed to house the influx. At the same time, more established residents moved away. But in the 1960(5, many industries relocated. Unemployment ensued, housing maintenance declined, and poverty escalated.

 

By 1971 when the precinct had grown to 2.5 square miles,the population within it was several times greater than it had been in 1913. The police blotter entries for 1971 reflect the change in the area. A robbery occurred at Bankers Trust early one spring afternoon; $700.00 in fives and tens was removed. A bomb scare was reported at a military recruiting booth at 163rd Street and Southern Boulevard. In seeking the arrest of a man who had imprisoned his common-law wife and infant, both the arresting ofHcer and the assailant were shot as a hostile crowd gathered. The majority of the arrests had become drug related. The precinct had begun to operate a narcotics patrol car and a patrolmen was injured in an early morning narcotics investigation. Although some residents looked to the station house for aid, others saw it as a target for their scorn and rage; the building had become less a refuge and more a fortress and was dubbed 'Fort Apache* in the popular press. As of the 1990 Census, the population within the 41st Precinct was 39,443, some 9000 less than when the station house opened in 1913.

 

The Desicn of the (former! 62nd Precinct

 

The design of the station house evokes the fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century palaces of Florence and Rome. Components of the three-stoty Simpson Avenue facade of the 62nd Police Precinct Station House have been compared with certain Renaissance prototypes, Michelozzo's Palazzo Medici-Riccardi in Florence and Raphael's Palazzo Vidoni-Caffarelli in Rome. Indeed, the choice of the neo-Renaissance style for this public building is a reflection of the City Beautiful movement, a vision of American cities comprising axial avenues along which stood buildings clothed in an harmonious classicism. The vision's earliest, though ephemeral, manifestation occurred at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, but gained momentum in the national effort to preserve the integrity of L*Enfant's plan for the City of Washington, D.C., in 1901. Charles F. McKim, a principal in the architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, was a great proselytizer for the City Beautiful movement. This vision of the City Beautiful prompted the founding of the New York City Art Commission in 1897 (McKim was the first architect member of the Commission, 1897-1901). Its jurisdiction was extended within the subsequent decade to review the designs of certain public structures and, by 1907, its charter was amended to include all structures constructed on City-owned property. It was to the Art Commission in December, 1911, that Hazzard, Brskine & Blagden submitted the plans and a watercolor perspective of the proposed "Simpson Street Police Station".

 

The Art Commission was comprised of twelve members. Submissions - sculptural, architectural, and landscape - were reviewed first by smaller committees, made up of the commissioners and chaired by the appropriate professional commissioner, and then the whole commission. From 1911 to 1913 the commissioner representing architecture was Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes.* The Simpson Street Police Station required two meetings before Stokes' committee, the first on January 9, 1912, and the second on May 14,1912. The make-up of the committee was not consistent; only Stokes, the chair, was present at both meetings.

 

Comparison of the Rrst water color perspective , the one submitted in December, 1911, and published in the Police Department's Annual Report for 1911, with the second water color perspective (Plate 3), submitted in May, 1912, to the Art Commission suggests that Stokes proposed changes in the design. Most apparent is the refinement of the first story rustication; there are eleven courses of equal height in the initial design and fifteen in the second (ftom the springblock up, the courses become gradually narrower in height); the voussoirs of the five-arch arcade number thirteen in the initial design and seventeen in the second. In the first, the keystones are prominent and are incorporated with the heavy molded belt course above. In the second, the keystones have been cropped just below a new dentil molding like their flanking voussoirs, and the voussoirs flanking these have been lowered one course. It is this change that has recalls the Michelozzo prototype from fifteenth-century Florence.

 

Single granite blocks replaced the base course masonry visible in the December, 1911, design. The granite spandrels below the arcade windows were articulated as panels between consoles. The doorway pediment within the central arch was eliminated. The character of the fenestration within the arches was changed also. The horizontal iron muntins were replaced with concentric muntins and the windows below became casements. Window grilles were added. The consoles flanking the central second story window were articulated as scrolls and quoins were added to frame the smooth-faced ashlar of the upper stories. The initial description of the building as submitted in December, 1911, called for the outside walls to be of concrete stone in imitation of natural Indiana limestone; the second submission called for walls of brick and limestone ashlar. The terra-cotta cornice and the green tile roof of the initial submission were retained in the final design.

It is likely that if Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden had retained the title of "Architects for the Police Department of the City of New York", this design would have been repeated elsewhere throughout the city as new precinct station houses were needed. But as a consequence of Commissioner Waldo's dismissal, the Simpson Street station house is the sole example.

 

Buildinc Description

 

The basement and ground story of the 62nd Police Precinct Station House are square in plan, 100 feet by 100 feet. A light-well indentation in the center of the back of the building admits daylight to the staircase (north elevation). The plans of the second and third stories show light-wells above the ground story in the building's sides (east and west elevations) that separate the three-story, limestone and hipped-roof front half of the station house from the four-story, yellow brick and flat-roofed rear half.

 

The three-story Simpson Street facade is faced with limestone. Five large arches, springing from the building's granite base, distinguish the rusticated ground story. Within each of these arches, except for the garage entrance at the right, the framework is of iron and configured as a broad central bay and narrower side bays. This configuration is carried concentrically into the arch as well.

 

The muntins terminate as scroll brackets, the horizontal member is enriched with dentilied molding. The main entrance, through the central arch, is Hanked by iron lanterns with spiked crestings; a cartouche superimposed on this arch's keystones carries an incised monogram incorporating the stylized initials "NYPD." The heavy paneled double doors are of oak, each with four panels. The sidelights are fixed. The outer eight lights of the semicircular transom are fixed, but the center light is hinged at the bottom. The oak double doors of the garage entrance are wider than the main entrance doors (there are no sidelights); each door is panelled with paired and alternating short and long panels, three short and two long.

 

The outer eight lights of the semi-circular transom are fixed; the central light is hinged at the bottom. The other three arches contain windows. Recessed granite spandrels below the windows are articulated to correspond with the iron window frame configuration above; consoles, separating a broad panel and flanking narrower panels, support the marble sills. The central windows and sidelights are hinged at their sides. The eight outer lights of the semi-circular transom are fixed, the central light is hinged at the bottom. The original iron grilles cover all three windows and all five semi-circular transoms; the bars of the semicircular grilles form a radiating pattern, exactly corresponding with the rebates of the surrounding voussoirs. There is an inscription on the building's base to the left of the main entrance.

 

Though in a spalled condition, it can be read: "Police Department, City of New York, R. Waldo, Police Commissioner, MCMXIII." The second and third stories of the Simpson Street facade are of smooth-faced, ashlar limestone. Five windows light the rooms of the precinct's officers on the second story and five more the patrolmen's dormitories on the third story. The central, second story window is set in an aedicule. Flanked by consoles, it has a pediment supported on scroll brackets. An iron flagpole supported by thin metal braces projects from its sill. Each of the third-story windows has a molded sill. A muntin divides the central, third story window; half of the window lights the east dormitory, the other half the west. The broad, bracketed comice above is terra cotta, richly detailed with dentil- and egg and dart moldings; the bracket surfaces are molded as double acanthus leaves. The comice soffit is articulated with coffers and roseate bosses. The hipped roof is covered with asphalt paper instead of the originial green tile.

 

Both the east and west elevations of the station house's front section are in full view, and both are finished in the manner of the Simpson Street facade. Three windows light the rusticated ground story. They are iron one-over-one with transoms. Above the belt course three windows with wood one-over-one sash light the smooth faced ashlar second and third stones Quoins punctuate the comers of these side elevations. The broad terra-cotta cornice continues that of the Simpson Street facade.

 

Iron picket gates, part of the original design and about twelve feet high and seven feet wide, flank the Simpson Street facade. Iron picket fencing runs about twenty-four feet along the east and west lot lines.

 

The four-story rear section of the station house is of yellow brick above and below a marble water table. At the foot of the eastern and western lightwells are lower one-story rooms. Each has a window with one-over-one wood sash the size of those above. The exterior walls of each of these one story rooms is coped with marble. Four windows light each of the stories on the east, west, and rear elevations. The windows on the ground story are the same height as those on the side elevations of the building's front section and are one-over-one with transoms. The upper-story windows are like those in the front section of the building. Three windows light each of the contiguous flights and landings of the staircase; their height was determined by their position on a flight or a landing. Ail of these window openings have marble sills and lintels and are set with one-over-one wood sash. The parapet and chimney are coped with marble also. There is an areaway at basement grade.

 

Subsequent History

 

Very little change has occurred to the exterior of the former 62nd Precinct Station House since it was officially completed in May, 1914. Following a fire in 1936, the station house was declared an unsafe building by the city's Buildings Department. It may have been at this time that the original green tile roof was removed. The building was made safe and the complaint removed in 1937. Spot lights to illuminate the parking area in front of the building have been fixed to the grilles within the extreme left and right arches. Recently townhouses have been built on either side of the station house, leaving the side elevations of the front section of the station house fully visible.

 

A new station house for the 41st Precinct is nearing completion at Southern Boulevard and Longwood Avenue. The soon-to-be vacated station house on Simpson Street will become a branch of the of the Safe Streets Program.

St Peter & St Paul, Gosberton, Lincolnshire

 

I have yet to establish whose signature this is.

I'm not certain it's a signature at all. It may be the initials of the individuals to whom the window is dedicated.

 

I'll leave it in this set until I know different.

    

Foxhurst, Bronx, New York City, New York, United States

 

The 62nd Police Precinct Station House, with its monumental ground-story arcade of bold, bull-nosed rustication and contrasting upper stories of smooth-faced ashlar limestone, was built in 1912-14 for a new police precinct in the West Farms area of the Bronx, then undergoing rapid development and increase in population. Designed by the architectural Srm of Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden in the neo-Renaissance style considered appropriate for an arm of municipal government, the station house reflects the vision of the City Beautiful movement. The three-story limestone Simpson Avenue facade is surmounted by a richly ornamented terra-cotta cornice and broad-eaved hipped roof (originally of green tile) evoking the fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century palaces of Florence and Rome. Submitted for the approval of the New York City Art Commission (itself founded in response to City Beautiful ideals), the design received subsequent academic refinement in the architecture committee, headed by Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes. This station house, commissioned by Rhinelander Waldo, the new Commissioner of the Police Department as part of an ambitious building program for the department, appears to have been intended as a model for others. But contemporary political reverses made it the only example of Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden's work conveying the image city government wished to project in the recently urbanized boroughs beyond Manhattan just before World War I.

 

The former 62nd Precinct and the 41st Precinct

 

In 1913 when the new station house opened, the 1.80 square miles of the precinct contained a population of 48,000 people along its thirty-three miles of streets. The full complement of the precinct force in 1916 consisted of one captain, three lieutenants, nine sergeants, seventy patrolmen, and three matrons. An elderly resident remembered not only the opening of the new precinct station house but the vestiges of the gardens and orchards of old West Farms. The residents of the Fox's Comers area, took great pride in their neighborhood. Relatives from lower Manhattan came for a few weeks in the summer months.

 

Entries from the police "blotters" of 1920-21 attest to an almost suburban ambience. Summons were issued for an unmuzzled dog, for violations to the Sabbath Law (selling on Sunday -many in the neighborhood were Jewish), for violations of the Sanitary Code (uncovered fruit), and for throwing garbage into a rear lot. Summons were issued to speeders, clocked at twenty-eight, twenty-nine and thirty-two miles per hour, on Southern Boulevard. There were routine raids on three speakeasies, at 935 and 1011 Southern Boulevard and 989 Westchester Avenue. Six neighborhood boys, thirteen to fifteen years of age, were brought in for playing in the street at Tiffany and 163rd Street. They were admonished and sent home with their parents. On the rare occasion, patrolmen's weapons were discharged -to destroy a crippled horse at the request of the owner and to shoot a mad dog, again at the owner's request. Every day there were deliveries to the station house's commissary, eighty pounds of butter from Blue Valley Creamery, five cases of eggs, 100 pounds of bacon from Swift & Co., 100 pounds of coffee, and from the National Biscuit Co., two dozen fig newtons, three dozen graham crackers, three dozen Loma Doones, one dozen marshmellows, and a half dozen ginger snaps.

 

In 1920 the 62nd Precinct became the 47th but four years later it was renumbered and became the 20th. In 1929 the renumbering of precincts reoccurred and the 20th became the 41st, which number it has had ever since. In an effort to facilitate trade regulation in the same year Traffic Precinct 'G* was assigned to the 41st Precinct station house at 1086 Simpson Street.

 

The area began to change with World War U when the factories in the Port Morris section of The Bronx drew thousands into war-related industry. The war effort attracted large migrations from the southern part of this country and from Puerto Rico. Following the war public projects were constructed to house the influx. At the same time, more established residents moved away. But in the 1960(5, many industries relocated. Unemployment ensued, housing maintenance declined, and poverty escalated.

 

By 1971 when the precinct had grown to 2.5 square miles,the population within it was several times greater than it had been in 1913. The police blotter entries for 1971 reflect the change in the area. A robbery occurred at Bankers Trust early one spring afternoon; $700.00 in fives and tens was removed. A bomb scare was reported at a military recruiting booth at 163rd Street and Southern Boulevard. In seeking the arrest of a man who had imprisoned his common-law wife and infant, both the arresting ofHcer and the assailant were shot as a hostile crowd gathered. The majority of the arrests had become drug related. The precinct had begun to operate a narcotics patrol car and a patrolmen was injured in an early morning narcotics investigation. Although some residents looked to the station house for aid, others saw it as a target for their scorn and rage; the building had become less a refuge and more a fortress and was dubbed 'Fort Apache* in the popular press. As of the 1990 Census, the population within the 41st Precinct was 39,443, some 9000 less than when the station house opened in 1913.

 

The Desicn of the (former! 62nd Precinct

 

The design of the station house evokes the fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century palaces of Florence and Rome. Components of the three-stoty Simpson Avenue facade of the 62nd Police Precinct Station House have been compared with certain Renaissance prototypes, Michelozzo's Palazzo Medici-Riccardi in Florence and Raphael's Palazzo Vidoni-Caffarelli in Rome. Indeed, the choice of the neo-Renaissance style for this public building is a reflection of the City Beautiful movement, a vision of American cities comprising axial avenues along which stood buildings clothed in an harmonious classicism. The vision's earliest, though ephemeral, manifestation occurred at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, but gained momentum in the national effort to preserve the integrity of L*Enfant's plan for the City of Washington, D.C., in 1901. Charles F. McKim, a principal in the architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, was a great proselytizer for the City Beautiful movement. This vision of the City Beautiful prompted the founding of the New York City Art Commission in 1897 (McKim was the first architect member of the Commission, 1897-1901). Its jurisdiction was extended within the subsequent decade to review the designs of certain public structures and, by 1907, its charter was amended to include all structures constructed on City-owned property. It was to the Art Commission in December, 1911, that Hazzard, Brskine & Blagden submitted the plans and a watercolor perspective of the proposed "Simpson Street Police Station".

 

The Art Commission was comprised of twelve members. Submissions - sculptural, architectural, and landscape - were reviewed first by smaller committees, made up of the commissioners and chaired by the appropriate professional commissioner, and then the whole commission. From 1911 to 1913 the commissioner representing architecture was Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes.* The Simpson Street Police Station required two meetings before Stokes' committee, the first on January 9, 1912, and the second on May 14,1912. The make-up of the committee was not consistent; only Stokes, the chair, was present at both meetings.

 

Comparison of the Rrst water color perspective , the one submitted in December, 1911, and published in the Police Department's Annual Report for 1911, with the second water color perspective (Plate 3), submitted in May, 1912, to the Art Commission suggests that Stokes proposed changes in the design. Most apparent is the refinement of the first story rustication; there are eleven courses of equal height in the initial design and fifteen in the second (ftom the springblock up, the courses become gradually narrower in height); the voussoirs of the five-arch arcade number thirteen in the initial design and seventeen in the second. In the first, the keystones are prominent and are incorporated with the heavy molded belt course above. In the second, the keystones have been cropped just below a new dentil molding like their flanking voussoirs, and the voussoirs flanking these have been lowered one course. It is this change that has recalls the Michelozzo prototype from fifteenth-century Florence.

 

Single granite blocks replaced the base course masonry visible in the December, 1911, design. The granite spandrels below the arcade windows were articulated as panels between consoles. The doorway pediment within the central arch was eliminated. The character of the fenestration within the arches was changed also. The horizontal iron muntins were replaced with concentric muntins and the windows below became casements. Window grilles were added. The consoles flanking the central second story window were articulated as scrolls and quoins were added to frame the smooth-faced ashlar of the upper stories. The initial description of the building as submitted in December, 1911, called for the outside walls to be of concrete stone in imitation of natural Indiana limestone; the second submission called for walls of brick and limestone ashlar. The terra-cotta cornice and the green tile roof of the initial submission were retained in the final design.

It is likely that if Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden had retained the title of "Architects for the Police Department of the City of New York", this design would have been repeated elsewhere throughout the city as new precinct station houses were needed. But as a consequence of Commissioner Waldo's dismissal, the Simpson Street station house is the sole example.

 

Buildinc Description

 

The basement and ground story of the 62nd Police Precinct Station House are square in plan, 100 feet by 100 feet. A light-well indentation in the center of the back of the building admits daylight to the staircase (north elevation). The plans of the second and third stories show light-wells above the ground story in the building's sides (east and west elevations) that separate the three-story, limestone and hipped-roof front half of the station house from the four-story, yellow brick and flat-roofed rear half.

 

The three-story Simpson Street facade is faced with limestone. Five large arches, springing from the building's granite base, distinguish the rusticated ground story. Within each of these arches, except for the garage entrance at the right, the framework is of iron and configured as a broad central bay and narrower side bays. This configuration is carried concentrically into the arch as well.

 

The muntins terminate as scroll brackets, the horizontal member is enriched with dentilied molding. The main entrance, through the central arch, is Hanked by iron lanterns with spiked crestings; a cartouche superimposed on this arch's keystones carries an incised monogram incorporating the stylized initials "NYPD." The heavy paneled double doors are of oak, each with four panels. The sidelights are fixed. The outer eight lights of the semicircular transom are fixed, but the center light is hinged at the bottom. The oak double doors of the garage entrance are wider than the main entrance doors (there are no sidelights); each door is panelled with paired and alternating short and long panels, three short and two long.

 

The outer eight lights of the semi-circular transom are fixed; the central light is hinged at the bottom. The other three arches contain windows. Recessed granite spandrels below the windows are articulated to correspond with the iron window frame configuration above; consoles, separating a broad panel and flanking narrower panels, support the marble sills. The central windows and sidelights are hinged at their sides. The eight outer lights of the semi-circular transom are fixed, the central light is hinged at the bottom. The original iron grilles cover all three windows and all five semi-circular transoms; the bars of the semicircular grilles form a radiating pattern, exactly corresponding with the rebates of the surrounding voussoirs. There is an inscription on the building's base to the left of the main entrance.

 

Though in a spalled condition, it can be read: "Police Department, City of New York, R. Waldo, Police Commissioner, MCMXIII." The second and third stories of the Simpson Street facade are of smooth-faced, ashlar limestone. Five windows light the rooms of the precinct's officers on the second story and five more the patrolmen's dormitories on the third story. The central, second story window is set in an aedicule. Flanked by consoles, it has a pediment supported on scroll brackets. An iron flagpole supported by thin metal braces projects from its sill. Each of the third-story windows has a molded sill. A muntin divides the central, third story window; half of the window lights the east dormitory, the other half the west. The broad, bracketed comice above is terra cotta, richly detailed with dentil- and egg and dart moldings; the bracket surfaces are molded as double acanthus leaves. The comice soffit is articulated with coffers and roseate bosses. The hipped roof is covered with asphalt paper instead of the originial green tile.

 

Both the east and west elevations of the station house's front section are in full view, and both are finished in the manner of the Simpson Street facade. Three windows light the rusticated ground story. They are iron one-over-one with transoms. Above the belt course three windows with wood one-over-one sash light the smooth faced ashlar second and third stones Quoins punctuate the comers of these side elevations. The broad terra-cotta cornice continues that of the Simpson Street facade.

 

Iron picket gates, part of the original design and about twelve feet high and seven feet wide, flank the Simpson Street facade. Iron picket fencing runs about twenty-four feet along the east and west lot lines.

 

The four-story rear section of the station house is of yellow brick above and below a marble water table. At the foot of the eastern and western lightwells are lower one-story rooms. Each has a window with one-over-one wood sash the size of those above. The exterior walls of each of these one story rooms is coped with marble. Four windows light each of the stories on the east, west, and rear elevations. The windows on the ground story are the same height as those on the side elevations of the building's front section and are one-over-one with transoms. The upper-story windows are like those in the front section of the building. Three windows light each of the contiguous flights and landings of the staircase; their height was determined by their position on a flight or a landing. Ail of these window openings have marble sills and lintels and are set with one-over-one wood sash. The parapet and chimney are coped with marble also. There is an areaway at basement grade.

 

Subsequent History

 

Very little change has occurred to the exterior of the former 62nd Precinct Station House since it was officially completed in May, 1914. Following a fire in 1936, the station house was declared an unsafe building by the city's Buildings Department. It may have been at this time that the original green tile roof was removed. The building was made safe and the complaint removed in 1937. Spot lights to illuminate the parking area in front of the building have been fixed to the grilles within the extreme left and right arches. Recently townhouses have been built on either side of the station house, leaving the side elevations of the front section of the station house fully visible.

 

A new station house for the 41st Precinct is nearing completion at Southern Boulevard and Longwood Avenue. The soon-to-be vacated station house on Simpson Street will become a branch of the of the Safe Streets Program.

Longwood, Bronx

 

The 62nd Police Precinct Station House, with its monumental ground-story arcade of bold, bull-nosed rustication and contrasting upper stories of smooth-faced ashlar limestone, was built in 1912-14 for a new police precinct in the West Farms area of the Bronx, then undergoing rapid development and increase in population. Designed by the architectural Srm of Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden in the neo-Renaissance style considered appropriate for an arm of municipal government, the station house reflects the vision of the City Beautiful movement. The three-story limestone Simpson Avenue facade is surmounted by a richly ornamented terra-cotta cornice and broad-eaved hipped roof (originally of green tile) evoking the fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century palaces of Florence and Rome. Submitted for the approval of the New York City Art Commission (itself founded in response to City Beautiful ideals), the design received subsequent academic refinement in the architecture committee, headed by Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes. This station house, commissioned by Rhinelander Waldo, the new Commissioner of the Police Department as part of an ambitious building program for the department, appears to have been intended as a model for others. But contemporary political reverses made it the only example of Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden's work conveying the image city government wished to project in the recently urbanized boroughs beyond Manhattan just before World War I.

 

The former 62nd Precinct and the 41st Precinct

 

In 1913 when the new station house opened, the 1.80 square miles of the precinct contained a population of 48,000 people along its thirty-three miles of streets. The full complement of the precinct force in 1916 consisted of one captain, three lieutenants, nine sergeants, seventy patrolmen, and three matrons. An elderly resident remembered not only the opening of the new precinct station house but the vestiges of the gardens and orchards of old West Farms. The residents of the Fox's Comers area, took great pride in their neighborhood. Relatives from lower Manhattan came for a few weeks in the summer months.

 

Entries from the police "blotters" of 1920-21 attest to an almost suburban ambience. Summons were issued for an unmuzzled dog, for violations to the Sabbath Law (selling on Sunday -many in the neighborhood were Jewish), for violations of the Sanitary Code (uncovered fruit), and for throwing garbage into a rear lot. Summons were issued to speeders, clocked at twenty-eight, twenty-nine and thirty-two miles per hour, on Southern Boulevard. There were routine raids on three speakeasies, at 935 and 1011 Southern Boulevard and 989 Westchester Avenue. Six neighborhood boys, thirteen to fifteen years of age, were brought in for playing in the street at Tiffany and 163rd Street. They were admonished and sent home with their parents. On the rare occasion, patrolmen's weapons were discharged -to destroy a crippled horse at the request of the owner and to shoot a mad dog, again at the owner's request. Every day there were deliveries to the station house's commissary, eighty pounds of butter from Blue Valley Creamery, five cases of eggs, 100 pounds of bacon from Swift & Co., 100 pounds of coffee, and from the National Biscuit Co., two dozen fig newtons, three dozen graham crackers, three dozen Loma Doones, one dozen marshmellows, and a half dozen ginger snaps.

 

In 1920 the 62nd Precinct became the 47th but four years later it was renumbered and became the 20th. In 1929 the renumbering of precincts reoccurred and the 20th became the 41st, which number it has had ever since. In an effort to facilitate trade regulation in the same year Traffic Precinct 'G* was assigned to the 41st Precinct station house at 1086 Simpson Street.

 

The area began to change with World War U when the factories in the Port Morris section of The Bronx drew thousands into war-related industry. The war effort attracted large migrations from the southern part of this country and from Puerto Rico. Following the war public projects were constructed to house the influx. At the same time, more established residents moved away. But in the 1960(5, many industries relocated. Unemployment ensued, housing maintenance declined, and poverty escalated.

 

By 1971 when the precinct had grown to 2.5 square miles,the population within it was several times greater than it had been in 1913. The police blotter entries for 1971 reflect the change in the area. A robbery occurred at Bankers Trust early one spring afternoon; $700.00 in fives and tens was removed. A bomb scare was reported at a military recruiting booth at 163rd Street and Southern Boulevard. In seeking the arrest of a man who had imprisoned his common-law wife and infant, both the arresting ofHcer and the assailant were shot as a hostile crowd gathered. The majority of the arrests had become drug related. The precinct had begun to operate a narcotics patrol car and a patrolmen was injured in an early morning narcotics investigation. Although some residents looked to the station house for aid, others saw it as a target for their scorn and rage; the building had become less a refuge and more a fortress and was dubbed 'Fort Apache* in the popular press. As of the 1990 Census, the population within the 41st Precinct was 39,443, some 9000 less than when the station house opened in 1913.

 

The Desicn of the (former! 62nd Precinct

 

The design of the station house evokes the fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century palaces of Florence and Rome. Components of the three-stoty Simpson Avenue facade of the 62nd Police Precinct Station House have been compared with certain Renaissance prototypes, Michelozzo's Palazzo Medici-Riccardi in Florence and Raphael's Palazzo Vidoni-Caffarelli in Rome. Indeed, the choice of the neo-Renaissance style for this public building is a reflection of the City Beautiful movement, a vision of American cities comprising axial avenues along which stood buildings clothed in an harmonious classicism. The vision's earliest, though ephemeral, manifestation occurred at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, but gained momentum in the national effort to preserve the integrity of L*Enfant's plan for the City of Washington, D.C., in 1901. Charles F. McKim, a principal in the architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, was a great proselytizer for the City Beautiful movement. This vision of the City Beautiful prompted the founding of the New York City Art Commission in 1897 (McKim was the first architect member of the Commission, 1897-1901). Its jurisdiction was extended within the subsequent decade to review the designs of certain public structures and, by 1907, its charter was amended to include all structures constructed on City-owned property. It was to the Art Commission in December, 1911, that Hazzard, Brskine & Blagden submitted the plans and a watercolor perspective of the proposed "Simpson Street Police Station".

 

The Art Commission was comprised of twelve members. Submissions - sculptural, architectural, and landscape - were reviewed first by smaller committees, made up of the commissioners and chaired by the appropriate professional commissioner, and then the whole commission. From 1911 to 1913 the commissioner representing architecture was Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes.* The Simpson Street Police Station required two meetings before Stokes' committee, the first on January 9, 1912, and the second on May 14,1912. The make-up of the committee was not consistent; only Stokes, the chair, was present at both meetings.

 

Comparison of the Rrst water color perspective , the one submitted in December, 1911, and published in the Police Department's Annual Report for 1911, with the second water color perspective (Plate 3), submitted in May, 1912, to the Art Commission suggests that Stokes proposed changes in the design. Most apparent is the refinement of the first story rustication; there are eleven courses of equal height in the initial design and fifteen in the second (ftom the springblock up, the courses become gradually narrower in height); the voussoirs of the five-arch arcade number thirteen in the initial design and seventeen in the second. In the first, the keystones are prominent and are incorporated with the heavy molded belt course above. In the second, the keystones have been cropped just below a new dentil molding like their flanking voussoirs, and the voussoirs flanking these have been lowered one course. It is this change that has recalls the Michelozzo prototype from fifteenth-century Florence.

 

Single granite blocks replaced the base course masonry visible in the December, 1911, design. The granite spandrels below the arcade windows were articulated as panels between consoles. The doorway pediment within the central arch was eliminated. The character of the fenestration within the arches was changed also. The horizontal iron muntins were replaced with concentric muntins and the windows below became casements. Window grilles were added. The consoles flanking the central second story window were articulated as scrolls and quoins were added to frame the smooth-faced ashlar of the upper stories. The initial description of the building as submitted in December, 1911, called for the outside walls to be of concrete stone in imitation of natural Indiana limestone; the second submission called for walls of brick and limestone ashlar. The terra-cotta cornice and the green tile roof of the initial submission were retained in the final design.

It is likely that if Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden had retained the title of "Architects for the Police Department of the City of New York", this design would have been repeated elsewhere throughout the city as new precinct station houses were needed. But as a consequence of Commissioner Waldo's dismissal, the Simpson Street station house is the sole example.

 

Buildinc Description

 

The basement and ground story of the 62nd Police Precinct Station House are square in plan, 100 feet by 100 feet. A light-well indentation in the center of the back of the building admits daylight to the staircase (north elevation). The plans of the second and third stories show light-wells above the ground story in the building's sides (east and west elevations) that separate the three-story, limestone and hipped-roof front half of the station house from the four-story, yellow brick and flat-roofed rear half.

 

The three-story Simpson Street facade is faced with limestone. Five large arches, springing from the building's granite base, distinguish the rusticated ground story. Within each of these arches, except for the garage entrance at the right, the framework is of iron and configured as a broad central bay and narrower side bays. This configuration is carried concentrically into the arch as well.

 

The muntins terminate as scroll brackets, the horizontal member is enriched with dentilied molding. The main entrance, through the central arch, is Hanked by iron lanterns with spiked crestings; a cartouche superimposed on this arch's keystones carries an incised monogram incorporating the stylized initials "NYPD." The heavy paneled double doors are of oak, each with four panels. The sidelights are fixed. The outer eight lights of the semicircular transom are fixed, but the center light is hinged at the bottom. The oak double doors of the garage entrance are wider than the main entrance doors (there are no sidelights); each door is panelled with paired and alternating short and long panels, three short and two long.

 

The outer eight lights of the semi-circular transom are fixed; the central light is hinged at the bottom. The other three arches contain windows. Recessed granite spandrels below the windows are articulated to correspond with the iron window frame configuration above; consoles, separating a broad panel and flanking narrower panels, support the marble sills. The central windows and sidelights are hinged at their sides. The eight outer lights of the semi-circular transom are fixed, the central light is hinged at the bottom. The original iron grilles cover all three windows and all five semi-circular transoms; the bars of the semicircular grilles form a radiating pattern, exactly corresponding with the rebates of the surrounding voussoirs. There is an inscription on the building's base to the left of the main entrance.

 

Though in a spalled condition, it can be read: "Police Department, City of New York, R. Waldo, Police Commissioner, MCMXIII." The second and third stories of the Simpson Street facade are of smooth-faced, ashlar limestone. Five windows light the rooms of the precinct's officers on the second story and five more the patrolmen's dormitories on the third story. The central, second story window is set in an aedicule. Flanked by consoles, it has a pediment supported on scroll brackets. An iron flagpole supported by thin metal braces projects from its sill. Each of the third-story windows has a molded sill. A muntin divides the central, third story window; half of the window lights the east dormitory, the other half the west. The broad, bracketed comice above is terra cotta, richly detailed with dentil- and egg and dart moldings; the bracket surfaces are molded as double acanthus leaves. The comice soffit is articulated with coffers and roseate bosses. The hipped roof is covered with asphalt paper instead of the originial green tile.

 

Both the east and west elevations of the station house's front section are in full view, and both are finished in the manner of the Simpson Street facade. Three windows light the rusticated ground story. They are iron one-over-one with transoms. Above the belt course three windows with wood one-over-one sash light the smooth faced ashlar second and third stones Quoins punctuate the comers of these side elevations. The broad terra-cotta cornice continues that of the Simpson Street facade.

 

Iron picket gates, part of the original design and about twelve feet high and seven feet wide, flank the Simpson Street facade. Iron picket fencing runs about twenty-four feet along the east and west lot lines.

 

The four-story rear section of the station house is of yellow brick above and below a marble water table. At the foot of the eastern and western lightwells are lower one-story rooms. Each has a window with one-over-one wood sash the size of those above. The exterior walls of each of these one story rooms is coped with marble. Four windows light each of the stories on the east, west, and rear elevations. The windows on the ground story are the same height as those on the side elevations of the building's front section and are one-over-one with transoms. The upper-story windows are like those in the front section of the building. Three windows light each of the contiguous flights and landings of the staircase; their height was determined by their position on a flight or a landing. Ail of these window openings have marble sills and lintels and are set with one-over-one wood sash. The parapet and chimney are coped with marble also. There is an areaway at basement grade.

 

Subsequent History

 

Very little change has occurred to the exterior of the former 62nd Precinct Station House since it was officially completed in May, 1914. Following a fire in 1936, the station house was declared an unsafe building by the city's Buildings Department. It may have been at this time that the original green tile roof was removed. The building was made safe and the complaint removed in 1937. Spot lights to illuminate the parking area in front of the building have been fixed to the grilles within the extreme left and right arches. Recently townhouses have been built on either side of the station house, leaving the side elevations of the front section of the station house fully visible.

 

A new station house for the 41st Precinct is nearing completion at Southern Boulevard and Longwood Avenue. The soon-to-be vacated station house on Simpson Street will become a branch of the of the Safe Streets Program.

 

- From the 1992 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

Unique Love Birds wedding cake toppers. Customized with elegant initials, flowers and leaves.

 

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Longwood, Bronx

 

The 62nd Police Precinct Station House, with its monumental ground-story arcade of bold, bull-nosed rustication and contrasting upper stories of smooth-faced ashlar limestone, was built in 1912-14 for a new police precinct in the West Farms area of the Bronx, then undergoing rapid development and increase in population. Designed by the architectural Srm of Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden in the neo-Renaissance style considered appropriate for an arm of municipal government, the station house reflects the vision of the City Beautiful movement. The three-story limestone Simpson Avenue facade is surmounted by a richly ornamented terra-cotta cornice and broad-eaved hipped roof (originally of green tile) evoking the fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century palaces of Florence and Rome. Submitted for the approval of the New York City Art Commission (itself founded in response to City Beautiful ideals), the design received subsequent academic refinement in the architecture committee, headed by Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes. This station house, commissioned by Rhinelander Waldo, the new Commissioner of the Police Department as part of an ambitious building program for the department, appears to have been intended as a model for others. But contemporary political reverses made it the only example of Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden's work conveying the image city government wished to project in the recently urbanized boroughs beyond Manhattan just before World War I.

 

The former 62nd Precinct and the 41st Precinct

 

In 1913 when the new station house opened, the 1.80 square miles of the precinct contained a population of 48,000 people along its thirty-three miles of streets. The full complement of the precinct force in 1916 consisted of one captain, three lieutenants, nine sergeants, seventy patrolmen, and three matrons. An elderly resident remembered not only the opening of the new precinct station house but the vestiges of the gardens and orchards of old West Farms. The residents of the Fox's Comers area, took great pride in their neighborhood. Relatives from lower Manhattan came for a few weeks in the summer months.

 

Entries from the police "blotters" of 1920-21 attest to an almost suburban ambience. Summons were issued for an unmuzzled dog, for violations to the Sabbath Law (selling on Sunday -many in the neighborhood were Jewish), for violations of the Sanitary Code (uncovered fruit), and for throwing garbage into a rear lot. Summons were issued to speeders, clocked at twenty-eight, twenty-nine and thirty-two miles per hour, on Southern Boulevard. There were routine raids on three speakeasies, at 935 and 1011 Southern Boulevard and 989 Westchester Avenue. Six neighborhood boys, thirteen to fifteen years of age, were brought in for playing in the street at Tiffany and 163rd Street. They were admonished and sent home with their parents. On the rare occasion, patrolmen's weapons were discharged -to destroy a crippled horse at the request of the owner and to shoot a mad dog, again at the owner's request. Every day there were deliveries to the station house's commissary, eighty pounds of butter from Blue Valley Creamery, five cases of eggs, 100 pounds of bacon from Swift & Co., 100 pounds of coffee, and from the National Biscuit Co., two dozen fig newtons, three dozen graham crackers, three dozen Loma Doones, one dozen marshmellows, and a half dozen ginger snaps.

 

In 1920 the 62nd Precinct became the 47th but four years later it was renumbered and became the 20th. In 1929 the renumbering of precincts reoccurred and the 20th became the 41st, which number it has had ever since. In an effort to facilitate trade regulation in the same year Traffic Precinct 'G* was assigned to the 41st Precinct station house at 1086 Simpson Street.

 

The area began to change with World War U when the factories in the Port Morris section of The Bronx drew thousands into war-related industry. The war effort attracted large migrations from the southern part of this country and from Puerto Rico. Following the war public projects were constructed to house the influx. At the same time, more established residents moved away. But in the 1960(5, many industries relocated. Unemployment ensued, housing maintenance declined, and poverty escalated.

 

By 1971 when the precinct had grown to 2.5 square miles,the population within it was several times greater than it had been in 1913. The police blotter entries for 1971 reflect the change in the area. A robbery occurred at Bankers Trust early one spring afternoon; $700.00 in fives and tens was removed. A bomb scare was reported at a military recruiting booth at 163rd Street and Southern Boulevard. In seeking the arrest of a man who had imprisoned his common-law wife and infant, both the arresting ofHcer and the assailant were shot as a hostile crowd gathered. The majority of the arrests had become drug related. The precinct had begun to operate a narcotics patrol car and a patrolmen was injured in an early morning narcotics investigation. Although some residents looked to the station house for aid, others saw it as a target for their scorn and rage; the building had become less a refuge and more a fortress and was dubbed 'Fort Apache* in the popular press. As of the 1990 Census, the population within the 41st Precinct was 39,443, some 9000 less than when the station house opened in 1913.

 

The Desicn of the (former! 62nd Precinct

 

The design of the station house evokes the fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century palaces of Florence and Rome. Components of the three-stoty Simpson Avenue facade of the 62nd Police Precinct Station House have been compared with certain Renaissance prototypes, Michelozzo's Palazzo Medici-Riccardi in Florence and Raphael's Palazzo Vidoni-Caffarelli in Rome. Indeed, the choice of the neo-Renaissance style for this public building is a reflection of the City Beautiful movement, a vision of American cities comprising axial avenues along which stood buildings clothed in an harmonious classicism. The vision's earliest, though ephemeral, manifestation occurred at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, but gained momentum in the national effort to preserve the integrity of L*Enfant's plan for the City of Washington, D.C., in 1901. Charles F. McKim, a principal in the architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, was a great proselytizer for the City Beautiful movement. This vision of the City Beautiful prompted the founding of the New York City Art Commission in 1897 (McKim was the first architect member of the Commission, 1897-1901). Its jurisdiction was extended within the subsequent decade to review the designs of certain public structures and, by 1907, its charter was amended to include all structures constructed on City-owned property. It was to the Art Commission in December, 1911, that Hazzard, Brskine & Blagden submitted the plans and a watercolor perspective of the proposed "Simpson Street Police Station".

 

The Art Commission was comprised of twelve members. Submissions - sculptural, architectural, and landscape - were reviewed first by smaller committees, made up of the commissioners and chaired by the appropriate professional commissioner, and then the whole commission. From 1911 to 1913 the commissioner representing architecture was Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes.* The Simpson Street Police Station required two meetings before Stokes' committee, the first on January 9, 1912, and the second on May 14,1912. The make-up of the committee was not consistent; only Stokes, the chair, was present at both meetings.

 

Comparison of the Rrst water color perspective , the one submitted in December, 1911, and published in the Police Department's Annual Report for 1911, with the second water color perspective (Plate 3), submitted in May, 1912, to the Art Commission suggests that Stokes proposed changes in the design. Most apparent is the refinement of the first story rustication; there are eleven courses of equal height in the initial design and fifteen in the second (ftom the springblock up, the courses become gradually narrower in height); the voussoirs of the five-arch arcade number thirteen in the initial design and seventeen in the second. In the first, the keystones are prominent and are incorporated with the heavy molded belt course above. In the second, the keystones have been cropped just below a new dentil molding like their flanking voussoirs, and the voussoirs flanking these have been lowered one course. It is this change that has recalls the Michelozzo prototype from fifteenth-century Florence.

 

Single granite blocks replaced the base course masonry visible in the December, 1911, design. The granite spandrels below the arcade windows were articulated as panels between consoles. The doorway pediment within the central arch was eliminated. The character of the fenestration within the arches was changed also. The horizontal iron muntins were replaced with concentric muntins and the windows below became casements. Window grilles were added. The consoles flanking the central second story window were articulated as scrolls and quoins were added to frame the smooth-faced ashlar of the upper stories. The initial description of the building as submitted in December, 1911, called for the outside walls to be of concrete stone in imitation of natural Indiana limestone; the second submission called for walls of brick and limestone ashlar. The terra-cotta cornice and the green tile roof of the initial submission were retained in the final design.

It is likely that if Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden had retained the title of "Architects for the Police Department of the City of New York", this design would have been repeated elsewhere throughout the city as new precinct station houses were needed. But as a consequence of Commissioner Waldo's dismissal, the Simpson Street station house is the sole example.

 

Buildinc Description

 

The basement and ground story of the 62nd Police Precinct Station House are square in plan, 100 feet by 100 feet. A light-well indentation in the center of the back of the building admits daylight to the staircase (north elevation). The plans of the second and third stories show light-wells above the ground story in the building's sides (east and west elevations) that separate the three-story, limestone and hipped-roof front half of the station house from the four-story, yellow brick and flat-roofed rear half.

 

The three-story Simpson Street facade is faced with limestone. Five large arches, springing from the building's granite base, distinguish the rusticated ground story. Within each of these arches, except for the garage entrance at the right, the framework is of iron and configured as a broad central bay and narrower side bays. This configuration is carried concentrically into the arch as well.

 

The muntins terminate as scroll brackets, the horizontal member is enriched with dentilied molding. The main entrance, through the central arch, is Hanked by iron lanterns with spiked crestings; a cartouche superimposed on this arch's keystones carries an incised monogram incorporating the stylized initials "NYPD." The heavy paneled double doors are of oak, each with four panels. The sidelights are fixed. The outer eight lights of the semicircular transom are fixed, but the center light is hinged at the bottom. The oak double doors of the garage entrance are wider than the main entrance doors (there are no sidelights); each door is panelled with paired and alternating short and long panels, three short and two long.

 

The outer eight lights of the semi-circular transom are fixed; the central light is hinged at the bottom. The other three arches contain windows. Recessed granite spandrels below the windows are articulated to correspond with the iron window frame configuration above; consoles, separating a broad panel and flanking narrower panels, support the marble sills. The central windows and sidelights are hinged at their sides. The eight outer lights of the semi-circular transom are fixed, the central light is hinged at the bottom. The original iron grilles cover all three windows and all five semi-circular transoms; the bars of the semicircular grilles form a radiating pattern, exactly corresponding with the rebates of the surrounding voussoirs. There is an inscription on the building's base to the left of the main entrance.

 

Though in a spalled condition, it can be read: "Police Department, City of New York, R. Waldo, Police Commissioner, MCMXIII." The second and third stories of the Simpson Street facade are of smooth-faced, ashlar limestone. Five windows light the rooms of the precinct's officers on the second story and five more the patrolmen's dormitories on the third story. The central, second story window is set in an aedicule. Flanked by consoles, it has a pediment supported on scroll brackets. An iron flagpole supported by thin metal braces projects from its sill. Each of the third-story windows has a molded sill. A muntin divides the central, third story window; half of the window lights the east dormitory, the other half the west. The broad, bracketed comice above is terra cotta, richly detailed with dentil- and egg and dart moldings; the bracket surfaces are molded as double acanthus leaves. The comice soffit is articulated with coffers and roseate bosses. The hipped roof is covered with asphalt paper instead of the originial green tile.

 

Both the east and west elevations of the station house's front section are in full view, and both are finished in the manner of the Simpson Street facade. Three windows light the rusticated ground story. They are iron one-over-one with transoms. Above the belt course three windows with wood one-over-one sash light the smooth faced ashlar second and third stones Quoins punctuate the comers of these side elevations. The broad terra-cotta cornice continues that of the Simpson Street facade.

 

Iron picket gates, part of the original design and about twelve feet high and seven feet wide, flank the Simpson Street facade. Iron picket fencing runs about twenty-four feet along the east and west lot lines.

 

The four-story rear section of the station house is of yellow brick above and below a marble water table. At the foot of the eastern and western lightwells are lower one-story rooms. Each has a window with one-over-one wood sash the size of those above. The exterior walls of each of these one story rooms is coped with marble. Four windows light each of the stories on the east, west, and rear elevations. The windows on the ground story are the same height as those on the side elevations of the building's front section and are one-over-one with transoms. The upper-story windows are like those in the front section of the building. Three windows light each of the contiguous flights and landings of the staircase; their height was determined by their position on a flight or a landing. Ail of these window openings have marble sills and lintels and are set with one-over-one wood sash. The parapet and chimney are coped with marble also. There is an areaway at basement grade.

 

Subsequent History

 

Very little change has occurred to the exterior of the former 62nd Precinct Station House since it was officially completed in May, 1914. Following a fire in 1936, the station house was declared an unsafe building by the city's Buildings Department. It may have been at this time that the original green tile roof was removed. The building was made safe and the complaint removed in 1937. Spot lights to illuminate the parking area in front of the building have been fixed to the grilles within the extreme left and right arches. Recently townhouses have been built on either side of the station house, leaving the side elevations of the front section of the station house fully visible.

 

A new station house for the 41st Precinct is nearing completion at Southern Boulevard and Longwood Avenue. The soon-to-be vacated station house on Simpson Street will become a branch of the of the Safe Streets Program.

 

- From the 1992 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

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Longwood, Bronx

 

The 62nd Police Precinct Station House, with its monumental ground-story arcade of bold, bull-nosed rustication and contrasting upper stories of smooth-faced ashlar limestone, was built in 1912-14 for a new police precinct in the West Farms area of the Bronx, then undergoing rapid development and increase in population. Designed by the architectural Srm of Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden in the neo-Renaissance style considered appropriate for an arm of municipal government, the station house reflects the vision of the City Beautiful movement. The three-story limestone Simpson Avenue facade is surmounted by a richly ornamented terra-cotta cornice and broad-eaved hipped roof (originally of green tile) evoking the fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century palaces of Florence and Rome. Submitted for the approval of the New York City Art Commission (itself founded in response to City Beautiful ideals), the design received subsequent academic refinement in the architecture committee, headed by Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes. This station house, commissioned by Rhinelander Waldo, the new Commissioner of the Police Department as part of an ambitious building program for the department, appears to have been intended as a model for others. But contemporary political reverses made it the only example of Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden's work conveying the image city government wished to project in the recently urbanized boroughs beyond Manhattan just before World War I.

 

The former 62nd Precinct and the 41st Precinct

 

In 1913 when the new station house opened, the 1.80 square miles of the precinct contained a population of 48,000 people along its thirty-three miles of streets. The full complement of the precinct force in 1916 consisted of one captain, three lieutenants, nine sergeants, seventy patrolmen, and three matrons. An elderly resident remembered not only the opening of the new precinct station house but the vestiges of the gardens and orchards of old West Farms. The residents of the Fox's Comers area, took great pride in their neighborhood. Relatives from lower Manhattan came for a few weeks in the summer months.

 

Entries from the police "blotters" of 1920-21 attest to an almost suburban ambience. Summons were issued for an unmuzzled dog, for violations to the Sabbath Law (selling on Sunday -many in the neighborhood were Jewish), for violations of the Sanitary Code (uncovered fruit), and for throwing garbage into a rear lot. Summons were issued to speeders, clocked at twenty-eight, twenty-nine and thirty-two miles per hour, on Southern Boulevard. There were routine raids on three speakeasies, at 935 and 1011 Southern Boulevard and 989 Westchester Avenue. Six neighborhood boys, thirteen to fifteen years of age, were brought in for playing in the street at Tiffany and 163rd Street. They were admonished and sent home with their parents. On the rare occasion, patrolmen's weapons were discharged -to destroy a crippled horse at the request of the owner and to shoot a mad dog, again at the owner's request. Every day there were deliveries to the station house's commissary, eighty pounds of butter from Blue Valley Creamery, five cases of eggs, 100 pounds of bacon from Swift & Co., 100 pounds of coffee, and from the National Biscuit Co., two dozen fig newtons, three dozen graham crackers, three dozen Loma Doones, one dozen marshmellows, and a half dozen ginger snaps.

 

In 1920 the 62nd Precinct became the 47th but four years later it was renumbered and became the 20th. In 1929 the renumbering of precincts reoccurred and the 20th became the 41st, which number it has had ever since. In an effort to facilitate trade regulation in the same year Traffic Precinct 'G* was assigned to the 41st Precinct station house at 1086 Simpson Street.

 

The area began to change with World War U when the factories in the Port Morris section of The Bronx drew thousands into war-related industry. The war effort attracted large migrations from the southern part of this country and from Puerto Rico. Following the war public projects were constructed to house the influx. At the same time, more established residents moved away. But in the 1960(5, many industries relocated. Unemployment ensued, housing maintenance declined, and poverty escalated.

 

By 1971 when the precinct had grown to 2.5 square miles,the population within it was several times greater than it had been in 1913. The police blotter entries for 1971 reflect the change in the area. A robbery occurred at Bankers Trust early one spring afternoon; $700.00 in fives and tens was removed. A bomb scare was reported at a military recruiting booth at 163rd Street and Southern Boulevard. In seeking the arrest of a man who had imprisoned his common-law wife and infant, both the arresting ofHcer and the assailant were shot as a hostile crowd gathered. The majority of the arrests had become drug related. The precinct had begun to operate a narcotics patrol car and a patrolmen was injured in an early morning narcotics investigation. Although some residents looked to the station house for aid, others saw it as a target for their scorn and rage; the building had become less a refuge and more a fortress and was dubbed 'Fort Apache* in the popular press. As of the 1990 Census, the population within the 41st Precinct was 39,443, some 9000 less than when the station house opened in 1913.

 

The Desicn of the (former! 62nd Precinct

 

The design of the station house evokes the fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century palaces of Florence and Rome. Components of the three-stoty Simpson Avenue facade of the 62nd Police Precinct Station House have been compared with certain Renaissance prototypes, Michelozzo's Palazzo Medici-Riccardi in Florence and Raphael's Palazzo Vidoni-Caffarelli in Rome. Indeed, the choice of the neo-Renaissance style for this public building is a reflection of the City Beautiful movement, a vision of American cities comprising axial avenues along which stood buildings clothed in an harmonious classicism. The vision's earliest, though ephemeral, manifestation occurred at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, but gained momentum in the national effort to preserve the integrity of L*Enfant's plan for the City of Washington, D.C., in 1901. Charles F. McKim, a principal in the architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, was a great proselytizer for the City Beautiful movement. This vision of the City Beautiful prompted the founding of the New York City Art Commission in 1897 (McKim was the first architect member of the Commission, 1897-1901). Its jurisdiction was extended within the subsequent decade to review the designs of certain public structures and, by 1907, its charter was amended to include all structures constructed on City-owned property. It was to the Art Commission in December, 1911, that Hazzard, Brskine & Blagden submitted the plans and a watercolor perspective of the proposed "Simpson Street Police Station".

 

The Art Commission was comprised of twelve members. Submissions - sculptural, architectural, and landscape - were reviewed first by smaller committees, made up of the commissioners and chaired by the appropriate professional commissioner, and then the whole commission. From 1911 to 1913 the commissioner representing architecture was Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes.* The Simpson Street Police Station required two meetings before Stokes' committee, the first on January 9, 1912, and the second on May 14,1912. The make-up of the committee was not consistent; only Stokes, the chair, was present at both meetings.

 

Comparison of the Rrst water color perspective , the one submitted in December, 1911, and published in the Police Department's Annual Report for 1911, with the second water color perspective (Plate 3), submitted in May, 1912, to the Art Commission suggests that Stokes proposed changes in the design. Most apparent is the refinement of the first story rustication; there are eleven courses of equal height in the initial design and fifteen in the second (ftom the springblock up, the courses become gradually narrower in height); the voussoirs of the five-arch arcade number thirteen in the initial design and seventeen in the second. In the first, the keystones are prominent and are incorporated with the heavy molded belt course above. In the second, the keystones have been cropped just below a new dentil molding like their flanking voussoirs, and the voussoirs flanking these have been lowered one course. It is this change that has recalls the Michelozzo prototype from fifteenth-century Florence.

 

Single granite blocks replaced the base course masonry visible in the December, 1911, design. The granite spandrels below the arcade windows were articulated as panels between consoles. The doorway pediment within the central arch was eliminated. The character of the fenestration within the arches was changed also. The horizontal iron muntins were replaced with concentric muntins and the windows below became casements. Window grilles were added. The consoles flanking the central second story window were articulated as scrolls and quoins were added to frame the smooth-faced ashlar of the upper stories. The initial description of the building as submitted in December, 1911, called for the outside walls to be of concrete stone in imitation of natural Indiana limestone; the second submission called for walls of brick and limestone ashlar. The terra-cotta cornice and the green tile roof of the initial submission were retained in the final design.

It is likely that if Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden had retained the title of "Architects for the Police Department of the City of New York", this design would have been repeated elsewhere throughout the city as new precinct station houses were needed. But as a consequence of Commissioner Waldo's dismissal, the Simpson Street station house is the sole example.

 

Buildinc Description

 

The basement and ground story of the 62nd Police Precinct Station House are square in plan, 100 feet by 100 feet. A light-well indentation in the center of the back of the building admits daylight to the staircase (north elevation). The plans of the second and third stories show light-wells above the ground story in the building's sides (east and west elevations) that separate the three-story, limestone and hipped-roof front half of the station house from the four-story, yellow brick and flat-roofed rear half.

 

The three-story Simpson Street facade is faced with limestone. Five large arches, springing from the building's granite base, distinguish the rusticated ground story. Within each of these arches, except for the garage entrance at the right, the framework is of iron and configured as a broad central bay and narrower side bays. This configuration is carried concentrically into the arch as well.

 

The muntins terminate as scroll brackets, the horizontal member is enriched with dentilied molding. The main entrance, through the central arch, is Hanked by iron lanterns with spiked crestings; a cartouche superimposed on this arch's keystones carries an incised monogram incorporating the stylized initials "NYPD." The heavy paneled double doors are of oak, each with four panels. The sidelights are fixed. The outer eight lights of the semicircular transom are fixed, but the center light is hinged at the bottom. The oak double doors of the garage entrance are wider than the main entrance doors (there are no sidelights); each door is panelled with paired and alternating short and long panels, three short and two long.

 

The outer eight lights of the semi-circular transom are fixed; the central light is hinged at the bottom. The other three arches contain windows. Recessed granite spandrels below the windows are articulated to correspond with the iron window frame configuration above; consoles, separating a broad panel and flanking narrower panels, support the marble sills. The central windows and sidelights are hinged at their sides. The eight outer lights of the semi-circular transom are fixed, the central light is hinged at the bottom. The original iron grilles cover all three windows and all five semi-circular transoms; the bars of the semicircular grilles form a radiating pattern, exactly corresponding with the rebates of the surrounding voussoirs. There is an inscription on the building's base to the left of the main entrance.

 

Though in a spalled condition, it can be read: "Police Department, City of New York, R. Waldo, Police Commissioner, MCMXIII." The second and third stories of the Simpson Street facade are of smooth-faced, ashlar limestone. Five windows light the rooms of the precinct's officers on the second story and five more the patrolmen's dormitories on the third story. The central, second story window is set in an aedicule. Flanked by consoles, it has a pediment supported on scroll brackets. An iron flagpole supported by thin metal braces projects from its sill. Each of the third-story windows has a molded sill. A muntin divides the central, third story window; half of the window lights the east dormitory, the other half the west. The broad, bracketed comice above is terra cotta, richly detailed with dentil- and egg and dart moldings; the bracket surfaces are molded as double acanthus leaves. The comice soffit is articulated with coffers and roseate bosses. The hipped roof is covered with asphalt paper instead of the originial green tile.

 

Both the east and west elevations of the station house's front section are in full view, and both are finished in the manner of the Simpson Street facade. Three windows light the rusticated ground story. They are iron one-over-one with transoms. Above the belt course three windows with wood one-over-one sash light the smooth faced ashlar second and third stones Quoins punctuate the comers of these side elevations. The broad terra-cotta cornice continues that of the Simpson Street facade.

 

Iron picket gates, part of the original design and about twelve feet high and seven feet wide, flank the Simpson Street facade. Iron picket fencing runs about twenty-four feet along the east and west lot lines.

 

The four-story rear section of the station house is of yellow brick above and below a marble water table. At the foot of the eastern and western lightwells are lower one-story rooms. Each has a window with one-over-one wood sash the size of those above. The exterior walls of each of these one story rooms is coped with marble. Four windows light each of the stories on the east, west, and rear elevations. The windows on the ground story are the same height as those on the side elevations of the building's front section and are one-over-one with transoms. The upper-story windows are like those in the front section of the building. Three windows light each of the contiguous flights and landings of the staircase; their height was determined by their position on a flight or a landing. Ail of these window openings have marble sills and lintels and are set with one-over-one wood sash. The parapet and chimney are coped with marble also. There is an areaway at basement grade.

 

Subsequent History

 

Very little change has occurred to the exterior of the former 62nd Precinct Station House since it was officially completed in May, 1914. Following a fire in 1936, the station house was declared an unsafe building by the city's Buildings Department. It may have been at this time that the original green tile roof was removed. The building was made safe and the complaint removed in 1937. Spot lights to illuminate the parking area in front of the building have been fixed to the grilles within the extreme left and right arches. Recently townhouses have been built on either side of the station house, leaving the side elevations of the front section of the station house fully visible.

 

A new station house for the 41st Precinct is nearing completion at Southern Boulevard and Longwood Avenue. The soon-to-be vacated station house on Simpson Street will become a branch of the of the Safe Streets Program.

 

- From the 1992 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

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This photo was taken on June 11, 2006, the day of the fire that destroyed the rear classrooms. The sanctuary was saved from the fire, but suffered weather damage over the next several years. In December 2009 an investor purchased this property for the sole reason of saving it and preventing the city from demolishing the building. This was the beginning of what turned into the saving of this building. After doing several months of historical research, the investor's partner located a company that had relocated a home in Cincinnati by dismantling it stone by stone. Thinking this might be an option for this property, the company was located and introduced to this structure. (to be continued)

 

This church was designed by Frank Mills Andrews. His body of work includes the Kentucky State Capitol, additions made to the Montana State Capitol, the McAlpin Building in New York City, (to be continued)

 

The article below details the wedding of Ada Gruver Sorg. It originally appeared in the Butler County Democrat newspaper on Thursday, November 9, 1905.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Ada Sorg Weds Capt. Drouillard

_________________________

 

Most Notable Wedding of The Season at Middletown

Wednesday Evening---Full Story of The Event

_________________________

 

Middletown, O., Nov. 2 – At 5:30 Wednesday afternoon, just as the stars came forth to brighten the

sky and the moon as the queen to shower her silvery sheen over the gorgeous loveliness of the autumnal landscape, Miss Ada Gruver Sorg, one of Middletown’s fairest and most charming daughters, plighted her troth to the husband of her choice, Captain James Pierre Drouillard, an honored and prominent member of one of the oldest and best families of Nashville, Tenn.

 

OCCURS IN CHURCH.

 

The ceremony was performed in the First Baptist church by the Pastor E. T. Stevens, in the presence of a concourse of guests, and it was very beautiful and impressive. In the street and about the church pressed a multitude of people of all classes and conditions eager to catch at least a glimpse of the fair bride and her distinguished retinue.

 

The arrangement of the details was a piece of rare perfection and there was no confusion. Chief Kelley with eight stalwart police officers in full uniform, maintained a decorous alignment of the surging crowd anxious to see the bridal procession.

 

SEMI MILITARY IN CHARACTER.

 

It was the most notable marriage ever solemnized in this city because of the social prominence of the contracting parties and the lavish decorations and other luxuriant features of the occasion. Guests were present from many of the largest cities in the United States and the assemblage was both brilliant and select.

 

The bright uniforms of the army officers highlighted the richness of tone and gave military dash to thesplendor of the event. In every way it was magnificent – the very acme of superbness – making an epoch in the social history of the city, and of such it will be long remembered.

 

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PLAYS.

 

The doors of the church were opened some time before the ceremony and while the guests assembled the Symphony Orchestra, of Cincinnati, under the conductorship of William J. Kopp, played two enrapturing selections, Valse Lente, “Amourense,” by Berger, and “La Lettre Manom,” by Jilet. The orchestra for the church was composed of ten pieces, the instrumentation being all strings.

 

Promptly at 5:30 o’clock, as the first sweet strain of the famous wedding march from “Lohengrin” was heard, the two pretty little flower girls, Melva Walburg and Marie Gruver, wearing dresses of English embroidery over light blue slips, with hats to match and trimmed in light blue feathers, appeared at either opening of the altar.

 

HOLD WHITE GATES AJAR.

 

They carried armfuls of lovely white chrysanthemums and made a picture of beauty. They walked to the center of the platform or pulpit and came down the steps and opened the white gates of the first pew.

 

While they held the gates ajar the head bridesmaid, Miss Helen D. Garrison, of this city, charming in an airy creation of blue figured net, brought out by bands of silk embroidered in blue and gold chiffon roses, full quaint skirt, high bodice and Dutch neck, appeared. She also wore a hat of point appliqué with white ostrich plumes and forget-me-nots on crown.

 

FOLLOWED BY BRIDESMAIDS.

 

She carried a blue muff embroidered in gold roses, and looked altogether lovely. She was quickly

followed by the other bridesmaids, Miss Jennie Lennox, of Colorado Springs, Col.; Daisy Long, of Kansas City, Mo.; Edna Gruver, of this city, and Florence M. Gregg, of Allegheny City, Pa., marching in twos in the order named.

 

They passed down the bridal pathway to the rear of the auditorium and entered the small receiving rooms at the rear, where they met the bride.

 

USHERS IN UNIFORM.

 

While this was transpiring the ushers had formed in the front vestibule of the church in this order:

Lieutenants Wallace M. Craigie and Richard W. Buchanan, in the full uniform of the United States army; Charles Aull, of Pittsburgh, and Henry P. Buell, of this city; Captain Sherwood A. Cheney and Lieutenant Albin L. Clark; Edward T. Harding and Senator J. Eugene Harding, of this city, and P.A. Sorg, of New York, and Dr. Rufus E. Ford, of Nashville, Tenn.

 

After the ushers proceeded up the center aisle, followed by Miss Garrison, head bridesmaid, and the other bridesmaids in the same formation as they before appeared.

 

COSTUMES ARE EXQUISITE.

 

They were accompanied by the matron of honor, Mrs. Paul A. Sorg, of New York, and the maid of honor, Miss Mabel E. Root, of Denver, Col.

 

Mrs. Paul A. Sorg was becomingly attired in a princess gown of Irish point lace trimmed in light blue. The hat was of the same material trimmed with gold ribbon and light blue ostrich tips. The muff was solid blue being decorated with a large butterfly of gold. She wore diamonds and pearls.

 

Miss Root’s gown was a “Callot” creation of pink and blue roses scattered over a background of white voile with insets of point Venice lace.

 

GARLANDED WITH ROSES.

 

It was garlanded with chiffon roses in corresponding colors with lovers’ knots of the blue embroidered in crystals. The bodice was a lovely creation – a coat of lace in Directory style. The hat was of point appliqué with pink and blue ostrich tip under left side and pink roses on crown, the muff harmonizing with the colors of the gown.

 

The ring bearer, Miss Dorothy Baker, of Hamilton, was costumed in pure white English embroidery over white, with hat to match. On a white satin pillow reposed the wedding ring.

 

Following this coterie of chivalry and beauty came the bride, Miss Ada Gruver Sorg, and her mother, Mrs. Paul J. Sorg.

 

BRIDE WEARS POINT LACE.

 

The bride wore an exquisite gown of Brussels rose point lace over satin. It was made with a plain skirt, high neck and elbow sleeves, the waist being relieved by a lace jacket falling over the high front. The bridal veil was Brussels net with rose point border and cluster of orange blossoms.

 

She carried a magnificent bouquet of white orchids and lilies of the valley. The only jewels worn were a corsage pin of diamond sprays – the gift of the groom – and a pendant necklace of diamonds – the gift of her mother. It was a regal costume and the queenly figure of the bride displayed admirably its varied beauties.

 

MRS. SORG’S COSTUME.

 

Mrs. Paul J. Sorg was attired in a captivating gown of white silk trimmed in Brussels rose point and duchess lace with garlands of velvet flowers. Her hat was a beautiful work of silver lace and ostrich plumes. A diamond necklace completed the stunning toilet.

 

The bride and her mother followed the attendants up the bridal pathway to the chancel, where the

party divided left and right, taking their places on prie dieus. Miss Garrison, Miss Root, Mrs. Paul J. Sorg and P.A. Sorg ascended the altar steps, where they were met by the minister, the Rev. E. T. Stevens, who came from the left.

 

CEREMONY IS PERFORMED.

 

The bridegroom, Captain Drouillard, and his best man, Mr. Van Leer Wills, of St. Louis, emerged from the right. The bridegroom met the bride at the altar steps and escorted her to their position in front of the minister.

 

The mother gave the bride away and then Mr. Stevens pronounced the solemn words making them husband and wife. The ceremony employed was the full ring service of the Episcopal church, at the conclusion of which the entire party joined in the Lord’s prayer.

 

During the ceremony the orchestra softly rendered “O Solo Mio,” by Padua, an Italian melody of

wonderful sweetness and a favorite selection of Captain Drouillard.

 

MARCH FROM CHURCH.

 

When the last word of the prayer was spoken the orchestra instantly changed to Mendelssohn’s

wedding march, the radiant flower girls noiselessly opened the white gates and the bride and

bridegroom, smiling and bowing in response to numerous signs of recognition and congratulations from the guests, led the march from the church.

 

Mother and son, Mrs. Paul J. Sorg and P.A. Sorg, came next with the maid of honor and best man, the matron of honor and head bridesmaid and other bridesmaids and the ushers following the guests departing last for the waiting carriages that conveyed them to the residence.

 

LEAVE FOR HONEYMOON.

 

After the reception last evening Captain and Mrs. Drouillard left in a special car for a honeymoon trip to the East and South. The bride’s traveling gown is a tailor-made suit of blue broadcloth trimmed with black braid. The hat is of dark blue velvet trimmed in roses. After an absence of several weeks they will return to this city and take up their residence with Mrs. Paul J. Sorg.

 

The decorations at the First Baptist church, where the ceremony was performed, were gorgeous.

 

A sweeping arch of snowy chrysanthemums stood in grandeur at the main entrance to the sacred edifice. It was dotted with large bows of pale blue satin ribbon trimmed over bunches of white maline. On either side of the softly carpeted aisle the ends of the pews had high standards of pure white chrysanthemums.

 

ROPED WITH SATIN.

 

Running the entire length of the auditorium along both sides of the aisle were large ropes of white satin with large white tassels. These stopped at the chancel, where were two white wicker gates that were opened with satin ribbons by the flower girls.

 

From the arch to the gates was the bridal pathway and never was there a prettier one. It looked like a picturesque lane down through a flower bedecked Edenland, and it can not be adequately described.

 

The girders of the auditorium were profusely decorated with old southern smilax, while over the walls there cutwined, in the most natural manner, this same decoration, while American flags looked out from between the windows, giving a dash of bright and patriotic color to the room.

 

BACKGROUND FOR PULPIT.

 

The pulpit, in which the ceremony was performed, had a background of rush lattice work, the solid effect being broken by tall kenlia [sp], cocus, pandams [sp] and bamboo palms. The base was of sidedium [sp] ferns with a vine of smilax over all.

 

Here and there a yellow croton and areaca palm reared their lofty heads as stately sentinels over the bewildering scene. An immense American flag formed the color contract over and in the rear of all.

 

The chandeliers were trimmed with asparagus and the orchestra was concealed behind a bank of palms in the entrance to the pulpit on the right.

 

HOUSE TRANSFORMED WITH FLOWERS.

 

The palatial Sorg residence, where the reception was held last night, always beautiful as to

architecture and appointments, was transformed into a veritable floral paradise. The decorations

required days of preparation and were the most elaborate and lavish ever seen here.

 

The arch in the main hall was entirely hidden by an artistic weave of southern smilax from which was suspended hanging baskets of yellow chrysanthemums. The broad and massive stairway from the first to the second floor was decorated in a like manner.

 

The balustrades were twined about with smilax caught here and there with yellow chrysanthemums. In the hall huge bunches of this queen of flowers rested at vantage places, presenting an effect of the most entrancing beauty.

 

MUSIC ROOM DECORATION.

 

In the music room the arch was completely hidden with smilax and about the apartment in exquisite vases were mammoth displays of white chrysanthemums.

 

The oval-shaped ceiling was interlaced with asparagus sprengerini through which peeped myriad electric bulbs to halo the place with soft and mellow light.

 

The library was a dream of floral beauty. The bookcases were banked with sibodinin [sp] ferns relieved with large bunches of white chrysanthemums.

 

The same color effect obtained throughout the mansion, and when the guests were seated at the bridal banquet, the scene presented was an idealistic picture from fairyland.

 

TWENTY MUSICIANS IN ORCHESTRA.

 

The orchestra was in the main hall during the reception. The twenty musicians were completely hidden by a bamboo lattice screen and an immense bank of palms of many varieties.

 

The verandas of the residence were enclosed in canvas and decorated with smilax and chrysanthemums together with hundreds of electric lights.

 

The bride’s table was set in the dining room. It was circular in shape, and the cloth was of the finest texture of drawn or open work over light blue satin upon which was the tasteful pattern of the American eagle, symbolizing the United States army.

 

CENTERPIECE OF CHRYSANTHEMUMS.

 

The centerpiece was of white chrysanthemums with large bows of blue satin ribbon running through. Ascending from the centerpiece were tendrils of asparagus sprengerini, to which clung in realistic profusion great bunches of white English hothouse grapes. The whole was garnished with sprays of farlayense ferns.

 

The souvenirs were huge bows of white satin ribbon upon which a New York photographer photographed a likeness of the bridge and groom. The photographs were tinted by Miss Jessie Coleman of Washington, D.C., in compliment to the bride. The bows contain the names of the party, date of the wedding and the initials of Captain and Mrs. Drouillard.

 

IDEA ALMOST UNIQUE.

 

The idea is new and only once before was it followed in this country, and that was at a luncheon given to Miss Alice Roosevelt.

 

Supper at the reception last night was served at small tables, each seating four, in all the down-stairs rooms and in the large hall upstairs. Three hundred invitations were issued to the reception. The bride and her maids of honor received in the music room.

 

At the bridal party dinner Tuesday evening presents were made by the bride and bridegroom. The

latter gave to the ushers handsome military hair brushes engraved with their monograms.

 

The bride-elect gave to each of the bridesmaids a pair of beautiful belt pins and cuffs of light blue

enamel with rows of pearls.

 

To the maid of honor was bestowed a circle of pearls and diamonds, while to the matron of honor was presented a gold chain and pendant cross of whole pearls. The head bridesmaid was honored with a belt and cuff buttons of solid pearls. The flower girls and ring bearer were given belt and cuff pins of blue enamel.

 

The presentation of these wedding courtesies was fraught with the greatest pleasure and keenest delight and cemented a friendship that will last forever.

 

Two private cars brought the Nashville (Tenn.) guests to the wedding.

 

PERSONNEL OF PARTY.

 

The personnel of the party is as follows:

 

Mrs. Van Keer Kirkman, Masters Bernard Drouillard and Macon Kirkman, Major and Mrs. A. W. Willis and Miss Eleanor Willis, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Farrell, Miss Josephine Farrell and Norman Farrell, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Douglas, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Clark Kirkman, Mr. William Bransford, Mrs. James P. Kirkman, Mr. and Mrs. George A. Washington, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Benjamin, Mr. and Mrs. Dan Buntin, Major and Mrs. John W. Thomas, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Fielder, Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. Rean E. Folk, Mr. and Mrs. John M. Gray, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Thompson, Dr. Rufus E. Fort, Dr. Lucius E. Burch, and the bridegroom’s old nurse, Miss Mary Finnegan.

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Baby, shower, bridal, wedding, birthday, chocolate, invitations, invite, custom, personalized, announcement, party, anniversary, stripes, circles, dots, flowers, floral, blue, brown, gray, white, purple, green, pink, bow, ribbon, black, square, colorful, polkadot, polka, dot, pokadot, poka, monogram, initial, beige, cream, ivory, neutral, beveled, 3D, 3-D, textured, feet, footprints, foot, prints, save, the, date, 30th, 40th, 50th, 1st, rose, red, flower, floral, trendy, mod, modern, cheap, inexpensive, quality, photo, digital, professional, free, photo-free, tiffany, tiffany, fushia, fuchsia, orange, mocha, gifts, boxes, cocoa, coco, bud, scroll, swirl, spiral, squiggle, lines, tiffany blue, tiffany, tifany, checkered, umbrella, oriental, chinese, japanese, pattern, wine, stripe, baby carriage, carriage, gold, metallic,salmon, lucite, green, light gray, grey, autumn, fall, orange, leaves, burnt, plaid, ocean, clouds, beach, calcun, sand, water, destination wedding, destination, beach, rattle, damask, black, pink polka dot, heart, big

Baby, shower, bridal, wedding, birthday, chocolate, invitations, invite, custom, personalized, announcement, party, anniversary, stripes, circles, dots, flowers, floral, blue, brown, gray, white, purple, green, pink, bow, ribbon, black, square, colorful, polkadot, polka, dot, pokadot, poka, monogram, initial, beige, cream, ivory, neutral, beveled, 3D, 3-D, textured, feet, footprints, foot, prints, save, the, date, 30th, 40th, 50th, 1st, rose, red, flower, floral, trendy, mod, modern, cheap, inexpensive, quality, photo, digital, professional, free, photo-free, tiffany, tiffany, fushia, fuchsia, orange, mocha, gifts, boxes, cocoa, coco, bud, scroll, swirl, spiral, squiggle, lines, tiffany blue, tiffany, tifany, checkered, umbrella, oriental, chinese, japanese, pattern, wine, stripe, baby carriage, carriage, gold, metallic,salmon, lucite, green, light gray, grey, autumn, fall, orange, leaves, burnt, plaid, ocean, clouds, beach, calcun, sand, water, destination wedding, destination, beach, rattle, damask, black, pink polka dot, heart, big

Although easy to remove (and you may do so for your own graphic use purposes), I have let the photographer's initials remain on the photo.

 

He obviously considered his portraits to be artistic works, and proudly put his intertwined S N monogram right on the negative.

 

On the back of the photo, he calls his studio S.N. BANSHUDO, in the SHIBA district of TOKYO.

 

In the Japanese Photographer database published in 2000 by Torin Boyd and Naomi Izakura, there is only one Meiji-era Photographer working in Shiba with the initials S N --- SHISUI NARUSE.

 

Okinawa Soba will leave you with that attribution, feeling satisfied that I have connected the dots.

  

Ca.1908-12 gelatin silver print.

  

Main Caption for this EIRYU set of Meiji-era photographs is found at the first picture here : www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/4426773216/

   

RANDOM SOBA : www.flickriver.com/photos/24443965@N08/random/

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Tibbits Opera House is the second-oldest theatre in Michigan, having been built in 1882. Rich in history and ambiance, even today the theatre offers theatre-goers nearly perfect acoustics, an intimate 499-seat setting, and a fine array of performances throughout the year. Barton S. Tibbits originally built the opera house with wisdom and vision. The aim was high art, timeless architecture, excellent acoustics, splendid furnishing and the finest of entertainment. Tibbits put Coldwater on the map as one of the few small cities in the nation with a social and cultural center of such grandeur. Thanks to the forward-thinking individuals who saved the opera house from destruction in the 1960s, the citizens of Branch County still have the opportunity to experience the opera house and the cultural activities valued so highly by its early residents.

 

Preserved in the edition of September 19, 1882 of the Coldwater Republican newspaper is a richly detailed account of the building's physical description. From surviving photos and valuable accounts like these, we can re-imagine the experience of the original theatre patron. When Tibbits Opera House first opened, such a patron would have found the theatre to be nothing less than an architectural masterpiece.

 

A patron's first experience of the theatre would have been his breathtaking view of the building's façade. With its French "Second Empire" architectural design, the building was adorned with a 24-foot (7.3 m)-tall, slate-covered cupola with a flag staff mounted with a golden eagle statue. The tip of the dome itself towered 76 feet (23 m) above the pavement below. At the base of the cupola, one could behold an elegant bronze bust of Shakespeare, and below this still, inscribed in an arch above the front window was "Tibbits Opera-House, 1882", in gold leaf. The face itself consisted of iron work, red and black brick, and cut stone "united in excellent taste." Three large windows allowed the glow of the sun to fill the theatre lobby, and below the middle window was an iron balcony furnished with glass globe lanterns.

 

As a patron entered the front doors, he would have found himself in a lobby with two stairwells leading up to the balcony, a manager's office, and a smoking room. Upon stepping through the terracotta leather covered and gold trimmed wooden doors into the auditorium, a patron would have been softly bathed in the shimmering glow of 94 gas lights. These lights, were crafted of polished brass and fitted with etched glass globes. The stage itself was equipped with 174 gas lights. All the lights in the entire theatre were controlled from the stage by means of a pipe system, allowing the stage manager to ignite or extinguish any or all of these brilliant lights in an instant. Beneath a dome resplendent with painted cherubs, a large chandelier, known as an "Opal glass reflector", scattered sparkles of reflected light over all. Elegant red Brussels' carpet softened patrons' steps, and grand opera chairs, upholstered in dark Cardinal plush awaited to seat them. These chairs were engraved with the monogram, B.S.T., Barton Tibbits' initials, and many of these chairs offered foot rests and hat and umbrella racks. Amazingly the auditorium originally held 1,000 seats for patrons. The seating area was divided into the parquet and the parquet circle – two separate areas on the floor in front of the orchestra pit. The walls of the auditorium, colored in cameo tints and dashes of cardinal, green, and gold color in "conventional figures" produced "a warm, sunny effect and [gave] the auditorium a bright and airy appearance which is very pleasing." Dominating the scene was a grandly ornate 34-foot (10 m)-wide by 53-foot (16 m)-long proscenium stage with elegant opera boxes situated within the massive tin and plaster arch.

 

The stage itself had all the latest technological features. Scenery and curtains were shifted and moved via the rigging loft, and the stage itself included a "paint-bridge and movable frame, five sets of grooves, trapdoors, and every modern convenience for producing all kinds of scenic effects." Additionally, speaking tubes and bell signals connected the stage manager with the box office, orchestra, and scene and trap shifters. The stage's collection of scenic backdrops was exhaustive and of the highest quality, and was a third larger than the Kalamazoo Opera House.

 

The boxes were draped with cardinal silk plush curtains, lined with gold, and trimmed with lace. In the center of the proscenium arch one beheld a portrait of William Shakespeare and above this portrait against a light-blue background was "a group of cherubs, gracefully posed, representing music and the drama." Surrounding the main chandelier in the auditorium were more "cunning little cherubs" trailing garlands of flowers. In the words of the Coldwater Republican, "The delicate coloring of the background brings out the figures in strong relief so one may almost imagine them floating in space and inhale the odor of their fragrant burden." The cove around the auditorium also was decorated with "vases of flowers, bouquets and conventional vines and figures." L. B. Chevelier, who painted many of the stage's backdrops, was the artistic genius behind such beautiful creations.

 

Regarding the beauty and workmanship of the theatre, Carolyn Gillespie has observed that "Tibbits was easily as elegant as the Second Olympic Theatre which was completed in St. Louis that same year." Elegance was paired with superb acoustics in the rendering of the stage and auditorium, and all in all, ironically the best visual description is perhaps given by the Republican: "It is impossible to give a description of the decorations which will convey an adequate idea of their beauty. They must be seen in order to be appreciated." Unfortunately for the modern patron, such an opportunity has long since died.

 

Currently 6/16/2016

 

The City of Coldwater is upgrading South Hanchett Street and Tibbits Plaza in keeping with our beautiful historic building. Work is currently being done on both the street and parking lot in front of the theatre.

Elegant, sweet, original and personalized Heart wedding cake topper for decorating your own cake or for a unique handmade in Italy wedding gift!

 

The light support heart-shaped, covered with a special paint, seams to be wood but is very light: only 24gr! One side is handpainted with the initials, elegant swirls and pretty clay flowers.

 

The heart is completely customizable to match your wedding palette or you favorite colors!

 

~✿ For orders and more informations about my shop, please visit my profile www.flickr.com/people/passionarte or send me a mail to passionarte.handmade@yahoo.it

My dear friend Jen was just notified that her adoption of a little girl from South Africa is finally proceeding. She leaves in a week to go and pick up her little one, which left us a very short amount of time to throw together a small shower to celebrate the arrival of her daughter. With a foreign adoption, it's always nice to highlight and celebrate the heritage of the child at the shower, thus we settled on a subtle pink, maroon and khaki safari theme. I just adore the artwork from PeaceLoveEtsy with the quote about adoption, and the shop owner even helped us create a matching monogram print containing Jen's daughters' new initials. Here is an inspiration board for our gathering.

 

Adoption Quotation Print from PeaceLoveEtsy.

 

Chambray Animal Group from Restoration Hardware

 

Cupcake Toppers from Etsy Seller MoreThanACupcake.

 

Invitation by William Arthur available at FineStationery.com

 

Personalized Rolling luggage and luggage tags are great gift ideas for the traveling child -- Pottery Barn Kids and Stacy Claire Boyd for FineStationery.com

Identifier: elginpastpresent00mack

Title: Elgin past and present : a historical guide / by Herbert B. Mackintosh

Year: 1914 (1910s)

Authors: Mackintosh, Herbert Bannerman, 1868-

Subjects:

Publisher: Elgin : J. D. Yeadon, 1914

Contributing Library: University of Guelph Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Scottish Studies Foundation (Canada)

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

ubt. Over the fire-place in a small room at the top of the stair are theletters I. H. S. in monogram. The sculptured armorial stones let into the walls are worth carefulattention. On the east wall is a panel (Fig. 6) within a mouldedborder containing three shields, one in chief and two in base. Thatin chief bears :—A lion rampant within a royal tressure (for Scotland).Above the shield is a closed crown and issuing from behind the formerare two branches of thistle, on each side one, consisting of a head onesmall leaf and three large ones. (Not shown in illustration.) Theshield in dexter base bears :—A stag head couped (Reid). Abovethe shield is a mitre with initials R. R. at sides of the last. The arms 32 ELGIN PAST AND PRESENT are those of Robert Reid, a Sub-Dean of the Elgin Cathedral, who wasAbbot of Kinloss (a mitred abbot) from about 1528, and Bishop ofOrkney from 1540. His arms appear at Kinloss Abbey and BeaulyPriory. The celebrated Robert Reid was a luminary in a dark age ;

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Fig. 6.—Shield in Bishops Palace. and a person whose name deserves to be always mentioned withgratitude and respect by his countrymen. He was a lover of learning,a man of piety, an able lawyer, skilled in diplomacy, and entirelydevoted to the interests of his country. He was President of the Courtof Justice, Edinburgh, 1549, the second founder of the Cathedral Churchof St Magnus, in his island diocese ; and the donor of the earliest en-dowment to what afterwards became the University of Edinburgh, ELGIN PAST AND PRESENT 33 In 1558 the town of Elgin paid 25 pund, 6s. and 3 pennies Scots as its proportion of the £2000 Scots, towards defraying the expensesof the embassy when Reid as Abbot of Kinloss was sent as Commissionerto witness the marriage of Mary Queen of Scots with the Dauphin. Inthese days of horticulture it may be interesting to recall that Robert Reidbrought from France an old soldier who was an expert in the planting andgrafting of fruit trees, and as the orchards and gar

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Elegant, romantic and personalized Heart wedding cake topper for decorating your own cake or for a unique handmade in Italy wedding gift!

 

The light heart-shaped support, covered with a special paint, seams to be wood but is very light: only 24gr! One side is handpainted with the initials, elegant swirls and pretty gems rhinestones!

A stick on the bottom will allow to insert it into the cake.

 

Measurements: the heart is about 4,3" high x 4,3" wide x 1,9" thick (11cm x 11cm x 5cm)

 

The heart is customizable to match your wedding palette or you favorite colors!

 

~✿ For orders and more informations about my shop, please visit my profile www.flickr.com/people/passionarte or send me a mail to passionarte.handmade@yahoo.it

 

Circa 1910-20, England. Simple, pull-over nainsook (a soft muslin) chemise with fixed straps edged with scalloped trim that serves as a seam binding inside and a trim outside along the edges. Bodice features an inset of cotton lace with raised, embroidered geometric shapes combined with stylized leaves. It also features drawn thread work and a scalloped edge. Monogrammed with the initials "HD."

 

I originally bought this to wear as a nightgown, but it's in such excellent shape, could be an interesting summer dress too.

Baby, shower, bridal, wedding, birthday, chocolate, invitations, invite, custom, personalized, announcement, party, anniversary, stripes, circles, dots, flowers, floral, blue, brown, gray, white, purple, green, pink, bow, ribbon, black, square, colorful, polkadot, polka, dot, pokadot, poka, monogram, initial, beige, cream, ivory, neutral, beveled, 3D, 3-D, textured, feet, footprints, foot, prints, save, the, date, 30th, 40th, 50th, 1st, rose, red, flower, floral, trendy, mod, modern, cheap, inexpensive, quality, photo, digital, professional, free, photo-free, tiffany, tiffany, fushia, fuchsia, orange, mocha, gifts, boxes, cocoa, coco, bud, scroll, swirl, spiral, squiggle, lines, tiffany blue, tiffany, tifany, checkered, umbrella, oriental, chinese, japanese, pattern, wine, stripe, baby carriage, carriage, gold, metallic,salmon, lucite, green, light gray, grey, autumn, fall, orange, leaves, burnt, plaid, ocean, clouds, beach, calcun, sand, water, destination wedding, destination, beach, rattle, damask, black, pink polka dot, heart, big

Foxhurst, Bronx, New York City, New York, United States

 

The 62nd Police Precinct Station House, with its monumental ground-story arcade of bold, bull-nosed rustication and contrasting upper stories of smooth-faced ashlar limestone, was built in 1912-14 for a new police precinct in the West Farms area of the Bronx, then undergoing rapid development and increase in population. Designed by the architectural Srm of Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden in the neo-Renaissance style considered appropriate for an arm of municipal government, the station house reflects the vision of the City Beautiful movement. The three-story limestone Simpson Avenue facade is surmounted by a richly ornamented terra-cotta cornice and broad-eaved hipped roof (originally of green tile) evoking the fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century palaces of Florence and Rome. Submitted for the approval of the New York City Art Commission (itself founded in response to City Beautiful ideals), the design received subsequent academic refinement in the architecture committee, headed by Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes. This station house, commissioned by Rhinelander Waldo, the new Commissioner of the Police Department as part of an ambitious building program for the department, appears to have been intended as a model for others. But contemporary political reverses made it the only example of Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden's work conveying the image city government wished to project in the recently urbanized boroughs beyond Manhattan just before World War I.

 

The former 62nd Precinct and the 41st Precinct

 

In 1913 when the new station house opened, the 1.80 square miles of the precinct contained a population of 48,000 people along its thirty-three miles of streets. The full complement of the precinct force in 1916 consisted of one captain, three lieutenants, nine sergeants, seventy patrolmen, and three matrons. An elderly resident remembered not only the opening of the new precinct station house but the vestiges of the gardens and orchards of old West Farms. The residents of the Fox's Comers area, took great pride in their neighborhood. Relatives from lower Manhattan came for a few weeks in the summer months.

 

Entries from the police "blotters" of 1920-21 attest to an almost suburban ambience. Summons were issued for an unmuzzled dog, for violations to the Sabbath Law (selling on Sunday -many in the neighborhood were Jewish), for violations of the Sanitary Code (uncovered fruit), and for throwing garbage into a rear lot. Summons were issued to speeders, clocked at twenty-eight, twenty-nine and thirty-two miles per hour, on Southern Boulevard. There were routine raids on three speakeasies, at 935 and 1011 Southern Boulevard and 989 Westchester Avenue. Six neighborhood boys, thirteen to fifteen years of age, were brought in for playing in the street at Tiffany and 163rd Street. They were admonished and sent home with their parents. On the rare occasion, patrolmen's weapons were discharged -to destroy a crippled horse at the request of the owner and to shoot a mad dog, again at the owner's request. Every day there were deliveries to the station house's commissary, eighty pounds of butter from Blue Valley Creamery, five cases of eggs, 100 pounds of bacon from Swift & Co., 100 pounds of coffee, and from the National Biscuit Co., two dozen fig newtons, three dozen graham crackers, three dozen Loma Doones, one dozen marshmellows, and a half dozen ginger snaps.

 

In 1920 the 62nd Precinct became the 47th but four years later it was renumbered and became the 20th. In 1929 the renumbering of precincts reoccurred and the 20th became the 41st, which number it has had ever since. In an effort to facilitate trade regulation in the same year Traffic Precinct 'G* was assigned to the 41st Precinct station house at 1086 Simpson Street.

 

The area began to change with World War U when the factories in the Port Morris section of The Bronx drew thousands into war-related industry. The war effort attracted large migrations from the southern part of this country and from Puerto Rico. Following the war public projects were constructed to house the influx. At the same time, more established residents moved away. But in the 1960(5, many industries relocated. Unemployment ensued, housing maintenance declined, and poverty escalated.

 

By 1971 when the precinct had grown to 2.5 square miles,the population within it was several times greater than it had been in 1913. The police blotter entries for 1971 reflect the change in the area. A robbery occurred at Bankers Trust early one spring afternoon; $700.00 in fives and tens was removed. A bomb scare was reported at a military recruiting booth at 163rd Street and Southern Boulevard. In seeking the arrest of a man who had imprisoned his common-law wife and infant, both the arresting ofHcer and the assailant were shot as a hostile crowd gathered. The majority of the arrests had become drug related. The precinct had begun to operate a narcotics patrol car and a patrolmen was injured in an early morning narcotics investigation. Although some residents looked to the station house for aid, others saw it as a target for their scorn and rage; the building had become less a refuge and more a fortress and was dubbed 'Fort Apache* in the popular press. As of the 1990 Census, the population within the 41st Precinct was 39,443, some 9000 less than when the station house opened in 1913.

 

The Desicn of the (former! 62nd Precinct

 

The design of the station house evokes the fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century palaces of Florence and Rome. Components of the three-stoty Simpson Avenue facade of the 62nd Police Precinct Station House have been compared with certain Renaissance prototypes, Michelozzo's Palazzo Medici-Riccardi in Florence and Raphael's Palazzo Vidoni-Caffarelli in Rome. Indeed, the choice of the neo-Renaissance style for this public building is a reflection of the City Beautiful movement, a vision of American cities comprising axial avenues along which stood buildings clothed in an harmonious classicism. The vision's earliest, though ephemeral, manifestation occurred at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, but gained momentum in the national effort to preserve the integrity of L*Enfant's plan for the City of Washington, D.C., in 1901. Charles F. McKim, a principal in the architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, was a great proselytizer for the City Beautiful movement. This vision of the City Beautiful prompted the founding of the New York City Art Commission in 1897 (McKim was the first architect member of the Commission, 1897-1901). Its jurisdiction was extended within the subsequent decade to review the designs of certain public structures and, by 1907, its charter was amended to include all structures constructed on City-owned property. It was to the Art Commission in December, 1911, that Hazzard, Brskine & Blagden submitted the plans and a watercolor perspective of the proposed "Simpson Street Police Station".

 

The Art Commission was comprised of twelve members. Submissions - sculptural, architectural, and landscape - were reviewed first by smaller committees, made up of the commissioners and chaired by the appropriate professional commissioner, and then the whole commission. From 1911 to 1913 the commissioner representing architecture was Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes.* The Simpson Street Police Station required two meetings before Stokes' committee, the first on January 9, 1912, and the second on May 14,1912. The make-up of the committee was not consistent; only Stokes, the chair, was present at both meetings.

 

Comparison of the Rrst water color perspective , the one submitted in December, 1911, and published in the Police Department's Annual Report for 1911, with the second water color perspective (Plate 3), submitted in May, 1912, to the Art Commission suggests that Stokes proposed changes in the design. Most apparent is the refinement of the first story rustication; there are eleven courses of equal height in the initial design and fifteen in the second (ftom the springblock up, the courses become gradually narrower in height); the voussoirs of the five-arch arcade number thirteen in the initial design and seventeen in the second. In the first, the keystones are prominent and are incorporated with the heavy molded belt course above. In the second, the keystones have been cropped just below a new dentil molding like their flanking voussoirs, and the voussoirs flanking these have been lowered one course. It is this change that has recalls the Michelozzo prototype from fifteenth-century Florence.

 

Single granite blocks replaced the base course masonry visible in the December, 1911, design. The granite spandrels below the arcade windows were articulated as panels between consoles. The doorway pediment within the central arch was eliminated. The character of the fenestration within the arches was changed also. The horizontal iron muntins were replaced with concentric muntins and the windows below became casements. Window grilles were added. The consoles flanking the central second story window were articulated as scrolls and quoins were added to frame the smooth-faced ashlar of the upper stories. The initial description of the building as submitted in December, 1911, called for the outside walls to be of concrete stone in imitation of natural Indiana limestone; the second submission called for walls of brick and limestone ashlar. The terra-cotta cornice and the green tile roof of the initial submission were retained in the final design.

It is likely that if Hazzard, Erskine & Blagden had retained the title of "Architects for the Police Department of the City of New York", this design would have been repeated elsewhere throughout the city as new precinct station houses were needed. But as a consequence of Commissioner Waldo's dismissal, the Simpson Street station house is the sole example.

 

Buildinc Description

 

The basement and ground story of the 62nd Police Precinct Station House are square in plan, 100 feet by 100 feet. A light-well indentation in the center of the back of the building admits daylight to the staircase (north elevation). The plans of the second and third stories show light-wells above the ground story in the building's sides (east and west elevations) that separate the three-story, limestone and hipped-roof front half of the station house from the four-story, yellow brick and flat-roofed rear half.

 

The three-story Simpson Street facade is faced with limestone. Five large arches, springing from the building's granite base, distinguish the rusticated ground story. Within each of these arches, except for the garage entrance at the right, the framework is of iron and configured as a broad central bay and narrower side bays. This configuration is carried concentrically into the arch as well.

 

The muntins terminate as scroll brackets, the horizontal member is enriched with dentilied molding. The main entrance, through the central arch, is Hanked by iron lanterns with spiked crestings; a cartouche superimposed on this arch's keystones carries an incised monogram incorporating the stylized initials "NYPD." The heavy paneled double doors are of oak, each with four panels. The sidelights are fixed. The outer eight lights of the semicircular transom are fixed, but the center light is hinged at the bottom. The oak double doors of the garage entrance are wider than the main entrance doors (there are no sidelights); each door is panelled with paired and alternating short and long panels, three short and two long.

 

The outer eight lights of the semi-circular transom are fixed; the central light is hinged at the bottom. The other three arches contain windows. Recessed granite spandrels below the windows are articulated to correspond with the iron window frame configuration above; consoles, separating a broad panel and flanking narrower panels, support the marble sills. The central windows and sidelights are hinged at their sides. The eight outer lights of the semi-circular transom are fixed, the central light is hinged at the bottom. The original iron grilles cover all three windows and all five semi-circular transoms; the bars of the semicircular grilles form a radiating pattern, exactly corresponding with the rebates of the surrounding voussoirs. There is an inscription on the building's base to the left of the main entrance.

 

Though in a spalled condition, it can be read: "Police Department, City of New York, R. Waldo, Police Commissioner, MCMXIII." The second and third stories of the Simpson Street facade are of smooth-faced, ashlar limestone. Five windows light the rooms of the precinct's officers on the second story and five more the patrolmen's dormitories on the third story. The central, second story window is set in an aedicule. Flanked by consoles, it has a pediment supported on scroll brackets. An iron flagpole supported by thin metal braces projects from its sill. Each of the third-story windows has a molded sill. A muntin divides the central, third story window; half of the window lights the east dormitory, the other half the west. The broad, bracketed comice above is terra cotta, richly detailed with dentil- and egg and dart moldings; the bracket surfaces are molded as double acanthus leaves. The comice soffit is articulated with coffers and roseate bosses. The hipped roof is covered with asphalt paper instead of the originial green tile.

 

Both the east and west elevations of the station house's front section are in full view, and both are finished in the manner of the Simpson Street facade. Three windows light the rusticated ground story. They are iron one-over-one with transoms. Above the belt course three windows with wood one-over-one sash light the smooth faced ashlar second and third stones Quoins punctuate the comers of these side elevations. The broad terra-cotta cornice continues that of the Simpson Street facade.

 

Iron picket gates, part of the original design and about twelve feet high and seven feet wide, flank the Simpson Street facade. Iron picket fencing runs about twenty-four feet along the east and west lot lines.

 

The four-story rear section of the station house is of yellow brick above and below a marble water table. At the foot of the eastern and western lightwells are lower one-story rooms. Each has a window with one-over-one wood sash the size of those above. The exterior walls of each of these one story rooms is coped with marble. Four windows light each of the stories on the east, west, and rear elevations. The windows on the ground story are the same height as those on the side elevations of the building's front section and are one-over-one with transoms. The upper-story windows are like those in the front section of the building. Three windows light each of the contiguous flights and landings of the staircase; their height was determined by their position on a flight or a landing. Ail of these window openings have marble sills and lintels and are set with one-over-one wood sash. The parapet and chimney are coped with marble also. There is an areaway at basement grade.

 

Subsequent History

 

Very little change has occurred to the exterior of the former 62nd Precinct Station House since it was officially completed in May, 1914. Following a fire in 1936, the station house was declared an unsafe building by the city's Buildings Department. It may have been at this time that the original green tile roof was removed. The building was made safe and the complaint removed in 1937. Spot lights to illuminate the parking area in front of the building have been fixed to the grilles within the extreme left and right arches. Recently townhouses have been built on either side of the station house, leaving the side elevations of the front section of the station house fully visible.

 

A new station house for the 41st Precinct is nearing completion at Southern Boulevard and Longwood Avenue. The soon-to-be vacated station house on Simpson Street will become a branch of the of the Safe Streets Program.

Artist: Junk, Rudolf

 

Date: 1906

 

Description: States, 'Ex Libris Franz Weber;' depicts a drape of fabric with a pattern made up of the initials 'FW' and surrounded by two columns and a leaf patterned frame. Signed at bottom right '06.'

 

Format: 1 print, col., 9 x 7 cm.

 

Source: Pratt Institute Libraries, Special Collections 1114 (sc01297)

 

Pratt Libraries Website

For inquiries regarding permissions and use fees, please contact: rightsandrepro.library@pratt.edu.

This Modern leaf shape earrings made by 16G copper wire,

not match style,

big leaf size: 1.75 x 2.75 inch

small leaf size: 1.25 x 1.75 inch

with a 1 and a 3 inches chains dangles,

both leaf also has a 6mm bicone Swarovski crystal beads.

Unique design could easy to wear daily as signature piece.

 

I like the color of copper, it’s my favor material, but if you like other material, please convo me, I do custom pendant size, chain length, or color of crystal beads

"Enzo and Nio are New York based street artists whose work has been appearing throughout the city, as well as in Europe, and as far as New Zealand (see second photo from top.) They have several series and recurring themes in their work. The one above of saint-like women and girls armed with weapons (often accompanied by a Latin phrase) is one, but they also have fake “Pull in Case of Emergency” boxes as well as a series of monogrammed bombs with their own initials. In some cases there’s overlap, as in the top photo. They’ve collaborated with Olek and Jilly Ballistic as (see fourth photo from top) and their Cocksharks rarely go unnoticed.

 

Apparently, they don’t like discussing their work, leaving it to each person’s own interpretation…so interpret away."

collabcubed.com/2012/11/20/enzo-e-nio-armed-women-girls/

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