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Architecture is intrinsically part of our everyday experience. Yet architecture exhibitions, with their emphasis on drawings, models and photographs, sometimes deny their audience an engagement with actual buildings.

 

Using the landscape of the Museum as a test site, the V&A invited nineteen architects to submit proposals for structures that examine notions of refuge and retreat. From these nineteen concept submissions, seven were selected for construction at full-scale.

 

Small spaces such as these can push the boundaries and possibilities of creative practice. A shift in scale towards smaller, bespoke structures encourages a heightened sensitivity to materials, texture and proportion. A renewed clarity emerges, allowing architects a freedom of expression that often struggles to survive in larger building projects.

 

BY

THE V&A = LONDON

 

PLUS.....

 

Thoughts about Photography.....

 

"People think that all cameramen do is point the camera at things, but it's a heck of a lot more complicated than that!"

 

-Larry in Groundhog Day

 

and this observation......

 

Life is like photograph, You can't get best picture just by talking. You need to take an action, you need to press the shutter! - Husni Mubarak Zainal

Architecture is intrinsically part of our everyday experience. Yet architecture exhibitions, with their emphasis on drawings, models and photographs, sometimes deny their audience an engagement with actual buildings.

 

Using the landscape of the Museum as a test site, the V&A invited nineteen architects to submit proposals for structures that examine notions of refuge and retreat. From these nineteen concept submissions, seven were selected for construction at full-scale.

 

Small spaces such as these can push the boundaries and possibilities of creative practice. A shift in scale towards smaller, bespoke structures encourages a heightened sensitivity to materials, texture and proportion. A renewed clarity emerges, allowing architects a freedom of expression that often struggles to survive in larger building projects.

 

BY

THE V&A = LONDON

 

PLUS.....

 

Thoughts about Photography.....

 

"People think that all cameramen do is point the camera at things, but it's a heck of a lot more complicated than that!"

 

-Larry in Groundhog Day

 

and this observation......

 

Life is like photograph, You can't get best picture just by talking. You need to take an action, you need to press the shutter! - Husni Mubarak Zainal

 

HAVE YOU LOOKED BEYOND OBVIOUS?

Architecture is intrinsically part of our everyday experience. Yet architecture exhibitions, with their emphasis on drawings, models and photographs, sometimes deny their audience an engagement with actual buildings.

 

Using the landscape of the Museum as a test site, the V&A invited nineteen architects to submit proposals for structures that examine notions of refuge and retreat. From these nineteen concept submissions, seven were selected for construction at full-scale.

 

Small spaces such as these can push the boundaries and possibilities of creative practice. A shift in scale towards smaller, bespoke structures encourages a heightened sensitivity to materials, texture and proportion. A renewed clarity emerges, allowing architects a freedom of expression that often struggles to survive in larger building projects.

 

BY

THE V&A = LONDON

 

PLUS.....

 

Thoughts about Photography.....

 

"People think that all cameramen do is point the camera at things, but it's a heck of a lot more complicated than that!"

 

-Larry in Groundhog Day

 

and this observation......

 

Life is like photograph, You can't get best picture just by talking. You need to take an action, you need to press the shutter! - Husni Mubarak Zainal

 

HAVE YOU LOOKED BEYOND OBVIOUS?

“Those who have no power to judge of past times but by their own, should always doubt their conclusions” Samuel Johnson

 

Listening to:Room 335 by Larry Carlton

triste y solitario cielo

que mira sin encontrar

entendimiento

l.a.-underground-lee-ritenour-larry-carlton

  

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The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.

 

--- Saint Augustine

 

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COEX Convention & Exhibition Center in Gangnam district, Seoul, is one of South Korea's largest convention and exhibition centers. It was designed by Larry Oltmanns who was a Design Partner with SOM at the time. Situated on the grounds of the Korean World Trade Center complex, the site features the convention and exhibition centers, the COEX shopping mall, two luxury hotels, a multiplex cinema, the COEX Aquarium and the Seven Luck Casino. Up to 200,000 people visit the complex to work and shop every day.

 

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COEX is served by Samseong Station on line 2 of the Seoul Subway.

 

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It was the site of the November 2010 G-20 Seoul summit.

 

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WIKIPEDIA = The COEX SEOUL = HI SEOUL = South Korea

 

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More about Seoul can be found here:

 

WIKIPEDIA = Hi Seoul // The Soul of ASIA

 

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Spent the day remembering what God gave me last year: freedom from abuse.

 

Slave Song

 

she’s still there when the day lights

still there when the night fights…

she’s still there for the daylight

still there for the night fights…

  

shadows own the night about her

whisper lies that her mind’s known

dare to take heart apart

and steal God’s power, all her own

 

but

 

she’s still there when the day lights….

still there when the night fights

she’s still there for the daylight

still there for the night fights…

 

slave to his obscene desire

push her down, where her head goes

crush her will, with love he says

and a slave song’s all that she knows

 

but

 

she’s still there when the day lights

still there when the night fights…

she’s still there for the daylight

still there for the night fights…

 

sit in blue, head bent with teardrops

cross her heart, keep it safe, love

only steps from wolves, tonight

but even slaves get noticed from above

 

and

 

you’re still there when the day lights

still there when the night fights…

you’re still there for the daylight

still there for the night fights

 

(c) 2006 by William E. Jones, Jr

(Written to "Slave Song" music by Larry Carlton)

bricalu.blogspot.com

 

Tell all the brothers to keep their heads up, eyes toward the sky.

 

- Emerson Rudd's last words -

Aug. 9, 1970 - Nov. 15, 2001

 

in Homage to Emerson Rudd, Henry Lee, Delara Darabi

and All Prisoners murdered by barbaric governments.

 

this i know and it's not a dream,

one day, sooner or later, we will win !!!

All over the World,

Kill Death Penalty NOW !!!!

 

USA 2009 - executions & stays

 

September

15 - Romell Broom - Ohio

Strickland delays execution

www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2009/09/...

© The Columbus Dispatch

16 - Stephen Moody - murdered by the state of Texas

22 - Romell Broom - Ohio - new hearing Nov. 30

Death row inmate's execution delayed again

blog.cleveland.com/metro/2009/09/death_row_inmates_execut...

22 - Christopher Coleman - murdered by the state of Texas

24 - Kenneth Mosley - Texas - stayed

30 - John Balentine - Texas - stayed

 

October

8 - Lawrence Reynolds - Ohio - stayed

 

Ohio Governor puts 2 executions on hold » Oct. 5

 

- Lawrence Reynolds until March 9, 2010

- Darryl Durr until April 20, 2010.

 

Governor Ted Strickland statement

governor.ohio.gov/News/PressReleases/2009/October2009/New...

© Office of the Governor

 

8 - Max Landon Payne - murdered by the state of Alabama

20 - Mark McClain - murdered by the state of Georgia

27 - Reginald Blanton - murdered by the state of Texas

 

November

4 - Paul Johnson - Florida - stayed

5 - Khristian Oliver - murdered by the state of Texas

10 - Daryl Durr - Ohio - stayed

10 - Yosvanis Valle - murdered by the state of Texas

10 - John Allen Muhammad - Virginia

Sniper John Allen Muhammad executed - CNN.com

edition.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/11/10/virginia.sniper.executio...

 

17 - Gerald Eldridge - Texas - stayed

17 - Larry Bill Elliott - murdered by the state of Virginia (electric chair)

18 - Danielle Simpson - murdered by the state of Texas

19 - Robert Thompson - murdered by the state of Texas

 

December

2 - Cecil Johnson, Jr. - murdered by the state of Tennessee

3 - Bobby Woods - murdered by the state of Texas

8 - Kenneth Biros - murdered by the state of Ohio

Biros executed | The Columbus Dispatch

Ohio first to employ new 1-drug method

www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2009/12/...

 

11 - Matthew Eric Wrinkles - murdered by the state of Indiana

16 - Carlton Gary - Georgia - stayed

 

as of December 16

 

NCADP

Amnesty International

Death Penalty Information Center

Good day All. Grey and dreary weather here today.

 

Listening to: Fingerprints by Larry Carlton

Architecture is intrinsically part of our everyday experience. Yet architecture exhibitions, with their emphasis on drawings, models and photographs, sometimes deny their audience an engagement with actual buildings.

 

Using the landscape of the Museum as a test site, the V&A invited nineteen architects to submit proposals for structures that examine notions of refuge and retreat. From these nineteen concept submissions, seven were selected for construction at full-scale.

 

Small spaces such as these can push the boundaries and possibilities of creative practice. A shift in scale towards smaller, bespoke structures encourages a heightened sensitivity to materials, texture and proportion. A renewed clarity emerges, allowing architects a freedom of expression that often struggles to survive in larger building projects.

 

BY

THE V&A = LONDON

 

PLUS.....

 

Thoughts about Photography.....

 

"People think that all cameramen do is point the camera at things, but it's a heck of a lot more complicated than that!"

 

-Larry in Groundhog Day

 

and this observation......

 

Life is like photograph, You can't get best picture just by talking. You need to take an action, you need to press the shutter! - Husni Mubarak Zainal

 

HAVE YOU LOOKED BEYOND OBVIOUS?

Tri-Colored-Glycerides

 

A hearty reflected visual soul food

 

When conifers leaked on the Rouge River

 

A true Canadiana photographic experience

 

Arundel,

QC

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6ooCngj0xI

Larry Carlton & Steve Lukater

Cuz we ended a lovers

 

Stay blessed mes ami(e)s

g

Nuits de la Guitare - Beaulieu/s mer - 7 Juillet 2011

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The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.

 

--- Saint Augustine

 

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COEX Convention & Exhibition Center in Gangnam district, Seoul, is one of South Korea's largest convention and exhibition centers. It was designed by Larry Oltmanns who was a Design Partner with SOM at the time. Situated on the grounds of the Korean World Trade Center complex, the site features the convention and exhibition centers, the COEX shopping mall, two luxury hotels, a multiplex cinema, the COEX Aquarium and the Seven Luck Casino. Up to 200,000 people visit the complex to work and shop every day.

 

=====

 

COEX is served by Samseong Station on line 2 of the Seoul Subway.

 

=====

 

It was the site of the November 2010 G-20 Seoul summit.

 

=====

 

WIKIPEDIA = The COEX SEOUL = HI SEOUL = South Korea

 

=====

 

======

 

=======

 

More about Seoul can be found here:

 

WIKIPEDIA = Hi Seoul // The Soul of ASIA

 

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sleepwalk: youtu.be/zF46smnRlgY, Larry Carlton.

  

Cómo me gusta sentir el viento alborotando mis cabellos, el sol sobre mi cara, el rumor perpetuo del mar en mis oídos....

 

A veces, solo a veces, me siento como un sonámbulo de la realidad....

  

.

youtu.be/syvF_cutj8w

 

It's 1865 and the telegraph is heading west. George Crane, wanting to keep law and order out of his territory, is out to stop the construction. The engineer on the job is Ken Mason and he is the grandson of Zorro. As Crane sends his men or Indians to stop the work, Mason repeatedly puts on the Zorro costume and rides to the rescue in this 12-chapter serial.

 

Clayton Moore

September 14th, 1914 — December 28th, 1999

 

Clayton Moore, though best remembered today as television’s Lone Ranger, had a lengthy and distinguished career in serials. Moore was a physically ideal serial lead, but his greatest strengths were his dramatic, quietly intense speaking voice and expressive face. These gifts helped Moore to convey a sincerity that could make the most unbelievable dialogue or situations seem real. The bulk of Moore’s cliffhanger work was done after World War 2, when serials’ shrinking budgets cut back on original action scenes and made the presence of skilled leading players more important than in the serial’s golden age. Moore, with his sincerity and acting skill, was just the type of actor the post-war serials needed.

Clayton Moore was born Jack Carlton Moore in Chicago. He began to train for a career as a circus acrobat at the age of eight, and joined a trapeze act called the Flying Behrs after finishing high school; as a member of the Behrs, Moore would perform for two circuses and at the 1934 World’s Fair. An injury to his left leg around 1935 forced him out of the aerialist business, and after working briefly as a male model in New York he moved to Hollywood in 1937, beginning his film career as a stuntman. He played numerous bit roles in addition to his stunt work for the next three years, among them a miniscule part in his first serial, Zorro’s Fighting Legion (Republic, 1939), as one of the members of the titular group. Edward Small, an independent producer allied with United Artists, cast Moore in his first credited parts in a pair of 1940 films, Kit Carson and The Son of Monte Cristo. The former featured Moore as a heroic young pioneer, the latter as an army officer aiding masked avenger Louis Hayward. Following these two films, Moore began to get credited speaking parts in other pictures. In 1941 he played the romantic lead in Tuxedo Junction, one of Republic Pictures’ “Weaver Brothers and Elviry” comedies, and the next year the studio signed him for his first starring serial, Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942).

Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942) was a vehicle for Republic’s new “Serial Queen,” Kay Aldridge, who played Nyoka Gordon, a girl seeking her missing scientist father in the deserts of North Africa. Moore was the heroic Dr. Larry Grayson, a member of an expedition searching for the “Tablets of Hippocrates,” an ancient list of medical cures sought by Nyoka’s father before he disappeared. Nyoka joined forces with Grayson and his expedition to locate Professor Gordon and the tablets–and to battle Arab ruler Vultura (Lorna Gray) and her band of desert cutthroats, who were after the Tablets and the treasure hidden with them. Perils of Nyoka was a highly exciting serial, with consistently imaginative and varied action sequences, and colorful characters and locales. Although Moore took second billing to Aldridge, his character received as much screen time as hers and his performance was a major part of the serial’s success. Moore, with his intense sincerity, made his nearly superhuman physician character believable; the audience never felt like questioning Dr. Grayson’s ability to perform emergency brain surgery on Nyoka’s amnesiac father in a desert cave, or his amazing powers of riding, wall-scaling, marksmanship, and sword-fighting, far beyond those of the average medical school graduate.

  

Moore went into the army in 1942, almost immediately after the release of Perils of Nyoka. He served throughout World War Two, and didn’t resume his film career until 1946, when he returned to Republic Pictures to appear in The Crimson Ghost. The impact of his starring turn in Perils of Nyoka was diminished by his long hiatus, and he found himself playing a supporting role in this new serial. He was cast as Ashe, the chief henchman of the mysterious Crimson Ghost, and aided that villain in his attempts to steal a counter-atomic weapon called a “Cyclotrode.” Ashe was ultimately brought to justice, along with his nefarious master, by stars Charles Quigley and Linda Stirling. The Crimson Ghost showed that Moore could play intensely mean villains as well as intensely courageous heroes. His sneering, bullying Ashe came off as thoroughly unpleasant, as he stalked through the serial doing his best to kill off hero and heroine.

  

Moore returned to heroic parts in his next cliffhanger, Jesse James Rides Again (Republic, 1947). The serial’s plot had Jesse, retired from outlawry, forced to go on the run because of new crimes committed in his name. Jesse and his pal Steve (John Compton) wound up in Tennessee, where, under the alias of “Mr. Howard,” Jesse came to the aid of a group of farmers victimized by an outlaw gang called the Black Raiders. The Raiders, secretly bossed by local businessman Jim Clark (Tristram Coffin), were after oil reserves beneath the local farmland, but Mr. Howard ultimately outgunned them. James’ own identity was exposed in the process, but he was allowed to escape arrest by a sympathetic marshal. Jesse James Rides Again was Republic’s best post-war Western serial, thanks in part to the unusual plot device of an ex-badman hero. Moore was able to give Jesse James a dangerous edge that most other serial leads couldn’t have pulled off; his cold, steely-eyed glare when gunning down villains seemed very much in keeping with dialogue references to Jesse’s outlaw past.

 

G-Men Never Forget (Republic, 1947), Moore’s next serial, cast him as Ted O’Hara, an FBI agent battling a racketeer boss named Vic Murkland (Roy Barcroft). O’Hara broke up various protection rackets organized by Murkland, but his efforts were hampered by Murkland’s impersonation of a kidnaped police commissioner (also played by Barcroft). G-Men Never Forget possessed a tough and realistic atmosphere not typical of gang-busting serials, and Moore delivered a grimly determined performance well-fitted to the serial’s mood. Moore’s acting, good supporting performances, skilled direction, and a well-written script made G-Men Never Forget a superior serial, one that could hold its own against earlier gang-busting chapterplays like the Dick Tracy outings.

 

Moore’s next serial was Adventures of Frank and Jesse James (Republic, 1948), in which he reprised his Jesse James role. Joined this time by Steve Darrell as Frank James, Moore tried to help a former gang member named John Powell (Stanley Andrews) develop a silver mine. Part of the mine’s proceeds were to be used to pay back victims of James Gang robberies, but the plan was derailed by a crooked mining engineer (John Crawford), who discovered the mine contained gold instead of silver and murdered Powell to keep this find secret. Crawford then used every trick in the book to keep Moore, Darrell, and Noel Neill (as Powell’s daughter) from developing the mine, but the James Boys unmasked his treachery by the end. Frank and Jesse James drew heavily on stock footage and plot elements from Republic’s earlier Adventures of Red Ryder, and was thus more predictable than its predecessor, but it was still an entertaining and well-made serial. Moore again made Jesse seem both sympathetic and (when fighting the bad guys) somewhat frightening.

 

By now, Moore was established as Republic’s premiere serial hero; however, his next cliffhanger would lead to his departure from the studio and change the course of his career. The last in a long line of Republic Zorro serials, Ghost of Zorro (1949) starred Moore as Ken Mason, the original Zorro’s grandson, who donned his ancestor’s mask to help a telegraph company establish a line in the wild West in the face of outlaw sabotage. Like Adventures of Frank and Jesse James, the serial was somewhat derivative of earlier outings (particularly Son of Zorro), but smoothly and professionally done. Moore delivered another strong performance, but for some odd reason Republic chose to have his voice dubbed by another actor in scenes where he was masked as Zorro. This strange production decision did not diminish Moore’s potential as a masked hero in the eyes of a group of television producers who were trying to find an actor to play the Lone Ranger on a soon-to-be-launched TV show; Moore’s turn in Ghost of Zorro landed him the part. Moore debuted as the Ranger in 1949, and played the part for two seasons on TV. During this period, he did make one apparent serial appearance in Flying Disc Man From Mars (Republic, 1950), but all his footage actually came from The Crimson Ghost.

 

In 1952, Moore was dropped from The Lone Ranger without any explanation from the producers, who apparently feared that Moore was becoming too identified as the Lone Ranger, and that he might become so sure of his position that he’d ask for a bigger salary. John Hart replaced Moore as the Ranger for the show’s third season, and Moore returned to freelance acting. He played numerous small roles in feature films, made multiple guest appearances (usually as a heavy) on TV shows like Range Rider and The Gene Autry Show, and also found time to make four more serials.

The first of these was Radar Men from the Moon (Republic, 1952), which featured Moore as a gangster named Graber, who was working with lunar invaders to bring the Earth under the dominion of Retik, Emperor of the Moon (Roy Barcroft). Scientist “Commando” Cody (George Wallace) opposed the planned conquest with the aid of his flying rocket suit and other handy gadgets. Moore met a fiery demise when his car plummeted off a cliff in the last chapter, and Retik came to a similarly sticky end shortly thereafter. Moore’s characterization in Radar Men from the Moon was reminiscent of his performance as “Ashe;” once again he performed deeds of villainy with swaggering relish.

 

Moore’s next serial, Columbia’s Son of Geronimo (1952), was his first non-Republic cliffhanger. He returned to playing a hero in this outing, an undercover cavalry officer named Jim Scott out to quell an Indian uprising led by Rodd Redwing as Porico, son of Geronimo. The uprising was being encouraged by outlaws John Crawford and Marshall Reed to serve their own ends, and Scott and Porico ultimately joined forces to defeat them. Son of Geronimo remains one of the few popular late Columbia serials, due to its strong and unusually violent action scenes and the forceful performances of Moore and his co-stars, particularly Reed and Redwing.

 

Moore’s last Republic serial was Jungle Drums of Africa (1952), in which he played Alan King, an American mining engineer developing a valuable uranium deposit in the African jungles. Moore was assisted by lady doctor Phyllis Coates and fellow engineer Johnny Sands and opposed by a group of Communist spies (Henry Rowland, John Cason) and their witch-doctor accomplice (Roy Glenn). While Drums drew extensively on stock shots of African animals to augment its jungle atmosphere, it relied to an unusually large extent on original footage for its action scenes and chapter endings, and the result was a modestly-budgeted but enjoyable serial that served as a good finish to Moore’s career at Republic.

 

Gunfighters of the Northwest (Columbia, 1953), Moore’s final serial, cast him as the second lead, a Mountie named Bram Nevin who backed up RCMP Sergeant Jock Mahoney. Moore, in his first and only “sidekick” role, played well off Mahoney; while the latter’s character was the focus of the serial’s action, Moore’s role was really more that of co-hero than of a traditional sidekick. The serial pitted the two leads against the “White Horse Rebels,” a gang of outlaws trying to overthrow the Canadian government. Though thinly-plotted, Gunfighters, with its nice location photography and good acting, was the last really interesting Columbia serial; it was also Moore’s last serial. In 1954, he returned to the Lone Ranger series, its producers having been forced to realize that Moore was firmly established as the Ranger and that audiences wouldn’t warm up to his substitute John Hart. The fourth and fifth seasons of the show featured Moore in his familiar place as the “daring and resourceful masked rider of the plains.”

 

After the Lone Ranger series ended in 1956, Moore reprised the role in two big-screen movies and then retired from acting. He remained in the public view, however, making personal appearances throughout the country in his Lone Ranger garb. Publicly and privately, he upheld the ideals that the Lone Ranger–and his serial heroes–had upheld on the screen: courage, charity, and a sense of justice. In 1979, he was barred by court order from making personal appearances as the Lone Ranger because the property’s owners worried that Moore’s close identification with the character would undercut a new Lone Ranger film. Moore nevertheless maintained his status as the “real” Lone Ranger in the eyes of fans, and, after the failure of the new Ranger feature, he was allowed to resume his mask in 1984. Moore died in Los Angeles in 1999, leaving behind several generations of fans that honored him not only for his TV persona, but for the kindess that characterized the off-screen man behind the mask.

Part of Clayton Moore’s success as the Lone Ranger was due to his respectful attitude towards the character. While some actors would have had a hard time taking a masked cowboy from a children’s radio show seriously, Moore’s performance was as heartfelt as if he had been playing a Shakespearian role; he gave the part all the benefit of his considerable acting talent. Moore played his cliffhanger roles, heroic and villainous, with the same respect and the same wholeheartedness. It’s no wonder that serial fans hold him in the same high regard that the Lone Ranger’s fans do.

  

This weekend I went up to Amelia Island and stayed at the Ritz Carlton with the family since my parents and my brother Larry were all signed up to do a Olympic Triathlon. Well, one night I got bored and decided to take some self - portraits.

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The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.

 

--- Saint Augustine

 

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COEX Convention & Exhibition Center in Gangnam district, Seoul, is one of South Korea's largest convention and exhibition centers. It was designed by Larry Oltmanns who was a Design Partner with SOM at the time. Situated on the grounds of the Korean World Trade Center complex, the site features the convention and exhibition centers, the COEX shopping mall, two luxury hotels, a multiplex cinema, the COEX Aquarium and the Seven Luck Casino. Up to 200,000 people visit the complex to work and shop every day.

 

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COEX is served by Samseong Station on line 2 of the Seoul Subway.

 

=====

 

It was the site of the November 2010 G-20 Seoul summit.

 

=====

 

WIKIPEDIA = The COEX SEOUL = HI SEOUL = South Korea

 

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More about Seoul can be found here:

 

WIKIPEDIA = Hi Seoul // The Soul of ASIA

 

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In 1962, growing media conglomerate the Music Corporation of America (MCA) acquired popular Decca Records and its subsidiary labels Coral and Brunswick. Since MCA's creation in 1924 as a talent booking agent, the company by 1960 had expanded into motion pictures and television production, so it's entry into the recorded music industry was a given.

With a few exceptions, Decca's artist roster tended to appeal to a slightly older audience which was fine in 1962. However, by 1966 the music landscape had changed drastically and MCA wanted to tap into a hipper, younger music market. Rather than purchase more new labels, they started their own, Universal City Records, better known by its abbreviation, Uni.

The label's initial roster consisted mostly of psychedelic pop groups with names like The Hippy Dippys and The Lollipop Shop. One such group, The Strawberry Alarm Clock gave Uni its first big hit, 'Incense and Peppermints' which went to #1 in November of 1967.

Uni would soon expand its roster to include jazz (Hugh Masekela, Larry Carlton), comedy (David Steinberg, Bill Cosby), R&B (Betty Everett, Garland Green), and reggae (Desmond Dekker). Several artists on Uni would go on to greater success elsewhere: The Osmond Brothers, David Essex, Paul Carrack, Cliff Richard (at least in the U.S.), and actress Marcia Strassman (best known for her roles in "Welcome Back, Kotter" and "Honey, I Shrunk The Kids").

Three artists who had early success on Uni would eventually become among the most successful acts of the '70s and '80s: Neil Diamond (who moved to Uni from Bang Records), Elton John, and Olivia Newton-John.

In 1972, MCA consolidated all of its labels into the new MCA Records and Uni was no more. Until 1988 that is, when the label was revived with artists such as Eric B & Rakim, Transvision Vamp, and Wet Wet Wet. The new Uni Records produced few hits and after two years was shuttered again.

 

Check out a few of Uni's biggest hits:

> STRAWBERRY ALARM CLOCK - Incense and Peppermints [#1-1967] ---> youtu.be/sOs1O85uEfA

> NEIL DIAMOND - Sweet Caroline (Good Times Never Seemed So Good) [#4-1969] ---> youtu.be/NsLyI1_R01M

> THE FOUNDATIONS - Build Me Up Buttercup [#3-1969] ---> youtu.be/9LyDhPP8b6w

> ELTON JOHN - Rocket Man [#6-1972] ---> youtu.be/-LX7WrHCaUA

> BRIAN HYLAND - Gypsy Woman [#3-1970] ---> youtu.be/RrSes5YxDtM

> HUGH MASEKELA - Grazing In The Grass [#1-1968] ---> youtu.be/34MABAmSkEc

 

youtu.be/syvF_cutj8w

Zorro Poster

It's 1865 and the telegraph is heading west. George Crane, wanting to keep law and order out of his territory, is out to stop the construction. The engineer on the job is Ken Mason and he is the grandson of Zorro. As Crane sends his men or Indians to stop the work, Mason repeatedly puts on the Zorro costume and rides to the rescue in this 12-chapter serial.

 

Clayton Moore

September 14th, 1914 — December 28th, 1999

 

Clayton Moore, though best remembered today as television’s Lone Ranger, had a lengthy and distinguished career in serials. Moore was a physically ideal serial lead, but his greatest strengths were his dramatic, quietly intense speaking voice and expressive face. These gifts helped Moore to convey a sincerity that could make the most unbelievable dialogue or situations seem real. The bulk of Moore’s cliffhanger work was done after World War 2, when serials’ shrinking budgets cut back on original action scenes and made the presence of skilled leading players more important than in the serial’s golden age. Moore, with his sincerity and acting skill, was just the type of actor the post-war serials needed.

Clayton Moore was born Jack Carlton Moore in Chicago. He began to train for a career as a circus acrobat at the age of eight, and joined a trapeze act called the Flying Behrs after finishing high school; as a member of the Behrs, Moore would perform for two circuses and at the 1934 World’s Fair. An injury to his left leg around 1935 forced him out of the aerialist business, and after working briefly as a male model in New York he moved to Hollywood in 1937, beginning his film career as a stuntman. He played numerous bit roles in addition to his stunt work for the next three years, among them a miniscule part in his first serial, Zorro’s Fighting Legion (Republic, 1939), as one of the members of the titular group. Edward Small, an independent producer allied with United Artists, cast Moore in his first credited parts in a pair of 1940 films, Kit Carson and The Son of Monte Cristo. The former featured Moore as a heroic young pioneer, the latter as an army officer aiding masked avenger Louis Hayward. Following these two films, Moore began to get credited speaking parts in other pictures. In 1941 he played the romantic lead in Tuxedo Junction, one of Republic Pictures’ “Weaver Brothers and Elviry” comedies, and the next year the studio signed him for his first starring serial, Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942).

Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942) was a vehicle for Republic’s new “Serial Queen,” Kay Aldridge, who played Nyoka Gordon, a girl seeking her missing scientist father in the deserts of North Africa. Moore was the heroic Dr. Larry Grayson, a member of an expedition searching for the “Tablets of Hippocrates,” an ancient list of medical cures sought by Nyoka’s father before he disappeared. Nyoka joined forces with Grayson and his expedition to locate Professor Gordon and the tablets–and to battle Arab ruler Vultura (Lorna Gray) and her band of desert cutthroats, who were after the Tablets and the treasure hidden with them. Perils of Nyoka was a highly exciting serial, with consistently imaginative and varied action sequences, and colorful characters and locales. Although Moore took second billing to Aldridge, his character received as much screen time as hers and his performance was a major part of the serial’s success. Moore, with his intense sincerity, made his nearly superhuman physician character believable; the audience never felt like questioning Dr. Grayson’s ability to perform emergency brain surgery on Nyoka’s amnesiac father in a desert cave, or his amazing powers of riding, wall-scaling, marksmanship, and sword-fighting, far beyond those of the average medical school graduate.

  

Moore went into the army in 1942, almost immediately after the release of Perils of Nyoka. He served throughout World War Two, and didn’t resume his film career until 1946, when he returned to Republic Pictures to appear in The Crimson Ghost. The impact of his starring turn in Perils of Nyoka was diminished by his long hiatus, and he found himself playing a supporting role in this new serial. He was cast as Ashe, the chief henchman of the mysterious Crimson Ghost, and aided that villain in his attempts to steal a counter-atomic weapon called a “Cyclotrode.” Ashe was ultimately brought to justice, along with his nefarious master, by stars Charles Quigley and Linda Stirling. The Crimson Ghost showed that Moore could play intensely mean villains as well as intensely courageous heroes. His sneering, bullying Ashe came off as thoroughly unpleasant, as he stalked through the serial doing his best to kill off hero and heroine.

  

Moore returned to heroic parts in his next cliffhanger, Jesse James Rides Again (Republic, 1947). The serial’s plot had Jesse, retired from outlawry, forced to go on the run because of new crimes committed in his name. Jesse and his pal Steve (John Compton) wound up in Tennessee, where, under the alias of “Mr. Howard,” Jesse came to the aid of a group of farmers victimized by an outlaw gang called the Black Raiders. The Raiders, secretly bossed by local businessman Jim Clark (Tristram Coffin), were after oil reserves beneath the local farmland, but Mr. Howard ultimately outgunned them. James’ own identity was exposed in the process, but he was allowed to escape arrest by a sympathetic marshal. Jesse James Rides Again was Republic’s best post-war Western serial, thanks in part to the unusual plot device of an ex-badman hero. Moore was able to give Jesse James a dangerous edge that most other serial leads couldn’t have pulled off; his cold, steely-eyed glare when gunning down villains seemed very much in keeping with dialogue references to Jesse’s outlaw past.

 

G-Men Never Forget (Republic, 1947), Moore’s next serial, cast him as Ted O’Hara, an FBI agent battling a racketeer boss named Vic Murkland (Roy Barcroft). O’Hara broke up various protection rackets organized by Murkland, but his efforts were hampered by Murkland’s impersonation of a kidnaped police commissioner (also played by Barcroft). G-Men Never Forget possessed a tough and realistic atmosphere not typical of gang-busting serials, and Moore delivered a grimly determined performance well-fitted to the serial’s mood. Moore’s acting, good supporting performances, skilled direction, and a well-written script made G-Men Never Forget a superior serial, one that could hold its own against earlier gang-busting chapterplays like the Dick Tracy outings.

 

Moore’s next serial was Adventures of Frank and Jesse James (Republic, 1948), in which he reprised his Jesse James role. Joined this time by Steve Darrell as Frank James, Moore tried to help a former gang member named John Powell (Stanley Andrews) develop a silver mine. Part of the mine’s proceeds were to be used to pay back victims of James Gang robberies, but the plan was derailed by a crooked mining engineer (John Crawford), who discovered the mine contained gold instead of silver and murdered Powell to keep this find secret. Crawford then used every trick in the book to keep Moore, Darrell, and Noel Neill (as Powell’s daughter) from developing the mine, but the James Boys unmasked his treachery by the end. Frank and Jesse James drew heavily on stock footage and plot elements from Republic’s earlier Adventures of Red Ryder, and was thus more predictable than its predecessor, but it was still an entertaining and well-made serial. Moore again made Jesse seem both sympathetic and (when fighting the bad guys) somewhat frightening.

 

By now, Moore was established as Republic’s premiere serial hero; however, his next cliffhanger would lead to his departure from the studio and change the course of his career. The last in a long line of Republic Zorro serials, Ghost of Zorro (1949) starred Moore as Ken Mason, the original Zorro’s grandson, who donned his ancestor’s mask to help a telegraph company establish a line in the wild West in the face of outlaw sabotage. Like Adventures of Frank and Jesse James, the serial was somewhat derivative of earlier outings (particularly Son of Zorro), but smoothly and professionally done. Moore delivered another strong performance, but for some odd reason Republic chose to have his voice dubbed by another actor in scenes where he was masked as Zorro. This strange production decision did not diminish Moore’s potential as a masked hero in the eyes of a group of television producers who were trying to find an actor to play the Lone Ranger on a soon-to-be-launched TV show; Moore’s turn in Ghost of Zorro landed him the part. Moore debuted as the Ranger in 1949, and played the part for two seasons on TV. During this period, he did make one apparent serial appearance in Flying Disc Man From Mars (Republic, 1950), but all his footage actually came from The Crimson Ghost.

 

In 1952, Moore was dropped from The Lone Ranger without any explanation from the producers, who apparently feared that Moore was becoming too identified as the Lone Ranger, and that he might become so sure of his position that he’d ask for a bigger salary. John Hart replaced Moore as the Ranger for the show’s third season, and Moore returned to freelance acting. He played numerous small roles in feature films, made multiple guest appearances (usually as a heavy) on TV shows like Range Rider and The Gene Autry Show, and also found time to make four more serials.

The first of these was Radar Men from the Moon (Republic, 1952), which featured Moore as a gangster named Graber, who was working with lunar invaders to bring the Earth under the dominion of Retik, Emperor of the Moon (Roy Barcroft). Scientist “Commando” Cody (George Wallace) opposed the planned conquest with the aid of his flying rocket suit and other handy gadgets. Moore met a fiery demise when his car plummeted off a cliff in the last chapter, and Retik came to a similarly sticky end shortly thereafter. Moore’s characterization in Radar Men from the Moon was reminiscent of his performance as “Ashe;” once again he performed deeds of villainy with swaggering relish.

 

Moore’s next serial, Columbia’s Son of Geronimo (1952), was his first non-Republic cliffhanger. He returned to playing a hero in this outing, an undercover cavalry officer named Jim Scott out to quell an Indian uprising led by Rodd Redwing as Porico, son of Geronimo. The uprising was being encouraged by outlaws John Crawford and Marshall Reed to serve their own ends, and Scott and Porico ultimately joined forces to defeat them. Son of Geronimo remains one of the few popular late Columbia serials, due to its strong and unusually violent action scenes and the forceful performances of Moore and his co-stars, particularly Reed and Redwing.

 

Moore’s last Republic serial was Jungle Drums of Africa (1952), in which he played Alan King, an American mining engineer developing a valuable uranium deposit in the African jungles. Moore was assisted by lady doctor Phyllis Coates and fellow engineer Johnny Sands and opposed by a group of Communist spies (Henry Rowland, John Cason) and their witch-doctor accomplice (Roy Glenn). While Drums drew extensively on stock shots of African animals to augment its jungle atmosphere, it relied to an unusually large extent on original footage for its action scenes and chapter endings, and the result was a modestly-budgeted but enjoyable serial that served as a good finish to Moore’s career at Republic.

 

Gunfighters of the Northwest (Columbia, 1953), Moore’s final serial, cast him as the second lead, a Mountie named Bram Nevin who backed up RCMP Sergeant Jock Mahoney. Moore, in his first and only “sidekick” role, played well off Mahoney; while the latter’s character was the focus of the serial’s action, Moore’s role was really more that of co-hero than of a traditional sidekick. The serial pitted the two leads against the “White Horse Rebels,” a gang of outlaws trying to overthrow the Canadian government. Though thinly-plotted, Gunfighters, with its nice location photography and good acting, was the last really interesting Columbia serial; it was also Moore’s last serial. In 1954, he returned to the Lone Ranger series, its producers having been forced to realize that Moore was firmly established as the Ranger and that audiences wouldn’t warm up to his substitute John Hart. The fourth and fifth seasons of the show featured Moore in his familiar place as the “daring and resourceful masked rider of the plains.”

 

After the Lone Ranger series ended in 1956, Moore reprised the role in two big-screen movies and then retired from acting. He remained in the public view, however, making personal appearances throughout the country in his Lone Ranger garb. Publicly and privately, he upheld the ideals that the Lone Ranger–and his serial heroes–had upheld on the screen: courage, charity, and a sense of justice. In 1979, he was barred by court order from making personal appearances as the Lone Ranger because the property’s owners worried that Moore’s close identification with the character would undercut a new Lone Ranger film. Moore nevertheless maintained his status as the “real” Lone Ranger in the eyes of fans, and, after the failure of the new Ranger feature, he was allowed to resume his mask in 1984. Moore died in Los Angeles in 1999, leaving behind several generations of fans that honored him not only for his TV persona, but for the kindess that characterized the off-screen man behind the mask.

Part of Clayton Moore’s success as the Lone Ranger was due to his respectful attitude towards the character. While some actors would have had a hard time taking a masked cowboy from a children’s radio show seriously, Moore’s performance was as heartfelt as if he had been playing a Shakespearian role; he gave the part all the benefit of his considerable acting talent. Moore played his cliffhanger roles, heroic and villainous, with the same respect and the same wholeheartedness. It’s no wonder that serial fans hold him in the same high regard that the Lone Ranger’s fans do.

 

It's 1865 and the telegraph is heading west. George Crane, wanting to keep law and order out of his territory, is out to stop the construction. The engineer on the job is Ken Mason and he is the grandson of Zorro. As Crane sends his men or Indians to stop the work, Mason repeatedly puts on the Zorro costume and rides to the rescue in this 12-chapter serial.

youtu.be/syvF_cutj8w

 

Clayton Moore

September 14th, 1914 — December 28th, 1999

 

Clayton Moore, though best remembered today as television’s Lone Ranger, had a lengthy and distinguished career in serials. Moore was a physically ideal serial lead, but his greatest strengths were his dramatic, quietly intense speaking voice and expressive face. These gifts helped Moore to convey a sincerity that could make the most unbelievable dialogue or situations seem real. The bulk of Moore’s cliffhanger work was done after World War 2, when serials’ shrinking budgets cut back on original action scenes and made the presence of skilled leading players more important than in the serial’s golden age. Moore, with his sincerity and acting skill, was just the type of actor the post-war serials needed.

Clayton Moore was born Jack Carlton Moore in Chicago. He began to train for a career as a circus acrobat at the age of eight, and joined a trapeze act called the Flying Behrs after finishing high school; as a member of the Behrs, Moore would perform for two circuses and at the 1934 World’s Fair. An injury to his left leg around 1935 forced him out of the aerialist business, and after working briefly as a male model in New York he moved to Hollywood in 1937, beginning his film career as a stuntman. He played numerous bit roles in addition to his stunt work for the next three years, among them a miniscule part in his first serial, Zorro’s Fighting Legion (Republic, 1939), as one of the members of the titular group. Edward Small, an independent producer allied with United Artists, cast Moore in his first credited parts in a pair of 1940 films, Kit Carson and The Son of Monte Cristo. The former featured Moore as a heroic young pioneer, the latter as an army officer aiding masked avenger Louis Hayward. Following these two films, Moore began to get credited speaking parts in other pictures. In 1941 he played the romantic lead in Tuxedo Junction, one of Republic Pictures’ “Weaver Brothers and Elviry” comedies, and the next year the studio signed him for his first starring serial, Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942).

Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942) was a vehicle for Republic’s new “Serial Queen,” Kay Aldridge, who played Nyoka Gordon, a girl seeking her missing scientist father in the deserts of North Africa. Moore was the heroic Dr. Larry Grayson, a member of an expedition searching for the “Tablets of Hippocrates,” an ancient list of medical cures sought by Nyoka’s father before he disappeared. Nyoka joined forces with Grayson and his expedition to locate Professor Gordon and the tablets–and to battle Arab ruler Vultura (Lorna Gray) and her band of desert cutthroats, who were after the Tablets and the treasure hidden with them. Perils of Nyoka was a highly exciting serial, with consistently imaginative and varied action sequences, and colorful characters and locales. Although Moore took second billing to Aldridge, his character received as much screen time as hers and his performance was a major part of the serial’s success. Moore, with his intense sincerity, made his nearly superhuman physician character believable; the audience never felt like questioning Dr. Grayson’s ability to perform emergency brain surgery on Nyoka’s amnesiac father in a desert cave, or his amazing powers of riding, wall-scaling, marksmanship, and sword-fighting, far beyond those of the average medical school graduate.

  

Moore went into the army in 1942, almost immediately after the release of Perils of Nyoka. He served throughout World War Two, and didn’t resume his film career until 1946, when he returned to Republic Pictures to appear in The Crimson Ghost. The impact of his starring turn in Perils of Nyoka was diminished by his long hiatus, and he found himself playing a supporting role in this new serial. He was cast as Ashe, the chief henchman of the mysterious Crimson Ghost, and aided that villain in his attempts to steal a counter-atomic weapon called a “Cyclotrode.” Ashe was ultimately brought to justice, along with his nefarious master, by stars Charles Quigley and Linda Stirling. The Crimson Ghost showed that Moore could play intensely mean villains as well as intensely courageous heroes. His sneering, bullying Ashe came off as thoroughly unpleasant, as he stalked through the serial doing his best to kill off hero and heroine.

  

Moore returned to heroic parts in his next cliffhanger, Jesse James Rides Again (Republic, 1947). The serial’s plot had Jesse, retired from outlawry, forced to go on the run because of new crimes committed in his name. Jesse and his pal Steve (John Compton) wound up in Tennessee, where, under the alias of “Mr. Howard,” Jesse came to the aid of a group of farmers victimized by an outlaw gang called the Black Raiders. The Raiders, secretly bossed by local businessman Jim Clark (Tristram Coffin), were after oil reserves beneath the local farmland, but Mr. Howard ultimately outgunned them. James’ own identity was exposed in the process, but he was allowed to escape arrest by a sympathetic marshal. Jesse James Rides Again was Republic’s best post-war Western serial, thanks in part to the unusual plot device of an ex-badman hero. Moore was able to give Jesse James a dangerous edge that most other serial leads couldn’t have pulled off; his cold, steely-eyed glare when gunning down villains seemed very much in keeping with dialogue references to Jesse’s outlaw past.

 

G-Men Never Forget (Republic, 1947), Moore’s next serial, cast him as Ted O’Hara, an FBI agent battling a racketeer boss named Vic Murkland (Roy Barcroft). O’Hara broke up various protection rackets organized by Murkland, but his efforts were hampered by Murkland’s impersonation of a kidnaped police commissioner (also played by Barcroft). G-Men Never Forget possessed a tough and realistic atmosphere not typical of gang-busting serials, and Moore delivered a grimly determined performance well-fitted to the serial’s mood. Moore’s acting, good supporting performances, skilled direction, and a well-written script made G-Men Never Forget a superior serial, one that could hold its own against earlier gang-busting chapterplays like the Dick Tracy outings.

 

Moore’s next serial was Adventures of Frank and Jesse James (Republic, 1948), in which he reprised his Jesse James role. Joined this time by Steve Darrell as Frank James, Moore tried to help a former gang member named John Powell (Stanley Andrews) develop a silver mine. Part of the mine’s proceeds were to be used to pay back victims of James Gang robberies, but the plan was derailed by a crooked mining engineer (John Crawford), who discovered the mine contained gold instead of silver and murdered Powell to keep this find secret. Crawford then used every trick in the book to keep Moore, Darrell, and Noel Neill (as Powell’s daughter) from developing the mine, but the James Boys unmasked his treachery by the end. Frank and Jesse James drew heavily on stock footage and plot elements from Republic’s earlier Adventures of Red Ryder, and was thus more predictable than its predecessor, but it was still an entertaining and well-made serial. Moore again made Jesse seem both sympathetic and (when fighting the bad guys) somewhat frightening.

 

By now, Moore was established as Republic’s premiere serial hero; however, his next cliffhanger would lead to his departure from the studio and change the course of his career. The last in a long line of Republic Zorro serials, Ghost of Zorro (1949) starred Moore as Ken Mason, the original Zorro’s grandson, who donned his ancestor’s mask to help a telegraph company establish a line in the wild West in the face of outlaw sabotage. Like Adventures of Frank and Jesse James, the serial was somewhat derivative of earlier outings (particularly Son of Zorro), but smoothly and professionally done. Moore delivered another strong performance, but for some odd reason Republic chose to have his voice dubbed by another actor in scenes where he was masked as Zorro. This strange production decision did not diminish Moore’s potential as a masked hero in the eyes of a group of television producers who were trying to find an actor to play the Lone Ranger on a soon-to-be-launched TV show; Moore’s turn in Ghost of Zorro landed him the part. Moore debuted as the Ranger in 1949, and played the part for two seasons on TV. During this period, he did make one apparent serial appearance in Flying Disc Man From Mars (Republic, 1950), but all his footage actually came from The Crimson Ghost.

 

In 1952, Moore was dropped from The Lone Ranger without any explanation from the producers, who apparently feared that Moore was becoming too identified as the Lone Ranger, and that he might become so sure of his position that he’d ask for a bigger salary. John Hart replaced Moore as the Ranger for the show’s third season, and Moore returned to freelance acting. He played numerous small roles in feature films, made multiple guest appearances (usually as a heavy) on TV shows like Range Rider and The Gene Autry Show, and also found time to make four more serials.

The first of these was Radar Men from the Moon (Republic, 1952), which featured Moore as a gangster named Graber, who was working with lunar invaders to bring the Earth under the dominion of Retik, Emperor of the Moon (Roy Barcroft). Scientist “Commando” Cody (George Wallace) opposed the planned conquest with the aid of his flying rocket suit and other handy gadgets. Moore met a fiery demise when his car plummeted off a cliff in the last chapter, and Retik came to a similarly sticky end shortly thereafter. Moore’s characterization in Radar Men from the Moon was reminiscent of his performance as “Ashe;” once again he performed deeds of villainy with swaggering relish.

 

Moore’s next serial, Columbia’s Son of Geronimo (1952), was his first non-Republic cliffhanger. He returned to playing a hero in this outing, an undercover cavalry officer named Jim Scott out to quell an Indian uprising led by Rodd Redwing as Porico, son of Geronimo. The uprising was being encouraged by outlaws John Crawford and Marshall Reed to serve their own ends, and Scott and Porico ultimately joined forces to defeat them. Son of Geronimo remains one of the few popular late Columbia serials, due to its strong and unusually violent action scenes and the forceful performances of Moore and his co-stars, particularly Reed and Redwing.

 

Moore’s last Republic serial was Jungle Drums of Africa (1952), in which he played Alan King, an American mining engineer developing a valuable uranium deposit in the African jungles. Moore was assisted by lady doctor Phyllis Coates and fellow engineer Johnny Sands and opposed by a group of Communist spies (Henry Rowland, John Cason) and their witch-doctor accomplice (Roy Glenn). While Drums drew extensively on stock shots of African animals to augment its jungle atmosphere, it relied to an unusually large extent on original footage for its action scenes and chapter endings, and the result was a modestly-budgeted but enjoyable serial that served as a good finish to Moore’s career at Republic.

 

Gunfighters of the Northwest (Columbia, 1953), Moore’s final serial, cast him as the second lead, a Mountie named Bram Nevin who backed up RCMP Sergeant Jock Mahoney. Moore, in his first and only “sidekick” role, played well off Mahoney; while the latter’s character was the focus of the serial’s action, Moore’s role was really more that of co-hero than of a traditional sidekick. The serial pitted the two leads against the “White Horse Rebels,” a gang of outlaws trying to overthrow the Canadian government. Though thinly-plotted, Gunfighters, with its nice location photography and good acting, was the last really interesting Columbia serial; it was also Moore’s last serial. In 1954, he returned to the Lone Ranger series, its producers having been forced to realize that Moore was firmly established as the Ranger and that audiences wouldn’t warm up to his substitute John Hart. The fourth and fifth seasons of the show featured Moore in his familiar place as the “daring and resourceful masked rider of the plains.”

 

After the Lone Ranger series ended in 1956, Moore reprised the role in two big-screen movies and then retired from acting. He remained in the public view, however, making personal appearances throughout the country in his Lone Ranger garb. Publicly and privately, he upheld the ideals that the Lone Ranger–and his serial heroes–had upheld on the screen: courage, charity, and a sense of justice. In 1979, he was barred by court order from making personal appearances as the Lone Ranger because the property’s owners worried that Moore’s close identification with the character would undercut a new Lone Ranger film. Moore nevertheless maintained his status as the “real” Lone Ranger in the eyes of fans, and, after the failure of the new Ranger feature, he was allowed to resume his mask in 1984. Moore died in Los Angeles in 1999, leaving behind several generations of fans that honored him not only for his TV persona, but for the kindess that characterized the off-screen man behind the mask.

Part of Clayton Moore’s success as the Lone Ranger was due to his respectful attitude towards the character. While some actors would have had a hard time taking a masked cowboy from a children’s radio show seriously, Moore’s performance was as heartfelt as if he had been playing a Shakespearian role; he gave the part all the benefit of his considerable acting talent. Moore played his cliffhanger roles, heroic and villainous, with the same respect and the same wholeheartedness. It’s no wonder that serial fans hold him in the same high regard that the Lone Ranger’s fans do.

  

为什么我以前能画出这样的东西,简直不可思议。。。

This weekend I went up to Amelia Island and stayed at the Ritz Carlton with the family since my parents and my brother Larry were all signed up to do a Olympic Triathlon. Well, one night I got bored and decided to take some self - portraits. The bed post was also pretty crazy so I thought hey, why not take pictures in front of it!? Haha. :P

youtu.be/syvF_cutj8w

 

It's 1865 and the telegraph is heading west. George Crane, wanting to keep law and order out of his territory, is out to stop the construction. The engineer on the job is Ken Mason and he is the grandson of Zorro. As Crane sends his men or Indians to stop the work, Mason repeatedly puts on the Zorro costume and rides to the rescue in this 12-chapter serial.

 

Clayton Moore

September 14th, 1914 — December 28th, 1999

 

Clayton Moore, though best remembered today as television’s Lone Ranger, had a lengthy and distinguished career in serials. Moore was a physically ideal serial lead, but his greatest strengths were his dramatic, quietly intense speaking voice and expressive face. These gifts helped Moore to convey a sincerity that could make the most unbelievable dialogue or situations seem real. The bulk of Moore’s cliffhanger work was done after World War 2, when serials’ shrinking budgets cut back on original action scenes and made the presence of skilled leading players more important than in the serial’s golden age. Moore, with his sincerity and acting skill, was just the type of actor the post-war serials needed.

Clayton Moore was born Jack Carlton Moore in Chicago. He began to train for a career as a circus acrobat at the age of eight, and joined a trapeze act called the Flying Behrs after finishing high school; as a member of the Behrs, Moore would perform for two circuses and at the 1934 World’s Fair. An injury to his left leg around 1935 forced him out of the aerialist business, and after working briefly as a male model in New York he moved to Hollywood in 1937, beginning his film career as a stuntman. He played numerous bit roles in addition to his stunt work for the next three years, among them a miniscule part in his first serial, Zorro’s Fighting Legion (Republic, 1939), as one of the members of the titular group. Edward Small, an independent producer allied with United Artists, cast Moore in his first credited parts in a pair of 1940 films, Kit Carson and The Son of Monte Cristo. The former featured Moore as a heroic young pioneer, the latter as an army officer aiding masked avenger Louis Hayward. Following these two films, Moore began to get credited speaking parts in other pictures. In 1941 he played the romantic lead in Tuxedo Junction, one of Republic Pictures’ “Weaver Brothers and Elviry” comedies, and the next year the studio signed him for his first starring serial, Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942).

Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942) was a vehicle for Republic’s new “Serial Queen,” Kay Aldridge, who played Nyoka Gordon, a girl seeking her missing scientist father in the deserts of North Africa. Moore was the heroic Dr. Larry Grayson, a member of an expedition searching for the “Tablets of Hippocrates,” an ancient list of medical cures sought by Nyoka’s father before he disappeared. Nyoka joined forces with Grayson and his expedition to locate Professor Gordon and the tablets–and to battle Arab ruler Vultura (Lorna Gray) and her band of desert cutthroats, who were after the Tablets and the treasure hidden with them. Perils of Nyoka was a highly exciting serial, with consistently imaginative and varied action sequences, and colorful characters and locales. Although Moore took second billing to Aldridge, his character received as much screen time as hers and his performance was a major part of the serial’s success. Moore, with his intense sincerity, made his nearly superhuman physician character believable; the audience never felt like questioning Dr. Grayson’s ability to perform emergency brain surgery on Nyoka’s amnesiac father in a desert cave, or his amazing powers of riding, wall-scaling, marksmanship, and sword-fighting, far beyond those of the average medical school graduate.

  

Moore went into the army in 1942, almost immediately after the release of Perils of Nyoka. He served throughout World War Two, and didn’t resume his film career until 1946, when he returned to Republic Pictures to appear in The Crimson Ghost. The impact of his starring turn in Perils of Nyoka was diminished by his long hiatus, and he found himself playing a supporting role in this new serial. He was cast as Ashe, the chief henchman of the mysterious Crimson Ghost, and aided that villain in his attempts to steal a counter-atomic weapon called a “Cyclotrode.” Ashe was ultimately brought to justice, along with his nefarious master, by stars Charles Quigley and Linda Stirling. The Crimson Ghost showed that Moore could play intensely mean villains as well as intensely courageous heroes. His sneering, bullying Ashe came off as thoroughly unpleasant, as he stalked through the serial doing his best to kill off hero and heroine.

  

Moore returned to heroic parts in his next cliffhanger, Jesse James Rides Again (Republic, 1947). The serial’s plot had Jesse, retired from outlawry, forced to go on the run because of new crimes committed in his name. Jesse and his pal Steve (John Compton) wound up in Tennessee, where, under the alias of “Mr. Howard,” Jesse came to the aid of a group of farmers victimized by an outlaw gang called the Black Raiders. The Raiders, secretly bossed by local businessman Jim Clark (Tristram Coffin), were after oil reserves beneath the local farmland, but Mr. Howard ultimately outgunned them. James’ own identity was exposed in the process, but he was allowed to escape arrest by a sympathetic marshal. Jesse James Rides Again was Republic’s best post-war Western serial, thanks in part to the unusual plot device of an ex-badman hero. Moore was able to give Jesse James a dangerous edge that most other serial leads couldn’t have pulled off; his cold, steely-eyed glare when gunning down villains seemed very much in keeping with dialogue references to Jesse’s outlaw past.

 

G-Men Never Forget (Republic, 1947), Moore’s next serial, cast him as Ted O’Hara, an FBI agent battling a racketeer boss named Vic Murkland (Roy Barcroft). O’Hara broke up various protection rackets organized by Murkland, but his efforts were hampered by Murkland’s impersonation of a kidnaped police commissioner (also played by Barcroft). G-Men Never Forget possessed a tough and realistic atmosphere not typical of gang-busting serials, and Moore delivered a grimly determined performance well-fitted to the serial’s mood. Moore’s acting, good supporting performances, skilled direction, and a well-written script made G-Men Never Forget a superior serial, one that could hold its own against earlier gang-busting chapterplays like the Dick Tracy outings.

 

Moore’s next serial was Adventures of Frank and Jesse James (Republic, 1948), in which he reprised his Jesse James role. Joined this time by Steve Darrell as Frank James, Moore tried to help a former gang member named John Powell (Stanley Andrews) develop a silver mine. Part of the mine’s proceeds were to be used to pay back victims of James Gang robberies, but the plan was derailed by a crooked mining engineer (John Crawford), who discovered the mine contained gold instead of silver and murdered Powell to keep this find secret. Crawford then used every trick in the book to keep Moore, Darrell, and Noel Neill (as Powell’s daughter) from developing the mine, but the James Boys unmasked his treachery by the end. Frank and Jesse James drew heavily on stock footage and plot elements from Republic’s earlier Adventures of Red Ryder, and was thus more predictable than its predecessor, but it was still an entertaining and well-made serial. Moore again made Jesse seem both sympathetic and (when fighting the bad guys) somewhat frightening.

 

By now, Moore was established as Republic’s premiere serial hero; however, his next cliffhanger would lead to his departure from the studio and change the course of his career. The last in a long line of Republic Zorro serials, Ghost of Zorro (1949) starred Moore as Ken Mason, the original Zorro’s grandson, who donned his ancestor’s mask to help a telegraph company establish a line in the wild West in the face of outlaw sabotage. Like Adventures of Frank and Jesse James, the serial was somewhat derivative of earlier outings (particularly Son of Zorro), but smoothly and professionally done. Moore delivered another strong performance, but for some odd reason Republic chose to have his voice dubbed by another actor in scenes where he was masked as Zorro. This strange production decision did not diminish Moore’s potential as a masked hero in the eyes of a group of television producers who were trying to find an actor to play the Lone Ranger on a soon-to-be-launched TV show; Moore’s turn in Ghost of Zorro landed him the part. Moore debuted as the Ranger in 1949, and played the part for two seasons on TV. During this period, he did make one apparent serial appearance in Flying Disc Man From Mars (Republic, 1950), but all his footage actually came from The Crimson Ghost.

 

In 1952, Moore was dropped from The Lone Ranger without any explanation from the producers, who apparently feared that Moore was becoming too identified as the Lone Ranger, and that he might become so sure of his position that he’d ask for a bigger salary. John Hart replaced Moore as the Ranger for the show’s third season, and Moore returned to freelance acting. He played numerous small roles in feature films, made multiple guest appearances (usually as a heavy) on TV shows like Range Rider and The Gene Autry Show, and also found time to make four more serials.

The first of these was Radar Men from the Moon (Republic, 1952), which featured Moore as a gangster named Graber, who was working with lunar invaders to bring the Earth under the dominion of Retik, Emperor of the Moon (Roy Barcroft). Scientist “Commando” Cody (George Wallace) opposed the planned conquest with the aid of his flying rocket suit and other handy gadgets. Moore met a fiery demise when his car plummeted off a cliff in the last chapter, and Retik came to a similarly sticky end shortly thereafter. Moore’s characterization in Radar Men from the Moon was reminiscent of his performance as “Ashe;” once again he performed deeds of villainy with swaggering relish.

 

Moore’s next serial, Columbia’s Son of Geronimo (1952), was his first non-Republic cliffhanger. He returned to playing a hero in this outing, an undercover cavalry officer named Jim Scott out to quell an Indian uprising led by Rodd Redwing as Porico, son of Geronimo. The uprising was being encouraged by outlaws John Crawford and Marshall Reed to serve their own ends, and Scott and Porico ultimately joined forces to defeat them. Son of Geronimo remains one of the few popular late Columbia serials, due to its strong and unusually violent action scenes and the forceful performances of Moore and his co-stars, particularly Reed and Redwing.

 

Moore’s last Republic serial was Jungle Drums of Africa (1952), in which he played Alan King, an American mining engineer developing a valuable uranium deposit in the African jungles. Moore was assisted by lady doctor Phyllis Coates and fellow engineer Johnny Sands and opposed by a group of Communist spies (Henry Rowland, John Cason) and their witch-doctor accomplice (Roy Glenn). While Drums drew extensively on stock shots of African animals to augment its jungle atmosphere, it relied to an unusually large extent on original footage for its action scenes and chapter endings, and the result was a modestly-budgeted but enjoyable serial that served as a good finish to Moore’s career at Republic.

 

Gunfighters of the Northwest (Columbia, 1953), Moore’s final serial, cast him as the second lead, a Mountie named Bram Nevin who backed up RCMP Sergeant Jock Mahoney. Moore, in his first and only “sidekick” role, played well off Mahoney; while the latter’s character was the focus of the serial’s action, Moore’s role was really more that of co-hero than of a traditional sidekick. The serial pitted the two leads against the “White Horse Rebels,” a gang of outlaws trying to overthrow the Canadian government. Though thinly-plotted, Gunfighters, with its nice location photography and good acting, was the last really interesting Columbia serial; it was also Moore’s last serial. In 1954, he returned to the Lone Ranger series, its producers having been forced to realize that Moore was firmly established as the Ranger and that audiences wouldn’t warm up to his substitute John Hart. The fourth and fifth seasons of the show featured Moore in his familiar place as the “daring and resourceful masked rider of the plains.”

 

After the Lone Ranger series ended in 1956, Moore reprised the role in two big-screen movies and then retired from acting. He remained in the public view, however, making personal appearances throughout the country in his Lone Ranger garb. Publicly and privately, he upheld the ideals that the Lone Ranger–and his serial heroes–had upheld on the screen: courage, charity, and a sense of justice. In 1979, he was barred by court order from making personal appearances as the Lone Ranger because the property’s owners worried that Moore’s close identification with the character would undercut a new Lone Ranger film. Moore nevertheless maintained his status as the “real” Lone Ranger in the eyes of fans, and, after the failure of the new Ranger feature, he was allowed to resume his mask in 1984. Moore died in Los Angeles in 1999, leaving behind several generations of fans that honored him not only for his TV persona, but for the kindess that characterized the off-screen man behind the mask.

Part of Clayton Moore’s success as the Lone Ranger was due to his respectful attitude towards the character. While some actors would have had a hard time taking a masked cowboy from a children’s radio show seriously, Moore’s performance was as heartfelt as if he had been playing a Shakespearian role; he gave the part all the benefit of his considerable acting talent. Moore played his cliffhanger roles, heroic and villainous, with the same respect and the same wholeheartedness. It’s no wonder that serial fans hold him in the same high regard that the Lone Ranger’s fans do.

  

Blues/jazz album by Larry Carlton.

 

larrycarlton.com/wordpress/?portfolio=sapphire-blue

 

Photo/Video Usage:

*Please do not post my images/videos to blogs, Tumblr, Pinterest, or other social media without my permission. Thanks!*

KLAX (Los Angeles International Airport) - 26 DEC 2017

 

"Challenger Five Victor Romeo" climbing out from RWY 25L en route to Kahului Airport (PHOG/OGG).

 

This aircraft belongs to Silver Companies, a diversified real estate investment and development firm. Larry D Silver is the President and CEO of the company.

 

Production Site: Montreal (YMX)

Test registration: C-GOWC

 

Registered to NAL Asset Management LTD: 11 DEC 2014 as G-SCAR

 

Re-registered on 29 JUN 2017 as N515VR.

 

Registered to Carlton Place Leasing LLC: 13 SEP 2017 as N515VR.

 

Engines: 2x Honeywell HTF7350

FAVORITE MUSICIAN LARRY CARLTON

Produced by Gary Katz

Recorded at the Village Recorder, West L.A.; Sound Labs, Hollywood; Warner Bros. Recording Studios; North Hollywood

Engineers : Roger Nichols, Al Schmitt & Bob Schaper

Assistant Engineers : Lenise Bent & Linda Tyler

Mastered by Bernie Grundman

  

Musicians :

 

Background vocals : Clydie King, Brenda Russell, Timothy B. Schmit, J.D. Souther & Biblical Gospel Singers

Guitars : Steve Lukather, Dean Parks & Larry Carlton

Bass : Chuck Rainey, Jim Hughart

Piano : Jaï Winding, Donald Fagen, Paul Griffin, David Foster, David Paich, James Newton Howard & John Capek

Drums : Jeff Porcaro & Harvey Mason

Percussion : Lenny Castro & Robert Greenidge

Tenor Sax : Tom Scott & Ron Holloway

 

www.cdbaby.com/cd/marcjordan1

Photographs of The New York Times Magazine edited by Kathy Ryan @aperturefnd 11/18 event

 

The book features photo of: Lynsey Addario, Ruven Afanador, Peter van Agtmael, Christopher Anderson, Kenji Aoki, Marc Asnin, Josef Astor, Roger Ballen, Anthony Barboza, Richard Barnes, Lillian Bassman, Letizia Battaglia and Franco Zecchin, Andrew Bettles, Jodi Bieber, Ellen Binder, Olaf Blecker, Richard Burbridge, James Casebere, Barron Claiborne, Chuck Close, Fred Conrad, Gregory Crewdson, Carlton Davis, Thomas Demand, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Rineke Dijkstra, Jillian Edelstein, Mitch Epstein, Donna Ferrato, Larry Fink, Lendon Flanagan, Leonard Freed, Lee Friedlander, Sally Gall, Tierney Gearon, Ashley Gilbertson, Nan Goldin, Katy Grannan, Stanley Greene, Lauren Greenfield, Thomas Hannich, Charles Harbutt, Lyle Ashton Harris, Alexei Hay, Todd Heisler, Lizzie Himmel, David Hockney, Reinhard Hunger and Sarah Illenberger, Nadav Kander, Edward Keating, Brenda Ann Kenneally, Hendrik Kerstens, Martin Klimas, Jeff Koons, Mikako Koyama, Antonin Kratochvil, Karen Kuehn, David LaChapelle, Brigitte Lacombe, Joachim Ladefoged, Jean-Pierre Laffont, Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin, Gillian Laub, Annie Leibovitz, Laura Letinsky, Ettore Malanca, Kurt Markus, Sally Mann, Mary Ellen Mark, Matuschka, Robert Maxwell, Gareth McConnell, Ryan McGinley, Hellen van Meene, Raymond Meier, Susan Meiselas, Jeff Mermelstein, Sheila Metzner, David Montgomery, Sarah Moon, Abelardo Morell, Vik Muniz, James Nachtwey, Dewey Nicks, Simon Norfolk, Erwin Olaf, Michael O'Neill, Martin Parr, Nigel Parry, Paolo Pellegrin, Gilles Peress, Mark Peterson, Jack Pierson, Matthew Pillsbury, Gueorgui Pinkhassov, Platon, Reza, Eugene Richards, Jeff Riedel, Matthew Rolston, Paolo Roversi, Sebastião Salgado, Horacio Salinas, Tom Schierlitz, Gary Schneider, Collier Schorr, Zachary Scott, Stéphane Sednaoui, David Seidner, Alfred Seiland, Andres Serrano, Cindy Sherman, Malick Sidibé, Laurie Simmons, Taryn Simon, Stephanie Sinclair, Rodney Smith, Sage Sohier, Mike + Doug Starn, Laurent van der Stockt, Thomas Struth, Sam Taylor-Wood, Joyce Tenneson, Scott Thode, Larry Towell, Lars Tunbjörk, Deborah Turbeville, Paolo Ventura, Massimo Vitali, Bruce Weber, Stephen Wilkes, Damon Winter, Dan Winters, Joel-Peter Witkin, Katherine Wolkoff, and Harf Zimmerman.

  

  

youtu.be/syvF_cutj8w

It's 1865 and the telegraph is heading west. George Crane, wanting to keep law and order out of his territory, is out to stop the construction. The engineer on the job is Ken Mason and he is the grandson of Zorro. As Crane sends his men or Indians to stop the work, Mason repeatedly puts on the Zorro costume and rides to the rescue in this 12-chapter serial.

 

Clayton Moore

September 14th, 1914 — December 28th, 1999

 

Clayton Moore, though best remembered today as television’s Lone Ranger, had a lengthy and distinguished career in serials. Moore was a physically ideal serial lead, but his greatest strengths were his dramatic, quietly intense speaking voice and expressive face. These gifts helped Moore to convey a sincerity that could make the most unbelievable dialogue or situations seem real. The bulk of Moore’s cliffhanger work was done after World War 2, when serials’ shrinking budgets cut back on original action scenes and made the presence of skilled leading players more important than in the serial’s golden age. Moore, with his sincerity and acting skill, was just the type of actor the post-war serials needed.

Clayton Moore was born Jack Carlton Moore in Chicago. He began to train for a career as a circus acrobat at the age of eight, and joined a trapeze act called the Flying Behrs after finishing high school; as a member of the Behrs, Moore would perform for two circuses and at the 1934 World’s Fair. An injury to his left leg around 1935 forced him out of the aerialist business, and after working briefly as a male model in New York he moved to Hollywood in 1937, beginning his film career as a stuntman. He played numerous bit roles in addition to his stunt work for the next three years, among them a miniscule part in his first serial, Zorro’s Fighting Legion (Republic, 1939), as one of the members of the titular group. Edward Small, an independent producer allied with United Artists, cast Moore in his first credited parts in a pair of 1940 films, Kit Carson and The Son of Monte Cristo. The former featured Moore as a heroic young pioneer, the latter as an army officer aiding masked avenger Louis Hayward. Following these two films, Moore began to get credited speaking parts in other pictures. In 1941 he played the romantic lead in Tuxedo Junction, one of Republic Pictures’ “Weaver Brothers and Elviry” comedies, and the next year the studio signed him for his first starring serial, Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942).

Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942) was a vehicle for Republic’s new “Serial Queen,” Kay Aldridge, who played Nyoka Gordon, a girl seeking her missing scientist father in the deserts of North Africa. Moore was the heroic Dr. Larry Grayson, a member of an expedition searching for the “Tablets of Hippocrates,” an ancient list of medical cures sought by Nyoka’s father before he disappeared. Nyoka joined forces with Grayson and his expedition to locate Professor Gordon and the tablets–and to battle Arab ruler Vultura (Lorna Gray) and her band of desert cutthroats, who were after the Tablets and the treasure hidden with them. Perils of Nyoka was a highly exciting serial, with consistently imaginative and varied action sequences, and colorful characters and locales. Although Moore took second billing to Aldridge, his character received as much screen time as hers and his performance was a major part of the serial’s success. Moore, with his intense sincerity, made his nearly superhuman physician character believable; the audience never felt like questioning Dr. Grayson’s ability to perform emergency brain surgery on Nyoka’s amnesiac father in a desert cave, or his amazing powers of riding, wall-scaling, marksmanship, and sword-fighting, far beyond those of the average medical school graduate.

  

Moore went into the army in 1942, almost immediately after the release of Perils of Nyoka. He served throughout World War Two, and didn’t resume his film career until 1946, when he returned to Republic Pictures to appear in The Crimson Ghost. The impact of his starring turn in Perils of Nyoka was diminished by his long hiatus, and he found himself playing a supporting role in this new serial. He was cast as Ashe, the chief henchman of the mysterious Crimson Ghost, and aided that villain in his attempts to steal a counter-atomic weapon called a “Cyclotrode.” Ashe was ultimately brought to justice, along with his nefarious master, by stars Charles Quigley and Linda Stirling. The Crimson Ghost showed that Moore could play intensely mean villains as well as intensely courageous heroes. His sneering, bullying Ashe came off as thoroughly unpleasant, as he stalked through the serial doing his best to kill off hero and heroine.

  

Moore returned to heroic parts in his next cliffhanger, Jesse James Rides Again (Republic, 1947). The serial’s plot had Jesse, retired from outlawry, forced to go on the run because of new crimes committed in his name. Jesse and his pal Steve (John Compton) wound up in Tennessee, where, under the alias of “Mr. Howard,” Jesse came to the aid of a group of farmers victimized by an outlaw gang called the Black Raiders. The Raiders, secretly bossed by local businessman Jim Clark (Tristram Coffin), were after oil reserves beneath the local farmland, but Mr. Howard ultimately outgunned them. James’ own identity was exposed in the process, but he was allowed to escape arrest by a sympathetic marshal. Jesse James Rides Again was Republic’s best post-war Western serial, thanks in part to the unusual plot device of an ex-badman hero. Moore was able to give Jesse James a dangerous edge that most other serial leads couldn’t have pulled off; his cold, steely-eyed glare when gunning down villains seemed very much in keeping with dialogue references to Jesse’s outlaw past.

 

G-Men Never Forget (Republic, 1947), Moore’s next serial, cast him as Ted O’Hara, an FBI agent battling a racketeer boss named Vic Murkland (Roy Barcroft). O’Hara broke up various protection rackets organized by Murkland, but his efforts were hampered by Murkland’s impersonation of a kidnaped police commissioner (also played by Barcroft). G-Men Never Forget possessed a tough and realistic atmosphere not typical of gang-busting serials, and Moore delivered a grimly determined performance well-fitted to the serial’s mood. Moore’s acting, good supporting performances, skilled direction, and a well-written script made G-Men Never Forget a superior serial, one that could hold its own against earlier gang-busting chapterplays like the Dick Tracy outings.

 

Moore’s next serial was Adventures of Frank and Jesse James (Republic, 1948), in which he reprised his Jesse James role. Joined this time by Steve Darrell as Frank James, Moore tried to help a former gang member named John Powell (Stanley Andrews) develop a silver mine. Part of the mine’s proceeds were to be used to pay back victims of James Gang robberies, but the plan was derailed by a crooked mining engineer (John Crawford), who discovered the mine contained gold instead of silver and murdered Powell to keep this find secret. Crawford then used every trick in the book to keep Moore, Darrell, and Noel Neill (as Powell’s daughter) from developing the mine, but the James Boys unmasked his treachery by the end. Frank and Jesse James drew heavily on stock footage and plot elements from Republic’s earlier Adventures of Red Ryder, and was thus more predictable than its predecessor, but it was still an entertaining and well-made serial. Moore again made Jesse seem both sympathetic and (when fighting the bad guys) somewhat frightening.

 

By now, Moore was established as Republic’s premiere serial hero; however, his next cliffhanger would lead to his departure from the studio and change the course of his career. The last in a long line of Republic Zorro serials, Ghost of Zorro (1949) starred Moore as Ken Mason, the original Zorro’s grandson, who donned his ancestor’s mask to help a telegraph company establish a line in the wild West in the face of outlaw sabotage. Like Adventures of Frank and Jesse James, the serial was somewhat derivative of earlier outings (particularly Son of Zorro), but smoothly and professionally done. Moore delivered another strong performance, but for some odd reason Republic chose to have his voice dubbed by another actor in scenes where he was masked as Zorro. This strange production decision did not diminish Moore’s potential as a masked hero in the eyes of a group of television producers who were trying to find an actor to play the Lone Ranger on a soon-to-be-launched TV show; Moore’s turn in Ghost of Zorro landed him the part. Moore debuted as the Ranger in 1949, and played the part for two seasons on TV. During this period, he did make one apparent serial appearance in Flying Disc Man From Mars (Republic, 1950), but all his footage actually came from The Crimson Ghost.

 

In 1952, Moore was dropped from The Lone Ranger without any explanation from the producers, who apparently feared that Moore was becoming too identified as the Lone Ranger, and that he might become so sure of his position that he’d ask for a bigger salary. John Hart replaced Moore as the Ranger for the show’s third season, and Moore returned to freelance acting. He played numerous small roles in feature films, made multiple guest appearances (usually as a heavy) on TV shows like Range Rider and The Gene Autry Show, and also found time to make four more serials.

The first of these was Radar Men from the Moon (Republic, 1952), which featured Moore as a gangster named Graber, who was working with lunar invaders to bring the Earth under the dominion of Retik, Emperor of the Moon (Roy Barcroft). Scientist “Commando” Cody (George Wallace) opposed the planned conquest with the aid of his flying rocket suit and other handy gadgets. Moore met a fiery demise when his car plummeted off a cliff in the last chapter, and Retik came to a similarly sticky end shortly thereafter. Moore’s characterization in Radar Men from the Moon was reminiscent of his performance as “Ashe;” once again he performed deeds of villainy with swaggering relish.

 

Moore’s next serial, Columbia’s Son of Geronimo (1952), was his first non-Republic cliffhanger. He returned to playing a hero in this outing, an undercover cavalry officer named Jim Scott out to quell an Indian uprising led by Rodd Redwing as Porico, son of Geronimo. The uprising was being encouraged by outlaws John Crawford and Marshall Reed to serve their own ends, and Scott and Porico ultimately joined forces to defeat them. Son of Geronimo remains one of the few popular late Columbia serials, due to its strong and unusually violent action scenes and the forceful performances of Moore and his co-stars, particularly Reed and Redwing.

 

Moore’s last Republic serial was Jungle Drums of Africa (1952), in which he played Alan King, an American mining engineer developing a valuable uranium deposit in the African jungles. Moore was assisted by lady doctor Phyllis Coates and fellow engineer Johnny Sands and opposed by a group of Communist spies (Henry Rowland, John Cason) and their witch-doctor accomplice (Roy Glenn). While Drums drew extensively on stock shots of African animals to augment its jungle atmosphere, it relied to an unusually large extent on original footage for its action scenes and chapter endings, and the result was a modestly-budgeted but enjoyable serial that served as a good finish to Moore’s career at Republic.

 

Gunfighters of the Northwest (Columbia, 1953), Moore’s final serial, cast him as the second lead, a Mountie named Bram Nevin who backed up RCMP Sergeant Jock Mahoney. Moore, in his first and only “sidekick” role, played well off Mahoney; while the latter’s character was the focus of the serial’s action, Moore’s role was really more that of co-hero than of a traditional sidekick. The serial pitted the two leads against the “White Horse Rebels,” a gang of outlaws trying to overthrow the Canadian government. Though thinly-plotted, Gunfighters, with its nice location photography and good acting, was the last really interesting Columbia serial; it was also Moore’s last serial. In 1954, he returned to the Lone Ranger series, its producers having been forced to realize that Moore was firmly established as the Ranger and that audiences wouldn’t warm up to his substitute John Hart. The fourth and fifth seasons of the show featured Moore in his familiar place as the “daring and resourceful masked rider of the plains.”

 

After the Lone Ranger series ended in 1956, Moore reprised the role in two big-screen movies and then retired from acting. He remained in the public view, however, making personal appearances throughout the country in his Lone Ranger garb. Publicly and privately, he upheld the ideals that the Lone Ranger–and his serial heroes–had upheld on the screen: courage, charity, and a sense of justice. In 1979, he was barred by court order from making personal appearances as the Lone Ranger because the property’s owners worried that Moore’s close identification with the character would undercut a new Lone Ranger film. Moore nevertheless maintained his status as the “real” Lone Ranger in the eyes of fans, and, after the failure of the new Ranger feature, he was allowed to resume his mask in 1984. Moore died in Los Angeles in 1999, leaving behind several generations of fans that honored him not only for his TV persona, but for the kindess that characterized the off-screen man behind the mask.

Part of Clayton Moore’s success as the Lone Ranger was due to his respectful attitude towards the character. While some actors would have had a hard time taking a masked cowboy from a children’s radio show seriously, Moore’s performance was as heartfelt as if he had been playing a Shakespearian role; he gave the part all the benefit of his considerable acting talent. Moore played his cliffhanger roles, heroic and villainous, with the same respect and the same wholeheartedness. It’s no wonder that serial fans hold him in the same high regard that the Lone Ranger’s fans do.

  

Larry Carlton and Robben Ford 'Cold Cold'

www.youtube.com/watch?v=f64XZRRs0jA

   

youtu.be/syvF_cutj8w

It's 1865 and the telegraph is heading west. George Crane, wanting to keep law and order out of his territory, is out to stop the construction. The engineer on the job is Ken Mason and he is the grandson of Zorro. As Crane sends his men or Indians to stop the work, Mason repeatedly puts on the Zorro costume and rides to the rescue in this 12-chapter serial.

 

Clayton Moore

September 14th, 1914 — December 28th, 1999

 

Clayton Moore, though best remembered today as television’s Lone Ranger, had a lengthy and distinguished career in serials. Moore was a physically ideal serial lead, but his greatest strengths were his dramatic, quietly intense speaking voice and expressive face. These gifts helped Moore to convey a sincerity that could make the most unbelievable dialogue or situations seem real. The bulk of Moore’s cliffhanger work was done after World War 2, when serials’ shrinking budgets cut back on original action scenes and made the presence of skilled leading players more important than in the serial’s golden age. Moore, with his sincerity and acting skill, was just the type of actor the post-war serials needed.

Clayton Moore was born Jack Carlton Moore in Chicago. He began to train for a career as a circus acrobat at the age of eight, and joined a trapeze act called the Flying Behrs after finishing high school; as a member of the Behrs, Moore would perform for two circuses and at the 1934 World’s Fair. An injury to his left leg around 1935 forced him out of the aerialist business, and after working briefly as a male model in New York he moved to Hollywood in 1937, beginning his film career as a stuntman. He played numerous bit roles in addition to his stunt work for the next three years, among them a miniscule part in his first serial, Zorro’s Fighting Legion (Republic, 1939), as one of the members of the titular group. Edward Small, an independent producer allied with United Artists, cast Moore in his first credited parts in a pair of 1940 films, Kit Carson and The Son of Monte Cristo. The former featured Moore as a heroic young pioneer, the latter as an army officer aiding masked avenger Louis Hayward. Following these two films, Moore began to get credited speaking parts in other pictures. In 1941 he played the romantic lead in Tuxedo Junction, one of Republic Pictures’ “Weaver Brothers and Elviry” comedies, and the next year the studio signed him for his first starring serial, Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942).

Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942) was a vehicle for Republic’s new “Serial Queen,” Kay Aldridge, who played Nyoka Gordon, a girl seeking her missing scientist father in the deserts of North Africa. Moore was the heroic Dr. Larry Grayson, a member of an expedition searching for the “Tablets of Hippocrates,” an ancient list of medical cures sought by Nyoka’s father before he disappeared. Nyoka joined forces with Grayson and his expedition to locate Professor Gordon and the tablets–and to battle Arab ruler Vultura (Lorna Gray) and her band of desert cutthroats, who were after the Tablets and the treasure hidden with them. Perils of Nyoka was a highly exciting serial, with consistently imaginative and varied action sequences, and colorful characters and locales. Although Moore took second billing to Aldridge, his character received as much screen time as hers and his performance was a major part of the serial’s success. Moore, with his intense sincerity, made his nearly superhuman physician character believable; the audience never felt like questioning Dr. Grayson’s ability to perform emergency brain surgery on Nyoka’s amnesiac father in a desert cave, or his amazing powers of riding, wall-scaling, marksmanship, and sword-fighting, far beyond those of the average medical school graduate.

  

Moore went into the army in 1942, almost immediately after the release of Perils of Nyoka. He served throughout World War Two, and didn’t resume his film career until 1946, when he returned to Republic Pictures to appear in The Crimson Ghost. The impact of his starring turn in Perils of Nyoka was diminished by his long hiatus, and he found himself playing a supporting role in this new serial. He was cast as Ashe, the chief henchman of the mysterious Crimson Ghost, and aided that villain in his attempts to steal a counter-atomic weapon called a “Cyclotrode.” Ashe was ultimately brought to justice, along with his nefarious master, by stars Charles Quigley and Linda Stirling. The Crimson Ghost showed that Moore could play intensely mean villains as well as intensely courageous heroes. His sneering, bullying Ashe came off as thoroughly unpleasant, as he stalked through the serial doing his best to kill off hero and heroine.

  

Moore returned to heroic parts in his next cliffhanger, Jesse James Rides Again (Republic, 1947). The serial’s plot had Jesse, retired from outlawry, forced to go on the run because of new crimes committed in his name. Jesse and his pal Steve (John Compton) wound up in Tennessee, where, under the alias of “Mr. Howard,” Jesse came to the aid of a group of farmers victimized by an outlaw gang called the Black Raiders. The Raiders, secretly bossed by local businessman Jim Clark (Tristram Coffin), were after oil reserves beneath the local farmland, but Mr. Howard ultimately outgunned them. James’ own identity was exposed in the process, but he was allowed to escape arrest by a sympathetic marshal. Jesse James Rides Again was Republic’s best post-war Western serial, thanks in part to the unusual plot device of an ex-badman hero. Moore was able to give Jesse James a dangerous edge that most other serial leads couldn’t have pulled off; his cold, steely-eyed glare when gunning down villains seemed very much in keeping with dialogue references to Jesse’s outlaw past.

 

G-Men Never Forget (Republic, 1947), Moore’s next serial, cast him as Ted O’Hara, an FBI agent battling a racketeer boss named Vic Murkland (Roy Barcroft). O’Hara broke up various protection rackets organized by Murkland, but his efforts were hampered by Murkland’s impersonation of a kidnaped police commissioner (also played by Barcroft). G-Men Never Forget possessed a tough and realistic atmosphere not typical of gang-busting serials, and Moore delivered a grimly determined performance well-fitted to the serial’s mood. Moore’s acting, good supporting performances, skilled direction, and a well-written script made G-Men Never Forget a superior serial, one that could hold its own against earlier gang-busting chapterplays like the Dick Tracy outings.

 

Moore’s next serial was Adventures of Frank and Jesse James (Republic, 1948), in which he reprised his Jesse James role. Joined this time by Steve Darrell as Frank James, Moore tried to help a former gang member named John Powell (Stanley Andrews) develop a silver mine. Part of the mine’s proceeds were to be used to pay back victims of James Gang robberies, but the plan was derailed by a crooked mining engineer (John Crawford), who discovered the mine contained gold instead of silver and murdered Powell to keep this find secret. Crawford then used every trick in the book to keep Moore, Darrell, and Noel Neill (as Powell’s daughter) from developing the mine, but the James Boys unmasked his treachery by the end. Frank and Jesse James drew heavily on stock footage and plot elements from Republic’s earlier Adventures of Red Ryder, and was thus more predictable than its predecessor, but it was still an entertaining and well-made serial. Moore again made Jesse seem both sympathetic and (when fighting the bad guys) somewhat frightening.

 

By now, Moore was established as Republic’s premiere serial hero; however, his next cliffhanger would lead to his departure from the studio and change the course of his career. The last in a long line of Republic Zorro serials, Ghost of Zorro (1949) starred Moore as Ken Mason, the original Zorro’s grandson, who donned his ancestor’s mask to help a telegraph company establish a line in the wild West in the face of outlaw sabotage. Like Adventures of Frank and Jesse James, the serial was somewhat derivative of earlier outings (particularly Son of Zorro), but smoothly and professionally done. Moore delivered another strong performance, but for some odd reason Republic chose to have his voice dubbed by another actor in scenes where he was masked as Zorro. This strange production decision did not diminish Moore’s potential as a masked hero in the eyes of a group of television producers who were trying to find an actor to play the Lone Ranger on a soon-to-be-launched TV show; Moore’s turn in Ghost of Zorro landed him the part. Moore debuted as the Ranger in 1949, and played the part for two seasons on TV. During this period, he did make one apparent serial appearance in Flying Disc Man From Mars (Republic, 1950), but all his footage actually came from The Crimson Ghost.

 

In 1952, Moore was dropped from The Lone Ranger without any explanation from the producers, who apparently feared that Moore was becoming too identified as the Lone Ranger, and that he might become so sure of his position that he’d ask for a bigger salary. John Hart replaced Moore as the Ranger for the show’s third season, and Moore returned to freelance acting. He played numerous small roles in feature films, made multiple guest appearances (usually as a heavy) on TV shows like Range Rider and The Gene Autry Show, and also found time to make four more serials.

The first of these was Radar Men from the Moon (Republic, 1952), which featured Moore as a gangster named Graber, who was working with lunar invaders to bring the Earth under the dominion of Retik, Emperor of the Moon (Roy Barcroft). Scientist “Commando” Cody (George Wallace) opposed the planned conquest with the aid of his flying rocket suit and other handy gadgets. Moore met a fiery demise when his car plummeted off a cliff in the last chapter, and Retik came to a similarly sticky end shortly thereafter. Moore’s characterization in Radar Men from the Moon was reminiscent of his performance as “Ashe;” once again he performed deeds of villainy with swaggering relish.

 

Moore’s next serial, Columbia’s Son of Geronimo (1952), was his first non-Republic cliffhanger. He returned to playing a hero in this outing, an undercover cavalry officer named Jim Scott out to quell an Indian uprising led by Rodd Redwing as Porico, son of Geronimo. The uprising was being encouraged by outlaws John Crawford and Marshall Reed to serve their own ends, and Scott and Porico ultimately joined forces to defeat them. Son of Geronimo remains one of the few popular late Columbia serials, due to its strong and unusually violent action scenes and the forceful performances of Moore and his co-stars, particularly Reed and Redwing.

 

Moore’s last Republic serial was Jungle Drums of Africa (1952), in which he played Alan King, an American mining engineer developing a valuable uranium deposit in the African jungles. Moore was assisted by lady doctor Phyllis Coates and fellow engineer Johnny Sands and opposed by a group of Communist spies (Henry Rowland, John Cason) and their witch-doctor accomplice (Roy Glenn). While Drums drew extensively on stock shots of African animals to augment its jungle atmosphere, it relied to an unusually large extent on original footage for its action scenes and chapter endings, and the result was a modestly-budgeted but enjoyable serial that served as a good finish to Moore’s career at Republic.

 

Gunfighters of the Northwest (Columbia, 1953), Moore’s final serial, cast him as the second lead, a Mountie named Bram Nevin who backed up RCMP Sergeant Jock Mahoney. Moore, in his first and only “sidekick” role, played well off Mahoney; while the latter’s character was the focus of the serial’s action, Moore’s role was really more that of co-hero than of a traditional sidekick. The serial pitted the two leads against the “White Horse Rebels,” a gang of outlaws trying to overthrow the Canadian government. Though thinly-plotted, Gunfighters, with its nice location photography and good acting, was the last really interesting Columbia serial; it was also Moore’s last serial. In 1954, he returned to the Lone Ranger series, its producers having been forced to realize that Moore was firmly established as the Ranger and that audiences wouldn’t warm up to his substitute John Hart. The fourth and fifth seasons of the show featured Moore in his familiar place as the “daring and resourceful masked rider of the plains.”

 

After the Lone Ranger series ended in 1956, Moore reprised the role in two big-screen movies and then retired from acting. He remained in the public view, however, making personal appearances throughout the country in his Lone Ranger garb. Publicly and privately, he upheld the ideals that the Lone Ranger–and his serial heroes–had upheld on the screen: courage, charity, and a sense of justice. In 1979, he was barred by court order from making personal appearances as the Lone Ranger because the property’s owners worried that Moore’s close identification with the character would undercut a new Lone Ranger film. Moore nevertheless maintained his status as the “real” Lone Ranger in the eyes of fans, and, after the failure of the new Ranger feature, he was allowed to resume his mask in 1984. Moore died in Los Angeles in 1999, leaving behind several generations of fans that honored him not only for his TV persona, but for the kindess that characterized the off-screen man behind the mask.

Part of Clayton Moore’s success as the Lone Ranger was due to his respectful attitude towards the character. While some actors would have had a hard time taking a masked cowboy from a children’s radio show seriously, Moore’s performance was as heartfelt as if he had been playing a Shakespearian role; he gave the part all the benefit of his considerable acting talent. Moore played his cliffhanger roles, heroic and villainous, with the same respect and the same wholeheartedness. It’s no wonder that serial fans hold him in the same high regard that the Lone Ranger’s fans do.

  

  

youtu.be/syvF_cutj8w

It's 1865 and the telegraph is heading west. George Crane, wanting to keep law and order out of his territory, is out to stop the construction. The engineer on the job is Ken Mason and he is the grandson of Zorro. As Crane sends his men or Indians to stop the work, Mason repeatedly puts on the Zorro costume and rides to the rescue in this 12-chapter serial.

 

Clayton Moore

September 14th, 1914 — December 28th, 1999

 

Clayton Moore, though best remembered today as television’s Lone Ranger, had a lengthy and distinguished career in serials. Moore was a physically ideal serial lead, but his greatest strengths were his dramatic, quietly intense speaking voice and expressive face. These gifts helped Moore to convey a sincerity that could make the most unbelievable dialogue or situations seem real. The bulk of Moore’s cliffhanger work was done after World War 2, when serials’ shrinking budgets cut back on original action scenes and made the presence of skilled leading players more important than in the serial’s golden age. Moore, with his sincerity and acting skill, was just the type of actor the post-war serials needed.

Clayton Moore was born Jack Carlton Moore in Chicago. He began to train for a career as a circus acrobat at the age of eight, and joined a trapeze act called the Flying Behrs after finishing high school; as a member of the Behrs, Moore would perform for two circuses and at the 1934 World’s Fair. An injury to his left leg around 1935 forced him out of the aerialist business, and after working briefly as a male model in New York he moved to Hollywood in 1937, beginning his film career as a stuntman. He played numerous bit roles in addition to his stunt work for the next three years, among them a miniscule part in his first serial, Zorro’s Fighting Legion (Republic, 1939), as one of the members of the titular group. Edward Small, an independent producer allied with United Artists, cast Moore in his first credited parts in a pair of 1940 films, Kit Carson and The Son of Monte Cristo. The former featured Moore as a heroic young pioneer, the latter as an army officer aiding masked avenger Louis Hayward. Following these two films, Moore began to get credited speaking parts in other pictures. In 1941 he played the romantic lead in Tuxedo Junction, one of Republic Pictures’ “Weaver Brothers and Elviry” comedies, and the next year the studio signed him for his first starring serial, Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942).

Perils of Nyoka (Republic, 1942) was a vehicle for Republic’s new “Serial Queen,” Kay Aldridge, who played Nyoka Gordon, a girl seeking her missing scientist father in the deserts of North Africa. Moore was the heroic Dr. Larry Grayson, a member of an expedition searching for the “Tablets of Hippocrates,” an ancient list of medical cures sought by Nyoka’s father before he disappeared. Nyoka joined forces with Grayson and his expedition to locate Professor Gordon and the tablets–and to battle Arab ruler Vultura (Lorna Gray) and her band of desert cutthroats, who were after the Tablets and the treasure hidden with them. Perils of Nyoka was a highly exciting serial, with consistently imaginative and varied action sequences, and colorful characters and locales. Although Moore took second billing to Aldridge, his character received as much screen time as hers and his performance was a major part of the serial’s success. Moore, with his intense sincerity, made his nearly superhuman physician character believable; the audience never felt like questioning Dr. Grayson’s ability to perform emergency brain surgery on Nyoka’s amnesiac father in a desert cave, or his amazing powers of riding, wall-scaling, marksmanship, and sword-fighting, far beyond those of the average medical school graduate.

  

Moore went into the army in 1942, almost immediately after the release of Perils of Nyoka. He served throughout World War Two, and didn’t resume his film career until 1946, when he returned to Republic Pictures to appear in The Crimson Ghost. The impact of his starring turn in Perils of Nyoka was diminished by his long hiatus, and he found himself playing a supporting role in this new serial. He was cast as Ashe, the chief henchman of the mysterious Crimson Ghost, and aided that villain in his attempts to steal a counter-atomic weapon called a “Cyclotrode.” Ashe was ultimately brought to justice, along with his nefarious master, by stars Charles Quigley and Linda Stirling. The Crimson Ghost showed that Moore could play intensely mean villains as well as intensely courageous heroes. His sneering, bullying Ashe came off as thoroughly unpleasant, as he stalked through the serial doing his best to kill off hero and heroine.

  

Moore returned to heroic parts in his next cliffhanger, Jesse James Rides Again (Republic, 1947). The serial’s plot had Jesse, retired from outlawry, forced to go on the run because of new crimes committed in his name. Jesse and his pal Steve (John Compton) wound up in Tennessee, where, under the alias of “Mr. Howard,” Jesse came to the aid of a group of farmers victimized by an outlaw gang called the Black Raiders. The Raiders, secretly bossed by local businessman Jim Clark (Tristram Coffin), were after oil reserves beneath the local farmland, but Mr. Howard ultimately outgunned them. James’ own identity was exposed in the process, but he was allowed to escape arrest by a sympathetic marshal. Jesse James Rides Again was Republic’s best post-war Western serial, thanks in part to the unusual plot device of an ex-badman hero. Moore was able to give Jesse James a dangerous edge that most other serial leads couldn’t have pulled off; his cold, steely-eyed glare when gunning down villains seemed very much in keeping with dialogue references to Jesse’s outlaw past.

 

G-Men Never Forget (Republic, 1947), Moore’s next serial, cast him as Ted O’Hara, an FBI agent battling a racketeer boss named Vic Murkland (Roy Barcroft). O’Hara broke up various protection rackets organized by Murkland, but his efforts were hampered by Murkland’s impersonation of a kidnaped police commissioner (also played by Barcroft). G-Men Never Forget possessed a tough and realistic atmosphere not typical of gang-busting serials, and Moore delivered a grimly determined performance well-fitted to the serial’s mood. Moore’s acting, good supporting performances, skilled direction, and a well-written script made G-Men Never Forget a superior serial, one that could hold its own against earlier gang-busting chapterplays like the Dick Tracy outings.

 

Moore’s next serial was Adventures of Frank and Jesse James (Republic, 1948), in which he reprised his Jesse James role. Joined this time by Steve Darrell as Frank James, Moore tried to help a former gang member named John Powell (Stanley Andrews) develop a silver mine. Part of the mine’s proceeds were to be used to pay back victims of James Gang robberies, but the plan was derailed by a crooked mining engineer (John Crawford), who discovered the mine contained gold instead of silver and murdered Powell to keep this find secret. Crawford then used every trick in the book to keep Moore, Darrell, and Noel Neill (as Powell’s daughter) from developing the mine, but the James Boys unmasked his treachery by the end. Frank and Jesse James drew heavily on stock footage and plot elements from Republic’s earlier Adventures of Red Ryder, and was thus more predictable than its predecessor, but it was still an entertaining and well-made serial. Moore again made Jesse seem both sympathetic and (when fighting the bad guys) somewhat frightening.

 

By now, Moore was established as Republic’s premiere serial hero; however, his next cliffhanger would lead to his departure from the studio and change the course of his career. The last in a long line of Republic Zorro serials, Ghost of Zorro (1949) starred Moore as Ken Mason, the original Zorro’s grandson, who donned his ancestor’s mask to help a telegraph company establish a line in the wild West in the face of outlaw sabotage. Like Adventures of Frank and Jesse James, the serial was somewhat derivative of earlier outings (particularly Son of Zorro), but smoothly and professionally done. Moore delivered another strong performance, but for some odd reason Republic chose to have his voice dubbed by another actor in scenes where he was masked as Zorro. This strange production decision did not diminish Moore’s potential as a masked hero in the eyes of a group of television producers who were trying to find an actor to play the Lone Ranger on a soon-to-be-launched TV show; Moore’s turn in Ghost of Zorro landed him the part. Moore debuted as the Ranger in 1949, and played the part for two seasons on TV. During this period, he did make one apparent serial appearance in Flying Disc Man From Mars (Republic, 1950), but all his footage actually came from The Crimson Ghost.

 

In 1952, Moore was dropped from The Lone Ranger without any explanation from the producers, who apparently feared that Moore was becoming too identified as the Lone Ranger, and that he might become so sure of his position that he’d ask for a bigger salary. John Hart replaced Moore as the Ranger for the show’s third season, and Moore returned to freelance acting. He played numerous small roles in feature films, made multiple guest appearances (usually as a heavy) on TV shows like Range Rider and The Gene Autry Show, and also found time to make four more serials.

The first of these was Radar Men from the Moon (Republic, 1952), which featured Moore as a gangster named Graber, who was working with lunar invaders to bring the Earth under the dominion of Retik, Emperor of the Moon (Roy Barcroft). Scientist “Commando” Cody (George Wallace) opposed the planned conquest with the aid of his flying rocket suit and other handy gadgets. Moore met a fiery demise when his car plummeted off a cliff in the last chapter, and Retik came to a similarly sticky end shortly thereafter. Moore’s characterization in Radar Men from the Moon was reminiscent of his performance as “Ashe;” once again he performed deeds of villainy with swaggering relish.

 

Moore’s next serial, Columbia’s Son of Geronimo (1952), was his first non-Republic cliffhanger. He returned to playing a hero in this outing, an undercover cavalry officer named Jim Scott out to quell an Indian uprising led by Rodd Redwing as Porico, son of Geronimo. The uprising was being encouraged by outlaws John Crawford and Marshall Reed to serve their own ends, and Scott and Porico ultimately joined forces to defeat them. Son of Geronimo remains one of the few popular late Columbia serials, due to its strong and unusually violent action scenes and the forceful performances of Moore and his co-stars, particularly Reed and Redwing.

 

Moore’s last Republic serial was Jungle Drums of Africa (1952), in which he played Alan King, an American mining engineer developing a valuable uranium deposit in the African jungles. Moore was assisted by lady doctor Phyllis Coates and fellow engineer Johnny Sands and opposed by a group of Communist spies (Henry Rowland, John Cason) and their witch-doctor accomplice (Roy Glenn). While Drums drew extensively on stock shots of African animals to augment its jungle atmosphere, it relied to an unusually large extent on original footage for its action scenes and chapter endings, and the result was a modestly-budgeted but enjoyable serial that served as a good finish to Moore’s career at Republic.

 

Gunfighters of the Northwest (Columbia, 1953), Moore’s final serial, cast him as the second lead, a Mountie named Bram Nevin who backed up RCMP Sergeant Jock Mahoney. Moore, in his first and only “sidekick” role, played well off Mahoney; while the latter’s character was the focus of the serial’s action, Moore’s role was really more that of co-hero than of a traditional sidekick. The serial pitted the two leads against the “White Horse Rebels,” a gang of outlaws trying to overthrow the Canadian government. Though thinly-plotted, Gunfighters, with its nice location photography and good acting, was the last really interesting Columbia serial; it was also Moore’s last serial. In 1954, he returned to the Lone Ranger series, its producers having been forced to realize that Moore was firmly established as the Ranger and that audiences wouldn’t warm up to his substitute John Hart. The fourth and fifth seasons of the show featured Moore in his familiar place as the “daring and resourceful masked rider of the plains.”

 

After the Lone Ranger series ended in 1956, Moore reprised the role in two big-screen movies and then retired from acting. He remained in the public view, however, making personal appearances throughout the country in his Lone Ranger garb. Publicly and privately, he upheld the ideals that the Lone Ranger–and his serial heroes–had upheld on the screen: courage, charity, and a sense of justice. In 1979, he was barred by court order from making personal appearances as the Lone Ranger because the property’s owners worried that Moore’s close identification with the character would undercut a new Lone Ranger film. Moore nevertheless maintained his status as the “real” Lone Ranger in the eyes of fans, and, after the failure of the new Ranger feature, he was allowed to resume his mask in 1984. Moore died in Los Angeles in 1999, leaving behind several generations of fans that honored him not only for his TV persona, but for the kindess that characterized the off-screen man behind the mask.

Part of Clayton Moore’s success as the Lone Ranger was due to his respectful attitude towards the character. While some actors would have had a hard time taking a masked cowboy from a children’s radio show seriously, Moore’s performance was as heartfelt as if he had been playing a Shakespearian role; he gave the part all the benefit of his considerable acting talent. Moore played his cliffhanger roles, heroic and villainous, with the same respect and the same wholeheartedness. It’s no wonder that serial fans hold him in the same high regard that the Lone Ranger’s fans do.

  

Fifth Avenue, Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

 

The Aeolian Building was constructed in 1925-27 to the design of architects Warren & Wetmore for the Gould Realty Co., controlled by Commodore Charles A. Gould, a wealthy iron and steel manufacturer and property owner (who died in 1926). Awarded a gold medal by the Fifth Avenue Association prior to its completion, the building was sold at public auction in 1927 and acquired as an investment by Gould's daughter, Celia Gould Milne, who retained it until 1944. The building was leased until 1938 as the headquarters of the Aeolian Co., a leading manufacturer of roll-operated instruments. The firm of Warren & Wetmore is best known for its designs for hotels and railroad-related buildings, notably Grand Central Terminal. Designed in a restrained and graceful neoclassical style with French Renaissance style detailing, the Aeolian Building is clad in Indiana limestone with Italian marble spandrel panels, and buff-colored terra cotta on the upper portion. Following the requirements of the 1916 Zoning Resolution, itrises nine stories before setting back on the tenth, twelfth, and fourteenth stories. The comer of the building is rounded on the lower nine stories, while the upper portions feature angles and concave curves. Bronze and carved garlands and other decorative elements adorn the structure, and large urns surmount the ninth story. A tower with a pyramidal roof (covered in copper) with a lantern rises in front of a two-story penthouse/mechanical section. The building was called by Paul Goldberger in the New York Times in 1984 "a lyrical... gem... that may be the city's most inventive merging of modem commercial design with French and classical architectural detail... as good a reminder as New York has that architecture can be exuberant and fanciful yet discreet and well-mannered."

 

Since 1930, this has been the location of the flagship Elizabeth Arden Red Door Salon. Florence Nightingale Graham (1878-1966) took the professional name of Elizabeth Arden in 1910 when she opened a Fifth Avenue salon. One of the pioneers of the women's cosmetics and beauty business, she became one of the most successful American businesswomen of all time. Elizabeth Arden, Inc., owned this building from 1944 to 1969.

  

Aeolian Building '

 

In February 1925, the Gould Realty Co. purchased the property that was the site of the William G. Rockefeller residence (1876) at the northeast comer of Fifth Avenue and East 54,h Street. The parcel, considered by the New York Times "one of the most valuable in the section" of upper Fifth Avenue, sold for SI.6 million. The Gould Realty Co. was controlled by Commodore Charles Albert Gould (1849-1926), a wealthy iron and steel manufacturer and New York property owner. Born in Batavia, New York, Gould began a career as an accountant and Republican politician in Buffalo. He acquired a steam forge in 1884, then built his own iron and steel forge three years later. Gould decided to specialize in the manufacture of iron and steel products for railroads. He established the Gould Coupler Co. (to make automatic railroad car couplers) in New York and the Gould Steel Co. in Indiana in 1892. The malleable iron and steel works were relocated after 1895 to a large tract in a new town, later called Depew, New York, when it was joined by the yards and shops of the New York Central Railroad. After Gould's move to New York City, he founded the Gould Realty Co. and Gould Securities Co. to handle his real estate acquisitions, which were worth nearly $7 million at the time of his death. Gould commissioned a new facade for his former residence at 714 Fifth Avenue (1907-08, Woodruff Leeming); the building was leased in 1910 to perfumer Francois Coty as his American headquarters." Among Gould's other properties were No. 126-128 'Fifth Avenue (1905-06, Robert Maynicke) and No. 396-398 Broadway (1898-99, William H. Birkmire).

 

In March 1925, it was announced thatthe Aeolian Co., a leading manufacturer of roll-operated instruments, had signed a 63 -year lease for $ 12 million and would occupy most of the new building to be constructed by Gould, with display spaces for instruments, a small recital hall, executive offices, a library, and an artists' room. The proposed building was initially described as in the "Francis I" style. Warren & Wetmore, the architects df Aeolian Hall (1912-13), 33 West 42n<l Street, and, more recently, Steinway Hall (1924-25), 109-1 13 West57m Street, for the Steinway & Sons piano company, were selected as architects and filed in July 1925 for a fourteen-story building, expected to cost $1 million. Construction began in October 1925, with the James Baird Construction Co. as builder. Commodore Gould died, however, in January 1926. The Aeolian Buildingwas awarded a gold medal, for best new building within the Fifth Avenue district, by the Fifth Avenue Association at the end of 1926. The Real Estate Record & Guide opined that

 

The new Aeolian Building is a graceful addition to the music and art center which dominates the development of upper Fifth Avenue in the neighborhood of Fifty-seventh Street. Every effort was made by the architects to design a structure in keeping with the traditions of the Aeolian Company... and at the same time expressive of the relation of their interests to the musical arts. This desire, together with the necessity for erecting a practical and modern office and studio building, produced the present structure. B

 

The building was completed in January 1927, at a cost of about SI.55 million.' At its dedication in February 1927, architect Whitney Warren expressed the hope thatthe building conveyed something of a sense of "a little rest, a little peace, a simplicity complete, a dream realized" on Fifth Avenue, while Michael Friedsam, president of the Fifth Avenue Association, stated that "this splendid building is a Fifth Avenue-New York message of inspiration and good-will to the country. Such beautiful structures as this insure to our common country the commercial leadership of the world." The building was featured in Architecture & Building and The Architect in 1927.

 

Designed in a restrained and graceful neoclassical style with French Renaissance style detailing, the Aeolian Building is clad in Indiana limestone with Italian marble spandrel panels, and a buff-colored terra-cotta-clad upper portion. The terra cotta was manufactured by 1he Federal Terra Cotta Co. Following the 1916 Zoning Resolution, the building rises nine stories before setting back on the tenth, twelfth, and fourteenth stories. The corner of the building is rounded on the lower nine stories, while the upper portions feature angles and concave curves. Bronze and carved garlands and other decorative elements adorn the structure, window sash and frames are bronze, and large urns surmount the ninth story. A tower with a pyramidal roof (covered in copper) with an open lantern rises in front of a two-story penthouse and mechanical floor section.

 

The Aeolian Building demonstrates Warren & Wetmore's success in the design of setbacks and picturesque towers. Because few buildings were constructed in New York City during World War I and the following recession, tall buildings erected in the 1920s, such as this building, were among the first to reflect the provisions of the Zoning Resolution, including setbacks on the upper stories. Skyscraper architects, including Warren & Wetmore, thus became "sculptors in building masses," as remarked by architect Harvey Wiley Corbett. The curved and angled upper portions and the tower that cap the Aeolian Building follow in the long tradition in New York of tall buildings with embellished terminations. The graceful classical style, materials, setbacks and massing, picturesque upper portions and tower, and ornamentation add distinction to the Aeolian Building and make it a monumental architectural presence along the commercial and cultural corridor of Fifth Avenue in the 50s. The building was called by Paul Goldberger in the New York Times in 1984

 

a lyrical... gem... that may be the city's most inventive merging of modern commercial design with French and classical architectural detail., as good a reminder as New York has that architecture can be exuberant and fancijul yet discreet and well- mannered.

 

Under the stipulations of Commodore Gould's will, his various properties were sold at auction, in January 1927. The New York Times commented that "this is believed to be the first time on record that a gold medal building has ever been offered at absolute public auction." One of the most widely noted auctions of its type, attended by many prominent real estate operators, the properties garnered a total of some $6.7 million for the Gould Estate. The Aeolian Building was acquired as an investment by his daughter, Celia Adelaide Gould Milne, for $3 million, leading the Times to note that "the price paid for the property establishes a new square foot value of $432 for land and building in that vicinity." In February 1927, the property was conveyed by the Gould Estate to the Milne Security and Realty Corp. That entity, and its subsidiary, the 689 Fifth Avenue Corp., owned the building until 1944.

 

The Architects: Warren & Wetmore "

 

Whitney Warren (1864-1943), born in New York City, studied architectural drawing privately, attended Columbia College for a time, and continued his studies at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris from 1885 to 1894. Upon his return to New York, he worked in the office of McKim, Mead & White. One of Warren's country house clients was Charles Delavan Wetmore. Bom inElcnira,New York, Wetmore (1866-1941) was a graduate of Harvard University (1889) and Harvard Law School (1892), who had also studied architecture and had designed three dormitory buildings (c. 1890) on that campus before joining a law firm. Impressed by his client's architectural ability, Warren persuaded Wetmore to leave law and to establish Warren & Wetmore in 1898. While Warren was the principal designer of the firm and used his social connections to provide it with clients, Wetmore became the legal and financial specialist. Whitney Warren was also a founder of the Society of Beaux-Arts Architects and the Beaux-Arts Institute of Design.

 

Warren & Wetmore became a highly successful and prolific, largely commercial architectural firm, best known for its designs for hotels and for buildings commissioned by railroad companies. The firm's work was concentrated in New York City during the first three decades of the twentieth century, but it also received projects across the United States and overseas. The designs were mainly variations of the neo-Classical idiom, including essays in the Beaux- Arts and neo-Renaissance styles. Warren & Wetmore's first major commission, the result of a competition, was the flamboyant New York Yacht Club (1899-1900), 37 West 44,h Street. Early residences by the firm included town houses on the Upper East Side, such as the Marshall Orme Wilson House (1900-03), 3 East 64 Street; James A. and Florence S. Burden House (1902-05), 7 East 91s Street; and R. Livingston and Eleanor T. Beeckman House (1903-05), 854 Fifth Avenue. The firm of Warren & Wetmore was responsible for the design of the facades of the Chelsea Piers (1902-10, demolished) along the Hudson River between Little West 12th and West 23rd Streets; the Vanderbilt Hotel (1910-13), 4 Park Avenue, including the Delia Robbia Bar (with R. Guastavino Co. and Rookwood Pottery Co.); Aeolian Hall (1912-13); and a number of luxury apartment houses, such as No. 903 Park Avenue (1912).

 

Warren & Wetmore is most notably associated with the design of Grand Central Terminal (1903-13, with Reed & Stem and William J. Wilgus, engineer), East 42nd Street and Park Avenue, as well as a number of other projects in. its vicinity. Whitney Warren was the cousin of William K. Vanderbilt, chairman of the board of the New York Central Railroad, who was responsible for the firm's selection as chief designers. Nearby development by the firm over the span of two decades included: Hotel Belmont (1905-06, demolished); Ritz-Carlton Hotel (1910, demolished); Biltmore Hotel (1912-14, significantly altered), Vanderbilt Avenue and East 43rd Street; Park Avenue Viaduct (designed 1912, built 1917-19); Commodore Hotel (1916-19, significantly altered), 125 East 42nd Street; Equitable Trust Co. Building (1917-18), 347- 355 Madison Avenue; Hotel Ambassador (1921, demolished); and New York Central Building (1927- 29), 230 Park Avenue." With the firm's success with Grand Central Terminal came commissions for other railroad stations for the New York Central, Michigan Central, Canadian Northern, and Erie Railroads. Notable among these are the Fort Gary Station (1909), Winnepeg, Canada; Yonkers Railroad Station (1911); Union Station (1911-12), Houston; and Michigan Central Station (1913-14, with Reed &. Stem), Detroit.

 

The firm's later work displayed an increased interest in the "composition of architectural mass." Prominent later commissions included the Heckscher Building (1920-21), 730 Fifth Avenue; Plaza Hotel addition (1921), 2 Central Park South; Steinway Hall (1924-25); Aeolian Building (1925-27); Tower Building (1926), 200 Madison Avenue; Consolidated Edison Co. Building Tower (1926), 4 Irving Place; Erlanger Theater (1926-27), 246-256 West 44,h Street; and Stewart & Co. Building (1929, demolished), 721-725 Fifth Avenue. The Heckscher, Steinway, Aeolian, and Consolidated Edison Buildings, in particular, show the firm's success in its use of setbacks and picturesque towers. Little was constructed by the firm after 1930. Whitney Warren retired from Warren & Wetmore in 1931, butremained a consulting architect. Charles Wetmore was the firm's senior partner until the end of his life.

 

James Baird Construction Co.. Builder

 

The James Baird Construction Co. was established in New York City in 1925. James Baird (1873-1953), born in Kentucky, received a degree in civil engineering from the University of Michigan (1896). In 1899-1900, he was employed as a superintendent by the George A. Fuller Co. (founded in Chicago in 1882 by George Allon Fuller) and, in 1900-01, by the Thompson Starrett Co., both in New York. He returned to the Fuller Co. in 1902, and worked in the branch office in Boston. The George A. Fuller Co. moved its headquarters to New York and became a major force in the construction and promotion of tall office buildings in the city. The firm's offices were in the Fuller Building, better known as the Flatiron Building (1901-03, D.H. Burnham & Co.), Fifth Avenue and 23rd Street, for which Baird was credited with directing construction. From 1904 to 1910, he was in charge of the firm's work in Washington, D.C., and throughout the southeastern United States. Baird served as vice president of the Fuller concern from 1910 to 1922, and as president in 1922-24. He directed constructionofthe Commodore Hotel, and the Lincoln Memorial (1912-22, Henry Bacon), Washington, D.C. The James Baird Construction Co., of which Baird was president until his death, was responsible for the erection of the Aeolian Building; Freer Gallery of Art (1923-28, Charles A. Piatt), and Folger Shakespeare Library (1928-32, Paul Cret), Washington, D.C.; and the Brooklyn Printing Plant of the New York Times (1929-30, Albert Kahn), 59-75 Third Avenue. Baird moved to Arizona in 1933. He directed construction of temporary World War II buildings in Washington and elsewhere.

 

Fifth Avenue and West 57th Street Commercial and Cultural Center

 

For most of the nineteenth century, successive portions of Fifth Avenue enjoyed the reputation of being New York's most prestigious residential enclave. As the avenue was developed northward from Washington Square, its characterreflected the growth and change of Manhattan, with newer northerly residential sections followed closely by commercial redevelopment. After the Civil War, Fifth Avenue between 42nd and 59,h Streets was built up with town houses and mansions for New York's elite, yet by the turn of the century profound commercial change had occurred. One writer in 1907 commented that "among the many radical changes which have been brought about during the past six years in New York City, the most radical and the most significant are those which have taken place on Fifth Avenue. That thoroughfare has been completely transformed." Fifth Avenue became an elegant boulevard of prestigious retail shops, department stores, luxury hotels, and elite social clubs, as well as the center of American fashion. In the vicinity of the Aeolian Building are the St. Regis Hotel (1901-04, Trowbridge & Livingston; 1927, Sloan & Robertson), 699-703 Fifth Avenue; University Club (1896-1900, McKim, Mead & White), 1 West 54th Street; and Gotham Hotel (1902-05, Hiss & Weekes), 696-700 Fifth Avenue.

 

West 57th Street, particularly the blocks between Sixth Avenue and Broadway, also had a distinguished history, but one associated with the arts for over a century. As residences for the wealthy were constructed along Fifth Avenue and adjacent blocks, several early apartment houses were built on West 57,h Street in the 1880s that provided large studio space for artists, paving the way forthe neighborhood's eventual reputation as an artistic center. Carnegie Hall (1889- 91, William B. Tuthill), at the southeast corner of Seventh Avenue, became one of the nation's most legendary concert halls. The American Fine Arts Society Building (1891-92, Henry J. Hardenbergh), 215 West 57th Street, has been home to the Architectural League, Art Students League, and Society of American Artists, providing exhibition, classroom, and studio facilities; it was the site of "virtually every important exhibition of art and architecture held in the city" for many years. By the time the Louis H. Chalif Normal School of Dancing (1916, G.A. & H. Boehm), one of the earliest American schools to instruct teachers in dance, was built at 163-165 West 57th Street, it was said that the neighborhood "abounds in structures devoted to the cultivation of the arts." As indicated in the Federal Writers' Project's New York City Guide in 1939, "the completion of Carnegie Hall in 1891 established the district as the foremost musical center of the country. Manufacturers of musical instruments, especially pianos, opened impressive showrooms along Fifty- seventh Street." These included Chickering Hall (1924, Cross & Cross), 29 West 57,h Street, and Steinway Hall.

 

Aeolian Company

 

At the turn of the century, self-playing organs gained popularity among the wealthy in the United States and Europe. Automatic player organs, pianos, and other instruments (mosdy for residential use) remained popular throughout the first toee decades of the twentieth century, and New York became a center for their manufacture. Powered by foot pedals, the instruments' music was achieved through perforated paper rolls. New York City piano maker William B. Tremaine established the Mechanical Orguinette Co. (1878) to manufacture automated reed organs. He later founded the Aeolian Organ & Music Co. (1887) to make automatic organs; known as the Aeolian Co. after 1895, it also made automatic pianos. The pianola, a pneumatic player piano, was invented in 1895 by Edwin S. Votey, president of die Farrand & Votey Organ Co., Detroit. Votey joined Aeolian in 1897 and the firm obtained the patent for his invention (1900), which became immensely popular. In 1903, Tremaine organized the Aeolian, Weber Piano & Pianola Co. to absorb a number of manufacturers of self-playing instruments (pianos, reed organs, and automatic organs), including the [Albert] Weber Co., maker of pianos in New York since 1852. The Aeolian Co. remained a major subsidiary. The pianola was later supplantedby Aeolian's "Duo Art" reproducing piano (1913), which could replicate the sound of a famous artist playing and required no manual intervention. The Aeolian, Weber Piano & Pianola Co. became the world's leading manufacturer of roll-operated instruments.

 

In the 1920s, Aeolian attempted to branch out into the manufacture of organs for churches and concert halls. But with the onset of the Depression and the resultant loss of its residential market base, Aeolian ceased its organ manufacturing in 1930 and sold these assets. As the era of the player piano faded with the rising popularity of the gramophone and radio, the Aeolian, Weber Piano & Pianola Co. merged in 1932 with the American Piano Corp. to form the Aeolian American Corp. The American Piano Co. had been organized in 1908 through the consolidation of Chickering & Sons, Boston; Knabe & Co., Baltimore; and a number of other piano companies. Its player piano division was formed in 1909, and its "Ampico" system competed directly with Aeolian's "Duo Art" pianos. The firm became the American Piano Corp. in 1930. The Aeolian American Corp. became the Aeolian Corp. in 1959; it declared bankruptcy in 1985.

 

Aeolian's first location was at 841 Broadway, near Union Square, in the heart of the piano district; the company later moved uptown to 23rd Street, and then to 360 Fifth Avenue. Aeolian Hall (1912-13), 33 West 42nd Street, housed the firm's general offices and demonstration rooms showcasing its instruments, as well as a recital hall on the 43rd Street side where many noted musicians performed. The building was sold by Aeolian in 1924. William H. Alfring, vice president /general manager, was quoted in 3925 in the New York Times-. "We had a sentimental urge to return to Fifth Averiue, not only for Albert Weber's early association, but because the Aeolian Company was the first to erect a fine building north of Twenty-third Street, when it built at Thirty-fourth Street and Fifth Avenue." The firm's facilities in the new Aeolian Building included a shipping department in the basement, with a truck lift to the ground level; a showroom for its pianos and organs on the ground story, with a comer entrance; demonstration rooms on the lower six stories; a small second-story recital hall for 150; and recording studios for Duo Art records (rolls), offices, design studios, drafting rooms, and a director's room in the upper stories. The Aeolian Co. (Aeolian American Corp.) only remained in the Aeolian Building until 193 8, when it leased half of Chickering Hall on West 57,h Street.

 

Elizabeth Arden

 

Since 1930, the Aeolian Building has been the location of the flagship Elizabeth Arden Red Door Salon. Florence Nightingale Graham (1878-1966), one of the pioneers of the women's cosmetics and beauty business and one of the most successful female entrepreneurs in American history, was born near Toronto, Canada. By legend, during a short stint as a nurse she became interested in medicinal creams for beauty purposes. She moved to New York City around 1908, following her brother, and found a job with facial massage specialist Eleanor Adair. Graham took the professional name of Elizabeth Arden in 1910 when she opened her own salon at 509 Fifth Avenue. She foresaw the potential profits in cosmetics and her fortune early on was based on her pursuit in developing a light "fluffy" facial cream, which was achieved by chemist A. Fabian Swanson in 1914 as Cream Amoretta. This was followed by an astringent, Ardena Skin Tonic, and later by the popular Velva Moisture Film. From 1915 to 1920, she was said to have "introduced a larger number of preparations, of greater diversification ofuse, than any other cosmetics manufacturer in the world." Arden moved her salon farther north to 673 Fifth Avenue in 1915 (where she is credited with introducing mascara and eye shadow to Americans in 1917), and also opened a wholesale cosmetics branch for department and drug stores. Arden's marriage in 1915 to bankerThomas Jenkins Lewis provided her with American citizenship; he became her general manager, greatly assisting in the development of her wholesale business from 1918 until their divorce in 1934. Branch salons were established in Washington, D.C. (1914), Boston, and Paris (1922), as well as a luxury spa (1934) at her farm, Maine Chance, in Maine. Arden achieved entree into New York society through her close friendship with Elisabeth Marbury, one of the world's leading (and pioneering female) theatrical agents. Fortune in 193 8 wrote that Arden "built her business on swank, ultraexclusiveness and a line beautifully packaged and styled." The New York Times credited Arden with making cosmetics acceptable for "respectable" middle-aged women by "helping to create and popularize creams, lotions and oils — and salons at fashionable addresses in which they could be professionally applied. ... She was a pioneer in advertising beauty products in fashion magazines and newspapers."

 

Elizabeth Arden leased part of the ground story and five upper floors of the Aeolian Building in August 1929. A new black marble storefront, at the north end of the Fifth Avenue facade, was designed by architect Mott B. Schmidt." The Elizabeth Arden Red Door Salon, with "treatment rooms, rooms for exercise, tap dancing, and rooms for the use of the electric mask treatments and other innovations," opened in January 1930. The Federal Writers' Project's New York City Guide in 1939 called Elizabeth Arden's (and nemesis Helena Rubinstein's, at 715 Fifth Avenue) "among the most luxurious beauty salons in the country." Even through the Depression and World War II, her firm remained very profitable. In 1944, Elizabeth Arden, Inc., acquired control of the 689 Fifth Ave. Corp. from the Milne family, owning the building until 1969 and eventually occupying eleven floors. Time magazine notedin 1946 that Arden "made femininity a science and made more money doing it... than any . business woman in history" and that "the grand showcase of the Arden beauty empire at 691 Fifth Avenue is guarded by a grey-liveried doorman and a red door marked simply, Elizabeth Arden." In 1956, she opened a pioneering men's boutique in this building. Arden personally reigned over her empire until her death in 1966 at age 88, and was sole owner of her business. Her estate was estimated at between 30 and 50 million dollars. Elizabeth Arden, Inc., and Elizabeth Arden Sales Corp. at that time operated a billion-dollar global business which included fifty large "full-treatment" salons in major cities and at two resorts, and another fifty smaller salons for facials and hair styling, as well as the manufacture and sale of hundreds of cosmetics products and clothing. Miss Arden, however, had made no provision for the continuation of her firm after her death. The U.S. government soon claimed some S37 million in inheritance and corporate taxes. Elizabeth Arden was acquired in 1970 by Eli Lilly & Co., and was later purchased by Unilever in 1990. It was again sold in 2001 to FFI Fragrances (formerly French Fragrances, Inc.), which changed its name to Elizabeth Arden, Inc.

 

Aeolian (Elizabeth Arden) Building Tenants and Owners (1938 to present")

 

After the Aeolian Co. ended its lease in 1938, the lower two stories of the building were remodeled by architect Robert Carson for an I. Miller & Sons shoe store, which opened in June 1939. The original limestone pilasters and second-story marble window surrounds were removed and light grey-yellow marble cladding and new ground-story show windows and a comer entrance were installed; second-story cusped windows and bronze garlands were retained. Israel Miller (1866-1929), a Polish-born shoe manufacturer and merchant, established his business in New York City in 1895, which was almost exclusively for the theatrical profession. 1. Miller footwear also became fashionable for society women, leading him into the retail trade in 1911, with a store at 1554 Broadway. At the time of his death, I. Miller had 228 branch stores across the nation, including four in New York. This store, I Miller & Sons' third location on Fifth Avenue and fifth in New York, remained here until 1970.

 

The upper stories of the Aeolian (Elizabeth Arden) Building have housed a wide variety of businesses over the years, including furs, textiles, watches, carpets, wallpaper, perfumes, men's and women's apparel, jewelry, exercise equipment, industrial design, publishers' representatives, public relations, advertising, marketing, and a fashion modeling school. Several media firms have leased the upper portions of the building: Transamerican Broadcasting and Television. Corp., audition and commercial radio program studios (1939-50s); Olmsted Sound Studios, television producers (1954- 65); and Robert Saudek Assocs., Inc., movie and television producers (1966-70s). Saudek (1911- 1998) had been the producer of the influential television program Omnibus (1952-61), considered a precursor to public television. The building has also housed several organizations: the Pacific and American Councils of the Institute of Pacific Relations (1943- 50s), founded in 1925 to improve relations between nations occupying the Pacific region; Greater New York chapter, National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (1948-66), founded in 1938 and later known as the March of Dimes; and Fund for the Republic (1953-c. 1958), a non-profit subsidiary of the Ford Foundation established in 1952 for the defense of civil rights and liberties during the McCarthy era.

 

The building was acquired in 1969 by Arden- Esquire Realty Co. (Larry Silverstein and Bernard Mendik, partners). The ground story was remodeled with travertine marble and stainless steel in 1970 by Ernest Castro (Weissberg Castro Assocs.) for Dr. Aldo Gucci, purveyor of Italian shoes and handbags. The company begun by his father, Guccio Gucci, in Florence in 1921 as a saddlery and luggage business was continued by his three sons in 1939 and expanded within Italy. Gucci opened its first foreign shop in New York in 1953, at Fifth Avenue and 58'h Street. The Aeolian (Elizabeth Arden) Building was the location of Gucci's main New York store from 1970 to 1980, after which itwas a branch store for luggage and shoes when a galleria store opened across the street at 685 Fifth Avenue.

 

In 1999, the building was conveyed to 689 Fifth Avenue LLC, a subsidiary of Vornado Realty Trust.

 

Description

 

The fourteen-story (plus penthouse and tower) Aeolian Building is L-shaped in plan, with a Fifth Avenue frontage of about fifty feet and an East 54 Street frontage of 125 feet, and is designed in a neoclassical style with French Renaissance style detailing. The midsection is clad in Indiana limestone with Italian marble spandrel panels, while the upper portion (above the thirteenth story) is clad in a buff- colored terra cotta. The building rises nine stories before setting back on the tenth, twelfth, and fourteenth stories. The facades are articulated vertically by continuous pilasters from the third through the ninth or eleventh stories. The comer of the building is rounded on the lower nine stories, while the upper portions feature angles and concave curves. A tower with a pyramidal roof and lantern rises in front of a two-story penthouse and mechanical floor section. Original windows have mostly six-over-six double- hung bronze sash and frames. Base (First and second stories)

 

The non-historic ground story is the result of a complete remodeling in 1970, with travertine marble cladding and stainless steel storefront, for Gucci. The base originally had a pink granite watertable; limestone pilasters; ground- story doorways, rectangular show windows, and canopies, all of bronze; and marble surrounds at the second-story windows. A black marble storefrontwas designed for Elizabeth Arden (1929, Mott B. Schmidt) at the north end of the Fifth Avenue facade. In 1939, the rest of the base was remodeled for I. Miller & Sons: limestone pilasters and second-story marble surrounds were replacedby a light grey-yellowmarble cladding, and new ground-story show windows and a corner entrance were installed; second-story cusped windows and bronze garlands and the modillioned limestone cornice were retained. Fifth Avenue: The non-historic ground-story Elizabeth Arden shop at the north end has a red door surmounted by an oval design window set within a brass frame.

 

The non-historic southern storefront is set behind the piers and has a curved corner entrance. Awnings are placed over each opening. The second-story cornice bears the metal letters "ELIZABETH ARDEN". 54,h Street: From west to east, the ground story has: the corner entrance; four show windows; a bay with louvers; and an inset building entrance, with metal arched reveal, green marble floor and walls, glass and metal doors and transom, a hanging lamp, and louvers. Midsection (Third through ninth stories) The base of each of the building's pilasters at the third story is ornamented by a carved disk plaque (half of them are surmounted by urns). Third-story windows have balusters and are surmounted by entablatures. Three flagpoles have been installed on the third-story Fifth Avenue facade. Windows of the easternmost bay of the 54lh Street facade have louvers inserted. Air conditioning louvers have been inserted below ninth- story windows. The ninth-story 54lh Street facade is ornamented with carved plaques.

 

The ninth story is capped by a decorative limestone balustrade surmounted by large ums at the corners; there is a decorative central balcony on each facade. Upper Section (Tenth through fourteenth stories) The tenth and eleventh stories are setback at the corners of the building, with concave-curved and angled walls that connect to the central section of each facade, which extends above the lower facade plane. Each central section, flanked by scroll brackets, has two- story round-arched windows (single on Fifth Avenue and triple on 54th Street) with multi-pane sash, surmounted by keystones and carved garlands. Air conditioning louvers have been inserted below eleventh-story windows. The eleventh story is capped by a modillioned cornice and parapet. The set back twelfth and thirteenth stories have an angled bay on 54lh Street and are articulated with two-story round arches, set within which are windows with molded surrounds. The thirteenth story is capped by a balustrade.

 

The set back terra-cotta-clad fourteenth story is capped by a pierced parapet.

 

Tower

 

The terra-cotta-clad tower is ornamented with round arches (set within which are windows surmounted by oculi) surmounted by keystones and garlands. Chamfered corners are surmounted by decorative shells. The pyramidal roof and open lantern are covered with copper, originally embellished with gold leaf decoration. Penthouse/Mechanical Section This two-story terra-cotta-clad section extends eastward from the tower and is pierced by windows.

 

- From the 2002 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

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Conosciuto come "il musicista dei musicisti", è stato più volte definito come il più grande chitarrista vivente.

È Tommy Emmanuel, C.G.P.

Fin dagli inizi viene fortemente influenzato da due grandissimi artisti: Chet Atkins ed Hank Marvin. Tra i suoi riconoscimenti spiccano una nomination al Grammy Award nel 1998 con Chet Atkins per il cd "The Day Fingerpincker Took Over The World" e la vittoria al Nammy (Nashville Music Award) nel 1997. Nel 2000 partecipa alla cerimonia conclusiva insieme al fratello Shin alla cerimonia conclusiva alle Olimpiadi di Sidney.

 

Moltissime le sue collaborazioni con artisti di fama mondiale quali Sir George Martin (produttore e guida dei Beatles), Stevie Wonder, Erik Clapton, Michael Bolton, Chet Atkins, Tina Turner, Cliff Richard, Olivia Newton John, John Denver, Hank Marvin, Bruce Welch, Joan Armatrading, Robben Ford, Albert Lee, Larry Carlton, James Burton, Tina Arena e John Farnham, I Pooh (con i quali ha partecipato al Tour 2001) e recentemente Bill Wyman (storico bassista dei Rolling Stones con il quale ha effettuato una serie di concerti in Inghilterra).

 

La tecnica di Emmanuel ne fa un vero mostro sacro della musica contemporanea, capace di imporsi anche tra gli addetti ai lavori per la sua capacità di innovare, da un punto di vista tecnico, l’approccio con la chitarra.

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