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Milky Way over Jebel Akhdar, northern Oman.

La cafetière typiquement omanaise !

Sahab Hotel, sitting at the peak of Jebel Al Akhdar mountain in Oman at an altitude of 2,004 meters.

Photographed with Canon 5d Mk3 and Canon TS-E 24mm f3.5L lens.

This is a 5-stop HDR base image, digitally blended with mood enhancing layers and other post production trickery.

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The Hajar Mountains (Arabic: جبال الحجر‎) (Arabic for stone mountains) is a mountain range in northeastern Oman and also the eastern United Arab Emirates. They separate the low coastal plain of Oman from the high desert plateau, and lie 50-100 km inland from the Gulf of Oman coast. The mountains begin in the north, forming the Musandam peninsula. From there the Northern Hajar (Hajar al Gharbi) runs southeast, moving gradually further from the coast as it goes. The central section of the Hajar is the Jebel Akhdar, the highest and wildest terrain in the country (with the highest point in eastern Arabia). The Jebel Akhdar (and the smaller Jebel Nakhl range) are bounded on the south by the low Samail Valley (which leads northeast to Muscat). East of Samail are the Eastern Hajar (Hajar ash Sharqi), which run east (much closer to the coast) to the fishing town of Sur.

 

One of the highlights of visiting Oman is definitely off road drive through Al Hajar Mountains. You might not see it properly but if you look at the lower part of the road, there is a 4x4 car, just to get an idea of the scale around you.

 

Camera Model: PENTAX K20D; Focal length: 23.13 mm; Aperture: 6.7; Exposure time: 1/90 s; ISO: 100

 

All rights reserved - Copyright © Lucie Debelkova - www.luciedebelkova.com

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

Intérieur du château de Jabrin.

Avec une vue imprenable sur la plaine, le château de Jabrin (1675) illustre bien l'architecture résidentielle et bénéficie d'un état de conservation et d'entretien remarquable. Ce château fut une importante école d'astrologie, de médecine et de loi islamique. Jabrin est également célèbre pour ses plafonds peints de motifs floraux.

The impressive view from Jebel Al Akhdar, Oman

Petite mosquée au pied du Fort de Nizwa

Oman - Jebel Akhdar - Wadi Bani Awf

_MG_9070_1_2_Realistic

The trees are pomegranate trees, the green stuff in the middle is food for the goats ,left side are spring onions and the rest we have no idea what it is.

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To walk right to the cliffs of Jebel Shams for a look down into the valley took us some effort, because it goes straight downwards for some hundred meters without any safety fence...

 

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Ville célèbre pour son Fort et ses poteries

There are so many castles and forts in Oman for visitors to explore. All are beautifully restored and maintained. The attending staff seem quite proud of their heritage and tourist sites. The flag of Oman also shows this pride.

 

It consists of three horizontal bands of white, red, and green of equal width with a broad, vertical, red band on one side; the national emblem (a khanjar dagger in its sheath superimposed on two crossed swords) in white is centered near the top of the vertical band; white represents peace and prosperity, red recalls battles against foreign invaders, and green symbolizes the Jebel Akhdar (Green Mountains) and fertility.

 

A reminder that all of my images are copyrighted and are not for your use in any way unless you contact me. Thank you so much for your visits and comments.

To walk right to the cliffs of Jebel Shams for a look down into the valley took us some effort, because it goes straight downwards for some hundred meters without any safety fence...

 

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Vieux village d'Al Hamra et ses maisons traditionnelles.

Souk de Nizwa recouvert du drapeau d'Oman

Shuraijah's fertile terraces, the view from the plateau atop the Jebel Akhdar.

The Jebel Akhdar, Jabal Akhdar or Al Jabal Al Akhdar (Arabic: الجبل الأخضر ‎ meaning The Green Mountain), is part of the Al Hajar Mountains range in Oman, which extends about 300 km (186 mi) northwest to southeast, between 50–100 km (31–62 mi) inland from the Gulf of Oman coast. It is one of Oman’s most spectacular areas. The highest point, Jabal Shams (the mountain of the sun), is around 3,000 metres (around 9,800 feet) high. It is the highest point in Oman and the whole of eastern Arabia. It comprises the central section of the Al Hajar Mountains range, and is located around 150 km (93 mi) from Muscat.

Terraces of Jebal Akhdar

The range is mostly desert, but at higher altitudes it receives around 300 mm (12 in) of precipitation annually, moist enough to allow the growth of shrubs and trees and support agriculture. It is this that gives the mountains their 'green' name.[1] Cool summers provide the visitor with fresh air surrounded by breathtaking stones. The area is about 2 hours drive from Nizwa and is famous for its traditional rose water extraction and agricultural products including pomegranate, apricot, peach and walnut. The Jebel is mostly inhabited by the ancient Arab tribe Bani Riyam (al Riyamy). Most descendants of the tribe are now in nearby towns such as Nizwa and Izki; some inhabit Ibra.

The Jebel Akhdar was the scene for a conflict between Omani forces loyal to the Sultan of Oman (aided by British soldiers including the Special Air Service) and Saudi Arabian backed rebel forces of the inland Imamate of Oman between 1957 and 1959. This conflict is known as the Jebel Akhdar War.

In August 2011, Sultan Qaboos designated Jebel Akhdar a nature reserve in a bid to conserve its unique yet fragile biodiversity. A decree issued by the Royal Court established the ‘Jebel Akhdar Sanctuary for Natural Sceneries’.

 

Arabian Cat Snake (Telescopus dhara) from Jebel Akhdar. These pretty snakes are found throughout the country in rocky areas, where they hunt at night for animals like geckos and bats.

The Jebel Akhdar, Jabal Akhdar or Al Jabal Al Akhdar (Arabic: الجبل الأخضر ‎ meaning The Green Mountain), is part of the Al Hajar Mountains range in Oman, which extends about 300 km (186 mi) northwest to southeast, between 50–100 km (31–62 mi) inland from the Gulf of Oman coast. It is one of Oman’s most spectacular areas. The highest point, Jabal Shams (the mountain of the sun), is around 3,000 metres (around 9,800 feet) high. It is the highest point in Oman and the whole of eastern Arabia. It comprises the central section of the Al Hajar Mountains range, and is located around 150 km (93 mi) from Muscat.

Terraces of Jebal Akhdar

The range is mostly desert, but at higher altitudes it receives around 300 mm (12 in) of precipitation annually, moist enough to allow the growth of shrubs and trees and support agriculture. It is this that gives the mountains their 'green' name.[1] Cool summers provide the visitor with fresh air surrounded by breathtaking stones. The area is about 2 hours drive from Nizwa and is famous for its traditional rose water extraction and agricultural products including pomegranate, apricot, peach and walnut. The Jebel is mostly inhabited by the ancient Arab tribe Bani Riyam (al Riyamy). Most descendants of the tribe are now in nearby towns such as Nizwa and Izki; some inhabit Ibra.

The Jebel Akhdar was the scene for a conflict between Omani forces loyal to the Sultan of Oman (aided by British soldiers including the Special Air Service) and Saudi Arabian backed rebel forces of the inland Imamate of Oman between 1957 and 1959. This conflict is known as the Jebel Akhdar War.

In August 2011, Sultan Qaboos designated Jebel Akhdar a nature reserve in a bid to conserve its unique yet fragile biodiversity. A decree issued by the Royal Court established the ‘Jebel Akhdar Sanctuary for Natural Sceneries’.

 

Sayq, Oman, 2013.

A more detailed look at the steep and dramatic terraces of the Jebel Akhdar region shows that the gardens are well laid out and maintained. The fruits from these farms include peaches, pomegranates, grapes, walnuts, almonds, apricots, lemons, apples and roses (for rosewater) which are all sold in the souks of the nearby city of Nizwa.

 

Photo taken hiking along the mountain paths of the Jebel Akhdar, Oman

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