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Oman - Jebel Akhdar - Wadi Bani Awf

After few rainy days, i found it a good time to capture the saturated browny colour of the Fort. although the colour is not distributed equally!, it did a good job to saturate the tops of fort walls.

 

The shot was taken with Tamron SP 10-24mm set @ 15mm

ISO speed: 100

Aperture: f/25

Shutter Speed: 1.6 seconds.

 

This is the last shot i took after i've been asked to leave coz it was closing time!! 5PM . . .

 

Here is more about this Fort:

"The most splendid of all is arguably the fort at Nakhal, On a rocky spur, backed by the striking red rock of the Jebel Akhdar Mountains and overlooking an oasis of date palms, the position of Nakhal is one of its chief delights, the splendid views from the fort classically Arabian. The rampart walls offer fascinating examples of Islamic architecture, impressive for the scale and harmony of design, while sensitive restoration work has made the fort’s inner sanctum a treat as well – a series of rooms simply and beautifully furnished, the perfect place to retreat from Oman’s midday sun."

 

"It is in Batinah region, in Nakhal town. This fort is believed that it was built before Islam. This beautiful fort is built on the peak of the mountain and it is about 200 meters height which makes its view so lovely that it attract tourist to visit it.

This fort was renewed in the 3rd and 10th hijrey century during the density of Bani Kharous and Ya'aruba.

The outer door and towers were built during the destiny of Imam Said bin Sultan in the 1834.

The fort is built of platform rock which gives it characteristic and feature of beauty.

In 1995, the fort was repaired and many handicraft items were added in it which made a point to capture more tourists to visit it. "

a dealer near the bridge over Wadi Quf

www.nikkiundmichi.de - Oman. Michi am Rand einer Schlucht im Dschabal al-Ahdar Gebirge. (Jebel al-Akhdar)

Agora and Temple of Demeter, part of the World Heritage Site at Shahhat in Libya, ancient Cyrene.

_MG_9070_1_2_Realistic

This girl was not shy like all the others and was really happy to get our candies,that she shared then with her photo shy friends....

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Water is critical to survival in Oman’s arid climate and sophisticated distribution systems are required to supply adequate water to mountain villages and to the terraced gardens and fields that sustain these people. The problem was solved perhaps as early as the 6th century BCE when extensive irrigation channels, called falaj, were built to bring water from mountain run-off and subterranean springs to the locations where needed for domestic and agricultural use. It is thought that the Persians, who ruled over Oman at the time and have their own similar system called qanats, may have introduced the concept. Oman today still has over 11,000 falaj that form the basis of water supply to rural areas.

 

in the Jebel Akhdar, Oman

To walk right to the cliffs of Jebel Shams for a look down into the valley took us some effort, because it goes straight downwards for some hundred meters without any safety fence...

 

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A more detailed look at the steep and dramatic terraces of the Jebel Akhdar region shows that the gardens are well laid out and maintained. The fruits from these farms include peaches, pomegranates, grapes, walnuts, almonds, apricots, lemons, apples and roses (for rosewater) which are all sold in the souks of the nearby city of Nizwa.

 

Photo taken hiking along the mountain paths of the Jebel Akhdar, Oman

The Jebel Akhdar, Jabal Akhdar or Al Jabal Al Akhdar (Arabic: الجبل الأخضر ‎ meaning The Green Mountain), is part of the Al Hajar Mountains range in Oman, which extends about 300 km (186 mi) northwest to southeast, between 50–100 km (31–62 mi) inland from the Gulf of Oman coast. It is one of Oman’s most spectacular areas. The highest point, Jabal Shams (the mountain of the sun), is around 3,000 metres (around 9,800 feet) high. It is the highest point in Oman and the whole of eastern Arabia. It comprises the central section of the Al Hajar Mountains range, and is located around 150 km (93 mi) from Muscat.

Terraces of Jebal Akhdar

The range is mostly desert, but at higher altitudes it receives around 300 mm (12 in) of precipitation annually, moist enough to allow the growth of shrubs and trees and support agriculture. It is this that gives the mountains their 'green' name.[1] Cool summers provide the visitor with fresh air surrounded by breathtaking stones. The area is about 2 hours drive from Nizwa and is famous for its traditional rose water extraction and agricultural products including pomegranate, apricot, peach and walnut. The Jebel is mostly inhabited by the ancient Arab tribe Bani Riyam (al Riyamy). Most descendants of the tribe are now in nearby towns such as Nizwa and Izki; some inhabit Ibra.

The Jebel Akhdar was the scene for a conflict between Omani forces loyal to the Sultan of Oman (aided by British soldiers including the Special Air Service) and Saudi Arabian backed rebel forces of the inland Imamate of Oman between 1957 and 1959. This conflict is known as the Jebel Akhdar War.

In August 2011, Sultan Qaboos designated Jebel Akhdar a nature reserve in a bid to conserve its unique yet fragile biodiversity. A decree issued by the Royal Court established the ‘Jebel Akhdar Sanctuary for Natural Sceneries’.

 

Jebel Akhdar (Green Mountain) at 6000 ft at 7a.m.

I've been rifling through my archives, finding old pics to try out in Lightroom, which I've got a trial version of. This one is from Oman - Jebel Akhdar (I think the translation is Green Mountains).

You can go trekking for days in the area, but you have to be well equipped,because villages can be far away.

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The Jebel Akhdar, Jabal Akhdar or Al Jabal Al Akhdar (Arabic: الجبل الأخضر ‎ meaning The Green Mountain), is part of the Al Hajar Mountains range in Oman, which extends about 300 km (186 mi) northwest to southeast, between 50–100 km (31–62 mi) inland from the Gulf of Oman coast. It is one of Oman’s most spectacular areas. The highest point, Jabal Shams (the mountain of the sun), is around 3,000 metres (around 9,800 feet) high. It is the highest point in Oman and the whole of eastern Arabia. It comprises the central section of the Al Hajar Mountains range, and is located around 150 km (93 mi) from Muscat.

Terraces of Jebal Akhdar

The range is mostly desert, but at higher altitudes it receives around 300 mm (12 in) of precipitation annually, moist enough to allow the growth of shrubs and trees and support agriculture. It is this that gives the mountains their 'green' name.[1] Cool summers provide the visitor with fresh air surrounded by breathtaking stones. The area is about 2 hours drive from Nizwa and is famous for its traditional rose water extraction and agricultural products including pomegranate, apricot, peach and walnut. The Jebel is mostly inhabited by the ancient Arab tribe Bani Riyam (al Riyamy). Most descendants of the tribe are now in nearby towns such as Nizwa and Izki; some inhabit Ibra.

The Jebel Akhdar was the scene for a conflict between Omani forces loyal to the Sultan of Oman (aided by British soldiers including the Special Air Service) and Saudi Arabian backed rebel forces of the inland Imamate of Oman between 1957 and 1959. This conflict is known as the Jebel Akhdar War.

In August 2011, Sultan Qaboos designated Jebel Akhdar a nature reserve in a bid to conserve its unique yet fragile biodiversity. A decree issued by the Royal Court established the ‘Jebel Akhdar Sanctuary for Natural Sceneries’.

 

Cyrene (in Greek, Κυρήνη – Kyrēnē) was an ancient Greek colony in present-day Shahhat; Libya, the oldest and most important of the five Greek cities in the region. It gave eastern Libya the classical name Cyrenaica that it has retained to modern times.

Cyrene lies in a lush valley in the Jebel Akhdar uplands. The city was named after a spring, Kyre, which the Greeks consecrated to Apollo. It was also the seat of the Cyrenaics, a famous school of philosophy in the 3rd century BC, founded by Aristippus, a disciple of Socrates.

Jebel Akhdar, Sultanate of Oman, Sunset

Jebel Akhdar Oman 2014

he Jebel Akhar, Jabal Akhdar or Al Jabal Al Akhdar, is part of the Al Hajar Mountains range in Ad Dakhiliyah Governorate of Oman.

The Jebel Akhdar, Jabal Akhdar or Al Jabal Al Akhdar (Arabic: الجبل الأخضر ‎ meaning The Green Mountain), is part of the Al Hajar Mountains range in Oman, which extends about 300 km (186 mi) northwest to southeast, between 50–100 km (31–62 mi) inland from the Gulf of Oman coast. It is one of Oman’s most spectacular areas. The highest point, Jabal Shams (the mountain of the sun), is around 3,000 metres (around 9,800 feet) high. It is the highest point in Oman and the whole of eastern Arabia. It comprises the central section of the Al Hajar Mountains range, and is located around 150 km (93 mi) from Muscat.

Terraces of Jebal Akhdar

The range is mostly desert, but at higher altitudes it receives around 300 mm (12 in) of precipitation annually, moist enough to allow the growth of shrubs and trees and support agriculture. It is this that gives the mountains their 'green' name.[1] Cool summers provide the visitor with fresh air surrounded by breathtaking stones. The area is about 2 hours drive from Nizwa and is famous for its traditional rose water extraction and agricultural products including pomegranate, apricot, peach and walnut. The Jebel is mostly inhabited by the ancient Arab tribe Bani Riyam (al Riyamy). Most descendants of the tribe are now in nearby towns such as Nizwa and Izki; some inhabit Ibra.

The Jebel Akhdar was the scene for a conflict between Omani forces loyal to the Sultan of Oman (aided by British soldiers including the Special Air Service) and Saudi Arabian backed rebel forces of the inland Imamate of Oman between 1957 and 1959. This conflict is known as the Jebel Akhdar War.

In August 2011, Sultan Qaboos designated Jebel Akhdar a nature reserve in a bid to conserve its unique yet fragile biodiversity. A decree issued by the Royal Court established the ‘Jebel Akhdar Sanctuary for Natural Sceneries’.

 

Milky Way over Jebel Akhdar, northern Oman.

Jebel Akhdar - Sultanate of Oman

The Hajjar Mountains (Arabic: جبال الحجر‎) (Arabic for stone mountains) in northeastern Oman and also the eastern United Arab Emirates are the highest mountain range in the eastern Arabian peninsula. They separate the low coastal plain of Oman from the high desert plateau, and lie 50–100 km inland from the Gulf of Oman coast.

 

The mountains begin in the north, forming the Musandam peninsula. From there the Northern Hajjar (Hajjar al Gharbi) runs southeast, parallel to the coast but moving gradually further away as it goes. The central section of the Hajjar is the Jebel Akhdar (9,834 feet (2,980 m)), the highest and wildest terrain in the country. Jebel Akhdar (and the smaller Jebel Nakhl range) are bounded on the east by the low Samail Valley (which leads northeast to Muscat). East of Samail are the Eastern Hajjar (Hajjar ash Sharqi), which run east (much closer to the coast) to the fishing town of Sur, almost at the eastern point of Oman. The mountains extend for 500 km in total.

  

Cyrene (in Greek, Κυρήνη – Kyrēnē) was an ancient Greek colony in present-day Shahhat; Libya, the oldest and most important of the five Greek cities in the region. It gave eastern Libya the classical name Cyrenaica that it has retained to modern times.

Cyrene lies in a lush valley in the Jebel Akhdar uplands. The city was named after a spring, Kyre, which the Greeks consecrated to Apollo. It was also the seat of the Cyrenaics, a famous school of philosophy in the 3rd century BC, founded by Aristippus, a disciple of Socrates.

Late afternoon from campsite in the Green Mountain Jebel Akhdar area of Oman, June 2012

Amazing what happens to buildings left to the elements

Ash Shirayjah, Sayq Plateau.

Bahla Fort is one of four historic fortresses situated at the foot of the Jebel Akhdar highlands in Oman. It was built in the 13th and 14th centuries, when the oasis of Bahla was prosperous under the control of the Banu Nabhan tribe

 

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Cyrene (in Greek, Κυρήνη – Kyrēnē) was an ancient Greek colony in present-day Shahhat; Libya, the oldest and most important of the five Greek cities in the region. It gave eastern Libya the classical name Cyrenaica that it has retained to modern times.

Cyrene lies in a lush valley in the Jebel Akhdar uplands. The city was named after a spring, Kyre, which the Greeks consecrated to Apollo. It was also the seat of the Cyrenaics, a famous school of philosophy in the 3rd century BC, founded by Aristippus, a disciple of Socrates.

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