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Parkers’ Lighthouse rises three levels above the Long Beach Harbor and can boast a beautiful view from every table.

 

A proud recipient of Wine Spectator’s Award of Excellence, Parkers’ Lighthouse is known for its mesquite grilled fresh seafood and spectacular views; and is home to a brand new, two-story wine cellar. The restaurant’s extensive menu features innovative Southern California seafood dishes, as well as creative sushi and sashimi and an extensive wine list. Experience Happy Hour, Monday through Friday, 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Lounge on the main floor or 3 p.m. to 5 p.m on our waterfront patio, with great deals on specially priced cocktails, wine, craft beers and selected menu items.

 

Parkers’ Lighthouse is also home to the Queensview Steakhouse, located on the third floor; open Tuesday through Saturday nights. This upscale supper club offers live music and an exquisite menu of prime steaks, chops, lobster, and fresh grilled fish. Experience Happy Hour at the Bar & Lounge, Tuesday through Friday, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. with great deals on Jazz inspired Martinis, specially priced cocktails, wine, and craft beers.

 

On behalf of the entire staff at Parkers’ Lighthouse and the Queensview Steakhouse…we look forward to serving you.

parkerslighthouse.com

Make your own Magic!

 

Hey, Let’s go to San Francisco and then Mexico for Halloween vacation (we watched “The Book of Life” after dinner, I had no idea what it was going to be about: the day of the dead and mexico), I announced last night as I prepared homemade Mexican tortilla soup.

 

Amaya cheered! Benji looked at me weird. I promise not to “grocery store” shop ALL year I quipped back if that could help to make it happen. We have made it almost two months already and have saved a lot of money. Take a giant leap of faith: it's better to attempt the impossible and fall short than to do nothing at all is what this new Moon (and Chinese new year and beginning of Lent) is all about. “Write your own story”, is what the movie was about and actually is a fitting theme for this lunation.

  

One minute after the exact new Moon in Aquarius, the Moon moves into Pisces and the Sun moves into Pisces two minutes later. This Moon really is on the cutting edge of change here and is quite apt for a New Moon in the decan that is about the confrontation of the old and the new. Benji said ok if he can buy an “American refrigerator” that makes ice. I think he is kidding and I am sure that I growled.

 

Amaya cheered and said she wants a jar of Nutella once a month, I said ok to that, Benji can have special local beers, everyone gets their vice I might get the odd bottle of perrier water and some healthfood orders once in a blue moon. But they are both on board, and adventurous eaters, for the no grocery shopping even though it means we will be eating lots of garden produce and weird things in the freezer (we still get cheese, butter, milk and yogurt from a local producers place and twice a month vegetables and fruit from the local farmers market or the wednesday veggie truck guy (we dont have food trucks here yet—but a veggie truck, yes.

 

The individualistic Aquarius New Moon rocks my 9th House of Adventure, filling my head with radical ideas about escaping from responsibilities. I have noticed I buck all normalcy lately: not grocery store shopping again, making chicken foot soup-just in time for Chinese new year, wearing all these weird handmade clothes, like I am finally letting out my inner artist/wacko that I have stifled since childhood. One of the best things about getting older is realizing that we don't have to spend our energy worrying what other people think and we get to be comfortable in our own skin, and raise our own freak flags.

 

There’s a window of opportunity to make a clean break from some aspect of your life that is no longer serving you well. If it’s boring, it’s OUT. How about healthy dose of non-traditional behavior to spice up your daily routine?! Still, I hate refrigeration, he has a dorm sized fridge for his beers and I hate that noise it makes. But, whatever, you have to choose your battles wisely. He has the right to make his own magic happen too. He has dealt with my crazy back to the land ways for long enough, he didnt sign up for that (he took me to get goat shit this afternoon after chainsawing a cord of wood to heat our house for the week) plus, I don’t have to use it! [ed update: he said he was kidding, we dont have room for it and he said he doesnt need one]

 

So if you really want to make a radical change, then this is this new moon to start something really innovative. You could go for a shocking new make-over, shave your head, dye your hair purple, paint your nails blue or start a creative project that will be really controversial. Dare to be different, experiment and don’t be afraid of being wrong. Just get out there, try something, and make your magic happen, the moon is with you!

  

Directly in front of the Saint Anthony Hotel is Travis Park in San Antonio, Texas. Several persons took an afternoon siesta on park benches. A few laid on grass rapped up in personal camping bed rolls. Without standard indoor residential necessities, our homeless brothers and sisters still enjoyed this Park's many beautiful flowers.

 

How innovative are you with your camera ART? Do you always do it the same way?

 

Is that boring and depriving you of the fun of creativity? Rather than a self-imposed funky depression, is not every day a new chance to do better, learn more, get closer to loved ones, share a smile with a stranger, tender a panhandler money to choose (food, cigarettes, beer, vice, water, etc.), help a homeless person find an inside bed, since the city parks are not for sleeping after their closing time? How can you make another's life better each day? The Creator needs a little help from us to assist better his creations (from humans down to animals and insects).

 

Passionate? Is that how we should describe your love of making magic shots with your camera, your many improving talents, your awesome creativity, your independence deviating from the norms, and your lack of fear of doing it well your way?

 

EXPLORE # 444 on Tuesday, April 15, 2008

TURNER HALL

Constructed in 1882 and dedicated in 1883, Turner Hall is one of several important Milwaukee buildings designed by architect and German immigrant Henry H. Koch. Koch was also the architect for Milwaukee’s famous City Hall and the Pfister Hotel. His work was an innovative mix of Queen Anne and Romanesque styles expressed with local materials.

Turner Hall is a unique four-story, multi-use facility constructed of Milwaukee’s characteristic cream city brick. Complete with gymnasium, restaurant/beer hall, meeting rooms, and a grand two-story ballroom, the Hall continues to house functions that promote the development of both a sound mind and a sound body. The original Italianate façade of cream city brick was recently restored, as were the famous panoramic paintings located in the first floor of the building.

Turner Hall is the only building in Milwaukee that currently holds the three following honorary architectural and historical designations: a National Landmark, a listing on the National Registry of Historic Places, and a local Historical Landmark.

NRHP #77000041

Turner Hall & The Milwaukee Turners

Firework display at the "Stuttgart Festival" performed by the German company "Innovative Pyrotechnik" (IP).

 

Canon PowerShot S5 IS

Aufnahmedatum/-zeit: 14.10.2007 21:47

Aufnahmemodus: Manuell

Tv (Verschlusszeit): 3.2

Av (Blendenzahl): 5.6

Filmempfindlichkeit (ISO): 80

Objektiv: 6.0 - 72.0mm

Brennweite: (crop)

6.0mm

The end is near, some last nice shots from the firework display at the Stuttgart Festival performed by "Innovative Pyrotechnik"

 

Canon PowerShot S5 IS

Aufnahmedatum/-zeit: 14.10.2007 21:55

Aufnahmemodus: Manuell

Tv (Verschlusszeit): 2.5

Av (Blendenzahl): 5.6

Filmempfindlichkeit (ISO): 80

Objektiv: 6.0 - 72.0mm

Brennweite: 9.7mm

modern furniture series: semae sticker / tee logo / card, des. #3

 

the semae represents the Eames Low Side Chair by Charles and Ray Eames, 1946

 

It is hard to imagine now, but the use of plywood and chrome-plated steel in residential furniture was considered edgy, risky, and thoroughly new when this chair made its 1946 debut. It is modern, lightweight, strong, sculptural, and a complete departure from what furniture was.

 

Charles Ormond Eames, Jr was born in 1907 in Saint Louis, Missouri. By the time he was 14 years old, while attending high school, Charles worked at the Laclede Steel Company as a part-time laborer, where he learned about engineering, drawing, and architecture (and also first entertained the idea of one day becoming an architect).

 

Charles briefly studied architecture at Washington University in St. Louis on an architectural scholarship. He proposed studying Frank Lloyd Wright to his professors, and when he would not cease his interest in modern architects, he was dismissed from the university. In the report describing why he was dismissed from the university, a professor wrote the comment "His views were too modern." While at Washington University, he met his first wife, Catherine Woermann, whom he married in 1929. A year later, they had a daughter, Lucia.

 

After he left school and was married, Charles began his own architectural practice, with partners Charles Gray and later Walter Pauley.

One great influence on him was the Finnish architect Eliel Saarinen (whose son Eero, also an architect, would become a partner and friend). At the elder Saarinen's invitation, he moved in 1938 with his wife Catherine and daughter Lucia to Michigan, to further study architecture at the Cranbrook Academy of Art, where he would become a teacher and head of the industrial design department. One of the requirements of the Architecture and Urban Planning Program, at the time Eames applied, was for the student to have decided upon his project and gathered as much pertinent information in advance – Eames' interest was in the St. Louis waterfront. Together with Eero Saarinen he designed prize-winning furniture for New York's Museum of Modern Art "Organic Design" competition. Their work displayed the new technique of wood moulding (originally developed by Alvar Aalto), that Eames would further develop in many moulded plywood products, including, beside chairs and other furniture, splints and stretchers for the U.S. Navy during World War II.

 

In 1941, Charles and Catherine divorced, and he married his Cranbrook colleague Ray Kaiser, who was born in Sacramento, California. He then moved with her to Los Angeles, California, where they would work and live for the rest of their lives. In the late 1940s, as part of the Arts & Architecture magazine "Case Study" program, Ray and Charles designed and built the groundbreaking Eames House, Case Study House #8, as their home. Located upon a cliff overlooking the Pacific Ocean, and constructed entirely of pre-fabricated steel parts intended for industrial construction, it remains a milestone of modern architecture.

 

In the 1950s, the Eameses would continue their work in architecture and modern furniture design, often (like in the earlier moulded plywood work) pioneering innovative technologies, such as the fiberglass and plastic resin chairs and the wire mesh chairs designed for Herman Miller. Besides this work, Charles would soon channel his interest in photography into the production of short films. From their first one, the unfinished Traveling Boy (1950), to the extraordinary Powers of Ten (1977), their cinematic work was an outlet for ideas, a vehicle for experimentation and education.

 

The Eameses also conceived and designed a number of landmark exhibitions. The first of these, Mathematica: a world of numbers...and beyond (1961), was sponsored by IBM, and is the only one of their exhibitions still existant. The original was created for a new wing of the (currently named) California Science Center; it is now owned by and on display at the New York Hall of Science. In late 1961 a duplicate was created for the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago; in 1980 it moved to the Museum of Science, Boston. Another version was created for the 1964/1965 New York World's Fair IBM exhibit. After the World's Fair it was moved to the Pacific Science Center in Seattle where it stayed until 1980. The Mathematica Exhibition is still considered a model for scientific popularization exhibitions. It was followed by "A Computer Perspective: Background to the Computer Age" (1971) and "The World of Franklin and Jefferson" (1975-1977), among others.

 

The office of Charles and Ray Eames, which functioned for more than four decades (1943-88) at 901 Washington Boulevard in Venice, California, included in its staff, at one time of another, a number of remarkable designers, like Don Albinson, Deborah Sussman, Richard Foy and Henry Beer.

 

Among the many important designs originating there are the molded-plywood DCW (Dining Chair Wood) and DCM (Dining Chair Metal with a plywood seat) (1945), Eames Lounge Chair (1956), the Aluminum Group furniture (1958) and as well as the Eames Chaise (1968), designed for Charles's friend, film director Billy Wilder, the playful Do-Nothing Machine (1957), an early solar energy experiment, and a number of toys.

 

Short films produced by the couple often document their interests in collecting toys and cultural artifacts on their travels. The films also record the process of hanging their exhibits or producing classic furniture designs, to the purposefully mundane topic of filming soap suds moving over the pavement of a parking lot. Perhaps their most popular movie, "Powers of 10", gives a dramatic demonstration of orders of magnitude by visually zooming away from the earth to the edge of the universe, and then microscopically zooming into the nucleus of a carbon atom. Charles was a prolific photographer as well with thousands of images of their furniture, exhibits and collections, and now a part of the Library of Congress.

 

Charles Eames died of a heart attack on August 21, 1978 while on a consulting trip in his native Saint Louis, and now has a star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame. Ray died 10 years later to the exact day.

 

At the time of his death they were working on what became their last production, the Eames Sofa which went into production in 1984.

 

graphics: a.golden, eyewash design c. 2007

 

Arne Jaconben:

 

The Model 3107 chair is one of the most popular chairs in Danish design history. It was designed by Arne Jacobsen, using a new technique in which plywood could be bent in two dimensions. It has been produced exclusively by Fritz Hansen A/S ever since its invention in 1955. It is also the most copied chair in the world.

 

Being a "copy" itself contributes some irony to that fact. The chair, along with the Jacobsen's Ant chair, was, according to Jacobsen himself, inspired by a chair made by the husband and wife design team of Charles and Ray Eames.

 

The chair comes with a number of different undercarriges - both as a regular four-legged chair, an office-chair with five wheels and as a barstool. It comes with armrests, a writing-table attached, and different forms of upholstring. To some extent, these additions mar the simple aesthetics of the chair, while contributing with some practical elements.

 

Arne Jacobsen is the Danish architect who mastered the most personal and successful interpretation of the international functionalism. His architecture includes a considerable number of epoch-making buildings in Denmark, Germany and Great Britain. Arne Jacobsen initially trained as a mason before studying architecture at the Royal Danish Academy of Arts, Copenhagen, graduating in 1927.

 

From 1927 until 1930, he worked in the architectural office of Paul Holsoe. In 1930, he established his own design office, which he headed until his death in 1971, and worked independently as an architect, interior, furniture, textile and ceramics designer. He was professor of Architecture at the Royal Academy of Arts, Copenhagen, from 1956 onwards. His best known projects are St. Catherine's College, Oxford, and the SAS Hotel, Copenhagen.

 

Arne Jacobsen's designs came into existence as brief sketches and were then modeled in plaster or cardboard in full size. He kept on working until his revolutionary ideas for new furniture had been realized at the utmost perfection. The "Ant" from 1952 became the starting point of his world fame as a furniture designer and became the first of a number of lightweight chairs with seat and back in one piece of moulded wood.

 

graphics: a.golden, eyewash design c. 2007

 

TURNER HALL

Constructed in 1882 and dedicated in 1883, Turner Hall is one of several important Milwaukee buildings designed by architect and German immigrant Henry H. Koch. Koch was also the architect for Milwaukee’s famous City Hall and the Pfister Hotel. His work was an innovative mix of Queen Anne and Romanesque styles expressed with local materials.

Turner Hall is a unique four-story, multi-use facility constructed of Milwaukee’s characteristic cream city brick. Complete with gymnasium, restaurant/beer hall, meeting rooms, and a grand two-story ballroom, the Hall continues to house functions that promote the development of both a sound mind and a sound body. The original Italianate façade of cream city brick was recently restored, as were the famous panoramic paintings located in the first floor of the building.

Turner Hall is the only building in Milwaukee that currently holds the three following honorary architectural and historical designations: a National Landmark, a listing on the National Registry of Historic Places, and a local Historical Landmark.

NRHP #77000041

Turner Hall & The Milwaukee Turners

No sell Out - "Malcolm X & Keith LeBlanc" - Play this track here.

 

¿Whats this iPod Shuffle set all about? Read about it here

 

I read the autobiography of Malcolm X in the late 1980's. It was a very moving book for me. One of a man coming out of criminality to lead his people, then to be betrayed by his peers.

 

Malcolm X (May 19th 1925 – February 21st 1965), was born Malcolm Little and also known as El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz. He was an African-American Muslim minister, public speaker, and human rights activist. He was a courageous advocate for the rights of African Americans, a man who indicted white America in the harshest terms for its crimes against black Americans. His detractors in his age of inequality accused him of preaching racism, black supremacy, antisemitism, and violence. He has been described as one of the greatest, and most influential, African Americans in history.

 

Keith LeBlanc started out as a session drummer with Sugarhill Records, early 1980's. He formed the Sugar Hill House Band with fellow Americans Doug Wimbish (bass) and Skip "Little Axe" McDonald (guitar), working with leading rap artists as The Sugarhill Gang (Rapper's Delight) and Grandmaster Flash and Melle Mel on The Message and Freedom.

 

From his own 'Malcolm X No Sell Out', the first ever sampling record, on Tommy Boy Records (1983) to his involvement in creating the sound of funk noise giants Tackhead with Wimbish, McDonald and British dub producer Adrian Sherwood, he has gained recognition as one of the top and most innovative drummers/programmers around.

 

If you like bands and music, checkout my band pix.

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Tesco plc is a British international grocery and general merchandising retail chain headquartered in the Tesco House in Cheshunt, Hertfordshire. It is the UK's largest supermarket chain.

 

The chain was founded by Jack Cohen in 1919. The brand first appeared after Cohen bought a shipment of tea from T.E. Stockwell and he used those initials and added the first two letters of his own surname. The first Tesco store was opened in 1929 in Burnt Oak, Edgware, Middlesex.

 

During the 1950s and the 1960s Tesco grew organically, and also through acquisitions, until it owned more than 800 stores. Originally specialising in food and drink, it has diversified into areas such as clothing, electronics, financial services, telecoms, home, health, car and dental insurance, retailing and renting DVDs, CDs, music downloads, Internet services and software. It is the largest British retailer by both global sales and domestic market share, with profits exceeding £3 billion, and the third largest global retailer based on revenue, after Wal-Mart and Carrefour and second largest in profit behind Wal-Mart.

 

Tesco's UK stores are divided into six formats, differentiated by size and the range of products sold. Tesco Extra stores are larger, mainly out-of-town hypermarkets that stock nearly all of Tesco's product ranges. Exceptions include Hexham Extra, Kingston upon Hull Extra, Stevenage Extra, Wigan Extra, Grimsby Extra, Galashiels Extra, Slough Extra, Eastbourne Extra, Yeovil Extra and Burnley Extra, which are in the heart of the town centre and Cardiff Western Avenue Extra, Cardiff Pengam Green Extra and the one pictured here as a panorama, Warrington Extra are located in the inner-city) that stock nearly all of Tesco's product ranges.

 

Tesco Express stores are neighbourhood convenience shops, stocking mainly food with an emphasis on higher-margin products (due to small store size, and the necessity to maximise revenue per square foot) alongside everyday essentials. They are found in busy city centre districts, small shopping precincts in residential areas, small towns and on Esso petrol station forecourts. In Warrington alone no-one is more than 3 miles away from a Tesco.

 

I have a Tesco clubcard and the intelligence collected about my purchases, where they are made and how often is total. Such that at Christmas I generally get opening hours of the filling station in Scotland nearest to where I spend the festive season with my club card statement. Despite the fact that is the only time I generally fill up there. When George Orwell wrote about 1984 I think he had authority not supermarkets in mind.

 

NB: Like all the images on this stream, full size prints up to 30x20inches are available, Check my profile for how to contact me.

 

Checkout more cool stuff from my photostream.

 

Keep in touch, add me as a contact www.flickr.com/relationship.gne?id=33062170@N08 so I can follow all your new uploads.

 

(c) Hotpix / HotpixUK Tony Smith - Hotpix.freeserve.co.uk WDCC

 

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The Mo, slang for moustache, and November come together each year for Movember.

 

Movember challenges men to change their appearance and the face of men’s health by growing a moustache. The rules are simple, start Movember 1st clean shaven and then grow a moustache for the entire month. The moustache becomes the ribbon for men’s health, the means by which awareness and funds are raised for cancers that affect men. Much like the commitment to run or walk for charity, the men of Movember commit to growing a moustache for 30 days.

 

The idea for Movember was sparked in 2003 over a few beers in Melbourne, Australia. The plan was simple – to bring the moustache back as a bit of a joke and do something for men’s health. No money was raised in 2003, but the guys behind the Mo realized the potential a moustache had in generating conversations about men’s health. Inspired by the women around them and all they had done for breast cancer, the Mo Bros set themselves on a course to create a global men’s health movement.

 

The funds raised through Movember’s UK campaign benefit the The Prostate Cancer Charity (TPCC), the UK’s leading prostate cancer charity.

The money raised as a result of Movember is channelled by our men’s health partner into a number of world class and innovative education, support, research and awareness initiatives.

 

The success of Movember can be directly attributed to the more than 627,000 Mo Bros and Mo Sistas who have supported our cause since 2003. Movember is sincerely grateful for their efforts and appreciate all they do.

 

For those of you new to Movember, we challenge you to join us in changing the face of men's health.

 

Visit: uk.movember.com/

  

My fake Mo is not just a concept, it's an attitude.

Please donate to #Movember: uk.movember.com/donate

 

Surprisingly, because the metals are such perfect expressions of archetypal energies, we can actually learn quite a bit about people by studying the properties of metals and the behavior of planets. That same correspondence exists in the human temperament. For instance, the leaden person is someone who has, like Saturn, lost their bid to become a star. They have accepted a mere physical existence and believe the created world is all that counts. The positive characteristics of the saturnine person are patience, responsibility, somberness, structure and realism, true knowledge of history and karma. The black messenger crows of Chronos bring black moods, depression and despair to us, but they also alert us to illusion and fakeness in our lives.

While we have already discussed the planetary archetypes, it is worth reminding ourselves at this point exactly how the alchemists looked on the relationship between the planet and its metal. They believed that the metals had the same “virtue” as the corresponding planet, that a single spirit infuses both the planet and the metal. In other words, the planet was a celestial manifestation and the metal a terrestrial manifestation of the same universal force. Therefore, the metals are the purest expression of the planetary energies in the mineral kingdom, which is the basis for material reality on earth. The next stage of evolution on our planet is the plant kingdom, and the alchemists assigned a metal and its corresponding planet to describe the characteristics of every known herb, flower, and plant. Similarly, on the next level in the evolution of matter in the animal kingdom, all creatures carry their own metallic or planetary signatures, which are expressed in their behavior. In human beings, the alchemists referred to the sum total of the cosmic signatures of the metals as a person’s “temperament.” Originally, that word referred to the metallurgical process of “tempering” or mixing different metals to produce certain characteristics in an alloy. Although the alchemists considered lead the lowest of the base metals, they treated it with a great deal of respect, as they did its corresponding planet Saturn. Lead was said to carry all the energy of its own transformation, and it was that hidden energy that the alchemists sought to free. To the alchemists, the ancient metal was a powerful “sleeping giant” with a dark and secret nature that encompassed both the beginning and end of the Great Work.

Lead is the heaviest of the seven metals; it is very tied to gravity, form, and manifested reality. It is also a very stubborn metal known for its durability and resistance to change. Lead products dating from 7000 BC are still intact, and lead water pipes installed by the Romans 1,500 years ago are still in use today. Alchemists depicted lead in their drawings as the god Saturn (a crippled old man with a sickle), Father Time, or a skeleton representing death itself. Any of these symbols in their manuscripts meant the alchemist was working with the metal lead in the laboratory or a leaden attitude in his accompanying meditation.Lead is a boundary of heaviness for matter. Metals of greater atomic weight are too heavy and disintegrate over time (by radioactive decay) to turn back into lead. So radioactive decay is really a Saturnic process that introduces a new characteristic in the metals – that of time. All the hyper-energetic metals beyond lead are trapped in time to inexorably return to lead. There is no natural process more unalterably exact than radioactive decay. Atomic clocks, the most precise timekeeping devices we have, are based on this leaden process. Geologists measure the age of radioactive rocks by how much lead they contain, and the age of the earth is estimated by taking lead isotope measurements. In many ways, lead carries the signature of Father Time.Native lead, which is lead metal found in a chemically uncombined state, is actually extremely rare. It is found in the earth's crust in a concentration of only about 13 parts per billion. Lead does not form crystals easily, and thus the pure mineral form is very rare and extremely valuable as rock specimens. Such elemental lead can also be found in very unusual “metamorphosed” limestone and marble formations that are equally rare.Surprisingly, lead is in the same group in the Periodic Table as gold, and when it occurs in nature, it is always found with gold and silver. In fact, the chemical symbol for lead (Pb) is from the Latin word plumbum, which means “liquid silver.” We derive our words “plumbing” and “plumb bob” from the use of lead in those applications. In the smelting of silver, lead plays an important role by forming a layer over the emerging molten silver and protecting it from combining with the air and splattering out. The volatile molten lead covering is gradually burnt away, until only the pure silver metal “peeks out” (in the smelter’s terminology) in a stabilized form. Thus, lead protects and even sacrifices itself for the nobler metals.The planet Saturn and its metal and the planet have the same symbol (L) in alchemy. The Hermetic interpretation is that the symbol is basically the cross of the elements that depicts the division between the Above and Below or spirit and matter. The lunar crescent of the soul is below the cross, representing the manifestation (or entrapment) of soul below in matter. Despite these associations with the noble metals, lead itself never makes it to such heights among the metals. The silvery luster of fresh cut lead quickly fades, as if it were “dying” before your eyes. Furthermore, alchemists considered lead to be “hydrophobic” or against the life nourishing archetype of water. Lead ores lack the slightest water content and tend to form machine-like structures.The most common ore of lead is galena, which also contains the noble metals silver and gold. Galena is lead sulfide, a favorite of rock collectors because of its distinctive cubic shapes, characteristic cleavage, and high density. In fact, the structure of galena is identical to that of natural table salt. The two minerals have exactly the same crystal shapes, symmetry and cleavage, although galena crystals are thousands of times larger. Some galena may contain up to 1% silver and often contains trace amounts of gold. The large volume of galena that is processed for lead produces enough silver as a by product to make galena the leading ore of silver as well Galena definitely has the signature of lead. Its color is silver gray with a bluish tint. The luster ranges from metallic to dull in the weathered faces, and the isometric crystals are opaque to light. The massive crystals of galena almost always take the form of a cube or octahedron, and the cleavage is perfect in four direction always forming cubes. Because of the perfect cleavage, fractures are rarely seen and the dark crystalline structure is nearly perfect.Lead is also found in other sulfuric minerals like calcite and dolomite, as well as lead oxidation minerals such as and anglesite and cerussite, which is found in the oxidation zone of lead deposits usually associated with galena. Some formations show cerussite crusts around a galena core as if the act of oxidation was frozen in time. Cerrussite is lead carbonate and also a favorite of rock hounds. Its very high luster is due mostly to the metallic lead content, and just as leaded crystal glass sparkles more brilliantly because of its lead content, so too does cerussite. Cerussite has one of the highest densities for a transparent mineral. It is over six and a half times as dense as water. Most rocks and minerals average only around three times the density of water. Cerussite is famous for its great sparkle and density, and its amazing twinned (or double) crystals. The mineral forms geometrically intricate structures and star shapes that simply amazing to behold – sometimes the twinned crystals form star shapes with six "rays" extending out from the star.When freed from its ores, lead metal has a bluish-white color and is very soft – capable of being scratched by a fingernail. With its dull metallic luster and high density, lead cannot easily be confused with any other metal. It is also malleable, ductile, and sectile – meaning it can be pounded into other shapes, stretched into a wire, and cut into slices. However, lead is a dark, sluggish, base metal. Of the seven metals, it is the slowest conductor of electricity and heat, the least lustrous or resonant. Its Saturnic signature of heaviness is expressed not only in its being the heaviest metal but also in its tendency to form inert and insoluble compounds. No other metal forms as many. Although it tarnishes upon exposure to air like silver, lead is extremely resistant to corrosion over time and seems to last forever. Lead pipes bearing the insignia of Roman emperors, used as drains from the baths, are still in service. The surface of lead is protected by a thin layer of lead oxide, and it does not react with water. The same process protects lead from the traditional “liquid fire” of the alchemists – sulfuric acid. In fact, lead bottles are still used to store the highly corrosive acid. Lead is so inalterable, that half of all the lead in the world today is simply recovered from scrap and formed directly into bullion for reuse.Lead is truly a destroyer of light. It is added to high-quality glassware (lead crystal) to absorb light reflections and make the glass clearer. Lead salts in glass are not changed by light but change light itself by absorbing it. Incoming light in lead crystal meets with high resistance, but once it is within the glass, light is immediately absorbed or dispersed without any reflected light escaping. Sheets of lead are also impermeable to all forms of light, even high energy X-rays and gamma rays, which makes lead the perfect shield against any form of radiation and is why it is used to transport and store radioactive materials.Lead is an extremely poor conductor of electricity and blocks all kinds of energy transmission. Indeed, one of the signatures of lead is its ability to “dampen” or absorb energy. Unlike other metals, when lead is struck, the vibrations are immediately absorbed and any tone is smothered in dullness. Lead is an effective sound proofing medium and tetraethyl lead is still used in some grades of gasoline as an antiknock compound to “quiet” the combustion of gasoline.Thin lead sheets are used extensively in the walls of high-rise buildings to block the transmission of sound, and thick pads of lead are used in the foundations to absorb the vibrations of street traffic and even minor earthquakes. Lead sheets are widely used in roofing to block solar rays, and lead foil is used to form lightproof enclosures in laboratory work. Ultimately, lead corresponds to the galactic Black Hole that absorbs all forms of radiation and light.Lead reacts with more chemicals than any other metal, however, instead of producing something new and useful, lead “kills” the combining substance by making it inert, insoluble and unable to enter into further chemical reactions. Its salts precipitate out of solutions heavily and copiously. Lead has the same effect in the plant kingdom. It accumulates in the roots and slows down the “breathing” process in plants. Young plants are adversely affected by even the smallest amount of lead in the soil.Lead is poisonous and accumulates over time in the bones of the human body, where it cannot be flushed out. It has also been found in high concentrations in gallstones and kidney stones. The old alchemical graphic for lead – a skeleton – was grotesquely appropriate. The symptoms of lead poisoning (known as “Saturnism”) are lack of energy, depression, blindness, dizziness, severe headaches at the back of the head, brain damage, attention deficit disorder, learning disabilities and mental retardation, antisocial behavior and anger, atrophy of muscular tissue and cramping, excess growth of connective tissue resulting in a rigid appearance, rapid aging, coma, and early death. Rats fed only 5 parts per million of lead had a lifespan 25% shorter than normal rats. Children are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning, and it is believed to be an important factor in stillborn fetuses. Children with more than just 0.3 parts per million of lead in their blood suffer a significant slowing of brain function and corresponding drop in IQ. Lead in paint has caused mental retardation and premature aging in hundreds of children who ingested old flaking paint from the walls of their homes. Lead paint was used extensively until the poisonous effects were documented in the 1960s. Because of its lasting durability, lead paint is still used outdoors in advertising and the yellow lines on highways and curbs. The subtly controlling aspect of those applications is another signature of lead and of “leaden” persons in general.Not surprisingly, lead has found use as an insecticide and was even once considered for use as a military weapon. Lead metal reacts violently with fluorine and chlorine to form the highly poisonous gases, lead fluoride and lead chloride. Lead is also used in all kinds of ammunition – another appropriate application of lead’s esoteric signature as Father Time and the Grim Reaper. There are many research studies linking lead exposure to anger and violence, especially in adolescents. One recent study of all counties in the United States conducted by Colorado State University revealed that the murder rate in counties with the highest lead levels were four times higher than in counties with the lowest levels of lead.More benevolent uses of lead are in storage batteries, covering for underground and transoceanic cables, waste plumbing, shielding around X-ray equipment and nuclear reactors, solder, pewter, fine lead crystal glass, and flint glass with a high refractive index for achromatic lenses.Even the elemental metal carries the seed of its own redemption. The alchemists knew that Fire is lord over lead, for the metal has a low melting point and is easily separated from its ore by roasting in an open flame, and the metal itself melts in a candle flame. Lead expands on heating and contracts on cooling more than any other solid heavy metal. (Silver is the opposite and is considered an antidote to lead.)Perhaps owing to its dual nature, lead carries deeply hidden within its structure the fire of its own transformation. Many lead salts reveal a whole rainbow of brilliant colors, with the solar colors of yellow, orange, and red predominating. This is why lead has been used in paints for so many centuries. Finely divided lead powder is pyrophoric (“fire containing”) and easily catches fire or erupts spontaneously in flames. When made into a fine powder, lead metal must be kept in a vacuum to keep from catching fire. Otherwise, it ignites and burns down to a bright yellow ash, revealing its deeply hidden solar signature. So, the wonder of lead is that hidden deep inside the gray, dead metal is a tiny, eternal spark that is the seed of its own resurrection. In the eyes of alchemists, this makes lead the most important metal despite its unattractive darkness. For dull lead and gleaming gold are really the same things, only at different stages of growth or maturity.The Secret Fire inside lead is really the alchemical basis for transforming lead into gold, and correspondingly, gives mankind hope for its own spiritual transformation. That tiny spark of light in the darkest part of matter makes resurrection part of the structure of the universe. So, deep down inside, the metal lead also yearns to be transformed. It wants to rise in the air and fly, leave matter and form behind, and be free as Fire. Lead unites two contrasting forces: rigid heaviness and revivifying inner fire. Archetypically, the lead process is concerned with death and resurrection. Greek myth says that after death our soul is put on a scale, and the weights of the scale are made from lead, the metal that carries Saturn's signature.Lead is used in magical rituals, spells, and amulets to promote contact with deep unconscious levels (the underworld), deep meditation, controlling negativity, breaking bad habits and addictions, protection, stability, grounding, solidity, perseverance, decisiveness, concentration, conservation, and material constructions (buildings). Pick up a hunk of lead and the first thing you notice is its weight – its connection to gravity. It is that connection to something beyond matter and light, the very form of the universe that is the physical basis for this experiment. During the winter months, preferably on some clear night in late January or early February, go outside and find the planet Saturn in the northern sky. Relax and try to focus all your attention on the golden sphere. Relax completely with an open and quiet mind. Become empty and let the planet influence you. Do this until you feel a real connection with the distant planet. Continue gazing upon Saturn and place a piece of lead metal in your hand. You should be able to feel a strange resonance building. That eerie, cold vibration is not your imagination. It is what alchemists refer to as the “call of lead.” You are experiencing the metal’s true signature or living correspondence with its planetary twin.The strange connection between lead and Saturn has been documented by modern scientists, who have shown that lead compounds react differently depending on Saturn’s position in the sky. For instance, solutions of lead nitrate produce the greatest weight of crystallization (or manifestation) during February, when Saturn rules the sky, and the least during June, when Saturn is barely visible. Lead compounds also exhibit different properties when Saturn aligns with other planets. For example, lead sulfate solution rises 60% higher on strips of filter paper during conjunctions of Saturn with Mars than at other times. It is also known that the ease of making lead solutions (the “solubility coefficient” of lead) varies with the position of Saturn relative to the other planets. NASA is even considering a series of astrochemical experiments to see if the Saturn-lead effects become more pronounced in outer space.Surprisingly, because the metals are such perfect expressions of archetypal energies, we can actually learn quite a bit about people by studying the properties of metals and the behavior of planets. That same correspondence exists in the human temperament. For instance, the leaden person is someone who has, like Saturn, lost their bid to become a star. They have accepted a mere physical existence and believe the created world is all that counts. The positive characteristics of the saturnine person are patience, responsibility, somberness, structure and realism, true knowledge of history and karma. The black messenger crows of Chronos bring black moods, depression and despair to us, but they also alert us to illusion and fakeness in our lives. Surprisingly, because the metals are such perfect expressions of archetypal energies, we can actually learn quite a bit about people by studying the properties of metals and the behavior of planets. That same correspondence exists in the human temperament. For instance, the leaden person is someone who has, like Saturn, lost their bid to become a star. They have accepted a mere physical existence and believe the created world is all that counts. The positive characteristics of the saturnine person are patience, responsibility, somberness, structure and realism, true knowledge of history and karma. The black messenger crows of Chronos bring black moods, depression and despair to us, but they also alert us to illusion and fakeness in our lives. Surprisingly, because the metals are such perfect expressions of archetypal energies, we can actually learn quite a bit about people by studying the properties of metals and the behavior of planets. That same correspondence exists in the human temperament. For instance, the leaden person is someone who has, like Saturn, lost their bid to become a star. They have accepted a mere physical existence and believe the created world is all that counts. The positive characteristics of the saturnine person are patience, responsibility, somberness, structure and realism, true knowledge of history and karma. The black messenger crows of Chronos bring black moods, depression and despair to us, but they also alert us to illusion and fakeness in our lives. Because the lusterless metal is so “dead” and resists interaction with other substances, it is used as containers for acids, like automobile batteries, and is used as a lining in pipes that carry corrosive substances. Similarly, the lead tempered person is like an acid-proof container that stores up caustic feelings and anger. Phrases like “acid tongued” and “vitriolic” have their origins in this alchemical process of storing negative emotional energy.On the psychological level, lead is symbolic of a person’s inertness and unwillingness to change. There is a denial of all higher or spiritual energies, and the alchemists often portrayed the leaden person as lying in an open grave or hopelessly chained to matter in some way. A feeling of being trapped in material reality is symptomatic of a leaden attitude. Leaden people are stubborn, unyielding, and often control other people by making them wait. They must always be right, rarely accept blame or admit to being in error, and have no real regard for the truth of a situation. They may be religious but not spiritual. They tend to be suspicious of genius and inspiration, which they will often attribute to fantasy, They feel threatened by freedom of thought and expression, and sometimes use ridicule or try to “push people’s buttons” to control it. They tend to be very uncreative, judgmental, and smug.On the other hand, leaden people are grounded, earthy, and practical. They are good friends during times of bereavement – a rock of support at funerals and deathbeds. Such people secretly crave stimulation, excitement, and new ideas. They gravitate to people who supply energy and entertainment in their lives. This craving for stimulation often makes them focus on nervous energy instead of higher inspiration. Therefore, Saturn’s children can be very reactive and excitable instead of lethargic, as they try to escape from their prison of matter.As soon as bright, fresh lead metal is exposed to air, it forms a dull-gray oxide layer called the “litharge” that resists any further chemical interaction. In alchemy, air is associated with spiritual energy, and lead reacts to it by instantly forming a barrier or blocking it. Likewise, one of the distinguishing characteristics of someone with a lead temperament is their lack of interest in spiritual ideas. There is also a general lack of interest in life in general, and leaden people often seem lazy, lethargic, or unresponsive.In the individual, lead absorbs the inner light or insight necessary for personal growth and blocks all outside “radiations,” such as attempts at spiritual instruction by others. Because psychological lead absorbs both the deeper vibrations of intuition and higher spiritual energies and aspirations, the person with a lead temperament is uninspired, unimaginative, and lacks that creative spark so necessary for positive change. Before long the lead person starts to feel trapped in his or her dull environment and seeks out excitement, death-defying feats, lively people, and challenging conversation. Their favorite color is often red, and unconsciously, they are seeking the alchemical element of Fire. Fire is one of the Four Elements that represents activity, energy, creative thinking, and transformation. Fire is the tool alchemists use to begin the transmutation of lead into gold as well as transform leaden consciousness into a golden awareness of higher reality. In the laboratory, the changes in the metal and in the alchemist take place simultaneously. Otherwise, there can be no real transformation. The alchemists transmuted the Lead temperament using the Fire operation of Calcination. Physically, lead and Saturn rule the bones, teeth, spleen, and slow chronic processes such as aging. The therapeutic effects are contracting, coagulating, drying, and mineralizing. Saturn-ruled plants enhance the structures of life. They give a sobriety of disposition, en-abling one to see limitations. These plants give steadiness, solidity of pur-pose, subtlety, diplomacy, patience, and an ability to work on the physical plane better.Saturnic or leaden energies are needed for those who have a hard time finishing pro-jects or for those with plenty of ideas but never realize them. Alchemists seeking to produce physical effects found in saturnine elixirs the essential vibratory rate that enabled materialization. Alchemists seeking to produce physical effects found in saturnine elixirs the essential vibratory rate that enabled materialization. Generally speaking, any other elixir mixed with a Saturn elixir will be earthed, which makes them of great value when working on physical plane phenomenon. Their physical therapeutic properties become refrigerant, anti-pyretic, sedative, styptic, and astringent.For instance, if one mixes a saturnine elixir with a mercurial one, the alchemists believed it would release knowledge contained in secret magical manuscripts or in ancient hermetic traditions, because the Saturn-Mercury vibration contains all hidden knowledge of an esoteric nature within it. Alchemical oils were mixed in the same way. For example, to treat leukemia, alchemists would prescribe an equal mixture of lead oil and gold oil. The alchemists made an Oil of Lead that was good for “growth of bones after breaking, strengthening the skeleton, osteoporosis and atrophy of the bones, stimulation of the spleen, drying tissue, reducing secretions and discharges, stopping bleeding, reducing fever, increasing patience, and stopping visions and an overactive imagination.” They also suggested it for hallucinations due to neurological disorders that have delirious after-effects such as encephalitis and post-traumatic stress syndrome. In the “like cures like” philosophy of homeopathy, lead is used to treat sclerosis, the hardening of bones and arteries, which is the hallmark of old age and signature of lead. The homeopathic name of lead is Plumbum metallicum. Native tin is known as stannum, which is the Latin word for tin and also gives the metal its chemical symbol (Sn). The alchemical symbol is K, which shows the lunar principle of soul above the cross of the elements or emerging from the darkness of matter.

Tin is a shiny, silvery-white metal that is malleable, somewhat ductile and sectile, and seems like a perfected form of lead to the casual observer. In fact, the Romans called tin Plumbum album or “white lead.” Tin resists weathering and does not oxidize, and tin utensils buried underground or lost at sea in sunken ships shone like new when rediscovered after hundreds of years. “Tinkers” were gypsy craftsmen who wandered from neighborhood to neighborhood in Europe repairing tin kettles and utensils or melting them down and recasting them. Native or elemental tin is extremely rare in nature and is found with gold and copper deposits. The metal was considered “semi-noble” in ancient times and was used for jewelry in Babylonia and Egypt. The Romans used it to make mirrors, and it was used as coinage in Europe at one time.

Tin has a highly crystalline structure, and due to the breaking of these crystals, a "cry" is heard when a tin bar is bent. Unlike lead, tin has pleasing acoustic effects and is used in the making of bells. The crystals in common grey tin have a cubic structure, but when heated or frozen it changes into white tin, which has a tetragonal structure. After further heating or freezing, white tin disintegrates into a powdery substance. This powder has the ability to “infect” other tin surfaces it comes in contact with by forming blisters that spread until all the metal “sickens” and disintegrates. This transformation is encouraged by impurities such as zinc and aluminum and can be prevented by adding small amounts of antimony or bismuth to the metal. The sickness of tin was called the “tin plague” and was the scourge of tin roofs during Europe’s frigid winters. The mysterious effect was first was first noticed as “growths” on organ pipes in European cathedrals, where it was thought to be the work of the devil to disfigure god’s work.Tin metal has only a few practical uses and most tin is used in alloys. Bronze is an alloy of 5% tin and 95% copper, and the development of bronze by humans marked a new age of advancement known as the Bronze Age. Most solder is a combination of tin and lead; pewter is also an alloy of tin and lead. Other tin alloys are used to make tin cans and tin roofs, and tin has significant use as a corrosion fighter in the protection of other metals. Tin resists distilled, sea and soft tap water, but is attacked by strong acids, alkalis, and acid salts. When heated in air, tin forms tin oxide, which is used to plate steel and make tin cans. Other uses are in type metal, fusible metal, Babbitt metal, and die casting alloys. Tin chloride is used as a reducing agent and mordant in calico printing. Tin salts sprayed onto glass are used to produce electrically conductive coatings, which are used for panel lighting and for frost-free windshields. Window glass is made by floating molten glass on molten tin to produce a flat surface. A crystalline tin-niobium alloy is superconductive at very low temperatures, and shoebox-sized electromagnets made of the wire produce magnetic fields comparable to conventional electromagnets weighing hundreds of tons.The distribution of tin on earth follows an ecliptic at an angle of 23.5 º to the equator that is an exact track of the orbit of Jupiter slicing through the planet. Even stranger, these jovian forces seem to form tin veins that zigzag through the rocks in a lightening bolt pattern. This is no haphazard effect, but an astonishing confirmation of Jupiter freeing the metals from their Saturnic prison on earth. Goethe was just one great alchemical philosopher who believed this. “A remarkable influence proceeds from the metal tin,” he wrote. “This has a differentiating influence, and opens a door through which a way is provided for different metals to be formed from primeval rocks.”Tin ore minerals include oxide minerals like cassiterite and a few sulfides such as franckerite. By far the most tin comes from cassiterite or tin oxide. Reduction of this ore in burning coal results in tin metal and was probably how tin was made by the ancients. Cassiterite is a black or reddish brown mineral that has ornately faceted specimens with a greasy, high luster. It is generally opaque, but its luster and multiple crystal faces cause a sparkling surface. Cassiterite has been an important ore of tin for thousands of years and is still the greatest source of tin today. Most aggregate specimens of cassiterite show crystal twins, with the typical twin bent at a near-60-degree angle to form a distinctive "Elbow Twin." Other crystalline forms include eight-sided prisms and four-sided pyramids. Cassiterite is sometimes found in nature associated with topaz and fluorite gemstones.Tin has a surprising affinity for silica and shares its crystalline structure. In the jovian ring on our planet where native tin is found, the metal lies in silica veins of quartz and granite. In the body, high concentrations of tin and silica are found in the boundary layer of the skin, and tin reacts with silica acid in many of the “shaping” processes of growth. In the Middle Ages, sick people were served food on a tin plate and drinks in a tin vessel to help them regenerate and recover their strength. Today, we know that tin acts as a bactericide and pesticide.Native tin is known as stannum, which is the Latin word for tin and also gives the metal its chemical symbol (Sn). The alchemical symbol is K, which shows the lunar principle of soul above the cross of the elements or emerging from the darkness of matter.

 

Tin is a shiny, silvery-white metal that is malleable, somewhat ductile and sectile, and seems like a perfected form of lead to the casual observer. In fact, the Romans called tin Plumbum album or “white lead.” Tin resists weathering and does not oxidize, and tin utensils buried underground or lost at sea in sunken ships shone like new when rediscovered after hundreds of years. “Tinkers” were gypsy craftsmen who wandered from neighborhood to neighborhood in Europe repairing tin kettles and utensils or melting them down and recasting them. Native or elemental tin is extremely rare in nature and is found with gold and copper deposits. The metal was considered “semi-noble” in ancient times and was used for jewelry in Babylonia and Egypt. The Romans used it to make mirrors, and it was used as coinage in Europe at one time.

Tin has a highly crystalline structure, and due to the breaking of these crystals, a "cry" is heard when a tin bar is bent. Unlike lead, tin has pleasing acoustic effects and is used in the making of bells. The crystals in common grey tin have a cubic structure, but when heated or frozen it changes into white tin, which has a tetragonal structure. After further heating or freezing, white tin disintegrates into a powdery substance. This powder has the ability to “infect” other tin surfaces it comes in contact with by forming blisters that spread until all the metal “sickens” and disintegrates. This transformation is encouraged by impurities such as zinc and aluminum and can be prevented by adding small amounts of antimony or bismuth to the metal. The sickness of tin was called the “tin plague” and was the scourge of tin roofs during Europe’s frigid winters. The mysterious effect was first was first noticed as “growths” on organ pipes in European cathedrals, where it was thought to be the work of the devil to disfigure god’s work.Tin metal has only a few practical uses and most tin is used in alloys. Bronze is an alloy of 5% tin and 95% copper, and the development of bronze by humans marked a new age of advancement known as the Bronze Age. Most solder is a combination of tin and lead; pewter is also an alloy of tin and lead. Other tin alloys are used to make tin cans and tin roofs, and tin has significant use as a corrosion fighter in the protection of other metals. Tin resists distilled, sea and soft tap water, but is attacked by strong acids, alkalis, and acid salts. When heated in air, tin forms tin oxide, which is used to plate steel and make tin cans. Other uses are in type metal, fusible metal, Babbitt metal, and die casting alloys. Tin chloride is used as a reducing agent and mordant in calico printing. Tin salts sprayed onto glass are used to produce electrically conductive coatings, which are used for panel lighting and for frost-free windshields. Window glass is made by floating molten glass on molten tin to produce a flat surface. A crystalline tin-niobium alloy is superconductive at very low temperatures, and shoebox-sized electromagnets made of the wire produce magnetic fields comparable to conventional electromagnets weighing hundreds of tons.The distribution of tin on earth follows an ecliptic at an angle of 23.5 º to the equator that is an exact track of the orbit of Jupiter slicing through the planet. Even stranger, these jovian forces seem to form tin veins that zigzag through the rocks in a lightening bolt pattern. This is no haphazard effect, but an astonishing confirmation of Jupiter freeing the metals from their Saturnic prison on earth. Goethe was just one great alchemical philosopher who believed this. “A remarkable influence proceeds from the metal tin,” he wrote. “This has a differentiating influence, and opens a door through which a way is provided for different metals to be formed from primeval rocks.”Tin ore minerals include oxide minerals like cassiterite and a few sulfides such as franckerite. By far the most tin comes from cassiterite or tin oxide. Reduction of this ore in burning coal results in tin metal and was probably how tin was made by the ancients. Cassiterite is a black or reddish brown mineral that has ornately faceted specimens with a greasy, high luster. It is generally opaque, but its luster and multiple crystal faces cause a sparkling surface. Cassiterite has been an important ore of tin for thousands of years and is still the greatest source of tin today. Most aggregate specimens of cassiterite show crystal twins, with the typical twin bent at a near-60-degree angle to form a distinctive "Elbow Twin." Other crystalline forms include eight-sided prisms and four-sided pyramids. Cassiterite is sometimes found in nature associated with topaz and fluorite gemstones.Tin has a surprising affinity for silica and shares its crystalline structure. In the jovian ring on our planet where native tin is found, the metal lies in silica veins of quartz and granite. In the body, high concentrations of tin and silica are found in the boundary layer of the skin, and tin reacts with silica acid in many of the “shaping” processes of growth. In the Middle Ages, sick people were served food on a tin plate and drinks in a tin vessel to help them regenerate and recover their strength. Today, we know that tin acts as a bactericide and pesticide.

Flowers last longer in tin vases, and food has been preserved in the tin cans (actually a thin layer of tin on iron) for over a century. Beer (ruled by the jovial Jupiter) is said to taste best from a tin mug. Jupiter rules growth, the metabolic system, the liver, and the enrichment of the blood from food. Jupiter therapeutic effects are anti-spasmodic and hepatic. Jupiter-ruled plants preserve the body and promote healthy growth and are the natural healing herbs of the planetary system. They af-fect the mind in such a way as to promote an understanding of ritual form from the highest point of view, and religious leaders, doctors, lawyers, etc. will find great benefit from jovian herb remedies. They also attune one to the wealth vibration and open up channels for growth and expansion, materi-ally as well as spiritually.Jupiter controls the circulation of blood in the human body. If mixed with a solar herbal eider, it will give the alchemist access to the highest plane. Jupiter-Mercury combinations produce insight into the philosophical principles of any system and their part in the cosmic scheme and provide an intuitive understanding of the great spiritual masters. This particular herbal mixture also produces a lightheartedness and gaiety, which can be very useful to those with a predisposition to depression or gloominess. The physical properties of such a mixture are anabolic and antispasmodic.The alchemists made an Oil of Tin that was used to treat the liver (jaundice, hepatitis, cirrhosis), certain types of eczema, liquid ovarian cysts, inflammatory effusions, pleurisies, acne, water retention, and certain types of obesity. This oil was said to be excellent for someone "loosing shape." The oil was also used as a sweat inducer, wormer, antispasmodic, cathartic, and laxative.The polar (opposite) metal to tin is mercury, and Oil of Tin was said to be an excellent antidote for mercury poisoning, and likewise mercury was said to balance the bad effects of tin. Tin and mercury oil combined are said to provide deep insight and cure lightheadedness and certain phases of manic-depressive syndrome.The homeopathic form of tin is called Stannum, a remedy which is said to strengthen and regenerate muscle and brain tissue. It is also a remedy for the joints and connective tissue of ligaments and cartilage. Stannum is allegedly beneficial in liver disease and is used for congestion, hardening, encephalitis, and other illnesses where the fluid balance is upset.During the early Spring, preferably sometime in March, go outside and find the red planet Mars in the night sky. Relax and try to focus all your attention on the tiny red sphere. Relax completely with an open and quiet mind. Become empty and let the planet influence you. Do this until you feel a real connection with the distant planet. Continue gazing upon Mars and place a piece of iron in your hand or a small cast iron pot or other object but not something of made of steel or chromed. You should be able to feel a resonance building. It is what alchemists refer to as the “call of iron.” You are experiencing the metal’s true signature or living correspondence with its planetary twin. See how your feelings compare to how the alchemists felt about this powerful metal.When mixed with solar herbs, iron herbs increase energy and activate the energetic potentials of other herbs. Martian elixirs release the action poten-tial of the soul of something. When mixed with other herbs, martian herbs acti-vate the potentialities of the other herbs to a great degree making them more forceful in applica-tion and generally more active. Mars herbs are wonderful tonics when mixed with Sun herbs. The combination gives great physical energy, tones the muscles, and increases sexual potency. They also provoke self-reliance, spontaneity, and indepen-dence of attitude. If the alchemist is involved in magical evocation, a mixture of a mars, moon, and mercurial elixirs will help produce the physical plane vehicle of manifestation.Copper is a reddish-brown metal with a bright metallic luster. It is in the same group in the Periodic Table as gold, and like gold, it is remarkably ductile. It is also very malleable and sectile (it can be pounded into other shapes and cut into slices) and is an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. Molten copper is a sea green color, and copper tarnishes with a green color and burns with a blue-green flame with flashes of red, and the alchemists sometimes described Venus, the metal’s archetypal planetary source, as dressed in a blue cloak over a red gown.Pick up a piece of copper and the first thing you notice is its surprising feeling of warmth and moisture. It is that connection to something archetypal and nourishing that makes up the signature of this metal. It is easy to connect with copper, just as its planet (Venus) is easy to see in the sky. It is so brilliant it is often mistaken for a bright star or even a UFO. The best time to see it is in the early evening or morning when it is close to the horizon. In fact, Venus has been called both the “Morning Star” and the “Evening Star” and is associated with magical energies. It is the “first star I see tonight” upon you make you wish that will come true with the sympathetic venusian energies. On some clear night or morning, go outside and find the planet Venus. Relax and try to focus all your attention on the brilliant white sphere. Relax completely with an open and quiet mind. Become empty and let the planet influence you. Do this until you feel a real connection with the distant planet. Continue gazing upon the planet and grab a piece of copper, a fistful of pennies, or even a copper cooking utensil. You should be able to feel a warm resonance building. That deep and soothing vibration is not your imagination. It is what alchemists refer to as the “call of copper.” You are experiencing the metal’s true signature or living correspondence with its planetary twin.The venusian signature gives refinement of senses and the ability to appreciate beauty. Artists, actors, and others in the public eye will find these elixirs a great aid to performing their work. Venus herbs also enhance the taste perceptions, promote affection, give an amiable disposition, and make one more psychically sensitive to astral influences. For those who feel a lack of charm, or some of the softer human qualities, a venusian elixir will stimulate the right vibration in your aura. Venusian elixirs also promote harmony and balance within our being and in our dealings with others. Venusian elixirs are said to give access to that realm of the astral that is intimately connected with the working and forces of the most intimate magic of nature. They are a great aid to alchemists who wish to make herbal alchemy their life work, as they open up the human consciousness to the secrets of the plant kingdom. Naturalists will find these elixirs most illuminating, as they will give conscious con-tact with the various “deities” of long past nature religions.Mercury is truly unique. It is the only metal that is liquid at room temperature and the heaviest natural liquid on the planet. According to alchemical theory, all the metals began in the liquid state on deep in the earth, but only mercury was able to retain it original innocence and life force and resist taking on a final form, and for that reason, the ancients called it Mercurius vivens (the “living mercury”). This silvery liquid metal (also known as “Quicksilver”) was known to ancient Chinese and Hindus before 2000 BC and has been found in sacred tubes in Egyptian tombs dated from 1500 BC. It was first used to form alloys with other metals around 500 BC. The Greeks applied germ-killing ability of mercury in healing ointments (to the benefit of those afflicted with wounds and skin infections), and in the Middle Ages, Paracelsus used it successfully to treat syphilis. However, the ancient Romans applied mercury compounds for long-term use in cosmetics, and many beautiful women eventually died of its cumulative poisonous effects. Today, many popular brands of eye makeup still contain low levels of mercury.In the East, metallic mercury was the main ingredient in most Tantric medicinal preparations. In his travels through India, Marco Polo observed that many people drank a concoction of mercury and sulfur twice monthly from early childhood with no observable ill effects. They believed the drink gave them longevity. Tantric alchemists in India still take metallic mercury in place of food as an elixir of life, although they caution that the body must be perfectly attuned and strengthened to tolerate the intense cosmic infusion of life force. In Indian alchemy, mercury is called rasa, which refers to the subtle essence that is the origin of all forms of matter. The cosmic chaos from which the universe sprang is called the Rasasara or “Sea of Mercury.” The craft of alchemy is referred to as Rasayana or “Knowledge of Mercury.” Go outside on the night of the full moon and gaze up at the silver orb. Relax and try to focus all your attention on the surface of the moon. Relax completely with an open and quiet mind. Become empty and let our closest planetary body influence you. Do this until you feel a real connection. Now, pick up piece of silver jewelry or dinnerware, and hold it in your left hand until it gets warm. You should be able to feel a liquid-like sensation of cool metallic energy. This is what alchemists refer to as the “call of silver.” You are experiencing the metal’s true signature or living correspondence with the moon itself. Try to remember how this feels in your body. Has the taste in your mouth changed? Has your eyesight altered? How does your skin feel.The alchemists prepared an Oil of Silver they used to treat disorders of the brain and cerebellum, reduce stress, balance emotions, improve memory, treat nervous disorders and epilepsy, improve both melancholia and mania. It was also used as a physical purgative and mental purifier. It was said to affect the subconscious mind, see into the past clearly, remove fears and blockages, allow one to unwind, produce “homey” feelings, give a feeling of grace and sensitivity, and enhanced imagination.Using elaborate mixing and heating techniques, Egyptian alchemists tried making gold by changing the proportions of the Four Elements in the base metals or by attempting to speed up natural growth of lesser metals into gold. Around 100 AD, Egyptian alchemist Maria Prophetissa used mercury and sulfur to try to make gold. Around 300 AD, the alchemist Zosimos, whose recipes often came to him in dreams, was working to transmute copper. “The soul of copper,” he wrote must be purified until it receives the sheen of gold and turns into the royal metal of the Sun." A technique known as "diplosis" (“doubling”) of gold became popular. One such recipe called for heating a mixture of two parts gold with one part each of silver and copper. After appropriate alchemical charging that brought the seed of gold alive, twice as much of a gold as originally added was produced. Egyptian alchemists believed that the gold acted as a seed in metals, especially copper and silver. According to their view, the seed of gold grew, eating the copper and silver as food, until the whole mixture was transformed into pure gold.Gold is a stubbornly pure metal when it comes to reacting or even associating with “lesser” elements. That signature explains a lot of the chemical characteristics of gold. Unlike nearly every other metal, there are no plants that contain even trace amounts of metallic gold. There are very few gold ores, because the noblest metal never alloys with the baser metals, but does alloy with the noble metal silver and makes an amalgam with mercury.Gold is extremely ductile, malleable, and sectile, and so soft it can be cut with a knife, which makes gold impractical to use for tools. It is also very heavy. A gold bar is twice as heavy as an equal-sized bar of lead. Furthermore, gold embodies an inner equilibrium of forces that make it pretty much indestructible. Gold never tarnishes like copper or silver or rust like iron and, whether found buried in the ground, at the bottom of the ocean, in an ancient tomb, or in the ring on your finger, it always looks the same. It cannot be damaged by heat and was considered completely inalterable until around 1100 AD, when alchemists concocted a mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acids known as Agua Regia (“Royal Water”) that could dissolve gold. The immortal metal is endlessly recycled, and all the gold known today is very nearly equal to all the gold that has ever been mined. One ounce of gold can be stretched into a single wire 35 miles long, or it can be beaten to just a few atoms thick. It is the most flexible, enduring, and beautiful of all metals.

Gold shows a distinct affinity for sulfur and forms an ore with a rare element called tellurium. It is one of the few elements gold easily bonds with. In fact, telluride is rarely found without gold. Gold also appears in minerals that are part of a group of tellurium sulfides called the tellurides. However, the amount of gold in these minerals is really miniscule next to the amount of gold found in its native metallic state. Native gold seems to like the company of the purest white quartz and is also found mixed with deposits of pyrite and a few other sulfide minerals. Gold is six times rarer than silver, and it takes about three tons of gold ore to extract an ounce of gold metal.Around the world, nearly every culture associated their supreme god or goddess with gold. For many centuries only the images of gods graced gold coins, until Alexander the Great began the trend of rulers’ images appearing on gold coins around 30 BC. Even the most primitive societies recognize the sacred properties of gold. For example, the Makuna tribes of modern Brazil believe that gold contains “the light of the sun and stars." The chemical symbol for gold (Au) comes from the Latin word aurum meaning "gold.” The alchemical cipher for gold is a rendition of the sun (A), and gold was considered a kind of congealed light. Sol is the King of alchemy, and his royal purple-red color is revealed in gold colloidal solutions, and red is his symbolic color. Sol Philosophorum was the name the alchemists gave to this living spirit of gold, which they saw as the refined essence of heat and fire. Gold was known and considered sacred from earliest times. Gold became popular because it reminded people of the sun with its warm, life-giving properties. Because of its imperishability, the ancient Chinese thought that gold conveyed immortality to its owners. Egyptian inscriptions dating back to 2600 BC describe these same associations with gold. Gold replaced bartering around 3500 BC when the people of Mesopotamia started using it as a kind of money because of it eternal value. By 2800 BC, gold was being fashioned into standardized weights in the form of rings. People started carried black stones called “touchstones” onto which they scraped a piece of gold to leave a streak. Depending on the brightness of the streak, one could estimate how much gold was in the sample. Around 1500 BC, Mesopotamian alchemists discovered a process for purifying gold known as "cuppellation," which involved heating impure gold in a porcelain cup called a “cuppel.” Impurities were absorbed by the porcelain, leaving a button of pure gold behind. Later alchemists used cuppels to test the quality of their transmutations.Using elaborate mixing and heating techniques, Egyptian alchemists tried making gold by changing the proportions of the Four Elements in the base metals or by attempting to speed up natural growth of lesser metals into gold. Around 100 AD, Egyptian alchemist Maria Prophetissa used mercury and sulfur to try to make gold. Around 300 AD, the alchemist Zosimos, whose recipes often came to him in dreams, was working to transmute copper. “The soul of copper,” he wrote must be purified until it receives the sheen of gold and turns into the royal metal of the Sun." A technique known as "diplosis" (“doubling”) of gold became popular. One such recipe called for heating a mixture of two parts gold with one part each of silver and copper. After appropriate alchemical charging that brought the seed of gold alive, twice as much of a gold as originally added was produced. Egyptian alchemists believed that the gold acted as a seed in metals, especially copper and silver. According to their view, the seed of gold grew, eating the copper and silver as food, until the whole mixture was transformed into pure gold.According to the medieval alchemists, Nature sought continually to create the perfection achieved in gold, and they looked at every metal as gold in the making. Alchemists also thought that the objective of every metal was to become gold, and every metal was tested for corrosion and strength and ranked as to how far it was from gold. Many alchemists felt that mercury was the closest metal to gold and that it could be transmuted directly into gold. Their intuition was correct, for mercury can indeed be turned into gold. Gold and mercury are next to each other on the Periodic Table. Mercury is element 80 (has 80 protons) and gold is element 79 (has 79 protons). In the 1960s, physicists were able to knock out a proton in mercury atoms using neutron particle accelerators, and thereby create minute quantities of gold.Gold is at the head of the metals, paired with what in the medieval mind was the strongest planet, the Sun. The alchemists were obsessed with gold’s signature of perfection. Medieval Italian alchemist Bernard Trevisan speculated, "Is not gold merely the Sun’s beams condensed into a solid yellow?" Seventeenth-century alchemist John French asked fervently: “Is there no sperm in gold? Is it not possible to exalt it for multiplication? Is there no universal spirit in the world? Is it not possible to find that collected in One Thing which is dispersed in all things? What is that which makes gold incorruptible? What induced the philosophers to examine gold for the matter of their medicine? Was not all gold once living? Is there none of this living gold, the matter of philosophers, to be had anymore?”Gold is highly valued in the everyday world too. It is used as coinage and is a standard for monetary systems in many countries. It is used to make jewelry and artwork, and also in dentistry, electronics, and plating. Since it is an excellent reflector of infrared energy (such as emerges from the sun), the metal is used to coat space satellites and interstellar probes. Chlorauric acid is used in photography for toning the silver image. It is also used in medicine to treat degenerative diseases such as arthritis and cancer.Chemist Lilly Kolisko performed experiments with gold chloride and showed its chemical behavior coincided with events that altered the strength of the sun, such as the weakening in solar forces during solar eclipses or their increase during the summer solstice. Moreover, she found that both silver and gold salts seemed to be equally influenced by the sun. In the case of silver, it was the forms or patterns that changed, whereas in the gold, it was the colors that changed. Silver shapes moved from jagged spikes to smooth rolling forms but the colors remained hues of grey, while the basic shape of gold patterns remained the same but the colors changed from brilliant yellows through violet to reddish-purple hues. This work presents an amazing confirmation of how the King and Queen, Sol and Luna, work together in creation, with the female principle representing soul and form and the male principle representing spirit and energy. Kolisko’s innovative work with the metals is presented in the Appendix. Her work has been duplicated by dozens of other chemists and has been confirmed many times.The signatures of gold are invoked in rituals, magical spells, and talismans concerning solar deities, the male force, authority, self-confidence, creativity, financial riches, investments, fortune, hope, health, and worldly and magical power. Gold talismans can be very expensive, but you can make one of gold colored cardboard or write the symbols on it with gold paint or plate an object with gold. Gold jewelry is said to improve self-confidence and inner strength. To charge water with the signature of gold, put a gold object in a glass of water and let sit in the sunlight for 6-10 hours.During sunrise or sunset, face the sun and try to feel it archetypal presence. If not too bright, gaze into the rising or setting sun and try to see the metallic solar disk of which the Egyptian alchemists spoke. Relax and try to focus all your attention on the golden sphere. Relax completely with an open and quiet mind. Become empty and let the presence at the center of our solar system influence you. Do this until you feel a real connection with the distant sun. Continue facing the sun as you pick up a piece of gold jewelry or a vial of pure gold flakes (such as sold in some novelty shops) into your right palm. You should be able to feel a electric warmth building. That eerie, warm vibration is not your imagination. It is what alchemists refer to as the “call of gold” – the resonation of the metal with its “planet.” You are experiencing the metal’s true signature or living correspondence, and for gold, this is the most perfect expression of all materials. If you can connect with this archetype, you will realize that it a very personal as well as divine presence. As Above, so Below. This is perfection on all levels of your mind, body, and soul resonating with the perfection inherent in the Whole Universe.For those with weaker wills or loss of contact with the divine presence, gold represents a psychological cure. The solar essences gives great ambition, courage, self-re-liance, dignity, authority, and the ability to manage oneself and others. The creative principle, no matter how small and insignificant it is within us can be enhanced to a great degree by tapping into the solar archetype. Just as the Sun represents the di-vine creative force in our immediate solar system, gold represents the same thing in our inner temperament. For lasting manifestation, the golden temperament needs to be firmly grounded in the world, and the danger at this phase of transformation is that the individual become too focused on the workings Above and forget his or her connection to the real world. Gold and the blazing Sun correspond to personal ambition, courage, and creative energy and vitality, but without a constant effort to remain pure and alive in the real world, the golden temperament can quickly transmute into the leaden qualities of despair, poor self esteem, lack of confidence, and impurity. Most important for the golden temperament, however, is to realize that once having reached this plateau, one has certain personal and karmic obligations. The golden attitude of this temperament is what brings the rewards of health, wealth, and happiness through synchonistic responses from the universe. Go against these archetypal powers at this level of achievement and even the slightest deviation from the golden path of righteousness and personal integrity can have disastrous and immediate consequences. The alchemists transmuted the Gold temperament using the operation of Coagulation.Chrysotherapy is the name given to healing with gold. The mystical metal has been used for both spiritual and medical purposes as far back as ancient Egypt. Over 5,000 years ago, the Egyptians used gold in dentistry and ingested it for mental, bodily, and spiritual purification. The ancients believed that gold in the body worked by stimulating the life force and raising the level of vibration on all levels. In Alexandria, alchemists developed a powerful elixir known as “liquid gold,” which reportedly had the ability to restore youth and perfect health. In ancient Rome, gold salves were used for the treatment of skin ulcers, and today, gold leaf plays an important role in the treatment of chronic skin ulcers. The great alchemist and founder of modern medicine, Paracelsus, developed many highly successful medicines from metallic minerals including gold. In medieval Europe, gold-coated pills and “gold waters” were extremely popular. Alchemists mixed powdered gold into drinks to "comfort sore limbs," and today, it is widely used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In the 1900s, surgeons implanted a $5.00 gold piece under the skin near an inflamed joint, such as a knee or elbow. In China, peasants still cook their rice with a gold coin in order to help replenish gold in their bodies, and fancy Chinese restaurants put 24-karat gold-leaf in their food preparations.The alchemists believed that gold represented the perfection of matter, and that its presence in the body would enliven, rejuvenate, and cure a multitude of “dis-eases.” Gold is never corrodes or even tarnishes, is completely non-toxic, and exhibits no interactions with other drugs. Gold is the only heavy metal that has a right-hand atomic spin and is therefore easily tolerated by the body.The alchemists believed that gold represented the perfection of matter, and that its presence in the body would enliven, rejuvenate, and cure a multitude of “dis-eases.” Gold is never corrodes or even tarnishes, is completely non-toxic, and exhibits no interactions with other drugs. Gold is the only heavy metal that has a right-hand atomic spin and is therefore easily tolerated by the body.Sun-ruled plants affect the soul in its positive phase of manifestation, which manifests on the personal level as our idea of ourselves as a progressive unified entity. Solar herbs help us realize our evolutionary epoch as an individual among many other individuals, helping to synthesize and synchronize our goals with those of the macrocosm. In this sense they are ego fortifiers, but with a divine purpose.Solar herbs heal inferiority complexes, bolstering people and giving them a sense of purpose beyond the norm. The Sun represents the Christ and Osiris consciousness in man, as well as Hercules in his monumental strength. For those with weaker wills, Sun ruled herbs will provide the springboard for more posi-tive action; they also bestow the quality of generosity to our souls. Solar plants, when alchemically charged, will reveal the divine purpose of our solar system, and will let you be-come aware of the will of God in manifestation. Solar essences give great ambition.

 

www.azothalchemy.org/metals.htm

  

Old Brewery and Wool store building, now apartments, cafes and shops in a leafy trendy suburb. It contains 78 apartments and 12 commercial premises and was completed in 1996.

 

From 1882 to 1902 this site was owned by the Queensland Brewery of Bulimba Beer fame ( later Carlton United ), which raised a 20,000 pound mortgage in 1883 to build their plant.

 

In 1906 the property was purchased by the principal pastoral firm of Dalgety and Company Ltd, which built on this and adjacent land from 1907 onwards. Jack Michod, Dalgety's Queensland Wool manager, was very involved in the design, in particular regarding natural lighting, floor room spacing and an innovative chute control system. No. 3 woolstore was part of the Dalgety's complex, which included the Dalgety Wharf and Dalgety Wool Dumping and Grain Store. In 1961 Dalgety and Company Ltd merged with New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company Ltd. As Dalgety and New Zealand Loan Ltd, they built a new wool centre at Rocklea in 1964 and sold the redundant woolstore to Queenland Primary Producers in 1964. Primaries transferred it to John (Paddy) Stephens in 1984, who ran it as Paddys Market, a popular Sunday venue for Brisbanites. Today it has been refurbished as trendy apartments, cafes and shops. Fortunately the building remains and with a number of other wool store building neighbours in the area, we are reminded of how much Australia invested in and got back from its wool exporting.

 

The woolstore comprises five floors, each one being over 1 acre (4,000 square metres) in area. Built during the post war era and international in architectural style, this is a typical brick clad steel framed structure which doglegs prominently along two street frontages. In keeping with traditional woolstores nearby, the base and entablature are highlighted compared with the intervening floors. However, other features indicate significant deviations in woolstore design and construction during this last phase of development at Teneriffe.

 

Some degree of verticality is provided by the ascending columns of windows. Nevertheless an overpowering horizontal emphasis is achieved by means of an inscribed frieze and intervening rows of windows with concrete sunshades. Unlike earlier woolstores which offered a modicum of decoration, the window shades are dominant though practical extrusions. Queensland's innovative hopper windows, which facilitate light and ventilation while providing weather protection, are arranged in pairs of two on the middle floors, but three for the top floor, plus green wooden louvres on every floor.

  

Thanks for stopping by. Appreciate your comments.

 

_MG_6787 2014-03-13

All photos by Mathias Vejerslev. www.flickr.com/photos/mvejerslev

 

Cities have always been associated with the experience of noise. With the growing democratization of what the urban spaces are used for in terms of events and activities, the need for a focus on how the sounds influence our everyday life arises.

Where the discourse primarily has been focussing on how to eliminate noise in the city, new initiatives focusing on the qualities of city sounds and what role they play in the public space are emerging. Whether the focus is reduction of traffic noise, acoustic design or cultural events, they all share a common goal: To improve and strenghten the sonic experience of the urban space for the people who live there as well as visitors. Bits & Beers: City Sound & Noise puts a spotlight on the topic through inspirational talks from innovative professionals within the field of city acoustics.

 

Bits & Beers is IdemoLab’s atypical evening conference connecting businesses, creatives, entrepreneurs, and makers in the relaxed Friday bar atmosphere, with the structure of a well organized business networking and knowledge sharing event. Bits & Beers consists of a “friday-bar”; short, introductory talks as well as an engaging exibition-area, where you can experience new technologies and concepts with-in the subject of the day.

 

Speakers:

 

Ingeborg Okkels

 

Ingeborg has a PHD in Musicology from Copenhagen University. Her PHD was looking into music technology and perception of audio. She has been a lecturer and writer on audio-related areas, specializing in electronic music and sound collages. As a composer and sound designer she has been working for art films and installations. Since 2014 Ingeborg Okkels have been facilitating many workshops related to sound, sound experience and sound awareness. These have been carried out in cooperation with museums, educational institutions, libraries, architects and private companies.

 

Kirstine Lorenzen

 

Kirstine Lorenzen has over the past 20 years working with green growth and technology development, especially within the energy, climate, street lights and traffic noise. Since May 2015, Kirstine has been responsible for the Silent City – Living Lab of Urban Noise Reduction. SC takes place in the Southern part of Greater Copenhagen.

 

Lærke Cecilie Bjerre:

 

Regulations for quiet urban areas are typically based on sound level limits alone. However, the full immersion in the on-site non-acoustic context is important when evaluating overall and subjective soundscape quality in urban recreational areas. Lærke and her two partners Anna Josefine Sørensen and Thea Mathilde Larsen won the Young Investigator Best Paper award in Hawaii 2016 for their research in holistic sound evaluation in urban areas.

  

Steffen Ring and Michael Frejdal

Ring Advocacy is a technical partner in the MONICA project - a project born to demonstrate how multiple Internet of Things technologies can help in terms of noise control, sound quality, crowd management and security at large cultural events taking place in the city. Ring Advocacy was founded in 2015 by Steffen Ring, MScEE, as a technology consultancy within regulatory affairs regarding spectrum and standardisation matters with a global scope. Also included in the project is Michael Frejdal, technical director of Tivoli in Copenhagen, which works as a pilot site for MONICA to investigate through Tivoli activities and events such as eg. 'Fredagsrock'.

 

Music:

Mads Hennelund

Mads Hennelund is the former leadsinger in the disco-pop band MÅNE. With his new soloproject PUNGIE he reunites clubmusic and technomusic with beautiful sounds and pop-harmonies

soundcloud.com/user-556569817

Laced with B is a swimwear collection designed by local San Diegan BreeAnna Quigg

 

SAN DIEGO (October 10, 2013)– Fashion Week San Diego® (FWSD) took place September 30th to October 6th with a week of events including three days of runway shows, a Trunk Show (market day), art & beauty event and much more. The event was a major success with a smooth production and the launching of the FWSD Designer Spring/Summer 2014 Collections.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 highlights include:

 

•FWSD 2013 Winning Designer as voted by the audience went to RHCREATION with first runner up Wishnow and second runner up Greenpacha also being recognized.

•RHCREATION successfully met with buyers from ModCloth.com on Monday October 7th as part of the Winning Designer Business Package.

•3,500 people attended the event.

•The city of San Diego showed its support of FWSD with the attendance of Interim Mayor Todd Gloria and County Supervisor Dave Roberts. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria also presented an official proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews.

•From the FWSD designers to the small business sponsors of FWSD, the event helped generate growth in businesses and the industries of fashion and tourism.

•$18,580 worth of sales was done during the Trunk Show of FWSD on Sunday.

•26 Designers were able to show their latest collection to buyers in order to grow their small businesses.

•Many of the FWSD Sponsors were able to take their businesses to the next level thanks to the exposure gained from being part of this event.

•Local hotels saw increased reservations from out of town guests and locals as a result of the event.

•Volunteers were able to gain relevant experience in order to grow their careers.

•In attendance were representatives from InStyle, Vanity Fair, and national fashion retailers. Designer Zandra Rhodes also attended.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 commenced September 30th and October 1st with private events for Sponsors and Designers respectively to celebrate the start of the week of events. These private events took place at Roppongi Restaurant & Sushi Bar in La Jolla with guests enjoying beer from Peroni Nastro Azzuro and music from the DJs of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Art & Beauty behind Fashion event on Wednesday October 2nd kicked off the first day open to public and industry. Beauty industry experts Jan Nordstrom Arnold of CND Nails, Claudio Lazo of Wella, Kevin James Bennett of MUD and Maryelle Koken of Sebastian International spoke about how the hair, makeup and nails bring a runway show to life. The night also included a panel of experts talking about how beauty effects fashion and vice versa. Panelists include Leilani Angel of Bellus Academy, Travis Parker, Dean Hall and Brian Hawkins of FIDM/Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising. We would like to thank our sponsor Bellus Academy for their sponsorship for this night. This interactive night included four live paintings by Launch Live Art of designs from FWSD designers. Guests also saw art from local artists part of RAW: natural born artists commissioned to create art pieces based on Spring/Summer trends.

 

Thursday October 3rd began the runway shows with seven FWSD designers showcasing their Spring/Summer 2014 collections. Designers featured Thursday include: C Venti, CG by Cynthia, Collections of Kathryn Elizabeth, Isabel Vianey, Laced with B, Mahogany Blues and Second Star Designs. The night ended with a runway shows featuring the collections of three designers from the new fashion competition series “Styled to Rock” including Dexter Simmons, Cecilia Aragon and Andre Soriano.

 

The runway shows continued Friday October 4th featuring FWSD Designers Diestra, Dos Caras Swimwear, Greenpacha, Keisha Audrey, ‘Love, Charles’, Maegan Stracy and RCREATION. The last runway show of the evening featured a Doggie Fashion Show with highly adoptable dogs from Rancho Coastal Humane Society (RCHS). Half of the dogs thus far have found forever homes.

 

Saturday October 4th was the final night of runway shows featuring FWSD Designers A’doreus, Ashley Raymond, Danh Ta, Maralonzo, NOIA, SYC Collection, VICTROLA, Wishnow, WM Couture and Yuwei Designs. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria was in attendance and presented the Official Proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews. The proclamation states the first week of October to be the official fashion week in San Diego. The night ended with an official after party with DJ Demon of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Trunk Show on October 5th marked the last day of FWSD 2013 where designers showed their collections and took orders from buyers. The winning designer and top models were announced along with an award from the FWSD 2013 Advisory Panel for most innovative designs.

 

About the event: Fashion Week San Diego® is a collaborative entertainment fashion event to celebrate emerging designers by showcasing and highlighting the pulse of these entrepreneurs and what they are creating. Fashion Week San Diego® is pleased to give these emerging fashion designers a platform to launch their careers.

Now amazing Capture One pro 10 is out, and for Sony users the express version is free.

The Capture One 9.4 before it was simply outstanding RAWC, much better than anything from Adobe or Raw Therapy.

 

Unfortunately, the free version of C1 does not handle Canon, Nikon or Olympus RAW, only Sony or DNG(Pentax and Leica).

 

So I guess It is another big reason for many of us to choose Sony over anything else. If you use Sony, you can get a full copy of Capture One pro 10 for just 50 USD.

AS far as I am concerned, this is an incredible deal, great Christmas gift for us from Phase One, the greatest company in Photography ever.

 

I think both Capture One 10 Pro and DXO 11 produce a bit better color than LR CC or LR6 for Sony, Canon,Olympus, or Nikon.

 

I suspect that Adobe programs are optimized for Canon but even for Canon CR2 files, LR6 and CC are not good enough, never produce the amazing amount details that Capture One 10 or DXO 11 does.

 

Seriously C Oen 10 pro for just 50 US is an amazing deal. nothing beats it for that price.

Capture One 10 is a much better more serious program than the LR crapware, and the biggest deal here is not need to deal with the Adobe subscription stuff. Many many Adobe users used the license and repaid it to re-activate it, it is really terribly unstable. I had one time could not use it when I was editing my images on site in a mountain area and they say my account is just trial although I paid it for full CC version.

So after coming back from the mountain, I decided to cancel all Adobe CC crap, and I just got Capture One express 8.32 for Sony free,then later in the same month (last April)I upgraded it to the pro version. I could not be happier.

Now, also DXO is offering me a copy FULL copy of DXO 11 Pro version for just 99 USD. I will get that too.

Honestly, there are still times we need Photoshop but I do have full copy of CS6, so I do not need CC anymore, and I've found life without Adobe CC crap is really much more relaxing and easier.

  

A few months after coming back from Hokkaido with my broken 6D, I realized was kind of missing it. It has technically no real advantage over any of my current cameras, but I kind of miss it.

So I have been checking through my old but not updated 6D images. I have also tested thorough them with some custom made software I bought a month ago from my old friend working as a Tsukuba university practical physicist.

 

I think I will re-measure it but as far as I remember the numbers I got from my test with the special made program, it was not even half as good as I thought it would be.......and I was deeply disappointed, in fact almost immediately depressed.

 

I just wish Canon to get its act together and makes a great sensor or even just buy off from Samsung or Renasus, whose sensor patents and designs are, imho, more advanced than that of Sony.

As long as we expose it to the right and or apply so-called ETTR it is fine, but a bit of under or over exposing makes it really bad. This is the reason why some call the Canon sensors like slide film in terms of exposure tolerance and the way we should use our Canons, and I guess I used to be able to some how manage it well to make my Canon look just fine.

 

But now, I am just too used to shooting my A7 A7R A7M2 A6300 and A7R2 other Sonys, with a couple of stops better dynamic range at ISO100, or more precisely better latitude. So now I tend to intentionally underexpose it to save the highlight, and in the post I lift the shadow up.

 

I think Sony sensors are like negative film, and Canons are like positive slide film, they are both good and bad , but for most of non-tripod handheld work, Sony has the edge since it allows us to underexpose intentionally to save the highlight and later on we can easily get the hidden shadow data back in PP.

 

With Sony A7 series I think we do seldom need CPL filters or ND filters, and it is hard to screw the exposure in normal use.

 

But I think Sony sensor quality is just plain overrated by DPR kind of sites, if any one challenge the assessment numbers or so called reviews they write, we must be labelled as naive fanboy or poor guy in short of cash and defending his old choice hard, or inane technically challenged morons.

 

Sony sensors are good in harsh day light high DR required scenes,but usually not great at high ISO.

I think many many people deliberately misguided by DPR DXO ,etc and without measuring the sensors in question themselves , just bashing one type of sensors that they dislike or reviews say bad, but in reality there is no such dramatic difference there.

 

Really, it is not that simple, the 5DS sensor is excellent in many regards, but it can not score well at DXO, and I am sure why the biased DPR guys rated it much lower than the Sony 36mp sensor ignoring the fact it is a very very different type of sensor than the Sony 36mp or 42mp chip, or even very different design than the Canon's own 6D sensor or 5DMK3 sensor.

 

The 5DS sensor is simply optimized for the best skin tone in a studio or great out of the camera color for landscape, so it has very strong intense color filters. I think it is about 1.6 times stronger than that of the 5DMK3,whose sensor design focus was high ISO or low noise throughout the ISO range, thus used weak thin CFA design.....So the 5DS sensor tends to produce better stronger punchier colors out of the camera compared to the previous Canon with weaker CFA design but at the cost of a tiny bit more shot noise at the base ISO.

 

I think Sony and its Alpha community is becoming like a fanatic religious group(like young earth creationist group let by Kent Hovind), never even accept or listen to any kind of different voice, opinion and preference, and it seems to be all review communities are misled by them or their excessively loud voice.

 

If you even mildly pan or hard on any Sony Alpha line camera, they will attack on you, or if you prefer something other than their preferred ones, they call you a troll or a fanboy, to turn the debate into a name calling contest.

 

It always happens at DPR fora ,especially in the Canon and the Open talk forums, Sony E mount fanboys really act like some sort of cult-worshipers intrude into other forums and bash others choice or force others to believe in Sony cult. If any one says anything good about Nikon, Canon, Fuji or Samsung compared to Alpha 7 line cameras, then they freak out and turn it into a name calling contest(it is always their tech to win any debate there), so it is impossible to logically argue or even talk anything about the A7X with presence of some die-hard Sony fanatics there. It is really that ridiculous.

 

It is like being in a Catholic church, these real die-hard Sony Alpha 7 fanboys in camera fora never accept any different belief, value or different opinion on any camera. If someone prefer the other sensor manufacture than Sony then they insult his or her technical knowledge or sometimes even his or her personality that they don't even know...........For example a few days ago, some one (obviously a wedding guy) mildly criticized(not even seriously bashed or panned) about terrible battery life of the A7S and he said the real issue for "HIM" was not the terrible battery life itself or having to carry many of tiny, lousy batteries for the Sony, but it was difficult to change it over and over many times without missing many important decisive moments.......I think it is very correct and I experienced it myself many many times, too, as a long time A7 user. But they(A7 fans)got obviously hurt by his comment because it is a fact, and they have to gather to attack on his personally. A few hours later the thread was closed as usual, and it was sad.. Well, I sometimes wonder if there are many kindergarten kids in the camera forums, they are seriously thin-skinned and easily hurt, maybe their self-esteem or pride (more like ego)is totally dependent on their so-called FF cameras? or winning the debate at DPR or some moronic rumor sites like SAR or CR really important for them to keep themselves calm and sane or just alive?

 

I have now several people asking me about my opinion on A7M2 vs 6D vs D750 issue, and I told them it is a personal choice, and there is no objectively or absolutely better one for every one, and I don't even believe there is any absolutely objective review at all. Then they said I have been intentionally closing my eyes, trying hard not to see the fact Sony is taking over the industry.........if I do not admit it then I have to be called a Canon or a Nikon or a Samsung or a Fuji fanboy, silly to say the least........... A few days ago I criticized about A7RMK2 pricing a bit, and I also said I began to realize how reasonably priced D810 was, and comparing the price of the D810 to the price of my own A7RMK2 or the5DS shows it very glaringly.

Then, a couple of usual Sony fanboys criticized me of being super ignorant about the A7RMK2, and told me that the Sony camera would be like having a great pro 4k cinema camera and a high resolution stills camera in one tiny body, so it is a historic game changer and nothing on the market compete well with it. And according to them the A7RMK2 sensor is really great at high ISO, even slightly better than the A7S or the Pentax 645Z........although all lab test results say otherwise.....I am sure they never used the 645Z if they think the A7R2 beats it.

  

Well I partly agree with them, but I say it is not a pro video camera, or it is not really innovative cinema camera that replaces real super 35mm pro cinema cameras; the battery life is too short, the heat dissipation issue is really bad, the FF is not suited for serious video, especially for running gun type of event or documentary work, etc. The bigger the sensor the more battery power consuming, and therefore, many of us do not want a FF video camera. In addition to all the above issues, it does not even have dual card slots, and it is a big issue for me and any one using it for serious video work.

 

But according to them the Red dragon, BMCC , Canon cinema EOS,etc are all immediately thrown into camera coffins by the advent of the Sony A7RMK2 and the A6300.

 

I think it is getting a bit too ridiculous although I admit it is an amazing camera mostly for stills landscape and studio work, it may or may not replace all, or it may even change the history of hybrid camera world.

 

But do not forget we all have preferences and different needs, different views on cameras, and sometimes technical numbers or feature set does not matter, sometimes we simply prefer one even if it is just technically a inferior camera or tool, we cannot measure usability and practicality of each system to each of us but it is very important to consider when we choose a new camera system.

 

That all said though, I think Sony has been right , it is really shaking the conservative camera world, just slowly but surely increasing its market share by introducing a great compact FF hybrid camera system.

 

Do not forget the biggest sales point of the A7 series is not any specific camera feature or the BSI sensor,etc, but it is being the only one hybrid open mount camera system that takes all mounts lenses,including the A mount lenses,the EF lenses, the F mount lenses with several times more accurate AF than any D-SLR type of cameras.

 

I think something like below is always happening now:

Some Canon guys buy an A7R2 or an A7M2, with use of adapted Canon lens line in mind and use it for a while with their adapted EF lenses or A mount lenses..

But in a few months, they'd realize they need some native FE mount lenses and buy some Zeiss Batis and Sony Z, G and GM series lenses, then they'd be like fragile insects trapped into a big spider nest. At this point, there is no more way back to Canon or Nikon even if either of these 2 makes something similar to the A7RMK2 in the near future because selling used FE mount lenses is very difficult because the FE lenses cannot be adapted to any other mount system as they have the shortest flange back design.

 

So, while I think Sony has succeeded converting many Canon guys into FE mount users, I am not sure if it will take over the market entirely so soon. The A7 system is just a temporal stop gap solution for many of us. After a few years it may be completely abandoned just like most of so-called Sony's great innovative products. Remember Mini disc or Memory Stick Duo?

I just think the future is open mount system but it is not the A7 or any Sony or Samsung.

The A7 system prevails for a short time but it will not be able to replace all Canon Nikon fast enough, and the Sony will be overlooking or dismissing minor brand but truly innovative small players emerging out to rival against Sony.

 

I think something like BMCC or Red of stills will take over the market.....I think the open mount is a dual-edged-sword for Sony it will help Sony to get many many Canon Nikon users temporarily coming to their mount but at the same time give a serious opportunity for a Red-like company to truly invent(not just innovate) something really new to take over the entire industry.....

 

But in any case I am sure the D-SLRs are dying, I re-confirmed this again in Thailand and Malaysia last year:

I went to Malaysia for work for a few hours(wished I had had more time to spend there shooting around Penang) in last December and then visited Thailand for about several hours(very sad to have just 2 hours there), and I saw the camera industry of SE Asia changed a lot like below.

It changed a lot there these 2 countries. I spent a lot of time in Thailand in 2011 and 2010. Back then, Canon and Nikon were the definite dominant players for sure. Now? I passed several of the chain stores in a few malls in Pinklao, Skumvitt and Platunam area that did not even carry Canon in the windows. Nikon, yes but not many were displayed there either.

Went to a photography trade show in Georgetown, Malaysia, the Nikon and Canon booths were there without any people. The mirrorless cameras, Sony, Fuji(especially popular), Olympus were packed with folks trying and buying.

For now, Canon and Nikon have lost their momentum over here for sure. Let's hope they can come back strong, but I feel it is too late now already.

 

Everything changes very fast in Asia and anything considered to be uncool cannot sell well there, it is even more drastic in Japan and South Korea, so I believe the sales numbers for CN are even worse there.

  

UPdate : now, Canon has just announced its new sensor development policy. Canon seems to have built a new sensor plant in Mie prefecture of Japan. It seems like Canon is going on new 65nm process rule and all upcoming Canon sensors will be produced at there.

I think the 1DX2 and the 80D sensors are processed at the new plant.

Sony is still leading the CMOS imaging industry, but giants like Samsung are in close pursuit. Also big players like Panasonic are forming joint ventures with the likes of TowerJazz to offer 12-inch wafer fabrication with state-of-the-art quantum efficiency and dark current performance at 65 nano meters, and additional 45nm digital technology, and added available capacity of approximately 800,000 8-inch wafers per year in three manufacturing plants in Japan, according to TowerJazz.

 

The stakes are huge. The CMOS image sensor market will reached the historic $10 billion milestone in 2015, according to Yale, and with new applications popping up in automotive, medical and surveillance, while smartphones begin adopting high-definition front facing cameras, the industry is likely to hit the $16 billion mark by 2020. So nobody is just sleeping and Sony has to consolidate its position ASAP, or probably Sony will lose it again just like its short-lived TV business.

  

UPDATE2:Another serious issue all the camera makers will have to face but I did not really realize before is that all ILC cameras are big to most of NORMAL non-photographer people, and they are very intimidating to most of NORMAL people(I mean regardless of mount type or sensor type).

I never realized it before but while walking around down town Fukuoka with one of my long time friends here forced me to understand it. A friend of mine told me that he thinks all interchangeable lens cameras are huge and intimidating to most of average people regardless of sensor size or format, it's just simply annoying!

I guess a big lens scares or annoys people more than a big body......I never saw it his way but I got his point and I decided to carry my tiny Canon G5X when I just walk around the city area with other people. If I am alone shooting something, then I usually carry my big camera, and I think it does not matter it's a m43, a FF, an APS-C, it is all big to most of NORMAL people, anyway.

Then why not just go all the way up to FF or MFDB, or at least APS-C?

 

So maybe the one really doomed is not Nikon F or Pentax K or Sony A but m43?

Nikon and Pentax have historically had very enthusiastic and even fanatic core shooters and they are usually too old to adapt themselves fast to new EVF based gear even if they understand it is the more logical thing for them as they are aged. So D-SLRs may survive as antique cameras, but m43 or Nikon One?

 

UPDATE3: Nikon has just announced a new sensor fab development with Toshiba and it seems like their new sensor design uses very similar AF tech to the DP AF of the Canon EOS M5 sensor without losing almost no amount of light getting into the sensor.

 

Canon also patented a few new curved sensor designs with Toshiba. Toshiba seems to work as a special sensor designer for many companies rather than producing it themselves now.

 

And it found out that the Sony's old curved sensor patent is no longer effective, and it was originally a Toshiba patent.

So if Sony really lost the patent to Toshiba , then Sony would have a big problem since Sony would not be able to use the curved sensor tech for their FF camera lines that helps them to design smaller and sharper lenses for the FE system.

  

UPDATE4: Now, I've just confirmed that Nikon DL series actual shipment date would be next January 17th as planned in last Nikon conference at Nikon D5600 launch. But it may delay even further to next CP+ show in Yokohama Japan(in Feb 2017).

 

So it is already promised to be a failed product line before the actual launch. I think Nikon is really stupid, I mean I don't think phones or mirrorless killing Nikon but itself, it obtuse marketing killing it.

   

Irn-Bru is a Scottish carbonated soft drink, for long advertised as "Scotland's other national drink".

 

It is produced in Westfield, Cumbernauld, North Lanarkshire by A.G. Barr of Glasgow, since moving out of their original Parkhead factory in the mid-1990s, and at a second manufacturing site in Mansfield, England. In addition to being sold throughout the United Kingdom, Barr's Irn-Bru is available throughout the world and can usually be purchased where there is a significant community of people from Scotland. Innovative and sometimes controversial marketing campaigns have kept it as the number one selling soft drink in Scotland, where it competes directly with global brands such as Coca-Cola and Pepsi.

 

The drink originated in Falkirk where it was particularly popular among the town's thirsty foundry workers. The name Irn-Bru is said to have originated during the re-building of Glasgow Central Station in 1901. When workers from the William Beardmore and Company Steel Works in Glasgow were dying from the large amounts of beer drunk to quench their thirst from the heat of the steel works, an alternative was sought. A local soft drinks manufacturer, A.G. Barr, approached the steel works and a contract was created to provide the workers with this drink. This unnamed drink later went on to be known as Iron Brew because of its connections to the steel (and iron) works.

  

SAN DIEGO (October 10, 2013)– Fashion Week San Diego® (FWSD) took place September 30th to October 6th with a week of events including three days of runway shows, a Trunk Show (market day), art & beauty event and much more. The event was a major success with a smooth production and the launching of the FWSD Designer Spring/Summer 2014 Collections.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 highlights include:

 

•FWSD 2013 Winning Designer as voted by the audience went to RHCREATION with first runner up Wishnow and second runner up Greenpacha also being recognized.

•RHCREATION successfully met with buyers from ModCloth.com on Monday October 7th as part of the Winning Designer Business Package.

•3,500 people attended the event.

•The city of San Diego showed its support of FWSD with the attendance of Interim Mayor Todd Gloria and County Supervisor Dave Roberts. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria also presented an official proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews.

•From the FWSD designers to the small business sponsors of FWSD, the event helped generate growth in businesses and the industries of fashion and tourism.

•$18,580 worth of sales was done during the Trunk Show of FWSD on Sunday.

•26 Designers were able to show their latest collection to buyers in order to grow their small businesses.

•Many of the FWSD Sponsors were able to take their businesses to the next level thanks to the exposure gained from being part of this event.

•Local hotels saw increased reservations from out of town guests and locals as a result of the event.

•Volunteers were able to gain relevant experience in order to grow their careers.

•In attendance were representatives from InStyle, Vanity Fair, and national fashion retailers. Designer Zandra Rhodes also attended.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 commenced September 30th and October 1st with private events for Sponsors and Designers respectively to celebrate the start of the week of events. These private events took place at Roppongi Restaurant & Sushi Bar in La Jolla with guests enjoying beer from Peroni Nastro Azzuro and music from the DJs of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Art & Beauty behind Fashion event on Wednesday October 2nd kicked off the first day open to public and industry. Beauty industry experts Jan Nordstrom Arnold of CND Nails, Claudio Lazo of Wella, Kevin James Bennett of MUD and Maryelle Koken of Sebastian International spoke about how the hair, makeup and nails bring a runway show to life. The night also included a panel of experts talking about how beauty effects fashion and vice versa. Panelists include Leilani Angel of Bellus Academy, Travis Parker, Dean Hall and Brian Hawkins of FIDM/Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising. We would like to thank our sponsor Bellus Academy for their sponsorship for this night. This interactive night included four live paintings by Launch Live Art of designs from FWSD designers. Guests also saw art from local artists part of RAW: natural born artists commissioned to create art pieces based on Spring/Summer trends.

 

Thursday October 3rd began the runway shows with seven FWSD designers showcasing their Spring/Summer 2014 collections. Designers featured Thursday include: C Venti, CG by Cynthia, Collections of Kathryn Elizabeth, Isabel Vianey, Laced with B, Mahogany Blues and Second Star Designs. The night ended with a runway shows featuring the collections of three designers from the new fashion competition series “Styled to Rock” including Dexter Simmons, Cecilia Aragon and Andre Soriano.

 

The runway shows continued Friday October 4th featuring FWSD Designers Diestra, Dos Caras Swimwear, Greenpacha, Keisha Audrey, ‘Love, Charles’, Maegan Stracy and RCREATION. The last runway show of the evening featured a Doggie Fashion Show with highly adoptable dogs from Rancho Coastal Humane Society (RCHS). Half of the dogs thus far have found forever homes.

 

Saturday October 4th was the final night of runway shows featuring FWSD Designers A’doreus, Ashley Raymond, Danh Ta, Maralonzo, NOIA, SYC Collection, VICTROLA, Wishnow, WM Couture and Yuwei Designs. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria was in attendance and presented the Official Proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews. The proclamation states the first week of October to be the official fashion week in San Diego. The night ended with an official after party with DJ Demon of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Trunk Show on October 5th marked the last day of FWSD 2013 where designers showed their collections and took orders from buyers. The winning designer and top models were announced along with an award from the FWSD 2013 Advisory Panel for most innovative designs.

 

About the event: Fashion Week San Diego® is a collaborative entertainment fashion event to celebrate emerging designers by showcasing and highlighting the pulse of these entrepreneurs and what they are creating. Fashion Week San Diego® is pleased to give these emerging fashion designers a platform to launch their careers.

German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 1834/1, 1927-1928. Photo: Fanamet. Publicity still for Spite Marriage (Edward Sedgewick, Buster Keaton, 1929).

 

At Il Cinema Ritrovato 2015 (27 June - 4 July 2015) in Bologna, a new, multi-year project starts with brand new restorations of the films of Buster Keaton (1895–1966). The Keaton Project will be launched with the silent short One Week (1920) and with the silent featureSherlock Jr. (1924), an early example of film within a film. The film showcases all of Buster Keaton’s virtues: his deadpan humour, his innovative technical accomplishments, his amazing stunts and perfect gags. The two restorations will be presented in Piazza Maggiore in Bologna accompanied live by Timothy Brock’s original scores and performed by the Bologna Opera House Orchestra.

 

Buster Keaton was born Joseph Frank Keaton in 1895 into a vaudeville family. His father was Joseph Hallie ‘Joe’ Keaton, who owned a travelling show with Harry Houdini called the Mohawk Indian Medicine Company. Keaton was born in Piqua, Kansas, the small town where his mother, Myra Keaton (née Myra Edith Cutler), happened to go into labour. By the time he was 3, Keaton began performing with his parents in The Three Keatons. He was being thrown around the stage and into the orchestra pit, or even into the audience. His little suits even had a handle concealed at the waist, so Joe could sling him like luggage. "It was the roughest knockabout act that was ever in the history of the theatre," Keaton told the historian Kevin Brownlow. It led to accusations of child abuse, and occasionally, arrest. However, Buster Keaton was always able to show the authorities that he had no bruises or broken bones. Noticing that his laughing drew fewer laughs from the audience, Keaton adopted his famous deadpan expression whenever he was working. For the rest of his career, Keaton was "the great stone face," with an expression that ranged from the impassive to the slightly quizzical. By the time he was 21, his father's alcoholism threatened the reputation of the family act, so Keaton and his mother, Myra, left for New York, where Buster Keaton's career swiftly moved from vaudeville to film. In February 1917, Keaton met Roscoe ‘Fatty’ Arbuckle at the Talmadge Studios in New York City, where Arbuckle was under contract to Joseph M. Schenck. He was hired as a co-star and gag man, making his first appearance in the short The Butcher Boy (Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle, 1917). He appeared in a total of 14 Arbuckle shorts, running into 1920. They were popular and, Keaton and Arbuckle became close friends. Keaton was one of few people to defend Arbuckle's character during accusations that he was responsible for the death of actress Virginia Rappe in 1921. In The Saphead (Herbert Blaché, Winchell Smith, 1920), Keaton had his first starring role in a full-length feature. It was a success and Schenck gave him his own production unit, Buster Keaton Comedies. He made a series of two-reel comedies, including One Week (Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton, 1920), The Boat (Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton, 1921), Cops (Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton, 1922), and The Paleface (Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton, 1922). Keaton then moved to full-length features. His first feature, Three Ages (Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton, 1923), was produced similarly to his short films, and was the dawning of a new era in comedic cinema, where it became apparent to Keaton that he had to put more focus on the story lines and characterization. His most enduring features include Our Hospitality (John G. Blystone, Buster Keaton, 1923), The Navigator (Donald Crisp, Buster Keaton, 1924), Sherlock Jr. (Buster Keaton, 1924), College (James W. Horne, Buster Keaton, 1927), and The General (Clyde Bruckman, Buster Keaton, 1927). The General, set during the American Civil War, combined physical comedy with Keaton's love of trains, including an epic locomotive chase. Employing picturesque locations, the film's storyline re-enacted an actual wartime incident. Though it would come to be regarded as Keaton's greatest achievement, the film received mixed reviews at the time. It was too dramatic for some filmgoers expecting a lightweight comedy. It was an expensive misfire, and Keaton was never entrusted with total control over his films again. His distributor, United Artists, insisted on a production manager who monitored expenses and interfered with certain story elements.

 

Buster Keaton endured this treatment for two more feature films, including Steamboat Bill Jr. (Charles Reisner, Buster Keaton, 1928), and then exchanged his independent setup for employment at Hollywood's biggest studio, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM). Keaton's loss of independence as a filmmaker coincided with the coming of sound films (although he was interested in making the transition) and mounting personal problems, In 1921, Keaton had married Natalie Talmadge, sister-in-law of his boss, Joseph Schenck, and sister of actresses Norma Talmadge and Constance Talmadge. She co-starred with Keaton in Our Hospitality. The couple had two sons, James (1922-2007) and Robert (1924–2009), but after the birth of Robert, the relationship began to suffer. Influenced by her family, Talmadge decided not to have any more children and this led to the couple staying in separate bedrooms. Her financial extravagance (she would spend up to a third of his salary on clothes) was another factor in the breakdown of the marriage. Keaton signed with MGM in 1928, a business decision that he would later call the worst of his life. He realized too late that MGM’s studio system would severely limit his creative input. For instance, the studio refused his request to make his early project, Spite Marriage (Edward Sedgwick, Buster Keaton, 1929), as a sound film and after the studio converted, he was obliged to adhere to dialogue-laden scripts. However, MGM did allow Keaton some creative participation on his last originally developed/written silent film The Cameraman (Edward Sedgwick, Buster Keaton, 1928). which was his first project under contract with them. Keaton was forced to use a stunt double during some of the more dangerous scenes, something he had never done in his heyday, as MGM wanted badly to protect its investment. Some of his most financially successful films for the studio were during this period. MGM tried teaming the laconic Keaton with the rambunctious Jimmy Durante in a series of films, The Passionate Plumber (Edward Sedgwick, 1932), Speak Easily (Edward Sedgwick, 1932), and What! No Beer? (Edward Sedgwick, 1933). In the first Keaton pictures with sound, he and his fellow actors would shoot each scene three times: one in English, one in Spanish, and one in either French or German. The actors would phonetically memorize the foreign-language scripts a few lines at a time and shoot immediately after. In 1932, Nathalie Talmadge had divorced Keaton, taking his entire fortune and refusing to allow any contact between Keaton and his sons, whose last name she had changed to Talmadge. Keaton was reunited with them about a decade later when his older son turned 18. With the failure of his marriage, and the loss of his independence as a filmmaker, Keaton lapsed into a period of alcoholism.

 

Buster Keaton was so demoralized during the production of What! No Beer? (Edward Sedgwick, 1933) that MGM fired him after the filming was complete, despite the film being a resounding hit. In 1933, he married his nurse, Mae Scriven, during an alcoholic binge about which he afterwards claimed to remember nothing. Scriven herself would later claim that she didn't know Keaton's real first name until after the marriage. When they divorced in 1936, it was again at great financial cost to Keaton. In 1934, Keaton accepted an offer to make an independent film in Paris, Le Roi des Champs-Élysées/The King of the Champs Elysees (Max Nosseck, 1934) with Paulette Dubost. In England, he made another film, The Invader/An Old Spanish Custom (Adrian Brunel, 1936). Upon Keaton's return to Hollywood, he made a screen comeback in a series of 16 two-reel comedies for Educational Pictures. Most of these are simple visual comedies, with many of the gags supplied by Keaton himself, often recycling ideas from his family vaudeville act and his earlier films. The high point in the Educational series is Grand Slam Opera (Buster Keaton, Charles Lamont, 1936), featuring Buster in his own screenplay as a contestant in a radio amateur hour show hoping to win the first price... by dancing and juggling. When the series lapsed in 1937, Keaton returned to MGM as a gag writer, including the Marx Brothers films At the Circus (Edward Buzzell, 1939) and Go West (Edward Buzzell, 1940), and providing material for Red Skelton. He also helped and advised Lucille Ball in her comedic work in films and television. In 1939, Columbia Pictures hired Keaton to star in ten two-reel comedies, running for two years. The director was usually Jules White, whose emphasis on slapstick and farce made most of these films resemble White's Three Stooges comedies. Keaton's personal favourite was the series' debut entry, Pest from the West (Del Lord, 1939), a shorter, tighter remake of The Invader (1936). Keaton's Columbia shorts rank as the worst comedies he made.

 

Buster Keaton's personal life stabilized with his 1940 marriage with Eleanor Norris, a 21-year-old dancer. She stopped his heavy drinking, and helped to salvage his career. He abandoned Columbia for the less strenuous field of feature films. Throughout the 1940s, Keaton played character roles in features. He made his last starring feature El Moderno Barba Azul/Boom In The Moon (Jaime Salvador, 1946) in Mexico. Critics rediscovered Keaton in 1949. He had cameos in such films as In the Good Old Summertime (Robert Z. Leonard, 1949), Sunset Boulevard (Billy Wilder, 1950), and Around the World in 80 Days (Michael Anderson, 1956), and did innumerable TV appearances. Keaton also appeared in a comedy routine about two inept stage musicians in Charlie Chaplin's Limelight (1952). In 1954, Keaton and his wife met film programmer Raymond Rohauer, with whom the couple would develop a business partnership to re-release Keaton's films. Around the same time, after buying the comedian's house, the actor James Mason found numerous cans of Keaton's films. Keaton had prints of the features Three Ages, Sherlock, Jr., Steamboat Bill, Jr., College (missing one reel) and the shorts The Boat and My Wife's Relations, which Keaton and Rohauer transferred to safety stock from deteriorating nitrate film stock. Unknown to them at the time, MGM also had saved some of Keaton's work: all his 1920-1926 features and his first eight two-reel shorts. In 1962 came a retrospective at the Cinematheque Francaise in Paris, and in 1965 a tribute at the Venice Film Festival. "I can't feel sorry for myself," he said in Venice. "It all goes to show that if you stay on the merry-go-round long enough you'll get another chance at the brass ring. Luckily, I stayed on." In 1960, Keaton had returned to MGM for the final time, playing a lion tamer in an adaptation of Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Michael Curtiz, 1960). Later Keaton played a cameo in It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (Stanley Kramer, 1963) and starred in four films for American International Pictures: Pajama Party (Don Weis, 1964), Beach Blanket Bingo (William Asher, 1965), How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (William Asher, 1964) and Sergeant Deadhead (Norman Taurog, 1964). As he had done in the past, Keaton also provided gags for the four AIP films. In 1965, Keaton starred in the short film The Railrodder (Gerald Potterton, Buster Keaton, 1965) for the National Film Board of Canada. Wearing his traditional pork pie hat, he travelled from one end of Canada to the other on a railway motorcar, performing a few stunts similar to those in films he did 50 years earlier. The film was Keaton's last silent screen performance. He also played the central role in Samuel Beckett's Film (Alan Schneider, 1965) and travelled to Italy to play a role in Due Marines e un Generale/War Italian Style (Luigi Scattini, 1965), with Italian comedy duo Franco Franchi and Ciccio Ingrassia. Keaton's final film was A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (Richard Lester, 1966) which was filmed in Spain in September-November 1965. He amazed the cast and crew by doing many of his own stunts. Shortly after completing the film, Keaton died of lung cancer in 1966 at his home in Woodland Hills, California. He was 70. In 1987, the documentary, Buster Keaton: A Hard Act to Follow, directed by Kevin Brownlow and David Gill, won two Emmy Awards.

 

Sources: Roger Ebert, Nicolette Olivier (IMDb), New York Times, Wikipedia, and IMDb.

This was my first hotel in Otaru, Hotel Nord.

This hotel is usually very expensive, but I got a bargain deal online. I just paid 3800 yen a night, including a dinner set at the famous Otaru canal German beer restaurant with a real German meister.

  

Otaru was not as good as the other places I visited in Hokkido this time , but it was still quite good, I loved Otaru canal and Otaru beer factory, where I ate a big german pizza and drank red star beer.

But still, if I have to pick 2 or 3 places for my next Hokkaido trip, I would not choose Otaru. It was crowded with very silly rude family crowds and not relaxing at all. In fact, I think Otaru was the least interesting place of popular Hokkaido tourist destinations.

  

The cruel reality to the all camera companies.

 

A few months after coming back from Hokkaido with my broken 6D, I realized was kind of missing it. It has technically no real advantage over any of my current cameras, but I kind of miss it.

So I have been checking through my old but not updated 6D images. I have also tested thorough them with some custom made software I bought a month ago from my old friend working as a Tsukuba university practical physicist.

 

I think I will re-measure it but as far as I remember the numbers I got from my test with the special made program, it was not even half as good as I thought it would be.......and I was deeply disappointed, in fact almost immediately depressed.

 

I just wish Canon to get its act together and makes a great sensor or even just buy off from Samsung or Renasus, whose sensor patents and designs are, imho, more advanced than that of Sony.

As long as we expose it to the right and or apply so-called ETTR it is fine, but a bit of under or over exposing makes it really bad. This is the reason why some call the Canon sensors like slide film in terms of exposure tolerance and the way we should use our Canons, and I guess I used to be able to some how manage it well to make my Canon look just fine.

 

But now, I am just too used to shooting my A7 A7R A7M2 A6300 and A7R2 other Sonys, with a couple of stops better dynamic range at ISO100, or more precisely better latitude. So now I tend to intentionally underexpose it to save the highlight, and in the post I lift the shadow up.

 

I think Sony sensors are like negative film, and Canons are like positive slide film, they are both good and bad , but for most of non-tripod handheld work, Sony has the edge since it allows us to underexpose intentionally to save the highlight and later on we can easily get the hidden shadow data back in PP.

 

With Sony A7 series I think we do seldom need CPL filters or ND filters, and it is hard to screw the exposure in normal use.

 

But I think Sony sensor quality is just plain overrated by DPR kind of sites, if any one challenge the assessment numbers or so called reviews they write, we must be labelled as naive fanboy or poor guy in short of cash and defending his old choice hard, or inane technically challenged morons.

 

Sony sensors are good in harsh day light high DR required scenes,but usually not great at high ISO.

I think many many people deliberately misguided by DPR DXO ,etc and without measuring the sensors in question themselves , just bashing one type of sensors that they dislike or reviews say bad, but in reality there is no such dramatic difference there.

 

Really, it is not that simple, the 5DS sensor is excellent in many regards, but it can not score well at DXO, and I am sure why the biased DPR guys rated it much lower than the Sony 36mp sensor ignoring the fact it is a very very different type of sensor than the Sony 36mp or 42mp chip, or even very different design than the Canon's own 6D sensor or 5DMK3 sensor.

 

The 5DS sensor is simply optimized for the best skin tone in a studio or great out of the camera color for landscape, so it has very strong intense color filters. I think it is about 1.6 times stronger than that of the 5DMK3,whose sensor design focus was high ISO or low noise throughout the ISO range, thus used weak thin CFA design.....So the 5DS sensor tends to produce better stronger punchier colors out of the camera compared to the previous Canon with weaker CFA design but at the cost of a tiny bit more shot noise at the base ISO.

 

I think Sony and its Alpha community is becoming like a fanatic religious group(like young earth creationist group let by Kent Hovind), never even accept or listen to any kind of different voice, opinion and preference, and it seems to be all review communities are misled by them or their excessively loud voice.

 

If you even mildly pan or hard on any Sony Alpha line camera, they will attack on you, or if you prefer something other than their preferred ones, they call you a troll or a fanboy, to turn the debate into a name calling contest.

 

It always happens at DPR fora ,especially in the Canon and the Open talk forums, Sony E mount fanboys really act like some sort of cult-worshipers intrude into other forums and bash others choice or force others to believe in Sony cult. If any one says anything good about Nikon, Canon, Fuji or Samsung compared to Alpha 7 line cameras, then they freak out and turn it into a name calling contest(it is always their tech to win any debate there), so it is impossible to logically argue or even talk anything about the A7X with presence of some die-hard Sony fanatics there. It is really that ridiculous.

 

It is like being in a Catholic church, these real die-hard Sony Alpha 7 fanboys in camera fora never accept any different belief, value or different opinion on any camera. If someone prefer the other sensor manufacture than Sony then they insult his or her technical knowledge or sometimes even his or her personality that they don't even know...........For example a few days ago, some one (obviously a wedding guy) mildly criticized(not even seriously bashed or panned) about terrible battery life of the A7S and he said the real issue for "HIM" was not the terrible battery life itself or having to carry many of tiny, lousy batteries for the Sony, but it was difficult to change it over and over many times without missing many important decisive moments.......I think it is very correct and I experienced it myself many many times, too, as a long time A7 user. But they(A7 fans)got obviously hurt by his comment because it is a fact, and they have to gather to attack on his personally. A few hours later the thread was closed as usual, and it was sad.. Well, I sometimes wonder if there are many kindergarten kids in the camera forums, they are seriously thin-skinned and easily hurt, maybe their self-esteem or pride (more like ego)is totally dependent on their so-called FF cameras? or winning the debate at DPR or some moronic rumor sites like SAR or CR really important for them to keep themselves calm and sane or just alive?

 

I have now several people asking me about my opinion on A7M2 vs 6D vs D750 issue, and I told them it is a personal choice, and there is no objectively or absolutely better one for every one, and I don't even believe there is any absolutely objective review at all. Then they said I have been intentionally closing my eyes, trying hard not to see the fact Sony is taking over the industry.........if I do not admit it then I have to be called a Canon or a Nikon or a Samsung or a Fuji fanboy, silly to say the least........... A few days ago I criticized about A7RMK2 pricing a bit, and I also said I began to realize how reasonably priced D810 was, and comparing the price of the D810 to the price of my own A7RMK2 or the5DS shows it very glaringly.

Then, a couple of usual Sony fanboys criticized me of being super ignorant about the A7RMK2, and told me that the Sony camera would be like having a great pro 4k cinema camera and a high resolution stills camera in one tiny body, so it is a historic game changer and nothing on the market compete well with it. And according to them the A7RMK2 sensor is really great at high ISO, even slightly better than the A7S or the Pentax 645Z........although all lab test results say otherwise.....I am sure they never used the 645Z if they think the A7R2 beats it.

  

Well I partly agree with them, but I say it is not a pro video camera, or it is not really innovative cinema camera that replaces real super 35mm pro cinema cameras; the battery life is too short, the heat dissipation issue is really bad, the FF is not suited for serious video, especially for running gun type of event or documentary work, etc. The bigger the sensor the more battery power consuming, and therefore, many of us do not want a FF video camera. In addition to all the above issues, it does not even have dual card slots, and it is a big issue for me and any one using it for serious video work.

 

But according to them the Red dragon, BMCC , Canon cinema EOS,etc are all immediately thrown into camera coffins by the advent of the Sony A7RMK2 and the A6300.

 

I think it is getting a bit too ridiculous although I admit it is an amazing camera mostly for stills landscape and studio work, it may or may not replace all, or it may even change the history of hybrid camera world.

 

But do not forget we all have preferences and different needs, different views on cameras, and sometimes technical numbers or feature set does not matter, sometimes we simply prefer one even if it is just technically a inferior camera or tool, we cannot measure usability and practicality of each system to each of us but it is very important to consider when we choose a new camera system.

 

That all said though, I think Sony has been right , it is really shaking the conservative camera world, just slowly but surely increasing its market share by introducing a great compact FF hybrid camera system.

 

Do not forget the biggest sales point of the A7 series is not any specific camera feature or the BSI sensor,etc, but it is being the only one hybrid open mount camera system that takes all mounts lenses,including the A mount lenses,the EF lenses, the F mount lenses with several times more accurate AF than any D-SLR type of cameras.

 

I think something like below is always happening now:

Some Canon guys buy an A7R2 or an A7M2, with use of adapted Canon lens line in mind and use it for a while with their adapted EF lenses or A mount lenses..

But in a few months, they'd realize they need some native FE mount lenses and buy some Zeiss Batis and Sony Z, G and GM series lenses, then they'd be like fragile insects trapped into a big spider nest. At this point, there is no more way back to Canon or Nikon even if either of these 2 makes something similar to the A7RMK2 in the near future because selling used FE mount lenses is very difficult because the FE lenses cannot be adapted to any other mount system as they have the shortest flange back design.

 

So, while I think Sony has succeeded converting many Canon guys into FE mount users, I am not sure if it will take over the market entirely so soon. The A7 system is just a temporal stop gap solution for many of us. After a few years it may be completely abandoned just like most of so-called Sony's great innovative products. Remember Mini disc or Memory Stick Duo?

I just think the future is open mount system but it is not the A7 or any Sony or Samsung.

The A7 system prevails for a short time but it will not be able to replace all Canon Nikon fast enough, and the Sony will be overlooking or dismissing minor brand but truly innovative small players emerging out to rival against Sony.

 

I think something like BMCC or Red of stills will take over the market.....I think the open mount is a dual-edged-sword for Sony it will help Sony to get many many Canon Nikon users temporarily coming to their mount but at the same time give a serious opportunity for a Red-like company to truly invent(not just innovate) something really new to take over the entire industry.....

 

But in any case I am sure the D-SLRs are dying, I re-confirmed this again in Thailand and Malaysia last year:

I went to Malaysia for work for a few hours(wished I had had more time to spend there shooting around Penang) in last December and then visited Thailand for about several hours(very sad to have just 2 hours there), and I saw the camera industry of SE Asia changed a lot like below.

It changed a lot there these 2 countries. I spent a lot of time in Thailand in 2011 and 2010. Back then, Canon and Nikon were the definite dominant players for sure. Now? I passed several of the chain stores in a few malls in Pinklao, Skumvitt and Platunam area that did not even carry Canon in the windows. Nikon, yes but not many were displayed there either.

Went to a photography trade show in Georgetown, Malaysia, the Nikon and Canon booths were there without any people. The mirrorless cameras, Sony, Fuji(especially popular), Olympus were packed with folks trying and buying.

For now, Canon and Nikon have lost their momentum over here for sure. Let's hope they can come back strong, but I feel it is too late now already.

 

Everything changes very fast in Asia and anything considered to be uncool cannot sell well there, it is even more drastic in Japan and South Korea, so I believe the sales numbers for CN are even worse there.

 

Update: now we all know the A7M3 is on the horizon, I believe it will be announced at Photokina in September if not in this coming June, and I am sure it will have the new A7R2 sensor tech and most of new technologies found in the A6300 body at the half the price of the A7R2.

I expect the A7M3 might become the final nail on Canon Nikon D-SLR coffin.

 

UPdate 2: now, Canon has just announced its new sensor development policy. Canon seems to have built a new sensor plant in Mie prefecture of Japan. It seems like Canon is going on new 65nm process rule and all upcoming Canon sensors will be produced at there.

I think the 1DX2 and the 80D sensors are processed at the new plant.

Sony is still leading the CMOS imaging industry, but giants like Samsung are in close pursuit. Also big players like Panasonic are forming joint ventures with the likes of TowerJazz to offer 12-inch wafer fabrication with state-of-the-art quantum efficiency and dark current performance at 65 nano meters, and additional 45nm digital technology, and added available capacity of approximately 800,000 8-inch wafers per year in three manufacturing plants in Japan, according to TowerJazz.

 

The stakes are huge. The CMOS image sensor market will reached the historic $10 billion milestone in 2015, according to Yale, and with new applications popping up in automotive, medical and surveillance, while smartphones begin adopting high-definition front facing cameras, the industry is likely to hit the $16 billion mark by 2020. So nobody is just sleeping and Sony has to consolidate its position ASAP, or probably Sony will lose it again just like its short-lived TV business.

  

UPDATE3: Looks like Sony has actually done something right this year.

Sony was the only one of those 3 camera companies to break even this time, and was actually profitable for the year in Imaging, though it’s difficult to say how much of that is contributed by pro video gear. The Imaging Products group at Sony posted slightly lower sales (-1.7%) but a very healthy profit (up 30.4b yen and hitting about 10% of sales).

In terms of unit volume, digital cameras at Sony dropped from 8.5m units to 6.1m units year-to-year. That’s mostly compact camera sales that dried up. Sony won’t say exactly how that shift is working other than to say “improvement in the product mix of digital cameras.” In other words, they suggest that by getting rid of compact camera volume and focusing all its effort on high priced ILC units they are getting a better profit margin.

The other two camera companies still making some money out of their camera business are Fuji and Canon. We do not know Canon's result in detail yet.

I think it is fair to say Fujifilm has a hobby camera business as their Digital cameras are about 2.5% of the company’s overall revenue stream. That they give us any insight into how that business is working is actually a bit surprising. Sales for digital cameras were down 8.2% year-to-year, yet it is still quite profitable.Fujifilm Japan says the imaging business earned 9 percent more profit to them and it was the best of the last 9 years.

To me, the most surprising finding is that Casio's camera division is still profitable and they sell only compact cameras.

But how do they make any serious money out of that compact camera sells is a big mystery to me.

             

Laced with B is a swimwear collection designed by local San Diegan BreeAnna Quigg

 

SAN DIEGO (October 10, 2013)– Fashion Week San Diego® (FWSD) took place September 30th to October 6th with a week of events including three days of runway shows, a Trunk Show (market day), art & beauty event and much more. The event was a major success with a smooth production and the launching of the FWSD Designer Spring/Summer 2014 Collections.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 highlights include:

 

•FWSD 2013 Winning Designer as voted by the audience went to RHCREATION with first runner up Wishnow and second runner up Greenpacha also being recognized.

•RHCREATION successfully met with buyers from ModCloth.com on Monday October 7th as part of the Winning Designer Business Package.

•3,500 people attended the event.

•The city of San Diego showed its support of FWSD with the attendance of Interim Mayor Todd Gloria and County Supervisor Dave Roberts. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria also presented an official proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews.

•From the FWSD designers to the small business sponsors of FWSD, the event helped generate growth in businesses and the industries of fashion and tourism.

•$18,580 worth of sales was done during the Trunk Show of FWSD on Sunday.

•26 Designers were able to show their latest collection to buyers in order to grow their small businesses.

•Many of the FWSD Sponsors were able to take their businesses to the next level thanks to the exposure gained from being part of this event.

•Local hotels saw increased reservations from out of town guests and locals as a result of the event.

•Volunteers were able to gain relevant experience in order to grow their careers.

•In attendance were representatives from InStyle, Vanity Fair, and national fashion retailers. Designer Zandra Rhodes also attended.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 commenced September 30th and October 1st with private events for Sponsors and Designers respectively to celebrate the start of the week of events. These private events took place at Roppongi Restaurant & Sushi Bar in La Jolla with guests enjoying beer from Peroni Nastro Azzuro and music from the DJs of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Art & Beauty behind Fashion event on Wednesday October 2nd kicked off the first day open to public and industry. Beauty industry experts Jan Nordstrom Arnold of CND Nails, Claudio Lazo of Wella, Kevin James Bennett of MUD and Maryelle Koken of Sebastian International spoke about how the hair, makeup and nails bring a runway show to life. The night also included a panel of experts talking about how beauty effects fashion and vice versa. Panelists include Leilani Angel of Bellus Academy, Travis Parker, Dean Hall and Brian Hawkins of FIDM/Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising. We would like to thank our sponsor Bellus Academy for their sponsorship for this night. This interactive night included four live paintings by Launch Live Art of designs from FWSD designers. Guests also saw art from local artists part of RAW: natural born artists commissioned to create art pieces based on Spring/Summer trends.

 

Thursday October 3rd began the runway shows with seven FWSD designers showcasing their Spring/Summer 2014 collections. Designers featured Thursday include: C Venti, CG by Cynthia, Collections of Kathryn Elizabeth, Isabel Vianey, Laced with B, Mahogany Blues and Second Star Designs. The night ended with a runway shows featuring the collections of three designers from the new fashion competition series “Styled to Rock” including Dexter Simmons, Cecilia Aragon and Andre Soriano.

 

The runway shows continued Friday October 4th featuring FWSD Designers Diestra, Dos Caras Swimwear, Greenpacha, Keisha Audrey, ‘Love, Charles’, Maegan Stracy and RCREATION. The last runway show of the evening featured a Doggie Fashion Show with highly adoptable dogs from Rancho Coastal Humane Society (RCHS). Half of the dogs thus far have found forever homes.

 

Saturday October 4th was the final night of runway shows featuring FWSD Designers A’doreus, Ashley Raymond, Danh Ta, Maralonzo, NOIA, SYC Collection, VICTROLA, Wishnow, WM Couture and Yuwei Designs. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria was in attendance and presented the Official Proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews. The proclamation states the first week of October to be the official fashion week in San Diego. The night ended with an official after party with DJ Demon of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Trunk Show on October 5th marked the last day of FWSD 2013 where designers showed their collections and took orders from buyers. The winning designer and top models were announced along with an award from the FWSD 2013 Advisory Panel for most innovative designs.

 

About the event: Fashion Week San Diego® is a collaborative entertainment fashion event to celebrate emerging designers by showcasing and highlighting the pulse of these entrepreneurs and what they are creating. Fashion Week San Diego® is pleased to give these emerging fashion designers a platform to launch their careers.

All photos by Mathias Vejerslev. www.flickr.com/photos/mvejerslev

 

Cities have always been associated with the experience of noise. With the growing democratization of what the urban spaces are used for in terms of events and activities, the need for a focus on how the sounds influence our everyday life arises.

Where the discourse primarily has been focussing on how to eliminate noise in the city, new initiatives focusing on the qualities of city sounds and what role they play in the public space are emerging. Whether the focus is reduction of traffic noise, acoustic design or cultural events, they all share a common goal: To improve and strenghten the sonic experience of the urban space for the people who live there as well as visitors. Bits & Beers: City Sound & Noise puts a spotlight on the topic through inspirational talks from innovative professionals within the field of city acoustics.

 

Bits & Beers is IdemoLab’s atypical evening conference connecting businesses, creatives, entrepreneurs, and makers in the relaxed Friday bar atmosphere, with the structure of a well organized business networking and knowledge sharing event. Bits & Beers consists of a “friday-bar”; short, introductory talks as well as an engaging exibition-area, where you can experience new technologies and concepts with-in the subject of the day.

 

Speakers:

 

Ingeborg Okkels

 

Ingeborg has a PHD in Musicology from Copenhagen University. Her PHD was looking into music technology and perception of audio. She has been a lecturer and writer on audio-related areas, specializing in electronic music and sound collages. As a composer and sound designer she has been working for art films and installations. Since 2014 Ingeborg Okkels have been facilitating many workshops related to sound, sound experience and sound awareness. These have been carried out in cooperation with museums, educational institutions, libraries, architects and private companies.

 

Kirstine Lorenzen

 

Kirstine Lorenzen has over the past 20 years working with green growth and technology development, especially within the energy, climate, street lights and traffic noise. Since May 2015, Kirstine has been responsible for the Silent City – Living Lab of Urban Noise Reduction. SC takes place in the Southern part of Greater Copenhagen.

 

Lærke Cecilie Bjerre:

 

Regulations for quiet urban areas are typically based on sound level limits alone. However, the full immersion in the on-site non-acoustic context is important when evaluating overall and subjective soundscape quality in urban recreational areas. Lærke and her two partners Anna Josefine Sørensen and Thea Mathilde Larsen won the Young Investigator Best Paper award in Hawaii 2016 for their research in holistic sound evaluation in urban areas.

  

Steffen Ring and Michael Frejdal

Ring Advocacy is a technical partner in the MONICA project - a project born to demonstrate how multiple Internet of Things technologies can help in terms of noise control, sound quality, crowd management and security at large cultural events taking place in the city. Ring Advocacy was founded in 2015 by Steffen Ring, MScEE, as a technology consultancy within regulatory affairs regarding spectrum and standardisation matters with a global scope. Also included in the project is Michael Frejdal, technical director of Tivoli in Copenhagen, which works as a pilot site for MONICA to investigate through Tivoli activities and events such as eg. 'Fredagsrock'.

 

Music:

Mads Hennelund

Mads Hennelund is the former leadsinger in the disco-pop band MÅNE. With his new soloproject PUNGIE he reunites clubmusic and technomusic with beautiful sounds and pop-harmonies

soundcloud.com/user-556569817

Laced with B is a swimwear collection designed by local San Diegan BreeAnna Quigg

 

SAN DIEGO (October 10, 2013)– Fashion Week San Diego® (FWSD) took place September 30th to October 6th with a week of events including three days of runway shows, a Trunk Show (market day), art & beauty event and much more. The event was a major success with a smooth production and the launching of the FWSD Designer Spring/Summer 2014 Collections.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 highlights include:

 

•FWSD 2013 Winning Designer as voted by the audience went to RHCREATION with first runner up Wishnow and second runner up Greenpacha also being recognized.

•RHCREATION successfully met with buyers from ModCloth.com on Monday October 7th as part of the Winning Designer Business Package.

•3,500 people attended the event.

•The city of San Diego showed its support of FWSD with the attendance of Interim Mayor Todd Gloria and County Supervisor Dave Roberts. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria also presented an official proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews.

•From the FWSD designers to the small business sponsors of FWSD, the event helped generate growth in businesses and the industries of fashion and tourism.

•$18,580 worth of sales was done during the Trunk Show of FWSD on Sunday.

•26 Designers were able to show their latest collection to buyers in order to grow their small businesses.

•Many of the FWSD Sponsors were able to take their businesses to the next level thanks to the exposure gained from being part of this event.

•Local hotels saw increased reservations from out of town guests and locals as a result of the event.

•Volunteers were able to gain relevant experience in order to grow their careers.

•In attendance were representatives from InStyle, Vanity Fair, and national fashion retailers. Designer Zandra Rhodes also attended.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 commenced September 30th and October 1st with private events for Sponsors and Designers respectively to celebrate the start of the week of events. These private events took place at Roppongi Restaurant & Sushi Bar in La Jolla with guests enjoying beer from Peroni Nastro Azzuro and music from the DJs of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Art & Beauty behind Fashion event on Wednesday October 2nd kicked off the first day open to public and industry. Beauty industry experts Jan Nordstrom Arnold of CND Nails, Claudio Lazo of Wella, Kevin James Bennett of MUD and Maryelle Koken of Sebastian International spoke about how the hair, makeup and nails bring a runway show to life. The night also included a panel of experts talking about how beauty effects fashion and vice versa. Panelists include Leilani Angel of Bellus Academy, Travis Parker, Dean Hall and Brian Hawkins of FIDM/Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising. We would like to thank our sponsor Bellus Academy for their sponsorship for this night. This interactive night included four live paintings by Launch Live Art of designs from FWSD designers. Guests also saw art from local artists part of RAW: natural born artists commissioned to create art pieces based on Spring/Summer trends.

 

Thursday October 3rd began the runway shows with seven FWSD designers showcasing their Spring/Summer 2014 collections. Designers featured Thursday include: C Venti, CG by Cynthia, Collections of Kathryn Elizabeth, Isabel Vianey, Laced with B, Mahogany Blues and Second Star Designs. The night ended with a runway shows featuring the collections of three designers from the new fashion competition series “Styled to Rock” including Dexter Simmons, Cecilia Aragon and Andre Soriano.

 

The runway shows continued Friday October 4th featuring FWSD Designers Diestra, Dos Caras Swimwear, Greenpacha, Keisha Audrey, ‘Love, Charles’, Maegan Stracy and RCREATION. The last runway show of the evening featured a Doggie Fashion Show with highly adoptable dogs from Rancho Coastal Humane Society (RCHS). Half of the dogs thus far have found forever homes.

 

Saturday October 4th was the final night of runway shows featuring FWSD Designers A’doreus, Ashley Raymond, Danh Ta, Maralonzo, NOIA, SYC Collection, VICTROLA, Wishnow, WM Couture and Yuwei Designs. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria was in attendance and presented the Official Proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews. The proclamation states the first week of October to be the official fashion week in San Diego. The night ended with an official after party with DJ Demon of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Trunk Show on October 5th marked the last day of FWSD 2013 where designers showed their collections and took orders from buyers. The winning designer and top models were announced along with an award from the FWSD 2013 Advisory Panel for most innovative designs.

 

About the event: Fashion Week San Diego® is a collaborative entertainment fashion event to celebrate emerging designers by showcasing and highlighting the pulse of these entrepreneurs and what they are creating. Fashion Week San Diego® is pleased to give these emerging fashion designers a platform to launch their careers.

Shot this at Sapporo beer Shrine

I had hard time finding a restroom in Sapporo, there were almost no restrooms available, so each time I wanted to go pee, I had to go find a 7-11 or Family mart or subway station near me.

 

This image was shot with Canon 6D handheld, actually one handed since I had my dog with me at the time of shooting this.

  

A few months after coming back from Hokkaido with my broken 6D, I realized was kind of missing it. It has technically no real advantage over any of my current cameras, but I kind of miss it.

So I have been checking through my old but not updated 6D images. I have also tested thorough them with some custom made software I bought a month ago from my old friend working as a Tsukuba university practical physicist.

 

I think I will re-measure it but as far as I remember the numbers I got from my test with the special made program, it was not even half as good as I thought it would be.......and I was deeply disappointed, in fact almost immediately depressed.

 

I just wish Canon to get its act together and makes a great sensor or even just buy off from Samsung or Renasus, whose sensor patents and designs are, imho, more advanced than that of Sony.

As long as we expose it to the right and or apply so-called ETTR it is fine, but a bit of under or over exposing makes it really bad. This is the reason why some call the Canon sensors like slide film in terms of exposure tolerance and the way we should use our Canons, and I guess I used to be able to some how manage it well to make my Canon look just fine.

 

But now, I am just too used to shooting my A7 A7R A7M2 A6300 and A7R2 other Sonys, with a couple of stops better dynamic range at ISO100, or more precisely better latitude. So now I tend to intentionally underexpose it to save the highlight, and in the post I lift the shadow up.

 

I think Sony sensors are like negative film, and Canons are like positive slide film, they are both good and bad , but for most of non-tripod handheld work, Sony has the edge since it allows us to underexpose intentionally to save the highlight and later on we can easily get the hidden shadow data back in PP.

 

With Sony A7 series I think we do seldom need CPL filters or ND filters, and it is hard to screw the exposure in normal use.

 

But I think Sony sensor quality is just plain overrated by DPR kind of sites, if any one challenge the assessment numbers or so called reviews they write, we must be labelled as naive fanboy or poor guy in short of cash and defending his old choice hard, or inane technically challenged morons.

 

Sony sensors are good in harsh day light high DR required scenes,but usually not great at high ISO.

I think many many people deliberately misguided by DPR DXO ,etc and without measuring the sensors in question themselves , just bashing one type of sensors that they dislike or reviews say bad, but in reality there is no such dramatic difference there.

 

Really, it is not that simple, the 5DS sensor is excellent in many regards, but it can not score well at DXO, and I am sure why the biased DPR guys rated it much lower than the Sony 36mp sensor ignoring the fact it is a very very different type of sensor than the Sony 36mp or 42mp chip, or even very different design than the Canon's own 6D sensor or 5DMK3 sensor.

 

The 5DS sensor is simply optimized for the best skin tone in a studio or great out of the camera color for landscape, so it has very strong intense color filters. I think it is about 1.6 times stronger than that of the 5DMK3,whose sensor design focus was high ISO or low noise throughout the ISO range, thus used weak thin CFA design.....So the 5DS sensor tends to produce better stronger punchier colors out of the camera compared to the previous Canon with weaker CFA design but at the cost of a tiny bit more shot noise at the base ISO.

 

I think Sony and its Alpha community is becoming like a fanatic religious group(like young earth creationist group let by Kent Hovind), never even accept or listen to any kind of different voice, opinion and preference, and it seems to be all review communities are misled by them or their excessively loud voice.

 

If you even mildly pan or hard on any Sony Alpha line camera, they will attack on you, or if you prefer something other than their preferred ones, they call you a troll or a fanboy, to turn the debate into a name calling contest.

 

It always happens at DPR fora ,especially in the Canon and the Open talk forums, Sony E mount fanboys really act like some sort of cult-worshipers intrude into other forums and bash others choice or force others to believe in Sony cult. If any one says anything good about Nikon, Canon, Fuji or Samsung compared to Alpha 7 line cameras, then they freak out and turn it into a name calling contest(it is always their tech to win any debate there), so it is impossible to logically argue or even talk anything about the A7X with presence of some die-hard Sony fanatics there. It is really that ridiculous.

 

It is like being in a Catholic church, these real die-hard Sony Alpha 7 fanboys in camera fora never accept any different belief, value or different opinion on any camera. If someone prefer the other sensor manufacture than Sony then they insult his or her technical knowledge or sometimes even his or her personality that they don't even know...........For example a few days ago, some one (obviously a wedding guy) mildly criticized(not even seriously bashed or panned) about terrible battery life of the A7S and he said the real issue for "HIM" was not the terrible battery life itself or having to carry many of tiny, lousy batteries for the Sony, but it was difficult to change it over and over many times without missing many important decisive moments.......I think it is very correct and I experienced it myself many many times, too, as a long time A7 user. But they(A7 fans)got obviously hurt by his comment because it is a fact, and they have to gather to attack on his personally. A few hours later the thread was closed as usual, and it was sad.. Well, I sometimes wonder if there are many kindergarten kids in the camera forums, they are seriously thin-skinned and easily hurt, maybe their self-esteem or pride (more like ego)is totally dependent on their so-called FF cameras? or winning the debate at DPR or some moronic rumor sites like SAR or CR really important for them to keep themselves calm and sane or just alive?

 

I have now several people asking me about my opinion on A7M2 vs 6D vs D750 issue, and I told them it is a personal choice, and there is no objectively or absolutely better one for every one, and I don't even believe there is any absolutely objective review at all. Then they said I have been intentionally closing my eyes, trying hard not to see the fact Sony is taking over the industry.........if I do not admit it then I have to be called a Canon or a Nikon or a Samsung or a Fuji fanboy, silly to say the least........... A few days ago I criticized about A7RMK2 pricing a bit, and I also said I began to realize how reasonably priced D810 was, and comparing the price of the D810 to the price of my own A7RMK2 or the5DS shows it very glaringly.

Then, a couple of usual Sony fanboys criticized me of being super ignorant about the A7RMK2, and told me that the Sony camera would be like having a great pro 4k cinema camera and a high resolution stills camera in one tiny body, so it is a historic game changer and nothing on the market compete well with it. And according to them the A7RMK2 sensor is really great at high ISO, even slightly better than the A7S or the Pentax 645Z........although all lab test results say otherwise.....I am sure they never used the 645Z if they think the A7R2 beats it.

  

Well I partly agree with them, but I say it is not a pro video camera, or it is not really innovative cinema camera that replaces real super 35mm pro cinema cameras; the battery life is too short, the heat dissipation issue is really bad, the FF is not suited for serious video, especially for running gun type of event or documentary work, etc. The bigger the sensor the more battery power consuming, and therefore, many of us do not want a FF video camera. In addition to all the above issues, it does not even have dual card slots, and it is a big issue for me and any one using it for serious video work.

 

But according to them the Red dragon, BMCC , Canon cinema EOS,etc are all immediately thrown into camera coffins by the advent of the Sony A7RMK2 and the A6300.

 

I think it is getting a bit too ridiculous although I admit it is an amazing camera mostly for stills landscape and studio work, it may or may not replace all, or it may even change the history of hybrid camera world.

 

But do not forget we all have preferences and different needs, different views on cameras, and sometimes technical numbers or feature set does not matter, sometimes we simply prefer one even if it is just technically a inferior camera or tool, we cannot measure usability and practicality of each system to each of us but it is very important to consider when we choose a new camera system.

 

That all said though, I think Sony has been right , it is really shaking the conservative camera world, just slowly but surely increasing its market share by introducing a great compact FF hybrid camera system.

 

Do not forget the biggest sales point of the A7 series is not any specific camera feature or the BSI sensor,etc, but it is being the only one hybrid open mount camera system that takes all mounts lenses,including the A mount lenses,the EF lenses, the F mount lenses with several times more accurate AF than any D-SLR type of cameras.

 

I think something like below is always happening now:

Some Canon guys buy an A7R2 or an A7M2, with use of adapted Canon lens line in mind and use it for a while with their adapted EF lenses or A mount lenses..

But in a few months, they'd realize they need some native FE mount lenses and buy some Zeiss Batis and Sony Z, G and GM series lenses, then they'd be like fragile insects trapped into a big spider nest. At this point, there is no more way back to Canon or Nikon even if either of these 2 makes something similar to the A7RMK2 in the near future because selling used FE mount lenses is very difficult because the FE lenses cannot be adapted to any other mount system as they have the shortest flange back design.

 

So, while I think Sony has succeeded converting many Canon guys into FE mount users, I am not sure if it will take over the market entirely so soon. The A7 system is just a temporal stop gap solution for many of us. After a few years it may be completely abandoned just like most of so-called Sony's great innovative products. Remember Mini disc or Memory Stick Duo?

I just think the future is open mount system but it is not the A7 or any Sony or Samsung.

The A7 system prevails for a short time but it will not be able to replace all Canon Nikon fast enough, and the Sony will be overlooking or dismissing minor brand but truly innovative small players emerging out to rival against Sony.

 

I think something like BMCC or Red of stills will take over the market.....I think the open mount is a dual-edged-sword for Sony it will help Sony to get many many Canon Nikon users temporarily coming to their mount but at the same time give a serious opportunity for a Red-like company to truly invent(not just innovate) something really new to take over the entire industry.....

 

But in any case I am sure the D-SLRs are dying, I re-confirmed this again in Thailand and Malaysia last year:

I went to Malaysia for work for a few hours(wished I had had more time to spend there shooting around Penang) in last December and then visited Thailand for about several hours(very sad to have just 2 hours there), and I saw the camera industry of SE Asia changed a lot like below.

It changed a lot there these 2 countries. I spent a lot of time in Thailand in 2011 and 2010. Back then, Canon and Nikon were the definite dominant players for sure. Now? I passed several of the chain stores in a few malls in Pinklao, Skumvitt and Platunam area that did not even carry Canon in the windows. Nikon, yes but not many were displayed there either.

Went to a photography trade show in Georgetown, Malaysia, the Nikon and Canon booths were there without any people. The mirrorless cameras, Sony, Fuji(especially popular), Olympus were packed with folks trying and buying.

For now, Canon and Nikon have lost their momentum over here for sure. Let's hope they can come back strong, but I feel it is too late now already.

 

Everything changes very fast in Asia and anything considered to be uncool cannot sell well there, it is even more drastic in Japan and South Korea, so I believe the sales numbers for CN are even worse there.

  

UPdate : now, Canon has just announced its new sensor development policy. Canon seems to have built a new sensor plant in Mie prefecture of Japan. It seems like Canon is going on new 65nm process rule and all upcoming Canon sensors will be produced at there.

I think the 1DX2 and the 80D sensors are processed at the new plant.

Sony is still leading the CMOS imaging industry, but giants like Samsung are in close pursuit. Also big players like Panasonic are forming joint ventures with the likes of TowerJazz to offer 12-inch wafer fabrication with state-of-the-art quantum efficiency and dark current performance at 65 nano meters, and additional 45nm digital technology, and added available capacity of approximately 800,000 8-inch wafers per year in three manufacturing plants in Japan, according to TowerJazz.

 

The stakes are huge. The CMOS image sensor market will reached the historic $10 billion milestone in 2015, according to Yale, and with new applications popping up in automotive, medical and surveillance, while smartphones begin adopting high-definition front facing cameras, the industry is likely to hit the $16 billion mark by 2020. So nobody is just sleeping and Sony has to consolidate its position ASAP, or probably Sony will lose it again just like its short-lived TV business.

  

UPDATE2:Another serious issue all the camera makers will have to face but I did not really realize before is that all ILC cameras are big to most of NORMAL non-photographer people, and they are very intimidating to most of NORMAL people(I mean regardless of mount type or sensor type).

I never realized it before but while walking around down town Fukuoka with one of my long time friends here forced me to understand it. A friend of mine told me that he thinks all interchangeable lens cameras are huge and intimidating to most of average people regardless of sensor size or format, it's just simply annoying!

I guess a big lens scares or annoys people more than a big body......I never saw it his way but I got his point and I decided to carry my tiny Canon G5X when I just walk around the city area with other people. If I am alone shooting something, then I usually carry my big camera, and I think it does not matter it's a m43, a FF, an APS-C, it is all big to most of NORMAL people, anyway.

Then why not just go all the way up to FF or MFDB, or at least APS-C?

 

So maybe the one really doomed is not Nikon F or Pentax K or Sony A but m43?

Nikon and Pentax have historically had very enthusiastic and even fanatic core shooters and they are usually too old to adapt themselves fast to new EVF based gear even if they understand it is the more logical thing for them as they are aged. So D-SLRs may survive as antique cameras, but m43 or Nikon One?

    

Update3:now, I think FF mirrorless is, like self-driving car, it is the future, definitely, but not really mature enough to be practical for many real life tasks, and they are both still immensely overpriced just because newer tech relatively to their older more practical rivals.

The Sony a7R2 should be cheaper than the D810 considering it does not have the complex mirror and proper weather sealings on the shutter. The X-T2 should be as cheap as the D7200 or the 80D. The A6300 should be as cheap as its predecessor(about 650US), no more than that, it is a great camera but still not able to shoot from a fast running car or train like the 7DMK2 or the D500, and so if you were a paparazzi or anything like that, you would not choose the A6300 as your main camera.

When I wrote my previous A6300 vs D500 hands-on experience,I was very very impressed with the A6300 AF, especially with the FE55mm f1.8Z. But now I am sure if my work is completely relying on the best AF in the game, I'd definitely choose the D500, not the A6300, which could not focus well on a super fast moving thing from a fast running train or a car unless the light level is perfectly ideal.

In last week,I tried to shoot street snaps from a fast running super express train with my A6300, A7M2 and A7R2, none of my Sonys could focus on anything moving from a 300km/h fast running train, I was really glad I also brought my D750 with me for my last short train trip.

Like Thom Hogan said, the Sony Alpha E mount cameras are too slow for anything moving fast, I mean their single AF speed is very fast, but it cannot track fast, especially when the light level is not really ideal.

Plus, the general operation speed of the Sony is just painfully slow, even the most expensive A7SMK2 is very slow. I mean it takes about 30 seconds to format a card, about 5 seconds or more to wake up from a long sleep, etc, and is too slow for anything unpredictably moving or decisive once a life time kind of shot. Another big issue of the Sony FE system is terribly short battery life. I know if I bring this up, many Sony fans would tell me after adding a couple of extra batteries it is still lighter than any of Nikon Canon FF D-SLRs. Maybe so, but the real issue here is because we need to change the battery almost every couple of hours, we would miss many decisive moments, and it is really annoying.

 

Now, it is obvious this is the most difficult time to spend some serious amount of money into any of these already existing camera system since they all suck in some ways and all the camera companies are too arrogant or stupid to listen to the actual users.

 

The FE50mm f1.4Z is an amazing lens that may change the direction of the entire industry but it is a huge lens, honestly, if I knew where Sony were heading to at very first place in 2013, I would not have spent this much money into Sony FE system......I wanted it to be small, light and simple, but now it is a big, heavy, expensive and very complex system.

Really, why every new lens must be AF and this huge is beyond me. It is just making the system impractical with the terribly oversized lenses. I have never seen any 50 this big(except my Otus 55 and the old Sigma Art I hated both of those huge 50 primes), seriously it is as big as the 85mm f1.4 GM and is an ugly looking lens, too.

Sony should not try a D-SLR replacement system with the A7 system, but a great RangeFinder replacement system.

Hope they wake up soon.

  

UPDATE4: I think I must correct some terrible lies spread by so called reviewers here:

1 Fuji X-Trans3 is just the same sensor design or some variant of the A6300 sensor. A lie. The Fuji 24mp sensor is Toshiba design, Sony produced sensor. Last year Toshiba sold out some of their CMOS plants to Sony, they made some specific contract conditions that they would continue to design core sensor designs and produce prototypes of their own sensors themselves, albeit a small number of each sensor they design, and then they take that to main fab process and Sony would mass produce that in Kumamoto Tech and Nagasaki tech.

And the Fuji X trans 3 sensor is the first practical case of this Toshiba Sony sensor business collaboration. So it is definitely not a Sony sensor. If you have both the A6300 and the X-Pro2 or X-T2 , you can easily tell that. The specs are very different and even the base ISO value is so dramatically different, I'd say the a6300 sensor is the better one here.

2 Nikon D7200 sensor is also Toshiba sensor but some similar variant of the X-Trans 3 sensor. No. Lit is another lie spread out through internet by the so called reviewer community.

The D7200 sensor was initially produced at Toshiba Kyushu plant, and then moved to Renesas Mie plant.

Now it is produced at Sony Kumamoto or Kagoshima tech.

So it is definitely a Toshiba sensor used Renesas IP, and the 20mp DX sensor used in the D500 seems also share the same tech used in the D7200 Toshiba sensor.

And they are nothing to do with Sony tech. Just now produced by Sony since Toshiba sold out their main CMOS factories to Sony last year does not mean they are Sony chips. It is a simple contract work and nothing like Sony designs it for others.

3 The Nikon D5 uses old Toshiba tech. No, wrong again. The Nikon D5 sensor is designed by Nikon and Renesas, produced by Renesas. All the high-speed read-out sensors from Nikon are designed by either Aptina or Renesas, nothing to do with Sony or Toshiba.

4 Canon does not sell sensors, it is another lie. They sell their industrial design sensors such as automobile and airplane sensors to Toyota or some other car airplane manufactures in Japan.

5 Renesas now has no their own CMOS factory. Wrong again, they still have 3 and 2 of which are small car use sensors but the last one in Mie still produces big sensors for Nikon. But their CMOS production capacity is not large enough for Nikon consumer grade bodies sold under 3k. So the D810 and the lower grade cameras use either Toshiba or Sony sensors produced at either Sony Kumamoto or Nagasaki, or some rare cases at Kagoshima.

6 Nikon is now completely dependent on Sony. Again, a big lie.

Nikon is now seeking another contract sensor producer who has large enough production capacity for their consumer grade camera sensors. And they are probably choosing Tower Jazz as their next main sensor producer. Now Panasonic, Tower Jazz and Sony are competing for that and I am sure Nikon will not choose Sony for their main sensor producer this time. As obtuse as the current Nikon management is, they at least understand how risky to give Sony all prior info about all their upcoming cameras, so they want to go against Sony. But the sad part is Nikon cannot be 100 percent independent from the Sony tie since Aptina one inch sensor choice is now no longer available as they are now a part of On Semi.

 

UPDATE5: Now, I just confirm that Nikon DL series actual shipment date would be next January 17th as planned in last Nikon conference at Nikon D3400 launch. But it may delay even further to next CP+ show in Yokohama Japan(in Feb 2017).

 

So it is already promised to be a failed product line before the actual launch. I think Nikon is really stupid, I mean I don't think phones or mirrorless killing Nikon but itself, it obtuse marketing killing it.

            

I have known Michael Carter for quite awhile and we have shared many adventures together. He is known to be one of the last true beatniks living in the East Village. He is a writer, poet and a Zen beer master. To give an example beer mysticism: A Zen beer master, a Taoist beer master and Michael Carter walk in to a bar. The bartender comes over and asks what they will have, the the Zen beer master says: 'that which can be called beer is not the true beer...'the Taoist beer master stares at the bowl of peanuts, after a while he ceases to see the peanuts; he no longer sees the bowl, then after another while he once again sees the peanuts and bowl as before... finally Michael Carter opening his third eye looks over at the others and says: 'I'll have what they're having...'

 

Michael is an East Village icon of sorts or sorted. Michael has produced thousands of art events in New York. He produced, created and participated in wacky art happenings, readings, musical performances and video presentations. He has appeared as his alter ego "Vindaloo" creating artistic ruckus and mayhem in his path. He is more known for being a poet giving fiery readings in cafes and clubs. He was also the editor and publisher of Redtape literary magazine. The East Village magazine communicated innovative artistic ideas with the collaboration of writers, artists and visual artists. Redtape featured comics, fiction, poetry, graphic art, and photography. It also provided a venue for both established and emerging artists and writers of the downtown New York scene. It was published between the years 1980 to 1992 and had a strong impact on the New York downtown scene. Michael would have monthly Redtape events with readings, art shows and music.

 

Michael formed a band in the 80's/90's with Julius Klein called Vacuum Bag. They were known for their wild shows and the unexpected behaviour of the singer, Michael Carter. Michael would often lose himself with emotion, go in a trance and jump from table to table, standing on bars half naked screaming. Unfortunately Vacuum Bag does not exist anymore, but you can still catch Michael Carter reading his poems in a dark bar or cafe. He really is the last Beatnik and one hell of a beer mystic. He is a full pledged member of the writer's beer mystic group The Unbearables. Michael is a featured writer in their various publications such as"Between C & D" and "Peau Sensible". Michael is the author of a book of poems called, "Broken Noses and Metempsychosis".

 

Michael Carter sometimes goes into a trance while reading and has visions. He is a strongly influenced by existentialism. He must have been channeling prophecy with the following, from his 1982 poem: “terror is released in lower manhattan/and the terrorists neither carry guns/nor subvert the state/but simply buy it off with promises."

 

The best way to close is to read one of Michael's poems. It speaks for itself.

 

La Mairie '89

 

Nearly full moon, black Jewish star

Lofted above inscrutable, cabalic hebrew

Same street where only fifty years ago

Hitler's dicks rounded up the usual suspects

And dispatched them to eternity

While Cocteau behind shuttered doors

Bewailed bold Eurydice's plight

And Picasso played socialist apostle

Both of 'em prancing bacchanals

Upon these high gates which once boasted

The skewered heads of nobility

Oui, in Paris this year they celebrate the guillotine

Doubtless the apex of Western Civ...

There's a slight slope to these streets

How the blood must run easily

Into the gutters

Like fresh spring rain

Nikon crisis 1:Electronics vs camera company.

It seems to me that the "pure camera makers" of old are being slowly challenged by electronics companies. From what I remember Sony's latest results were not all that grim. In the past film days it must have been cheaper to make a camera - it was really a light tight box with a light meter and a shutter. Now, we are looking at sensors, which take big dollars and big factories to make along with software which has to be updated and all types of micro-processors that never existed before. I would expect that big electronics companies like Sony, Panasonic, Samsung and Apple would ultimately have some kind of home field advantage - especially in the mass market.

 

While there will likely be niche markets for purists who want to stick with the old names with 1950th analogue finder technology with loud slapping mirror just like there are people who still buy very expensive high end fountain pens like my father and grandpa , I think the average person who just wants to take a good photo will slowly drift into the electronics company camp. Sony did buy Minolta camera business(not Minolta itself as always DPR forum experts say in many fora) and slowly transitioned it to a pretty innovative camera maker. So maybe, Nikon will ultimately meet the same kind of fate. I guess time will tell.

So that alone gives a decent reason for Samsung to stay in the business, and I do not believe if they stay in this game, they may be able to become one of three dominant players in this game with Sony and Fuji. So I am not very sure if Samsung really giving up or has just decided it is not a big enough market for them.

 

That said though, Sony's camera results were kind of vague, so it's hard to determine exactly how well stills camera sales/profits are doing. Their camera division includes "broadcast and professional use products like my FS7" and "flow cytometers", and they don't report how many cameras were sold.

Sony will face the same sales decline in few years after they will make a perfect camera lineup when there`s nothing reasonable to upgrade. It is unavoidable. Right now every new generation Sony camera gets better AF, better viewfinder, better video, ergonomics etc, and so we Sony users must keep up with that. I think Fuji people are in the same situation and they are also following every major Fuji camera update.

But sadly once they make everything right they`ll face the same problems as other camera manufacturers do face now. The original A7X series was just too imperfect or flawed and so most of us upgraded to the A7X2. I think the Fuji XT1 original was also a terrible experimental camera that never get matured, so when the X-PRo2 came out all my Fuji friends got it. But this cannot continue forever.

I`m not a Sony hater (on the contrary I love using their cameras and have recommended them to many people). This is just sad reality for over-saturated market: product is good enough, no reason to upgrade ever so often + strong competition from a cheaper accessible devices (older generation cameras are hugely discounted).

IMO, Sony already has faced this market saturation issue. their sales were down last year. total camera units down from 8.5 million down to 6.1 million - yes that includes P&S as well, however, Sony very carefully does not break it out any further - unlike just about every other camera company.

You have to wonder what they are actually hiding. They used to brag about their overall market share and their gains with that(until 2012). Now they only brag about how much they rip off their user base.

When you charge the different prices for the A7R2 from the A7M2 and also the A7S2, and your parts,etc are nearly identical you can be sure you are making a ton of profit on limited sales numbers. I suspect that the A7R2 and A7S2 are nearly pure profit for Sony. Do people actually think that sensor costs Sony 1500 per unit more to manufacturer? Are you that naive? The body price of the A7R2 and A7S are probably exactly the same as the A7M2, so that alone tells you how much overpriced the A7R2 and A7S2 are compared to the modest but reliable just as good A7M2.

While the Sony fangirls are loving it, they aren't seeing the big picture, Sony's market share is contracting with respects to the overall market. What will happen when Sony starts hitting diminishing returns on it's camera bodies? Right now, people are upgrading aggressively like they did with DSLR's 5+ years ago. Will someone with the A7R2 feel as strong of a need to upgrade to the A7R3? sooner or later Sony will exhaust it's user base. Honestly I cannot even imagine what camera forces me to displace my A7X2 cameras. (I think this simple logic also apply to Fuji system, it is hard for them to get the X-Pro2 users keep changing their cameras from that body.)

In actuality Sony is probably in more of a teetering stage than most. Canon for the most part has it's unit counts stabilized which means it gained market share. Nikon is contracting with the market and so is Sony. however Nikon has a far wider audience and potential customers that can / may upgrade to a new camera.

What's funny though is that the DSLR market is not contracting as much as some think it is, partly because Sony has stopped shipping mass shelf stuffing amounts of DSLT cameras. That distorted the shipments, and is never really taken into account.

We are also seeing a fairly dramatic MILC shift as well, as more and more units are being shipped to "Asia" not including Japan and China. Asia now accounts for the majority of mirrorless camera units. However with those, it's the discount units and the lower cost units that are being shipped there, not the high end units. So we are seeing a significant amount of what appears to be mirrorless inventory dumping which also sniffs like all is not right in the world, even in the world of mirrorless.

So Sony, Fuji and other mirrorless manufactures, especially Olympus will face really really serious financial issues as their mount systems get really matured. Their real enemies are not smartphones but unsold inventory and the market saturation. Just face the reality that normal or average camera users with a decent big sensor camera cannot justify upgrading to new camera at full price any more unless they are fanatic about IQ or crazy picky or interested in video.

Sony Canon Fuji fanboys talk about the Nikon financial crisis as though it is "Nikon only issue", but in reality they will also face the same issue.

Maybe Samsung was the only one smart enough to quit this sinking business before the ship actually sink into the deep hell just like IBM in the PC market a few years back?

 

In conclusion:

My present view on Sony is this... They're for the innovators and early adopters. Those who are willing to be "crash test dummies" and actually kind of enjoy that process, and are willing to pay a premium for the privilege. Sony is NOT for the average person, at least right now, IMO. The original A7R was a complete experimentation of the high resolution FF sensor in a compact body at the all cost of usability concept, and it was kind of received well, some hated it but many odd people like me loved it. The A7S was also an experimental concept camera to see if majority of FF buyers accept very low resolution but very high ISO capable almost ultimate lowlight hybrid camera even at the big cost of resolution and basic usability in still photography. I am not sure this concept model was well received or not, but I personally do not care for it, I much prefer the normal A7M2 and the original A7R(still my favorite a7X).

What does this necessarily do to the cost of entry into the system or a particular piece of gear? Well, there's this thing called economics. And if you don't understand (at least very basic of it) economics, you can't possibly understand the cost of goods sold. You also need to know a little about how businesses operate specifically, and generally. You need to understand the difference in product lineups and cost to the consumer between a market leader and a recent entrant into a market.

Without a basic understanding of these types of things (and you don't need to be able to define them or even know specifically what they are - you just kind of need to know about them), you can't even have any serious view about the current consumer camera market.

Most people either don't get this stuff, or don't consider it due to personal bias. I actually know most of people actually get it but do not accept or want to even see how it works, especially in the case of this controversial A7X series and in the case of the Fuji X line products.

In the case of what Sony hopes is a class leading 70-200 f/2.8 zoom... well... they're going to sell a LOT less of them than say, Canon or Nikon, but their development costs and potentially their manufacturing costs, are likely much higher. So they won't be able to spread out their R&D and manufacturing costs over a large number of units thus, the units will be more expensive than the competition if they wish to maintain their profit margins. And I am sure they are all after high profit margin stuff now and this is actually what has made Sony successful in this sinking market in very short time.

So, yeah... I expect that the lens will be substantially more expensive than the competition if it truly is going to be better than the (already excellent) Canon and (not great but fine) Nikon versions of the lens.

This is why, at least foreseable future-maybe at leat 3 -5 more years, until the size of market share for the Sony system increases, everything Sony will release in the A7 and FE line will be more expensive than the same class Canon , Nikon or m43.

But I think Sony market share may actually increase steadily, as Sony consolidate their offerings as a whole system and more people come to appreciate what's on offer.

But again it takes some time to get there, and all of the above what I said about Sony apply to Fuji also.

All in all, IMO, the disadvantages and risks of innovation are now firmly outweighed by the benefits........ and this will become mroe obvious because most of pople are getting really tired of Canon Nikon for their complete lack of innovation, let alone invention.

So like I said in the very first part of this write up, Sony and Fuji will probably win over Canon Nikon and Nikon will probably go bankrupt as it is mainly a camera company-about 75 percent of their total income comes from camera sells.

  

UPDATE:Another serious issue all the camera makers will have to face but I did not really realize before is that all ILC cameras are big to most of NORMAL non-photographer people, and they are very intimidating to most of NORMAL people(I mean regardless of mount type or sensor type).

I never realized it before but while walking around down town Fukuoka with one of my long time friends here forced me to understand it. A friend of mine told me that he thinks all interchangeable lens cameras are huge and intimidating to most of average people regardless of sensor size or format, it's just simply annoying!

I guess a big lens scares or annoys people more than a big body......I never saw it his way but I got his point and I decided to carry my tiny Canon G5X when I just walk around the city area with other people. If I am alone shooting something, then I usually carry my big camera, and I think it does not matter it's a m43, a FF, an APS-C, it is all big to most of NORMAL people, anyway.

Then why not just go all the way up to FF or MFDB, or at least APS-C?

 

So maybe the one really doomed is not Nikon F or Pentax K or Sony A but m43?

Nikon and Pentax have historically had very enthusiastic and even fanatic core shooters and they are usually too old to adapt themselves fast to new EVF based gear even if they understand it is the more logical thing for them as they are aged. So D-SLRs may survive as antique cameras, but m43 or Nikon One?

  

UPDATE2 : Now once again, it's proven that Sony and its E mount fanboys are all bark but never actually bite kind of dogs. Thanks to DXO for proving this, the over hyped, expensive, almost ridiculously huge Sony FE24-70mm f2.8G-Master is really just as good or a tiny bit better than the infamous so-called Zeiss fisheye zoom FE24-70mm f4Z even at the huge cost of the oversized barrel with the 82mm filter thread design. In fact , the expensive oversized FE24-70mmf2.8 G-Master(WTF is the G master anyway) is optically much worse than the Canon EF24-70mm f2.8L MK2 that all mean, ill-spirited Sony A7 fanboys despised a few months back(when the G master line was announced). And even sadly, the Sony G master is even worse than the equally huge but a bit lighter Nikon AF-S24-70mm f2.8E VR. Yeah Sony has again proved the E mount means overpriced trendy toy for old men, it might be taken as cool fashion item or cool old man's toy for the silly mount adapter game for a while(at least).

But for cost effective real world solution, Sony is not the answer to most of us. I am not anti mirrorless but becoming anti-Sony, and I am tired of all their immature products coming with their extremely condescending marketing.

 

Hope Red or someone like that will challenge the A7X line with better video minded ergonomics design.

  

Update3:now, I think FF mirrorless is, like self-driving car, it is the future, definitely, but not really mature enough to be practical for many real life tasks, and they are both still immensely overpriced just because newer tech relatively to their older more practical rivals.

The Sony a7R2 should be cheaper than the D810 considering it does not have the complex mirror and proper weather sealings on the shutter. The X-T2 should be as cheap as the D7200 or the 80D. The A6300 should be as cheap as its predecessor(about 650US), no more than that, it is a great camera but still not able to shoot from a fast running car or train like the 7DMK2 or the D500, and so if you were a paparazzi or anything like that, you would not choose the A6300 as your main camera.

When I wrote my previous A6300 vs D500 hands-on experience,I was very very impressed with the A6300 AF, especially with the FE55mm f1.8Z. But now I am sure if my work is completely relying on the best AF in the game, I'd definitely choose the D500, not the A6300, which could not focus well on a super fast moving thing from a fast running train or a car unless the light level is perfectly ideal.

In last week,I tried to shoot street snaps from a fast running super express train with my A6300, A7M2 and A7R2, none of my Sonys could focus on anything moving from a 300km/h fast running train, I was really glad I also brought my D750 with me for my last short train trip.

Like Thom Hogan said, the Sony Alpha E mount cameras are too slow for anything moving fast, I mean their single AF speed is very fast, but it cannot track fast, especially when the light level is not really ideal.

Plus, the general operation speed of the Sony is just painfully slow, even the most expensive A7SMK2 is very slow. I mean it takes about 30 seconds to format a card, about 5 seconds or more to wake up from a long sleep, etc, and is too slow for anything unpredictably moving or decisive once a life time kind of shot. Another big issue of the Sony FE system is terribly short battery life. I know if I bring this up, many Sony fans would tell me after adding a couple of extra batteries it is still lighter than any of Nikon Canon FF D-SLRs. Maybe so, but the real issue here is because we need to change the battery almost every couple of hours, we would miss many decisive moments, and it is really annoying.

 

Now, it is obvious this is the most difficult time to spend some serious amount of money into any of these already existing camera system since they all suck in some ways and all the camera companies are too arrogant or stupid to listen to the actual users.

 

The FE50mm f1.4Z is an amazing lens that may change the direction of the entire industry but it is a huge lens, honestly, if I knew where Sony were heading to at very first place in 2013, I would not have spent this much money into Sony FE system......I wanted it to be small, light and simple, but now it is a big, heavy, expensive and very complex system.

Really, why every new lens must be AF and this huge is beyond me. It is just making the system impractical with the terribly oversized lenses. I have never seen any 50 this big(except my Otus 55 and the old Sigma Art I hated both of those huge 50 primes), seriously it is as big as the 85mm f1.4 GM and is an ugly looking lens, too.

Sony should not try a D-SLR replacement system with the A7 system, but a great RangeFinder replacement system.

Hope they wake up soon.

 

The real reason why mirrorless cameras are not already successful replacing supposed to be primitive D-SLRs is they are bad value for our buck. Maybe it is newer better tech, but still very bad value.......almost all current mirrorless cameras are overpriced considering the fact most of them are still playing the catching-up game, every year they are replaced.

The A7MK2 was the first mirrorless camera to have stayed in the market for longer than a year. And the A7R2 seems to follow that trend.

   

Our brewery produces very diverse and ingenious varieties of beer. We produce both low fermentation beers (lager) and high fermentation beers (ale). The latter varieties result from playful variations of different barley, wheat, and hops combinations. We pay special attention to the choice of top quality raw ingredients. When selecting hops we try to prioritize the exceptionally high-quality Slovenian hops but when we are looking for a particular aroma we reach for foreign aromatic hops from around the world.

 

Our brewery is also known for offering its costumers an innovative selection of beers. We like to explore exciting new brewing ingredients and people’s openness to different, unconventional tastes. This encourages us to occasionally brew honey beer made with local honey, chestnut beer made with handpicked chestnuts, or play with spices and additives of a perfectly natural origin and locally-sourced. Examples of this include beer with spruce tips, beer with an addition of mint, beer with ginger, beer brewed from potatoes and beans etc. Our imagination knows no bounds.

 

Our production keeps growing year in, year out and so does the quality, and the broad spectrum of our beers. The foundation of our business is a contented and driven work team that uses its energy to push the boundaries and build a stable and successful company. In 2016 we received a formal recognition of our work by being awarded a bronze medal for our pale ale beer at an international beer competition in Ireland.

 

We are the first brewery that offers the service of brewing beer for other brands, following their own recipes. Our partners use our facilities and together we are raising the bar for the drinking culture in Slovenia, and spreading the love of beer beyond our borders.

 

Location:

Just next to main road from Ljubljana to Črnomelj in Lokve village.

 

*****

 

Pivovarna Vizir je pionir na področju craft pivovarstva v Sloveniji. V lastni pivovarni sedaj varimo zelo različne in z domišljijo dopolnjene stile piva. Proizvajamo tako piva spodnjega vrenja (lager ali ležak) kot tudi piva zgornjega vrenja (ale piva). V slednjih stilih se poigravamo z različnimi kombinacijami ječmena, pšenice in hmelja. Posebno pozornost posvečamo izbiri surovin, da so le te vrhunske. Prednost pri izbiri hmeljev dajemo izredno kvalitetnim slovenskim hmeljem, kadar pa je potrebna posebna dišava, pa posežemo tudi po tujih, aromatičnih hmeljih iz celega sveta.

 

Naša pivovarna je znana tudi po tem, da ponuja našim pivcem drugačna piva. Na tak način radi raziskujemo kaj vse se lahko uporabi pri varjenju piva in kako dovzetni so ljudje za drugačne, nenavadne okuse. Tako občasno zvarimo tudi medeno pivo z belokranjskim medom, kostanjevo pivo iz ročno nabranega kostanja ali pa se poigramo z začimbami in dodatki, ki so povsem naravni in iz naše neposredne okolice. Tak primer je pivo s smrekovimi vršički, pivo z dodatkom mete, pivo z ingverjem, pivo, zvarjeno iz krompirja in fižola itd. Skratka, domišljija pri nas nima meja. Proizvodnja našega piva raste iz leta v leto, s tem pa tudi kvaliteta in širok spekter naših piv. Temelj našega podjetja tako tvori zadovoljna in zagnana delovna ekipa, ki s svojo energijo premika meje in gradi stabilno in uspešno podjetje. V letu 2016 smo tako dobili tudi uradno potrditev, saj je naše pivo stila pale ale osvojilo na mednarodnem tekmovanju piv na Irskem bronasto medaljo.

The pub has several good beers on draft.

Laced with B is a swimwear collection designed by local San Diegan BreeAnna Quigg

 

SAN DIEGO (October 10, 2013)– Fashion Week San Diego® (FWSD) took place September 30th to October 6th with a week of events including three days of runway shows, a Trunk Show (market day), art & beauty event and much more. The event was a major success with a smooth production and the launching of the FWSD Designer Spring/Summer 2014 Collections.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 highlights include:

 

•FWSD 2013 Winning Designer as voted by the audience went to RHCREATION with first runner up Wishnow and second runner up Greenpacha also being recognized.

•RHCREATION successfully met with buyers from ModCloth.com on Monday October 7th as part of the Winning Designer Business Package.

•3,500 people attended the event.

•The city of San Diego showed its support of FWSD with the attendance of Interim Mayor Todd Gloria and County Supervisor Dave Roberts. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria also presented an official proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews.

•From the FWSD designers to the small business sponsors of FWSD, the event helped generate growth in businesses and the industries of fashion and tourism.

•$18,580 worth of sales was done during the Trunk Show of FWSD on Sunday.

•26 Designers were able to show their latest collection to buyers in order to grow their small businesses.

•Many of the FWSD Sponsors were able to take their businesses to the next level thanks to the exposure gained from being part of this event.

•Local hotels saw increased reservations from out of town guests and locals as a result of the event.

•Volunteers were able to gain relevant experience in order to grow their careers.

•In attendance were representatives from InStyle, Vanity Fair, and national fashion retailers. Designer Zandra Rhodes also attended.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 commenced September 30th and October 1st with private events for Sponsors and Designers respectively to celebrate the start of the week of events. These private events took place at Roppongi Restaurant & Sushi Bar in La Jolla with guests enjoying beer from Peroni Nastro Azzuro and music from the DJs of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Art & Beauty behind Fashion event on Wednesday October 2nd kicked off the first day open to public and industry. Beauty industry experts Jan Nordstrom Arnold of CND Nails, Claudio Lazo of Wella, Kevin James Bennett of MUD and Maryelle Koken of Sebastian International spoke about how the hair, makeup and nails bring a runway show to life. The night also included a panel of experts talking about how beauty effects fashion and vice versa. Panelists include Leilani Angel of Bellus Academy, Travis Parker, Dean Hall and Brian Hawkins of FIDM/Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising. We would like to thank our sponsor Bellus Academy for their sponsorship for this night. This interactive night included four live paintings by Launch Live Art of designs from FWSD designers. Guests also saw art from local artists part of RAW: natural born artists commissioned to create art pieces based on Spring/Summer trends.

 

Thursday October 3rd began the runway shows with seven FWSD designers showcasing their Spring/Summer 2014 collections. Designers featured Thursday include: C Venti, CG by Cynthia, Collections of Kathryn Elizabeth, Isabel Vianey, Laced with B, Mahogany Blues and Second Star Designs. The night ended with a runway shows featuring the collections of three designers from the new fashion competition series “Styled to Rock” including Dexter Simmons, Cecilia Aragon and Andre Soriano.

 

The runway shows continued Friday October 4th featuring FWSD Designers Diestra, Dos Caras Swimwear, Greenpacha, Keisha Audrey, ‘Love, Charles’, Maegan Stracy and RCREATION. The last runway show of the evening featured a Doggie Fashion Show with highly adoptable dogs from Rancho Coastal Humane Society (RCHS). Half of the dogs thus far have found forever homes.

 

Saturday October 4th was the final night of runway shows featuring FWSD Designers A’doreus, Ashley Raymond, Danh Ta, Maralonzo, NOIA, SYC Collection, VICTROLA, Wishnow, WM Couture and Yuwei Designs. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria was in attendance and presented the Official Proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews. The proclamation states the first week of October to be the official fashion week in San Diego. The night ended with an official after party with DJ Demon of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Trunk Show on October 5th marked the last day of FWSD 2013 where designers showed their collections and took orders from buyers. The winning designer and top models were announced along with an award from the FWSD 2013 Advisory Panel for most innovative designs.

 

About the event: Fashion Week San Diego® is a collaborative entertainment fashion event to celebrate emerging designers by showcasing and highlighting the pulse of these entrepreneurs and what they are creating. Fashion Week San Diego® is pleased to give these emerging fashion designers a platform to launch their careers.

All photos by Mathias Vejerslev. www.flickr.com/photos/mvejerslev

 

Cities have always been associated with the experience of noise. With the growing democratization of what the urban spaces are used for in terms of events and activities, the need for a focus on how the sounds influence our everyday life arises.

Where the discourse primarily has been focussing on how to eliminate noise in the city, new initiatives focusing on the qualities of city sounds and what role they play in the public space are emerging. Whether the focus is reduction of traffic noise, acoustic design or cultural events, they all share a common goal: To improve and strenghten the sonic experience of the urban space for the people who live there as well as visitors. Bits & Beers: City Sound & Noise puts a spotlight on the topic through inspirational talks from innovative professionals within the field of city acoustics.

 

Bits & Beers is IdemoLab’s atypical evening conference connecting businesses, creatives, entrepreneurs, and makers in the relaxed Friday bar atmosphere, with the structure of a well organized business networking and knowledge sharing event. Bits & Beers consists of a “friday-bar”; short, introductory talks as well as an engaging exibition-area, where you can experience new technologies and concepts with-in the subject of the day.

 

Speakers:

 

Ingeborg Okkels

 

Ingeborg has a PHD in Musicology from Copenhagen University. Her PHD was looking into music technology and perception of audio. She has been a lecturer and writer on audio-related areas, specializing in electronic music and sound collages. As a composer and sound designer she has been working for art films and installations. Since 2014 Ingeborg Okkels have been facilitating many workshops related to sound, sound experience and sound awareness. These have been carried out in cooperation with museums, educational institutions, libraries, architects and private companies.

 

Kirstine Lorenzen

 

Kirstine Lorenzen has over the past 20 years working with green growth and technology development, especially within the energy, climate, street lights and traffic noise. Since May 2015, Kirstine has been responsible for the Silent City – Living Lab of Urban Noise Reduction. SC takes place in the Southern part of Greater Copenhagen.

 

Lærke Cecilie Bjerre:

 

Regulations for quiet urban areas are typically based on sound level limits alone. However, the full immersion in the on-site non-acoustic context is important when evaluating overall and subjective soundscape quality in urban recreational areas. Lærke and her two partners Anna Josefine Sørensen and Thea Mathilde Larsen won the Young Investigator Best Paper award in Hawaii 2016 for their research in holistic sound evaluation in urban areas.

  

Steffen Ring and Michael Frejdal

Ring Advocacy is a technical partner in the MONICA project - a project born to demonstrate how multiple Internet of Things technologies can help in terms of noise control, sound quality, crowd management and security at large cultural events taking place in the city. Ring Advocacy was founded in 2015 by Steffen Ring, MScEE, as a technology consultancy within regulatory affairs regarding spectrum and standardisation matters with a global scope. Also included in the project is Michael Frejdal, technical director of Tivoli in Copenhagen, which works as a pilot site for MONICA to investigate through Tivoli activities and events such as eg. 'Fredagsrock'.

 

Music:

Mads Hennelund

Mads Hennelund is the former leadsinger in the disco-pop band MÅNE. With his new soloproject PUNGIE he reunites clubmusic and technomusic with beautiful sounds and pop-harmonies

soundcloud.com/user-556569817

East 9th Brewing.

All photos by Mathias Vejerslev. www.flickr.com/photos/mvejerslev

 

Cities have always been associated with the experience of noise. With the growing democratization of what the urban spaces are used for in terms of events and activities, the need for a focus on how the sounds influence our everyday life arises.

Where the discourse primarily has been focussing on how to eliminate noise in the city, new initiatives focusing on the qualities of city sounds and what role they play in the public space are emerging. Whether the focus is reduction of traffic noise, acoustic design or cultural events, they all share a common goal: To improve and strenghten the sonic experience of the urban space for the people who live there as well as visitors. Bits & Beers: City Sound & Noise puts a spotlight on the topic through inspirational talks from innovative professionals within the field of city acoustics.

 

Bits & Beers is IdemoLab’s atypical evening conference connecting businesses, creatives, entrepreneurs, and makers in the relaxed Friday bar atmosphere, with the structure of a well organized business networking and knowledge sharing event. Bits & Beers consists of a “friday-bar”; short, introductory talks as well as an engaging exibition-area, where you can experience new technologies and concepts with-in the subject of the day.

 

Speakers:

 

Ingeborg Okkels

 

Ingeborg has a PHD in Musicology from Copenhagen University. Her PHD was looking into music technology and perception of audio. She has been a lecturer and writer on audio-related areas, specializing in electronic music and sound collages. As a composer and sound designer she has been working for art films and installations. Since 2014 Ingeborg Okkels have been facilitating many workshops related to sound, sound experience and sound awareness. These have been carried out in cooperation with museums, educational institutions, libraries, architects and private companies.

 

Kirstine Lorenzen

 

Kirstine Lorenzen has over the past 20 years working with green growth and technology development, especially within the energy, climate, street lights and traffic noise. Since May 2015, Kirstine has been responsible for the Silent City – Living Lab of Urban Noise Reduction. SC takes place in the Southern part of Greater Copenhagen.

 

Lærke Cecilie Bjerre:

 

Regulations for quiet urban areas are typically based on sound level limits alone. However, the full immersion in the on-site non-acoustic context is important when evaluating overall and subjective soundscape quality in urban recreational areas. Lærke and her two partners Anna Josefine Sørensen and Thea Mathilde Larsen won the Young Investigator Best Paper award in Hawaii 2016 for their research in holistic sound evaluation in urban areas.

  

Steffen Ring and Michael Frejdal

Ring Advocacy is a technical partner in the MONICA project - a project born to demonstrate how multiple Internet of Things technologies can help in terms of noise control, sound quality, crowd management and security at large cultural events taking place in the city. Ring Advocacy was founded in 2015 by Steffen Ring, MScEE, as a technology consultancy within regulatory affairs regarding spectrum and standardisation matters with a global scope. Also included in the project is Michael Frejdal, technical director of Tivoli in Copenhagen, which works as a pilot site for MONICA to investigate through Tivoli activities and events such as eg. 'Fredagsrock'.

 

Music:

Mads Hennelund

Mads Hennelund is the former leadsinger in the disco-pop band MÅNE. With his new soloproject PUNGIE he reunites clubmusic and technomusic with beautiful sounds and pop-harmonies

soundcloud.com/user-556569817

This was my first hotel in Otaru, Hotel Nord.

This hotel is usually very expensive, but I got a bargain deal online. I just paid 3800 yen a night, including a dinner set at the famous Otaru canal German beer restaurant with a real German meister.

  

Otaru was not as good as the other places I visited in Hokkido this time , but it was still quite good, I loved Otaru canal and Otaru beer factory, where I ate a big german pizza and drank red star beer.

But still, if I have to pick 2 or 3 places for my next Hokkaido trip, I would not choose Otaru. It was crowded with very silly rude family crowds and not relaxing at all. In fact, I think Otaru was the least interesting place of popular Hokkaido tourist destinations.

  

The people I met in Hokkaido(especially Abashiri and Asahikawa) were much kinder than the people in my area(Fukuoka), the local people there were much kinder and helpful, also many of them seem to be more relaxed.

 

When I was stepping off my train, I dropped my Canon lens cap into the train track and I was really down staying there for a while and thinking about how to pick it up from the track. I knew I had to move the train car a bit forward to pick it up, but there was no way I could do that myself.

So I asked one of train officers drinking coffee at the station office what I could do to get it back. He was thinking about it for a minute or so and just asked me to stay at the station office, and he just moved the train a bit forward and picked my lens cap up for me.

 

He was kind , helpful and very very fast when I asked changing my next destination from Kitami to Kushiro, he just processed that for me in a minute without charging any extra money, excellent service...I think the people in Hokkaido were extremely nice, especially compared to people in my area(most of the locals in Fukuoka city area are mean and very stingy). Fukuoka used to be a nice place but now people there are very busy and becoming uncaring, very cold or apathetic to others.

  

Coming back from Hokkaido with my broken 6D, I was kind of missing it. It has technically no real advantage over any of my current cameras, but I kind of miss it.

So I have been checking through my old but not updated 6D images. I have also tested thorough them with some custom made software I bought a month ago from my old friend working as a Tsukuba university practical physicist.

 

I think I will re-measure it but as far as I remember the numbers I got from my test with the special made program, it was not even half as good as I thought it would be.......and I was deeply disappointed, in fact almost immediately depressed.

 

I just wish Canon to get its act together and makes a great sensor or even just buy it from Samsung or Renasus, whose sensor patents and designs are , imho, more advanced than that of Sony.

As long as we expose it to the right and or apply so-called ETTR it is fine, but a bit of under or over exposing makes it really bad. This is the reason why some called it like slide film in terms of exposure and the way we should use our Canons, and I guess I used to be able to some how manage it well to make my Canon look just fine.

 

But now, I am just too used to shooting my A7 A7R A7M2 and other Sonys, with a couple of stops better dynamic range , or more precisely better latitude, I tent to underexpose it to save the highlight, and in the post I lift the shadow up.

 

I think Sony sensors are like negative film, and Canons are like positive slide film, they are both good and bad , but for most of non-tripod handheld work, Sony has the edge since it allows us to underexpose intentionally to save the highlight and later on we can easily get the hidden shadow data back in PP.

 

With Sony A7 series I think we do seldom need CPL filters or ND filters, and it is hard to screw the exposure in normal use.

 

But I think Sony sensor quality is just plain overrated by DPR kind of sites, if any one challenge the assessment numbers or so called reviews they write, we must be labelled as naive fanboy or poor guy in short of cash and defending his old choice hard, or inane technically challenged morons.

 

Sony sensors are good in harsh day light high DR required scenes,but usually not great at high ISO.

I think many many people deliberately misguided by DPR DXO ,etc and without measuring the sensors in question themselves , just bashing one type of sensors that they dislike or reviews say bad, but in reality there is no such dramatic difference there.

 

Really, it is not that simple, the 5DS sensor is excellent in many regards, but it can not score well at DXO, and I am sure why the biased DPR guys rated it much lower than the Sony 36mp sensor ignoring the fact it is a very very different type of sensor than the Sony 36mp or 42mp chip, or even very different design than the Canon's own 6D sensor or 5DMK3 sensor.

 

The 5DS sensor is simply optimized for the best skin tone in a studio or great out of the camera color for landscape, so it has very strong intense color filters. I think it is about 1.6 times stronger than that of the 5DMK3,whose sensor design focus was high ISO or low noise throughout the ISO range, thus used weak thin CFA design.....So the 5DS sensor tends to produce better stronger punchier colors out of the camera compared to the previous Canon with weaker CFA design but at the cost of a tiny bit more shot noise at the base ISO.

 

I think Sony and its Alpha community is like a fanatic religious group(like young earth creationist group let by Kent Hovind), never even accept or listen to any kind of different voice, opinion and preference, and it seems to be all review communities are misled by them or their excessively loud voice.

 

If you even mildly pan or hard on any Sony Alpha line camera, they will attack on you, or if you prefer something other than their preferred ones, they call you a troll or a fanboy, to turn the debate into a name calling contest.

 

It always happens in DPR fora ,especially in the Canon and the Open talk forums, they really act like some sort of cult-worshipers. If any one says anything good about Nikon, Canon, Fuji or Samsung compared to Alpha 7 line cameras, then they freak out and turn it into a name calling contest(it is always their tech to win any debate there), so it is impossible to logically argue or even talk anything about the A7X with Sony fanatics. It is really that ridiculous.

 

It is like a cult religion, these real die-hard Sony Alpha 7 fanboys in camera fora never accept any different belief, value or different opinion on any camera. If someone prefer the other sensor manufacture than Sony then they insult his or her technical knowledge or sometimes even his or her personality that they don't even know...........For example a few days ago, some one (obviously a wedding guy) mildly criticized(not even seriously bashed or panned) about terrible battery life of the A7S and he said the real issue for "HIM" was not the terrible battery life itself or having to carry many of tiny, lousy batteries of the Sony, but it was difficult to change it over and over many times without missing many important decisive moments.......I think it is very correct and I experienced it myself many many times, too, as a long time A7 user. But they(A7 fans)got obviously hurt by his comment because it is a fact, and they have to gather to attack on him personally. A few hours later the thread was closed as usual, and it was sad.. Well, I sometimes wonder if there are many kindergarten kids in the camera forums, they are seriously thin-skinned and easily hurt, maybe their self-esteem or pride (more like ego)is totally dependent on their so-called FF cameras? or winning the debate at DPR or some moronic rumor sites like SAR really important for them to keep themselves calm and sane?

 

I have now several people asking me about my opinion on A7 vs 6D vs D750 issue, and I told them it is a personal choice, and there is no objectively or absolutely better one for every one, and I don't even believe there is any absolutely objective review at all. Then they said I have been intentionally closing my eyes, trying hard not to see the fact Sony is taking over the industry.........if I do not admit it then I have to be called a Canon or a Nikon or a Samsung or a Fuji fanboy, silly to say the least........... A few days ago I criticized about A7RMK2 pricing a bit, and I also said I began to realize how reasonably priced D810 was, and comparing the price of the D810 to the price of the A7RMK2 or the5DS shows it very glaringly.

Then, a couple of usual Sony fanboys criticized me of being super ignorant about the A7RMK2, and told me that the Sony camera would be like having a great pro 4k cinema camera and a high resolution stills camera in a tiny body, so it is a historic game changer and nothing on the market compete well with it. And according to them the A7RMK2 sensor is really great at high ISO, even slightly better than the A7S or the Pentax 645Z........although all lab test results say otherwise.....I am sure they never used the 645Z if they think the A7R2 beats it.

  

Well I partly agree with them, but I say it is not a pro video camera, or it is not really innovative cinema camera that replaces real super 35mm pro cinema cameras; the battery life is too short, the heat dissipation issue is really bad, the FF is not suited for serious video, especially for running gun type of event or documentary work, etc. The bigger the sensor the more battery power consuming, and therefore, many of us do not want a FF video camera. In addition to all the above issues, it does not even have dual card slots, and it is a big issue for me.

 

But according to them the Red dragon, BMCC , Canon cinema EOS,etc are all immediately thrown into camera coffins by the A7RMK2.

 

I think it is getting a bit too ridiculous although I admit it is an amazing camera mostly for stills landscape and studio work, it may or may not replace all, or it may even change the history of hybrid camera world.

 

But do not forget we all have preferences and different needs, views on cameras, and sometimes technical numbers or feature set does not matter, sometimes we simply prefer one even if it is just technically a inferior camera or tool or anything, we cannot measure usability and practicality of each system to each of us but it is very important to consider when we choose a new camera system.

 

That all said though, I think Sony has been right , it is really shaking the conservative camera world, just slowly but surely increasing its market share by introducing a great compact FF hybrid camera system.

 

Do not forget the biggest sales point of the A7 series is not any specific camera feature or the BSI sensor,etc, but it is being the only one hybrid open mount camera system that takes all mounts lenses,including the A mount lenses,the EF lenses, the F mount lenses lenses with several times more accurate AF than any D-SLR type of cameras.

 

I think something like below is always happening now:

Some Canon guys buy an A7R2 or an A7M2, with use of adapted Canon lens line in mind and use it for a while with their adapted EF lenses or A mount lenses..

But in a few months, they'd realize they need some native FE mount lenses and buy some Zeiss Batis and Sony Z and G lenses, then they'd be like fragile insects trapped into spider nest. At this point, there is no more way back to Canon or Nikon even if either of these 2 makes something similar to the A7RMK2 in the near future because selling used FE mount lenses is very difficult because the FE lenses cannot be adapted to any other mount system as they have the shortest flange back design.

 

So while I think Sony has succeeded converting many Canon guys into FE mount users, I am not sure if it will take over the market entirely so soon. The A7 system is just a temporal stop gap solution for many of us. After a few years it may be completely abandoned just like most of so-called Sony's great innovative products. Remember Mini disc or Memory Stick Duo?

I just think the future is open mount system but it is not the A7 or any Sony or Samsung or any Asian company.

The A7 system prevails for a short moment but it will not be able to replace all Canon Nikon fast enough, and the Sony will be overlooking or dismissing minor brand but truly innovative small players emerging out to rival against Sony.

 

I think something like BMCC or Red of stills will take over the market.....I think the open mount is a dual-edged-sword for Sony it will help Sony to get many many Canon Nikon users coming to their mount but at the same time give a serious opportunity for a Red-like company to truly invent something really new to take over the entire industry.....

 

But in any case I am sure the D-SLRs are dying, I re-confirmed this again in Thailand and Malaysia last year:

I went to Malaysia for work for a few hours(wished I had had more time to spend there shooting around Penang) in last December and then visited Thailand for about several hours(very sad to have my time there just a few hours), and I saw the camera industry of SE Asia changed a lot like below.

It changed a lot there these 2 countries. I spent a lot of time in Thailand in 2011 and 2010. Back then, Canon and Nikon were the definite dominant players for sure. Now? I passed several of the chain stores in a few malls in Pinklao, Skumvitt and Platnum area that did not even carry Canon in the windows. Nikon, yes but not many were displayed there either.

Went to a photography trade show in Georgetown, Malaysia, the Nikon and Canon booths were there without any people. The mirrorless cameras, Sony, Fuji(especially popular), Olympus were packed with folks trying and buying.

For now, Canon and Nikon have lost their momentum over here for sure. Let's hope they can come back strong, but I feel it is too late now already.

 

Everything changes very fast in Asia and anything considered to be uncool cannot sell well there, it is even more drastic in Japan and South Korea, so I believe the sales numbers for CN are even worse there.

 

Update: now we all know the A7M3 is on the horizon, I believe it will be announced at NBA in April if not at or a week before CP+ in Feb, and I am sure it will have the new A7R2 sensor tech and most of new technologies found in that body at the half the price of the A7R2.

I expect the A7M3 might become the final nail on Canon Nikon D-SLR coffin.

          

German postcard by Ross Verlag, no. 4704/1, 1929-1930. Photo: MGM. Publicity still for The Hollywood Revue of 1929 (Charles Reisner, 1929) with Keaton as Princess Raja. This performance must have been inspired by the Egyptian dance in The Cook (Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle, 1918).

 

At Il Cinema Ritrovato 2015 (27 June - 4 July 2015) in Bologna, a new, multi-year project starts with brand new restorations of the films of Buster Keaton (1895–1966). The Keaton Project will be launched with the silent short One Week (1920) and with the silent featureSherlock Jr. (1924), an early example of film within a film. The film showcases all of Buster Keaton’s virtues: his deadpan humour, his innovative technical accomplishments, his amazing stunts and perfect gags. The two restorations will be presented in Piazza Maggiore in Bologna accompanied live by Timothy Brock’s original scores and performed by the Bologna Opera House Orchestra.

 

Buster Keaton was born Joseph Frank Keaton in 1895 into a vaudeville family. His father was Joseph Hallie ‘Joe’ Keaton, who owned a travelling show with Harry Houdini called the Mohawk Indian Medicine Company. Keaton was born in Piqua, Kansas, the small town where his mother, Myra Keaton (née Myra Edith Cutler), happened to go into labour. By the time he was 3, Keaton began performing with his parents in The Three Keatons. He was being thrown around the stage and into the orchestra pit, or even into the audience. His little suits even had a handle concealed at the waist, so Joe could sling him like luggage. "It was the roughest knockabout act that was ever in the history of the theatre," Keaton told the historian Kevin Brownlow. It led to accusations of child abuse, and occasionally, arrest. However, Buster Keaton was always able to show the authorities that he had no bruises or broken bones. Noticing that his laughing drew fewer laughs from the audience, Keaton adopted his famous deadpan expression whenever he was working. For the rest of his career, Keaton was "the great stone face," with an expression that ranged from the impassive to the slightly quizzical. By the time he was 21, his father's alcoholism threatened the reputation of the family act, so Keaton and his mother, Myra, left for New York, where Buster Keaton's career swiftly moved from vaudeville to film. In February 1917, Keaton met Roscoe ‘Fatty’ Arbuckle at the Talmadge Studios in New York City, where Arbuckle was under contract to Joseph M. Schenck. He was hired as a co-star and gag man, making his first appearance in the short The Butcher Boy (Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle, 1917). He appeared in a total of 14 Arbuckle shorts, running into 1920. They were popular and, Keaton and Arbuckle became close friends. Keaton was one of few people to defend Arbuckle's character during accusations that he was responsible for the death of actress Virginia Rappe in 1921. In The Saphead (Herbert Blaché, Winchell Smith, 1920), Keaton had his first starring role in a full-length feature. It was a success and Schenck gave him his own production unit, Buster Keaton Comedies. He made a series of two-reel comedies, including One Week (Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton, 1920), The Boat (Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton, 1921), Cops (Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton, 1922), and The Paleface (Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton, 1922). Keaton then moved to full-length features. His first feature, Three Ages (Edward F. Cline, Buster Keaton, 1923), was produced similarly to his short films, and was the dawning of a new era in comedic cinema, where it became apparent to Keaton that he had to put more focus on the story lines and characterization. His most enduring features include Our Hospitality (John G. Blystone, Buster Keaton, 1923), The Navigator (Donald Crisp, Buster Keaton, 1924), Sherlock Jr. (Buster Keaton, 1924), College (James W. Horne, Buster Keaton, 1927), and The General (Clyde Bruckman, Buster Keaton, 1927). The General, set during the American Civil War, combined physical comedy with Keaton's love of trains, including an epic locomotive chase. Employing picturesque locations, the film's storyline re-enacted an actual wartime incident. Though it would come to be regarded as Keaton's greatest achievement, the film received mixed reviews at the time. It was too dramatic for some filmgoers expecting a lightweight comedy. It was an expensive misfire, and Keaton was never entrusted with total control over his films again. His distributor, United Artists, insisted on a production manager who monitored expenses and interfered with certain story elements.

 

Buster Keaton endured this treatment for two more feature films, including Steamboat Bill Jr. (Charles Reisner, Buster Keaton, 1928), and then exchanged his independent setup for employment at Hollywood's biggest studio, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM). Keaton's loss of independence as a filmmaker coincided with the coming of sound films (although he was interested in making the transition) and mounting personal problems, In 1921, Keaton had married Natalie Talmadge, sister-in-law of his boss, Joseph Schenck, and sister of actresses Norma Talmadge and Constance Talmadge. She co-starred with Keaton in Our Hospitality. The couple had two sons, James (1922-2007) and Robert (1924–2009), but after the birth of Robert, the relationship began to suffer. Influenced by her family, Talmadge decided not to have any more children and this led to the couple staying in separate bedrooms. Her financial extravagance (she would spend up to a third of his salary on clothes) was another factor in the breakdown of the marriage. Keaton signed with MGM in 1928, a business decision that he would later call the worst of his life. He realized too late that MGM’s studio system would severely limit his creative input. For instance, the studio refused his request to make his early project, Spite Marriage (Edward Sedgwick, Buster Keaton, 1929), as a sound film and after the studio converted, he was obliged to adhere to dialogue-laden scripts. However, MGM did allow Keaton some creative participation on his last originally developed/written silent film The Cameraman (Edward Sedgwick, Buster Keaton, 1928). which was his first project under contract with them. Keaton was forced to use a stunt double during some of the more dangerous scenes, something he had never done in his heyday, as MGM wanted badly to protect its investment. Some of his most financially successful films for the studio were during this period. MGM tried teaming the laconic Keaton with the rambunctious Jimmy Durante in a series of films, The Passionate Plumber (Edward Sedgwick, 1932), Speak Easily (Edward Sedgwick, 1932), and What! No Beer? (Edward Sedgwick, 1933). In the first Keaton pictures with sound, he and his fellow actors would shoot each scene three times: one in English, one in Spanish, and one in either French or German. The actors would phonetically memorize the foreign-language scripts a few lines at a time and shoot immediately after. In 1932, Nathalie Talmadge had divorced Keaton, taking his entire fortune and refusing to allow any contact between Keaton and his sons, whose last name she had changed to Talmadge. Keaton was reunited with them about a decade later when his older son turned 18. With the failure of his marriage, and the loss of his independence as a filmmaker, Keaton lapsed into a period of alcoholism.

 

Buster Keaton was so demoralized during the production of What! No Beer? (Edward Sedgwick, 1933) that MGM fired him after the filming was complete, despite the film being a resounding hit. In 1933, he married his nurse, Mae Scriven, during an alcoholic binge about which he afterwards claimed to remember nothing. Scriven herself would later claim that she didn't know Keaton's real first name until after the marriage. When they divorced in 1936, it was again at great financial cost to Keaton. In 1934, Keaton accepted an offer to make an independent film in Paris, Le Roi des Champs-Élysées/The King of the Champs Elysees (Max Nosseck, 1934) with Paulette Dubost. In England, he made another film, The Invader/An Old Spanish Custom (Adrian Brunel, 1936). Upon Keaton's return to Hollywood, he made a screen comeback in a series of 16 two-reel comedies for Educational Pictures. Most of these are simple visual comedies, with many of the gags supplied by Keaton himself, often recycling ideas from his family vaudeville act and his earlier films. The high point in the Educational series is Grand Slam Opera (Buster Keaton, Charles Lamont, 1936), featuring Buster in his own screenplay as a contestant in a radio amateur hour show hoping to win the first price... by dancing and juggling. When the series lapsed in 1937, Keaton returned to MGM as a gag writer, including the Marx Brothers films At the Circus (Edward Buzzell, 1939) and Go West (Edward Buzzell, 1940), and providing material for Red Skelton. He also helped and advised Lucille Ball in her comedic work in films and television. In 1939, Columbia Pictures hired Keaton to star in ten two-reel comedies, running for two years. The director was usually Jules White, whose emphasis on slapstick and farce made most of these films resemble White's Three Stooges comedies. Keaton's personal favourite was the series' debut entry, Pest from the West (Del Lord, 1939), a shorter, tighter remake of The Invader (1936). Keaton's Columbia shorts rank as the worst comedies he made.

 

Buster Keaton's personal life stabilized with his 1940 marriage with Eleanor Norris, a 21-year-old dancer. She stopped his heavy drinking, and helped to salvage his career. He abandoned Columbia for the less strenuous field of feature films. Throughout the 1940s, Keaton played character roles in features. He made his last starring feature El Moderno Barba Azul/Boom In The Moon (Jaime Salvador, 1946) in Mexico. Critics rediscovered Keaton in 1949. He had cameos in such films as In the Good Old Summertime (Robert Z. Leonard, 1949), Sunset Boulevard (Billy Wilder, 1950), and Around the World in 80 Days (Michael Anderson, 1956), and did innumerable TV appearances. Keaton also appeared in a comedy routine about two inept stage musicians in Charlie Chaplin's Limelight (1952). In 1954, Keaton and his wife met film programmer Raymond Rohauer, with whom the couple would develop a business partnership to re-release Keaton's films. Around the same time, after buying the comedian's house, the actor James Mason found numerous cans of Keaton's films. Keaton had prints of the features Three Ages, Sherlock, Jr., Steamboat Bill, Jr., College (missing one reel) and the shorts The Boat and My Wife's Relations, which Keaton and Rohauer transferred to safety stock from deteriorating nitrate film stock. Unknown to them at the time, MGM also had saved some of Keaton's work: all his 1920-1926 features and his first eight two-reel shorts. In 1962 came a retrospective at the Cinematheque Francaise in Paris, and in 1965 a tribute at the Venice Film Festival. "I can't feel sorry for myself," he said in Venice. "It all goes to show that if you stay on the merry-go-round long enough you'll get another chance at the brass ring. Luckily, I stayed on." In 1960, Keaton had returned to MGM for the final time, playing a lion tamer in an adaptation of Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Michael Curtiz, 1960). Later Keaton played a cameo in It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (Stanley Kramer, 1963) and starred in four films for American International Pictures: Pajama Party (Don Weis, 1964), Beach Blanket Bingo (William Asher, 1965), How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (William Asher, 1964) and Sergeant Deadhead (Norman Taurog, 1964). As he had done in the past, Keaton also provided gags for the four AIP films. In 1965, Keaton starred in the short film The Railrodder (Gerald Potterton, Buster Keaton, 1965) for the National Film Board of Canada. Wearing his traditional pork pie hat, he travelled from one end of Canada to the other on a railway motorcar, performing a few stunts similar to those in films he did 50 years earlier. The film was Keaton's last silent screen performance. He also played the central role in Samuel Beckett's Film (Alan Schneider, 1965) and travelled to Italy to play a role in Due Marines e un Generale/War Italian Style (Luigi Scattini, 1965), with Italian comedy duo Franco Franchi and Ciccio Ingrassia. Keaton's final film was A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (Richard Lester, 1966) which was filmed in Spain in September-November 1965. He amazed the cast and crew by doing many of his own stunts. Shortly after completing the film, Keaton died of lung cancer in 1966 at his home in Woodland Hills, California. He was 70. In 1987, the documentary, Buster Keaton: A Hard Act to Follow, directed by Kevin Brownlow and David Gill, won two Emmy Awards.

 

Sources: Roger Ebert, Nicolette Olivier (IMDb), New York Times, Wikipedia, and IMDb.

Cutting Shapes presented Genius of Time at Second Story Studios on Februrary 14th for a Day Party. Fog City Cider & Sangria were on board to keep all the movers & shakers hydrated..

  

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Laced with B is a swimwear collection designed by local San Diegan BreeAnna Quigg

 

SAN DIEGO (October 10, 2013)– Fashion Week San Diego® (FWSD) took place September 30th to October 6th with a week of events including three days of runway shows, a Trunk Show (market day), art & beauty event and much more. The event was a major success with a smooth production and the launching of the FWSD Designer Spring/Summer 2014 Collections.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 highlights include:

 

•FWSD 2013 Winning Designer as voted by the audience went to RHCREATION with first runner up Wishnow and second runner up Greenpacha also being recognized.

•RHCREATION successfully met with buyers from ModCloth.com on Monday October 7th as part of the Winning Designer Business Package.

•3,500 people attended the event.

•The city of San Diego showed its support of FWSD with the attendance of Interim Mayor Todd Gloria and County Supervisor Dave Roberts. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria also presented an official proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews.

•From the FWSD designers to the small business sponsors of FWSD, the event helped generate growth in businesses and the industries of fashion and tourism.

•$18,580 worth of sales was done during the Trunk Show of FWSD on Sunday.

•26 Designers were able to show their latest collection to buyers in order to grow their small businesses.

•Many of the FWSD Sponsors were able to take their businesses to the next level thanks to the exposure gained from being part of this event.

•Local hotels saw increased reservations from out of town guests and locals as a result of the event.

•Volunteers were able to gain relevant experience in order to grow their careers.

•In attendance were representatives from InStyle, Vanity Fair, and national fashion retailers. Designer Zandra Rhodes also attended.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 commenced September 30th and October 1st with private events for Sponsors and Designers respectively to celebrate the start of the week of events. These private events took place at Roppongi Restaurant & Sushi Bar in La Jolla with guests enjoying beer from Peroni Nastro Azzuro and music from the DJs of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Art & Beauty behind Fashion event on Wednesday October 2nd kicked off the first day open to public and industry. Beauty industry experts Jan Nordstrom Arnold of CND Nails, Claudio Lazo of Wella, Kevin James Bennett of MUD and Maryelle Koken of Sebastian International spoke about how the hair, makeup and nails bring a runway show to life. The night also included a panel of experts talking about how beauty effects fashion and vice versa. Panelists include Leilani Angel of Bellus Academy, Travis Parker, Dean Hall and Brian Hawkins of FIDM/Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising. We would like to thank our sponsor Bellus Academy for their sponsorship for this night. This interactive night included four live paintings by Launch Live Art of designs from FWSD designers. Guests also saw art from local artists part of RAW: natural born artists commissioned to create art pieces based on Spring/Summer trends.

 

Thursday October 3rd began the runway shows with seven FWSD designers showcasing their Spring/Summer 2014 collections. Designers featured Thursday include: C Venti, CG by Cynthia, Collections of Kathryn Elizabeth, Isabel Vianey, Laced with B, Mahogany Blues and Second Star Designs. The night ended with a runway shows featuring the collections of three designers from the new fashion competition series “Styled to Rock” including Dexter Simmons, Cecilia Aragon and Andre Soriano.

 

The runway shows continued Friday October 4th featuring FWSD Designers Diestra, Dos Caras Swimwear, Greenpacha, Keisha Audrey, ‘Love, Charles’, Maegan Stracy and RCREATION. The last runway show of the evening featured a Doggie Fashion Show with highly adoptable dogs from Rancho Coastal Humane Society (RCHS). Half of the dogs thus far have found forever homes.

 

Saturday October 4th was the final night of runway shows featuring FWSD Designers A’doreus, Ashley Raymond, Danh Ta, Maralonzo, NOIA, SYC Collection, VICTROLA, Wishnow, WM Couture and Yuwei Designs. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria was in attendance and presented the Official Proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews. The proclamation states the first week of October to be the official fashion week in San Diego. The night ended with an official after party with DJ Demon of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Trunk Show on October 5th marked the last day of FWSD 2013 where designers showed their collections and took orders from buyers. The winning designer and top models were announced along with an award from the FWSD 2013 Advisory Panel for most innovative designs.

 

About the event: Fashion Week San Diego® is a collaborative entertainment fashion event to celebrate emerging designers by showcasing and highlighting the pulse of these entrepreneurs and what they are creating. Fashion Week San Diego® is pleased to give these emerging fashion designers a platform to launch their careers.

All photos by Mathias Vejerslev. www.flickr.com/photos/mvejerslev

 

Cities have always been associated with the experience of noise. With the growing democratization of what the urban spaces are used for in terms of events and activities, the need for a focus on how the sounds influence our everyday life arises.

Where the discourse primarily has been focussing on how to eliminate noise in the city, new initiatives focusing on the qualities of city sounds and what role they play in the public space are emerging. Whether the focus is reduction of traffic noise, acoustic design or cultural events, they all share a common goal: To improve and strenghten the sonic experience of the urban space for the people who live there as well as visitors. Bits & Beers: City Sound & Noise puts a spotlight on the topic through inspirational talks from innovative professionals within the field of city acoustics.

 

Bits & Beers is IdemoLab’s atypical evening conference connecting businesses, creatives, entrepreneurs, and makers in the relaxed Friday bar atmosphere, with the structure of a well organized business networking and knowledge sharing event. Bits & Beers consists of a “friday-bar”; short, introductory talks as well as an engaging exibition-area, where you can experience new technologies and concepts with-in the subject of the day.

 

Speakers:

 

Ingeborg Okkels

 

Ingeborg has a PHD in Musicology from Copenhagen University. Her PHD was looking into music technology and perception of audio. She has been a lecturer and writer on audio-related areas, specializing in electronic music and sound collages. As a composer and sound designer she has been working for art films and installations. Since 2014 Ingeborg Okkels have been facilitating many workshops related to sound, sound experience and sound awareness. These have been carried out in cooperation with museums, educational institutions, libraries, architects and private companies.

 

Kirstine Lorenzen

 

Kirstine Lorenzen has over the past 20 years working with green growth and technology development, especially within the energy, climate, street lights and traffic noise. Since May 2015, Kirstine has been responsible for the Silent City – Living Lab of Urban Noise Reduction. SC takes place in the Southern part of Greater Copenhagen.

 

Lærke Cecilie Bjerre:

 

Regulations for quiet urban areas are typically based on sound level limits alone. However, the full immersion in the on-site non-acoustic context is important when evaluating overall and subjective soundscape quality in urban recreational areas. Lærke and her two partners Anna Josefine Sørensen and Thea Mathilde Larsen won the Young Investigator Best Paper award in Hawaii 2016 for their research in holistic sound evaluation in urban areas.

  

Steffen Ring and Michael Frejdal

Ring Advocacy is a technical partner in the MONICA project - a project born to demonstrate how multiple Internet of Things technologies can help in terms of noise control, sound quality, crowd management and security at large cultural events taking place in the city. Ring Advocacy was founded in 2015 by Steffen Ring, MScEE, as a technology consultancy within regulatory affairs regarding spectrum and standardisation matters with a global scope. Also included in the project is Michael Frejdal, technical director of Tivoli in Copenhagen, which works as a pilot site for MONICA to investigate through Tivoli activities and events such as eg. 'Fredagsrock'.

 

Music:

Mads Hennelund

Mads Hennelund is the former leadsinger in the disco-pop band MÅNE. With his new soloproject PUNGIE he reunites clubmusic and technomusic with beautiful sounds and pop-harmonies

soundcloud.com/user-556569817

Laced with B is a swimwear collection designed by local San Diegan BreeAnna Quigg

 

SAN DIEGO (October 10, 2013)– Fashion Week San Diego® (FWSD) took place September 30th to October 6th with a week of events including three days of runway shows, a Trunk Show (market day), art & beauty event and much more. The event was a major success with a smooth production and the launching of the FWSD Designer Spring/Summer 2014 Collections.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 highlights include:

 

•FWSD 2013 Winning Designer as voted by the audience went to RHCREATION with first runner up Wishnow and second runner up Greenpacha also being recognized.

•RHCREATION successfully met with buyers from ModCloth.com on Monday October 7th as part of the Winning Designer Business Package.

•3,500 people attended the event.

•The city of San Diego showed its support of FWSD with the attendance of Interim Mayor Todd Gloria and County Supervisor Dave Roberts. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria also presented an official proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews.

•From the FWSD designers to the small business sponsors of FWSD, the event helped generate growth in businesses and the industries of fashion and tourism.

•$18,580 worth of sales was done during the Trunk Show of FWSD on Sunday.

•26 Designers were able to show their latest collection to buyers in order to grow their small businesses.

•Many of the FWSD Sponsors were able to take their businesses to the next level thanks to the exposure gained from being part of this event.

•Local hotels saw increased reservations from out of town guests and locals as a result of the event.

•Volunteers were able to gain relevant experience in order to grow their careers.

•In attendance were representatives from InStyle, Vanity Fair, and national fashion retailers. Designer Zandra Rhodes also attended.

 

Fashion Week San Diego 2013 commenced September 30th and October 1st with private events for Sponsors and Designers respectively to celebrate the start of the week of events. These private events took place at Roppongi Restaurant & Sushi Bar in La Jolla with guests enjoying beer from Peroni Nastro Azzuro and music from the DJs of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Art & Beauty behind Fashion event on Wednesday October 2nd kicked off the first day open to public and industry. Beauty industry experts Jan Nordstrom Arnold of CND Nails, Claudio Lazo of Wella, Kevin James Bennett of MUD and Maryelle Koken of Sebastian International spoke about how the hair, makeup and nails bring a runway show to life. The night also included a panel of experts talking about how beauty effects fashion and vice versa. Panelists include Leilani Angel of Bellus Academy, Travis Parker, Dean Hall and Brian Hawkins of FIDM/Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising. We would like to thank our sponsor Bellus Academy for their sponsorship for this night. This interactive night included four live paintings by Launch Live Art of designs from FWSD designers. Guests also saw art from local artists part of RAW: natural born artists commissioned to create art pieces based on Spring/Summer trends.

 

Thursday October 3rd began the runway shows with seven FWSD designers showcasing their Spring/Summer 2014 collections. Designers featured Thursday include: C Venti, CG by Cynthia, Collections of Kathryn Elizabeth, Isabel Vianey, Laced with B, Mahogany Blues and Second Star Designs. The night ended with a runway shows featuring the collections of three designers from the new fashion competition series “Styled to Rock” including Dexter Simmons, Cecilia Aragon and Andre Soriano.

 

The runway shows continued Friday October 4th featuring FWSD Designers Diestra, Dos Caras Swimwear, Greenpacha, Keisha Audrey, ‘Love, Charles’, Maegan Stracy and RCREATION. The last runway show of the evening featured a Doggie Fashion Show with highly adoptable dogs from Rancho Coastal Humane Society (RCHS). Half of the dogs thus far have found forever homes.

 

Saturday October 4th was the final night of runway shows featuring FWSD Designers A’doreus, Ashley Raymond, Danh Ta, Maralonzo, NOIA, SYC Collection, VICTROLA, Wishnow, WM Couture and Yuwei Designs. Interim Mayor Todd Gloria was in attendance and presented the Official Proclamation to FWSD Founder & Director Allison Andrews. The proclamation states the first week of October to be the official fashion week in San Diego. The night ended with an official after party with DJ Demon of Sleeping Giant Music.

 

The Trunk Show on October 5th marked the last day of FWSD 2013 where designers showed their collections and took orders from buyers. The winning designer and top models were announced along with an award from the FWSD 2013 Advisory Panel for most innovative designs.

 

About the event: Fashion Week San Diego® is a collaborative entertainment fashion event to celebrate emerging designers by showcasing and highlighting the pulse of these entrepreneurs and what they are creating. Fashion Week San Diego® is pleased to give these emerging fashion designers a platform to launch their careers.

Ridgewood South Historic District. Ridgewood, Queens, New York City, New York, United StatesThe Ridgewood South Historic District is significant as a large, intact grouping of fully developed model tenements that reflect the development of Ridgewood in the early 20th century. A contiguous district in both typology and style, it is composed of over 210 buildings, primarily three-story brick tenements, and the St. Matthias Roman Catholic Church Complex. The tenements were constructed between 1911 and 1912 by the G.X. Mathews Company and were designed by architect Louis Allmendinger. Known as “Mathews Model Flats,” these “new law” tenements had larger rooms and more adequate sanitary facilities than their 19th-century predecessors. Built in long rows of repeated designs that create a sense of place, the facades retain a high degree of integrity and are distinguished by their buff and amber-colored brick facades, cast-stone details, ornate pressed metal cornices, and stoop and areaway ironwork. Transportation improvements and the consolidation of Greater New York City contributed to the development of Ridgewood, which was characterized by open farmland and several amusement parks in the 19th century. Denser building activity had begun with the coming of the electric trolley in 1894, and after 1898, Ridgewood was subjected to the eastward expansion of a growing New York City. Located adjacent to Brooklyn’s Eastern District (which contained the communities of Bushwick, Williamsburg and Greenpoint), Ridgewood became an ideal location for upwardly mobile German-Americans to relocate, away from the over-crowding and more recent immigrants inhabiting Bushwick and Williamsburg, as well as Manhattan’s Lower East Side. German-immigrant Gustave X. Mathews began building in Ridgewood in the first decade of the 20th century. Using wider lots, large air shafts, private bathrooms, and limiting occupancy to two families per floor, Mathews’ “cold-water” flats were a radical improvement to the overcrowded tenements of Williamsburg and the Lower East Side. By creating improved living quarters and controlling costs so that the apartments could be affordable to families of modest income, Mathews found a niche in the real estate market and met with immediate success. He built and sold over 300 tenements in Ridgewood between 1909 and 1912, receiving 25% the tenement house permits issued in Queens in 1911. As testament to their improved design, the “Mathews Model Flats” were exhibited by the New York City Tenement House Department at the Panama-Pacific Fair in San Francisco in 1915. The buildings in this district are fully developed Mathews Flats buildings, which became standards for later tenement house construction, and are characteristic of the development of the area in the first quarter of the 20th century. In addition to being innovative in plan, the tenements are striking in appearance. Built after 1905 when fire codes in Ridgewood began requiring masonry construction for attached rows, the buildings have load-bearing masonry walls constructed of light colored Kreischer brick. Using mainly buff and amber-colored brick, the buildings have fine detailing in the Romanesque- and Renaissance-Revival styles, including corbelled, projecting, contrasting and geometric patterned brickwork, brick pilasters, and contrasting brick bases and cast-stone string coursing. Most of the tenements employ the same design with Romanesque Revival-style round and segmental arches of contrasting brick, and carved-stone door lintels. With mainly flat facades, the mid-block buildings are recessed from the street wall of the corner buildings, adding further interest to the row. Other handsome details include Classically-inspired carved-stone entablatures, pressed metal cornices and original ironwork at the stoop and areaway. The buildings facing Woodward and Onderdonk Avenues have commercial storefronts at the first floor and apartments on the second and third floors, while those on the side streets are completely residential. The St. Matthias Roman Catholic Church complex, which includes a cathedral, rectory, school and convent, faces Catalpa Avenue at the eastern edge of the district. Constructed of pale yellow or amber brick, these four buildings are architecturally congruous with the rest of the district and are significant in the telling of Ridgewood’s history and development. The first building, designed by the prominent architect F.J. Berlenbach as a combined church and school, was erected on the property in 1909 and is currently used as the school. As the congregation grew with the population of the surrounding area, the grand cathedral—which was designed in the Italian Renaissance Revival style—was completed in 1926. The buildings in the district are mostly intact, however some alterations include new stoops, replacement windows and doors, removed ironwork, new awnings and altered storefronts. A cohesive collection of speculative urban architecture, the tenements in the Ridgewood South Historic District retain extremely high levels of architectural integrity and represent an important part of the development of housing in New York City. THE HISTORICAL AND ARCHITECTURAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE RIDGEWOOD SOUTH HISTORIC DISTRICT History of Ridgewood, Queens The Ridgewood South Historic District comprises approximately 207 multi-family residential and commercial buildings developed between 1900 and 1915, mainly by the G.X. Mathews Company, and the four-building St. Matthias Roman Catholic Church complex. Located along Catalpa, Onderdonk, Putnam, and Woodward avenues and Cornelia, Madison, and Woodbine streets, the district is located in southwestern Ridgewood, close to the Brooklyn-Queens border. Located in western Queens County, the town of Ridgewood originally spanned the Brooklyn-Queens border, an area that was inhabited by the Mespachtes Indians prior to being settled by Europeans. The high, thickly wooded terrain is part of the terminal moraine that runs through Ridgewood and continues east through the center of Long Island. Part of the town was located in Bushwick, Brooklyn, one of the original six towns that joined together to become the City of Brooklyn in 1854, while another section was part of the adjacent town of Newtown, one of the original three towns of Queens County. During the 17th and 18th centuries, farms in Bushwick and Ridgewood were tilled by Dutch and British families, who grew lettuce, corn, potatoes, cauliflower, and a variety of fruits for urban markets in Brooklyn and Manhattan. The only-known Dutch farmhouse surviving in Ridgewood is the Adrian and Ann Wyckoff Onderdonk House (third quarter of the 18th century, a designated New York City Landmark). At the start of the American Revolution, Ridgewood was mostly farmland, along with a small burial ground. During this period and for some time thereafter, many of the farms held slaves. In the mid-19th century, Bushwick began to lose its rural, agricultural landscape. Large numbers of Germans immigrated to New York following the political upheavals in central Europe in 1848. Many settled in Williamsburg and Bushwick (collectively with Greenpoint known as Brooklyn’s Eastern District) and began the development of the area's most famous local industry, brewing. Owned by German immigrants, the breweries employed a largely German workforce, whose families also provided a sufficient local demand for lager beer. Ridgewood was named for the reservoir, built in 1856-59 by the City of Brooklyn, located on the glacial ridge formed by the Long Island terminal moraine. The reservoir was located in the present-day Highland Park on the south side of Ridgewood. Early records show that the Woodard and Van Ende families, 18th-century owners of the land contained in the Ridgewood South Historic District, as well as many of their neighbors, were slave owners. [Henry Onderdonk, Jr., Queens County in Olden Times (Jamaica, NY: Charles Welling, 1865), 48; LPC, Adrian and Ann Wyckoff Onderdonk House Designation Report (LP-.1923) report prepared by Jay Shockley (New York: City of New York, 1995); United States Federal Census: 1790, 1800, 1810]. Development in Bushwick was further propelled by improvements in transportation. The Myrtle Avenue horsecar line was extended east to Broadway in 1855, while the elevated rapid transit line, operated by the Brooklyn Elevated Railroad, reached Broadway and Gates Avenue in 1885. By 1880, 35 breweries had been established in Brooklyn, including at least 11 located in a 14-block area in the Eastern District known as “brewer’s row,” and other German immigrants opened factories and knitting mills in the area. Tenements and small row houses were built to house the workers and their families. A second wave of development began after the construction of the elevated railroad along Myrtle Avenue in 1888, making the area an attractive alternative to congested downtown Brooklyn and lower Manhattan. Development, consisting primarily of three- and four-story multiple dwellings, spread eastward toward the Brooklyn-Queens border during the following decade. A number of picnic grounds, beer gardens, amusement parks, and racetracks opened amidst Ridgewood’s fields and farming villages towards the end of the 19th century, catering especially to the large German population of Bushwick. Located to the east of Bushwick, Ridgewood (also known as East Williamsburgh) remained largely rural until after the consolidation of the City of New York in 1898, just as the last vacant land in Bushwick was being developed. Transportation improvements to the area helped propel development. Myrtle and Metropolitan avenues and Fresh Pond Road are among the oldest streets in Ridgewood, having originally been Native American trails and then used by Long Island farmers to take their products to market. Stagecoaches and horsecars ran along Myrtle Avenue which extended from Fulton Ferry – with ferries that provided access to Manhattan – to Jamaica Avenue. The first railroad to reach the area, in 1878, was the New York Connecting Railroad Extension (once the Manhattan Beach Railroad), running from Brooklyn through Ridgewood to the Brooklyn seashore. In 1881, the Bushwick Railroad Company secured a right of way through several Ridgewood farms, and began operating steam service from Wyckoff and Myrtle Avenue to Lutheran Cemetery. The elevated rapid transit line ran to Wyckoff Avenue along the Brooklyn/Queens border beginning in 1888 and an extension of the electrified trolley ran from Bushwick to Fresh Pond Road in Ridgewood in 1894. The Myrtle Avenue line was extended at grade over the private right-of-way of the former Lutheran line from Wyckoff Avenue to Lutheran Cemetery in 1904. By the turn of the century, Bushwick’s builders began purchasing Ridgewood’s farms, parks, and racetracks. Over the next two decades they constructed tenements and small row houses similar to those they had built for the German-immigrant workers and their families in Bushwick. An article in the Real Estate Record and Guide published in late 1909 mentions that Bushwick was not a company town. Housing was constructed by speculative builders, most of whom were also of German descent, including some brewers who invested some of their profits into real estate. Three basic types of homes were constructed: two- and three-family row houses with one apartment per floor, two- and three-story tenements with two apartments per floor, and small multiple-dwellings with ground-floor stores. an area of over 150 blocks of former farmland and picnic parks in Ridgewood was then experiencing intense growth. The construction of the Queensboro Bridge further contributed to the development of the area. The bridge opened in 1909, linking the roadways of Queens to Manhattan, just as the United States was beginning to embrace automobile travel. From the turn of the century to World War I, more than 5,000 structures were built in Ridgewood; industrial areas developed to the north, while residential construction occurred in the southern section. The developers built wood-frame houses until 1905, when building codes took effect requiring masonry construction. All subsequent construction in Bushwick and Ridgewood, including within the Ridgewood South Historic District, was of masonry. Many of the builders, including the G.X. Mathews Company, hired the architectural firm of Louis Berger & Co. to design their rows, which were faced largely with bricks produced by the Kreischer Brick Manufacturing Company. Thus, many of Ridgewood’s buildings share similar designs, brickwork, and ornamentation. Building stopped during World War I, resuming at a slower pace following the war and continuing until the last Ridgewood farms were developed in the late 1930s. During this period, more of the same types of buildings were constructed, including new-law tenements and attached and semi-detached single- and multi-family houses. In 1939, the WPA Guide called the area “old-fashioned and respectable;” Ridgewood remained a working- and middle-class neighborhood throughout the rest of the 20th century. Middle-Class Housing in New York While the working poor were being crowded into tenement buildings, the rapidly increasing population was also displacing the middle class, who were priced out of the New York City housing market by the second half of the 19th century. By 1866, those who could not afford their own houses included “professional men, clergymen, shopkeepers, artists, college professors, and upper-level mechanics.” Some middle-class families adapted by moving into boarding houses, but living with other families in a subdivided former rowhouse conflicted with the era’s middle-class values, which stressed the “individual private house as the protector of family privacy, morality, and identity.” In the years following the Civil War, new types of multiple dwellings emerged to cater to those of greater means than the poor or working-class. Among New York’s first apartment houses were two designed by Richard Morris Hunt: the Stuyvesant Apartments (1869-70, demolished) at 142 East 18th Street, and Stevens House (1870-72, demolished), on the south side of 27th Street between Fifth Avenue and Broadway. (As opposed to tenements, in which residents shared toilets, both flats buildings and apartment houses had self-contained suites of rooms; the latter term generally referred to the more luxurious buildings, particularly those with elevators.) Between 1875 and 1879, approximately 700 new flats buildings were erected in New York; 516 were built in 1880 alone. A “revolution in living,” as the New York Times deemed it in 1878, was occurring, and by the mid-1880s, more New Yorkers lived in multiple dwellings than in rowhouses. For those unable to afford a private home and willing to live outside of Manhattan, the two-family house presented an alternative to the rented flat. Two-family houses had taken root in newly developing areas of Brooklyn by 1895, with affordability accounting for much of the house type’s appeal. A typical 1898 advertisement for a two-family house of Brooklyn described the house as “self-supporting … rent of upper floors pays all expenses.” As transportation improved, other areas in Brooklyn and Queens become feasible as commuter suburbs for the growing middle class. Gustave X. Mathews and the G. X. Mathews Company Ridgewood’s best-known builder, Gustave Xavier Mathews, was born in Rodalben, Palatinate, Germany in 1871. His parents, Xavier and Rosa Matheis, and their five sons immigrated to the United States in 1886, settling in New York, and later, on Myrtle Avenue in Bushwick by 1900. Shortly after, Gustave Mathews married Clara Kuntz, daughter of Louis (Ludwig) Kuntz, a prominent builder in the Bushwick-Ridgewood area. It was from his fatherin-law that Mathews learned the building trade, working with Kuntz and his partner, John Dreher. With his wife Clara, Mathews had four sons, Ernest L., Curtis X., William E. and Gustave X. Jr., who later became active in their father’s business. Mathews married a second time in 1917, several years after his first wife’s death, and had a daughter, Rose Claire. After over fifty years as a developer and builder in Queens, Mathews died at the age of 88 in 1958. Gustave X. Mathews began purchasing former farmland in Brooklyn and Queens County just after the turn of the 20th century, and was one of the first builders to start developing the Queens section of Ridgewood. In 1904, the Mathews Realty and Construction Company of Queens was incorporated, with G.X. Mathews and two of his brothers, William F. and Ernest, as its directors. Mathews first began building on a large scale on Grove, Linden and Bleecker Streets, near the Brooklyn border and the last stop of the elevated Myrtle Avenue train. Like the other turn-of-the-century multi-family houses developed in Bushwick and Ridgewood, the earliest buildings that Mathews constructed conformed to the standard 20-foot-wide lots that were being laid out in the area and resembled rowhouses, but were divided on the interior into one apartment per floor. By 1909, the G.X. Mathews Company was incorporated with G.X. Mathews as its president, a role he held until his death. In 1907-08, Mathews purchased portions of the former Schwamb and Fleckenstein farms along Forest Avenue, and began the company’s first full-block development, constructing the model tenement buildings that would make the company and Ridgewood famous. (Figure 1) By developing a large-scale and efficient building system, the company was able to produce well-designed housing at an affordable price. Meeting with continued success, the company agreed to purchase the old Meyerrose farm, the site of the Ridgewood South Historic District, in 1911, and constructed almost 170 model tenements on the site. That same year, the G. X. Mathews Company received 25% of the tenement house certificates issued in the borough of Queens. In 1915, the Tenement House Department of New York City selected the “Mathews Model Flats” as the “most up-to-date method of housing for the masses at a minimum of cost;” and other builders began to copy the buildings. By the mid-1910s, few large tracts of land were left to develop in Ridgewood, and the G.X. Mathews Company began to look for other areas for development. With a growing demand in the low-cost housing market, in the 1910s, the G. X. Mathews Company began constructing Mathews Model Flats in Astoria, Woodhaven, Corona, and Long Island City, moving the company’s office there to Jackson and 18th Avenue by 1919. The need for affordable housing continued after World War I, when the demand for housing in general was at another peak. At the time the City Housing Corporation began constructing the affordable row houses at Sunnyside Gardens (a designated New York City Historic District), the Mathews Company had already begun constructing over 300 buildings, including its model flats, smaller, two-story apartment buildings, and one- and two-family houses, just east of the site in Woodside. By 1924, the Mathews Company was based in Woodside and was advertising over “950 houses sold; ‘never a single foreclosure’”, promising a high return on investment. Despite the Depression, the Mathews Company continued building in the 1930s, constructing a group of 250 one-family brick homes with garages in the Elmhurst section of Queens. By 1942, the company had completed another 150 modern-style, 2-family homes in the area, near Calamus and Grand Avenues. Later in his career, Mathews’s work also included a group of single family homes near West Nyack, New York, where he and his family lived. After his death in 1958, his sons, who had been active in the G.X. Mathews Company, completed and sold the remaining houses in the West Nyack development. The Design of Mathews Model Flats Many of the turn-of-the-century multi-family houses developed in Bushwick and Ridgewood included two- or three-story plus basement buildings constructed on standard (20’ x 100’) lots, similar to those developed elsewhere in Brooklyn. These buildings resemble rowhouses and generally feature one apartment per floor. Some of the earliest buildings constructed by Gustave X. Mathews were of this type. According to Department of Buildings records, the earliest Mathews buildings were designed by the architecture firm of Louis Berger and Co., a prolific architect in the area. Filed in 1908, Berger is listed as architect of record for the earliest buildings that represent a departure from the conventional multi-family house plan: they were among the first that Mathews built featuring his innovative floor plan. The “Mathews Model Flats” were built on larger lots, 27.5 feet wide, allowing two apartments on each floor, each with its own full bathroom, with shared light shafts providing windows in each room. (Figure 2) The layout was “first planned and constructed” by the Mathews Company, and the buildings quickly became widely known in Queens, with other developers’ copies later described as the “Mathews Model Flats” type. A number of these “copies” are located within the Ridgewood South Historic District. Most of the three-story plus basement buildings in the district have six separate residential apartments, except for many of those that face Woodward, Onderdonk and Catalpa Avenues, some of which have commercial spaces at the ground floor. The basic plan of the Mathews Model Flats features five rooms – living room, dining room, bedroom, sitting room, and kitchen – plus a bathroom per apartment, all of which have access to light and air from central light shafts, as required by the 1901 Tenement House Law. The “cold water flats” had running water to all floors and a full bathroom – toilet, sink and tub, but no hot water or central heating system. Instead, a coal stove in the kitchen and a kerosene heater in the living room were used to heat each apartment. Although steam heat was common in most apartment and rowhouse buildings at the time, it was not uncommon for tenement buildings to lack a central heating system. With a private bathroom in each apartment, the Mathews flats buildings were a clear upgrade from a tenement, but lacked the extra amenities that distinguished them from more expensive apartment buildings. The G. X. Mathews Company created a niche in the real estate market. They built flats that were desirable places to live, while providing affordable home-ownership through multifamily occupancy and large-scale development. Using the economic advantages of the multifamily dwelling, Mathews Model Flats generated more income than a two-family rowhouse but were not as initially cost prohibitive as a larger flats or apartment building, and were easier to manage by owner-occupants. By building on a large scale, Mathews was able to keep costs down while still creating comfortable, low-rent apartments; and the company met with immediate success. The G.X. Mathews Company built and sold over 300 tenements in Ridgewood between 1909 and 1912, including many of the buildings in the Ridgewood North and Ridgewood South Historic Districts. Newspaper articles indicate that the six-family brick flats-houses in the Ridgewood South Historic District sold for $11,000, while other buildings in the area were less affordable. An article in the Real Estate Record and Guide published in late 1909 list prices of two- and three-story brick rowhouses at $9,000 to $12,000 and tenement buildings selling for $16,000 to $17,000, depending on size and location. Since there was a great demand for affordable housing, apartments rented immediately upon completion, and there was often a waiting list for Mathews Model Flats apartments. The buildings were so successful that they became the model for future development; the “Mathews Model Flats” were endorsed by the Tenement House Department. In a letter dated January 23, 1918, a commissioner of the Tenement House Department recommended “Mathews Model Flats” as a solution to the shortage of housing for U.S. Government shipyard employees. The letter explained that the model had been adopted as a standard in Queens for both the Mathews Company and other builders. Development of the Ridgewood South Historic District According to the 18th and early 19th century records, the land in the Ridgewood South Historic District was part of the Woodard and Van Ende/Onderdonk farms, two long narrow farms that extended along both sides of Woodward and Onderdonk Avenues, respectively, from approximately Newtown Creek to Myrtle Avenue. Following his death in the 1830s, Joseph Woodard’s heirs began selling off portions of the property, which had been mapped and divided into over 100 lots. Van Ende descendents occupied their farm for almost 100 years from 1709 to 1805, the property passing from purchaser Paulus Van Ende to his son, then to his granddaughter and later to his great-grandson. In 1786, the western portion of the farm was sold to Johannes Covert. (The small sections that extend from the otherwise straight western boundary of the district were part of the Covert property.) The next long term owners of the property were Adrian and Ann Wyckoff Onderdonk, whose descendents sold the southernmost portion of the farm, including the bulk of the property in the historic district, to Joachim Meyerrose in 1864.Born in Bremen, Joachim Meyerrose (whose name is sometimes spelled Meirose or Meyerose) immigrated to Newtown in 1844, finding employment on the farm of John C. Debevoise for a short time before renting farmland on 56th Street in Manhattan. Meyerrose returned to Newtown in 1854, purchasing almost nine acres of property from Debevoise. Ten years later, he enlarged the farm by purchasing additional land from Gertrude (Onderdonk) Schoonmaker. Meyerrose farmed the land, with the help of his sons, into the last quarter of the 19th century. His older son Richard left farming to open a hay and grain market, while Joseph Meyerrose continued to work the farm after his father’s retirement, expanding the operation by renting adjacent property. The earliest buildings in the Ridgewood South Historic District were not developed by G.X. Mathews. A number of other developers were also prolific in the Ridgewood area around the turn of the 20th century. When much of the property in Ridgewood was still used as farm or park land, the Long Island Real Estate Exchange and Investment Company, an extensive property owner in Queens at the turn of the 20th century, acquired the southern portion of the former Covert farm, on either side of Seneca (formerly Covert) Avenue, between Greene Avenue and Catalpa (Elm) Avenue, and had the site mapped and lotted by 1892. Part of this sub-division, 1817 Woodbine Street appears to be the oldest extant building in the historic district. Constructed c.1900, this wood-frame building was acquired by William and Carolina Haug by 1906. A German-immigrant and plasterer by trade, Haug hired the architecture firm of Louis Berger & Co. to design the buildings at 1813 and 1815 Woodbine Street on the adjacent property. The existing building was likely refaced in masonry to match around the same time. (Figures 9 & 10) Designed in 1906, these buildings followed the model of the earliest phase of Ridgewood residential development: multi-family residences resembling rowhouses with only one apartment per floor. They do, however, have similar exterior features to other buildings in the district, including light colored brick, projecting and denticulated brickwork, carved stone lintels and pressed metal cornices. Louis Berger & Co. was the architect of record for over 5,000 buildings in Ridgewood and Bushwick between 1895 and 1930. Born in 1875 in Rheinpfalz, Germany, Berger immigrated to America as a young boy in 1880 and settled in Ridgewood in 1892. He studied architecture at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and served as an apprentice with the firm Carrere & Hastings before establishing his own firm in Bushwick in 1895. His specialty was the design of tenement houses and the laws governing their construction. In 1910, he moved his office to Ridgewood, Queens, when he joined the development team of August Bauer and Paul Stier as resident architect. Berger, the most prolific architect to work in Ridgewood, benefited greatly from his association with Bauer & Stier, Inc., which alone built over 2,000 houses in Ridgewood. He also served as the president of the Brooklyn Society of Architects. The next group of residential buildings in the district was constructed on the south side of Catalpa Avenue in 1909 by developer Henry Schlachter. Also designed by Berger, these sixfamily tenements feature a floor plan similar to that of the Mathews Model Flats, employing shared, central courtyards to meet light and air requirements. (Figure 11) These buildings, however, are only 25 feet wide and feature a four-room plus hall, rather than five-room plan. Born in Germany, Schlachter came to the United States in 1880 and began his career as a mason. He became a prominent builder in the Bushwick and Ridgewood areas, constructing both two-family houses and larger, six-family flats. He also worked on the construction of the St. Matthias rectory, and later developed single family homes north of Jamaica Village. Also in 1909, Louis Berger and Co. designed the three buildings at 1811, 1815 and 1817 Cornelia Street for developer Jacob Rodler. Berger used the same exterior design and floor plan as the Schlachter buildings for two of the three buildings, (Figures 12 & 13) while the third features the earlier “rowhouse-style” plan due to its narrower lot. Another prominent developer in Ridgewood, Rodler was born in Germany and began his career in Queens as a framer. Shortly after the turn of the 20th century, he began to work as a builder of multi-family frame, and later masonry, buildings. Rodler relocated his company to Hempstead, Long Island in the 1920s. Newspapers indicate that G. X. Mathews agreed to purchase the entire Meyerrose Farm in February of 1911, at the reported price of $400,000 or $20,000 per acre, a record price for land in Ridgewood. Deed records show that he began the purchase in smaller, half-block or quarter-block parcels in August of that year, with Mathews giving purchasers’ mortgages of $1,000 per lot to the Meyerrose heirs and builders’ mortgages, ranging from $6,500 to $9,000 per lot to the Williamsburgh Savings Bank or other financial institutions. The permits at the Department of Buildings were filed in a similar manner, generally in groups of eight or nine buildings, with overlapping commencement and completion dates among the groups. This likely allowed Mathews to begin systematically developing the site on a large scale without a huge outlay of capital, selling buildings as they were completed and paying off the mortgages. As construction was wrapping up, the G. X. Mathews Company reported that 153 of the 167 tenements built in the district had already been sold. According to Department of Buildings permits, most (149 of 167) buildings constructed in the Ridgewood South Historic District by the G. X. Mathews Company were designed by architect Louis Allmendinger. Allmendinger (1878-1937) was born in Brooklyn to a German-immigrant beer brewer in 1878. A graduate of the Cooper Union, Allmendinger was working as an architect as early as 1901. With offices in Bushwick, he worked both for himself and for various architects until 1922 when he established his own firm, specializing in industrial and commercial buildings. Allmendinger’s work also included other types of buildings, including the Russian Orthodox Cathedral of the Transfiguration of Our Lord in Brooklyn (1916-21, a designated New York City Landmark) and its Parish House (1916). In 1926, he formed a partnership with M. Allen Schlendorf (b.1902) which lasted until Allmendinger’s death. Continuing to practice in Brooklyn, the new firm was responsible for numerous institutional, industrial, and commercial designs, including the Former J. Kurtz & Sons Store Building in Queens (1931, a designated New York City Landmark), the German Masonic Temple in Manhattan, the Liebmann Brewery and North American Brewery in Brooklyn, as well as the Ehler Coffee Plant, also in Brooklyn. After Allmendinger’s death in 1937, Schlendorf, who had studied at both the Cooper Union and Columbia University, continued the practice under his own name. Department of Buildings permits list R. George Smart of Ridgewood as the filing architect for the 14 buildings constructed by Mathews on the northwest side of Madison Street. Little is known about Smart, and it is unclear why Mathews changed architects for these buildings. The exterior details are the same and map footprints indicate that the buildings likely have the same plans as the other model flats in the district. The last buildings in the district constructed by Mathews are located on the northwest corner of Madison Street and Woodward Avenues. Permits for these buildings, filed in 1914, list G. X. Mathews as the owner and architect. Similar in architectural details to the others buildings constructed by Mathews, these buildings feature unique floor plans due to varying lots sizes and non-rectilinear shapes created by the railroad right-of-way. At 1879 Madison Street, the facade is curved outward from the adjacent building, rather than projecting as a bay. (Figure 14) Although he constructed the entire block front of buildings on the southeast side of Cornelia Street, Mathews did not develop the remaining portions of the block flanking the St. Matthias Church complex. The lots facing Woodward Avenue were purchased in 1913 by builder Kilian Schurger, and permits for the buildings’ construction were filed at the Department of Buildings the same year. Schurger immigrated to New York from Germany in 1881, and by 1913 was responsible for the construction of over 200 buildings in Ridgewood. Designed by Louis Berger and Co., the buildings constructed by Schurger feature alternating amber- and palered-brick facades with decorative brickwork and Renaissance-Revival-style cornices, carved-stone lintels and doors surrounds. The lots on the other side of the church property, along Onderdonk Avenue, as well as those across Onderdonk Avenue on the northwest side of Catalpa Avenue, were developed by Charles Fritz in 1913. Fritz used Allmendinger to design the tenement buildings; and they have a very similar appearance to the Mathews Model Flats. Fritz immigrated to Ridgewood from Germany as a child in the late 1870s, and began working as a builder in 1895. He constructed the buildings on Onderdonk and Catalpa Avenues in partnership with fellow German Joseph Barudio, in addition to a number of other multi-family buildings in the Ridgewood area. Among the last residential buildings in the district were 57-14 and 57-16 Catalpa Avenue, constructed in 1914. Designed by architect Louis Allmendinger, the buildings follow a similar basic plan to most other model tenements in the district, but have simplified Renaissance-Revival-style facades. These buildings were constructed by Cornelius Werberig, a German-born framer, who was also responsible for the construction of over 50 speculative houses in the Ridgewood area. According to 1920 and 1930 census records, a high level of home ownership and working-class employment was evident in the historic district. Most of the buildings were owner-occupied, primarily by German immigrants whose occupations included: engineer, store manager, brewer, butcher, baker, restaurant chef, restaurant waiter, house carpenter, cabinetmaker, and stonecutter. Mathews himself occupied a property on Putnam Avenue. Generally, the owners occupied one apartment and rented the others to help cover the mortgage and building maintenance. A number of their tenants had professional occupations such as salesman, clerk, bookkeeper, accountant or insurance inspector, while others held jobs in factories, as paper, glass or clothing cutters, shoemakers, or tool makers, or in the construction trades, including: electrician, contactor, carpenter, plasterer, painter, and metal worker. In the 1930s, the trend of working-class home ownership continued in the Ridgewood South Historic District. In general, most of the residential buildings were owner-occupied, while those with commercial ground floors had more absentee landlords, possibly due to the higher initial sale price of these properties. St. Matthias Church Complex Before selling the bulk of the family farm to G.X. Mathews, the Meyerrose heirs sold a large lot fronting on Catalpa Avenue to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Brooklyn for the construction of a new church. Between 1909 and 1926, a combined church-school, rectory, convent, and larger church were constructed for the newly formed parish of St. Matthias, all designed in a Classically-inspired style by local architect Francis J. Berlenbach, Jr. (Figure 16) The St. Matthias church complex is significant as an ensemble of buildings designed over a period of time by the same architect, and also as a highly intact example of early-20th century ecclesiastical architecture in New York. The founding and growth of the St. Matthias parish was integral to the development of Ridgewood as a largely German and German-American working-class community, and reflected the importance of the church as a community institution. In 1908, Father Nicholas M. Wagner (1873-1930) was appointed pastor-founder of St. Matthias Roman Catholic Church by the Right Reverend Charles E. McDonnell, Second Bishop of Brooklyn from 1892-1921, whose goal it was to have a church dedicated to each of the twelve apostles in Brooklyn. St. Matthias was the first Catholic church in Brooklyn dedicated to that saint. Born in Brooklyn to German-immigrant parents and trained overseas in a German seminary, Father Wagner’s first undertaking as pastor of St. Matthias was to conduct a census of the Ridgewood area; the approximately 1,500 Catholic residents counted in his census formed the new church’s parish. The first mass was held in an open-air pavilion at the Ridgewood Park and Colosseum, and by early 1909 an organized effort was underway to raise funds for the construction of a combined church-and-school building. Constructed in 1909— in record time, by all accounts—the parish’s first building was a combined church-and-school designed in a handsome Romanesque/Renaissance Revival style by Francis J. Berlenbach, Jr. and clad in the same Kreischer brick as the surrounding tenements, with stone and terra-cotta trim.(Figure 17) A chapel seating 600 occupied the main floor, with six classrooms for a parochial school on the floor above. In 1913 an addition to the rear of the building increased the capacity to 900. Construction of a brick-and-stone rectory was completed in 1910, with Berlenbach again providing the designs.(Figure 18) A convent was erected in 1914 to house the Sisters of Notre Dame, who had joined the parish in 1910 to take charge of the parochial school. Berlenbach designed the convent building in a Neo-classical style, using a slightly lighter shade of yellow Kreischer brick than was used for the church-school and rectory. (Figure 19) The rectory and convent are distinguished by their Dutch Renaissance-inspired central parapets. German-born mason Herman Veit was the contractor for the church-school and convent, and developer Henry Schlachter was the contractor for the rectory and the later church building. As the St. Matthias parish continued to grow during the 1910s, the need for a larger church became pressing. In 1917 a major building campaign was launched, only to be suspended due to the scarcity and high cost of materials and labor during wartime. Despite these challenges, Father Wagner took the farsighted step of planning for a temporary church structure that would ultimately serve as the foundation for a new church when funds allowed. The “basement” church, a simple one-story brick structure located between the convent and rectory, was completed in 1919. By 1924, the parish had raised enough of the projected $250,000 cost to begin construction on the new church; remarkably, this was accomplished largely through donations of $200 or less given by the parish’s working-class families. Dedicated in 1926, the new church, cruciform in plan and featuring a bell tower with a clock face atop the narthex, made a grand architectural statement for the thriving parish, yet complemented the existing buildings with its modest scale, pale-yellow brick, and elegant Classical forms and ornament. St. Matthias parish remained largely German-American until well into the 20th century, when immigrants from Poland and Latin America began settling in the area and joining the parish. Today masses are still offered in German, as well as in Polish, English, Spanish and Italian. Kreischer Brick The brick manufacturing firm that would later become B. Kreischer & Sons was founded by Balthazar Kreischer (1813-1886) in 1845. Kreischer was born in Bavaria and came to New York City in 1836, where he worked for a period as a mason. In the early 1850s, Kreischer was one of the first in the United States to produce fire brick, a fire resistant brick used in many industrial buildings. In 1853, Kreischer became aware of refractory clay deposits in Westfield, Staten Island. He acquired several tracts with clay deposits and purchased the rights to mine clay on nearby land. Two years later he established a brickworks on the Arthur Kill. As the factory expanded, the area became known as Kreischerville. By the time of Kreischer’s retirement in 1878, the company had become a major producer of building materials in the metropolitan area. Kreischer’s sons continued the firm, but financial problems forced them to sell the company in 1899. The Ridgewood South Historic District has remained largely unchanged since its completion in 1915, although the church has expanded its buildings over time. Transportation to the area was enhanced with the opening in 1928 of the BMT subway station at DeKalb and Wyckoff Avenues, just across the Brooklyn border, which provided service to 14th Street in Manhattan. The only major alterations in the historic district include the removal and replacement of the historic storefronts on the ground floor of the buildings facing Catalpa, Onderdonk, and Woodward avenues. The upper stories of these buildings and those on the residential side streets are largely intact. (Figure 21) Minor alterations include the installation of replacement windows and doors, the reconstruction or resurfacing of bluestone stoops and the removal of stoop and areaway ironwork. After the Second World War, Ridgewood’s large German population was joined by new immigrants from Romania, Italy, and Slovenia. A second wave of immigrants from Romania arrived in the 1980s, along with people from Poland and Yugoslavia. The neighborhood also drew large numbers of Chinese, Dominicans, Italians, Koreans, and Ecuadorians. While some of the six-family buildings have been subdivided into cooperative apartments, the architecture of Ridgewood has retained remarkable integrity. The rows of buildings in of the Ridgewood South Historic District, with their light-colored brick facades, comprise incredibly intact streetscapes. - From the 2010 NYCLPC Historic District Designation Report

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