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These two must have really had strong feelings for each other... I found them still at it the next day! Thanks to Erick and Alex below, the moths have been identified as cecropia moths. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyalophora_cecropia

Hyalophora cecropia

Hyalophora cecropia

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Raised in the Insectary

Hyalophora cecropia

Fauna Project

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Hyalophora cecropia

Fauna Project

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

I am extremely happy I found this Hyalophora Cecropia moth, the Cecropia silk moth, today. This is really large species comparing to other moths and butterflies. With a wingspan of 5-7 inches, is the largest moth found in North America

Hyalophora cecropia

Fauna Project

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

 

When I left my room in the Absaroka Lodge in Gardiner Montana on June 28, 2019, I found this Cecropia Moth on the outside door frame. Also known as a Robin Moth, Hyalophora cecropia is North America's largest native moth species. This particular moth seemed to be drying its wings in the early morning sun while perched on the door frame.

Hyalophora cecropia

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Raised in the Insectary

Hyalophora cecropia

Fauna Project

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

I had spotted some tiny Cecropia Caterpillars just after they hatched and was hoping they would grow larger. I was very excited to find two of them in the same cherry tree today. I will check again and see if they get full sized. They are so amazing I feel so lucky whenever I see one.

Première éclosion ce matin d'un de mes 3 cocons, quelle merveille :-)

  

Missed the dive but caught him popping out of the water with the fish.

 

I hope everyone enjoys this image! :D

(captive) In 2018, a friend gave my boyfriend, John, a female cecropia moth because it wasn't finding a mate. That evening, John set her outside on the back deck and within minutes not one, but two males came in, one which became her mate. I hadn't even realized these beauties were flying among us. And they really aren't for very long. Their winged existence as these large, stunning moths is very short, around two weeks. During this time, their sole purpose is to procreate. The female releases pheromones which attract a male from as far as a mile away. They will then mate for up to two days, before separating. The female will lay dozens of eggs and then live out her last days exploring her world.

 

This is a studio shot, captive female with wild male. Single frame at f/22, 1 sec exposure using a filtered flashlight.

Was super happy to find this gigantic caterpillar at its final stage. The best tip for you to find one is to search for foliage areas that are completely gone. These eat a lot so they end up removing a good chunk of leaves where they are. Check carefully around and you might find one. This one had eaten a lot and move to a second small tree next to the damaged area.

Éclosion du troisième cocon, enfin une femelle :-)

Hyalophora cecropia, the cecropia moth, is North America's largest native moth. It is a member of the family Saturniidae, or giant silk moths.Females have been documented with a wingspan of five to seven inches (160 mm) or more. These moths can be found all across North America as far west as Washington and north into the majority of Canadian provinces.

  

Rondeau Provincial Park, Ontario. Canada, June 18, 2020.

Hyalophora cecropia

Fauna Project

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

 

Cecropia Moth (Hyalophora cecropia) photographed alive and healthy on black velvet 6/10/20

I was researching this moth and found out they only live two weeks if that long. I'm glad I got a chance to enjoy it...

I was looking through the many pictures I've never gotten around to posting and found this one that I liked. It was taken a while back when I still had my Micro lens. I wish I still had it.

 

Nikon D7100Nikon 105mm Micro F/2.8 AF-S VR IF ED G

 

1/250s

f/7.1

ISO 280

Like the previous photo, this was taken at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in the butterfly and moth enclosure.

 

Hyalophora cecropia, the cecropia moth, is North America's largest native moth. It is a member of the family Saturniidae, or giant silk moths. Females have been documented with a wingspan of five to seven inches (160 mm) or more. These moths can be found all across North America as far west as Washington and north into the majority of Canadian provinces. Cecropia moth larvae are most commonly found on maple trees, but they have also been found on cherry and birch trees among many others. The species was first described by Carl Linnaeus in his 1758 10th edition of Systema Naturae Larvae There are typically five larval instars (developmental stages), each lasting approximately one week. The first instar larvae are black. Their coloration is due to small black hairs growing from tubercles (small projections) all over their body. These larvae feed upon many common trees and shrubs including maple, birch, and apple. As the caterpillars grow larger into the second larval instar, they become yellow green. During the third, fourth, and fifth instars, The cecropia moth becomes rather large and bluish green. At these final stages, the tubercles become blue, yellow or orange, depending on location on the body, while the black hairs are eventually lost. The caterpillars reach maturity in autumn and are about 4 to 4.5 inches (100 to 110 mm) long. [Wikipedia]

Cecropia Moth

Hyalophora cecropia, "Robin Moth"

(male)

Cecropia moth caterpillars. Sooooo big. Stilllllll eating…

The largest native moth found in North America - No accident the edge of the wing looks like a snake (imo).

By far the largest caterpillar that I saw during the bioblitz was this Cercropia Moth (Hyalophora cecropia) feeding on Cherry (Prunus sp.). Mt. Pleasant, Howard County Conservancy, Maryland.

Butterflies Go Free

Montreal Botanical Gardens

 

Explore #295 May 2/16

Cecropia caterpillar, fifth instar

  

The giant silky Cecropia has always been my favorite North American moth species. The wingspan can reach lengths of up to seven inches or more making this moth the largest in the country. I had the incredible opportunity to foster one after finding a very small caterpillar on a Rhododendron bush in my front yard exactly one year ago. This photo was taken one day after emergence on a curtain of black velvet just a few hours before I released it back into the wild. The final stage shown here has no digestive system or functional mouth parts. It's sole purpose is to mate and only lives a week or so after coming out of it's cocoon. The species was first described by Carl Linnaeus in his 1758 10th edition of Systema Naturae

Here's an extreme macro image of a tubercle on the back of my Cecropia Caterpillar. Such incredibly colorful and alien-looking formations when studied up close. These caterpillars have quite a few of these tubercles in their later instar stages which form in rows of red, yellow, and blue.

This is the largest moth of North America at a 5-6 inch wing span. It's the first time I ever saw it. New Jersey, 2015.

© Denis Dumoulin 2011- Tous droits réservés

Visiter: www.passioncanon.net/default.html

 

It's cocoon spinning time for the cecropia moths I'm rearing.

 

Freshly spun silk emits a pretty strong fluorescence under UV lights, and seems to fade as time goes on. This silk is just about as fresh as it gets with the central cocoon spun earlier in the day and 3 more caterpillars actively working on cocoons of their own.

 

UV highlights every one of the fine silk strands, revealing what a complicated mess they make. I'm not sure if there's a plan to the supporting pieces, or if they just have a blast laying it all down.

 

Technical notes:

-Lit with 2 UV flashlights with filters to reduce any visible light they emit.

-Unmodified camera is capturing the visible light emitted when the silk (and caterpillar knobs) are hit with UV - this is what your eyes would see.

-This is 3 exposures with the lights aimed to highlight different areas, then combined in Photoshop.

I raise butterflies and moths as a hobby. I raised them from eggs last year and they overwintered in their containers in my shed.

 

Please feel free to visit/Like my Waystation page on facebook.

 

www.facebook.com/MonarchWaystation2408

-Explored-

 

Nikon D7100

Nikon 105mm Micro F/2.8 AF-S VR IF ED G

 

1/2000s

f/7.1

ISO 720

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