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BEST IN HUGE MAGNIFICATION !

 

PRINSES JULIANA Aalborg Denmark.

Romantic evening, six-pointed star, deep blue water, windless. Midnight temperature well above 20 degrees.

All conditions are present for a very pleasant evening.

 

MUSIC:

1. Spice Girls - Love Thing (Lyrics & Pictures) - YouTube

1.STE CLASS MUSIC AND 1.STE CLASS SPICES IMAGES 10/10 !

 

The Music makes a weak in a way that one becomes strong. Benny Andersen.

  

Camera: Sigma DP1.

Exposure: 10 sec.

Iso: 50.

Aperture: 8,0.

Tripod.

Self-timer.

Processing: Sigma Pro/PhotoFiltre/Raw/Tiff.

I am still amazed at the camera sharpness.

See the rivets and the windows on the ship's side in lightbox.

The camera has been discontinued but purchased as used.

 

It is the 22.nd July 2014.

We have a heat wave in Denmark, and now it is close to midnight. The temperature is over 25 degrees, and since it is the bright nights' country, there is never completely dark now. As the weather forecast promises calm, I have decided to photograph PRINSES JULIANA with the ship's new covered aft stern. I am almost exclusively interested in night scenes, so when there was a couple of hours to the blue hour, I went for a long walk on the waterfront in Aalborg. I went for a walk to NORDKRAFT, one of Europe's largest cultural centers. Think, here inside the ground floor there is made ​​sandy beach with a thick layer of sand. On the way back to the bridge, where I wanted to do the filming, I stopped where there were many people gathered. Here was electronic music, guided by a DJ. Coincidentally, I came to talk to a few girls who sat next to me. One girl had just graduated as a graphic designer and it's just such people as image processing images on the process for brochures, so it was very interesting. I later went to the bridge where I took approx. 90 pictures, as I felt that there was an optimal photo weather. There was as usual a lot of traffic, so I tried as much as possible to expose the heavy buses. Suddenly stopping a sympathetic man where I stand, and begin to give advice on how to photograph. It was nice, but I was busy.

The image used here is the last in the line of approx. 90 images.

 

I have eaten there several times and the food is excellent.

 

Motor sailing ship PRINSES JULIANA was built in Holland as a training ship.

PRINSES JULIANA served as a training ship to 1969.

From 1970 it has been used as a restaurant ship.

After a lifetime of 75 years, the ship was renovated,

and today's comfort and the quality is top notch.

Many have asked: How can I make my own Chicken Stick? Here’s what I know. [Long-winded version]

 

1. Do you live in a cold climate? In my experience, the Red-shouldered Hawks only come looking for a hand out when it’s below freezing or there is snow on the ground.

2. Buteo species such as Red-shouldered and Red-tailed Hawks are accustomed to scavenging carcasses during the cold winter months. Accipiters, to my knowledge, are not. I’ve never had a Cooper’s or Sharp-shinned Hawk show the least bit of interest in the chicken stick.

3. In my case, it was an accident that started my relationship with this pair of Red-shouldered Hawks. I started putting out a piece of raw chicken in the woods for the fox at a location I dubbed the Magic Meat Stump; the Red-shouldered Hawk found and started poaching it.

4. So I started putting chicken up higher on a snag, so that the four-legged creatures (including my own dogs) couldn’t get to it.

5. Then later, I got hubby to build a teepee of large tree limbs (aka the chicken stick) so that I could better photograph the proceedings from my blind (bedroom window).

6. I climb a ladder and fasten the raw chicken part (leg, thigh, wing – it doesn’t matter) on a flat-head lag bolt that hubby also installed. Nothing too sharp that could hurt a bird. It’s about 14’ up in the air, which is eye level from my bedroom window.

7. I have talked to a raptor rehabber about this. She has said that the occasional raw chicken is a good supplement in a lean, harsh winter. It can mean the difference between a strong, breeding season and a weak one. However, the chicken is not a “complete meal” and you don’t want them to become too dependent on the handouts. So now I do it about once or twice a week. As soon as it gets above freezing, the hawks disappear of their own accord anyway, and any chicken left out just goes bad.

8. I always put it out first thing in the morning, never late in the day. I am interested in attracting day time birds, not nocturnal predators (raccoons, fisher cats, coyotes, etc). Use common sense to determine if you have the right habitat and yard for a chicken stick.

9. Other birds, especially woodpeckers and blue jays, prefer the raw chicken to suet. And it is their activity around the chicken stick that may first draw the attention of a hawk.

10. And if it needs saying, don’t put your chicken stick near your regular feeders. No need for worlds’ colliding, if you know what I mean.

11. And never put out cooked chicken with bones in it. Same splintering danger for wild birds as there is for your pet. Raw bones, however, are good and provide extra nutrients.

 

Any questions?

   

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1CSPVkMgiTs rain & thunder

 

(This image was last posted in early 2011. It now hangs on my wall at 40"x48". I am a bit surprised by two things; how much I used to write and how little I write now. I don't know why on the latter.)

 

One of 10 of my images chosen to be in a six artists, Art Gallery Exhibit/Show in April/May. My second gallery show in 41 years. My first was 1971.

 

Narrative: Some of you know, I’ve got a thing for rainy evenings and nights, mostly especially experienced when I’m in a car. I love driving in the rain - the harder the better; hearing it, feeling it, smelling it, seeing it come down in any form and splash around. The air is mist-humidifier thick and lingers in the nose, a combination of spring-freshness and city-grit. ~ View On Black (click large for the details)

 

I like the way buildings of concrete or brick change colors as their stone facades get made wet by the rain. I also like the multiple light sources you find come dusk; bright and pretty lights shining here and there, all with differing color temps. So, in the rain, in the car, at night, on city streets, I’m kinda’ in photo heaven.

 

I call this my dash-cam :-) I’ll put the camera on the dashboard and capture images as go. Sometimes it’s the little point-and-shoot camera, the Canon 880IS, or the Mamiya 2 ¼ (a little too heavy to control on the turns), or sometimes the D300. This was the D300 with the 12-24mm lens (which is really sharp at f/8). I’ve gotten fairly comfortable with the "Dashboard" process (iso settings, f-stops, shutter speeds, zoom setting) and I get a lot of fun and, I hope, interesting images and points-of-view doing this. No fender-benders….yet. :-)

 

This is North Michigan Avenue, the high-priced shopping district, just north of the Chicago River, late rush hour.

 

A storm had moved in with these luscious, low, heavy, slate-gray, leaden-looking clouds. In-between the “soak-you-to-your-undies” sheets of downpour these kinds of clouds can deliver, pedestrians will take their chances on crossing the street.

 

Naturally, people act as if they’ve never driven in the rain before, and traffic slows to a crawl; except for the cabbies. Cabbies: love them and hate them. Cross in front of them at your own risk, even if you have the light. Or at least, do like this pedestrian is doing; wear bright colors so at least Cabman can’t tell the Judge you blended in with the dark and he didn’t see you.

 

“I was wearin’ fluorescent, banana, canary yellow, ya’honna. He couldn’t help but see me! He jus’ runned me over, was all.”

 

But, you sure do appreciate their “reckless cabbie hustle” as your viewpoint changes; from driver to customer. It’s quite different when it's you in the back seat watching those $.50-cent by the minute or by the quarter-mile fees, rolling up on the taxi-meter while you sit in traffic. “Five dollars already, and we ain’t movin’” , you think.

 

“Go through the light, I don’t mind, please driver.” “Oh, yes, didn’t you know - you can turn on red here. Left even; from any lane!” “Let’s go down this alley, it looks open.” “I see the sidewalk is kinda’ clear…just a thought.”

 

Then you don’t mind if they even run over some silver-haired Grandmother and her “precious widdle puppy”; just get me there while I’ve still got some change in my pocket.

 

KaThump!!! “Ooops. Oh, naw, you only winged her, Driver. She's OK, she’s getting’ up. Hey, she’s givin’ you the finger! Two-of-‘em! Damn, she’s shootin’ ‘em in the air, like she just don’t care!"

 

Grandmother picks up one of her dark-gray, thick-heeled orthopedic shoes, and with the speed and accuracy of an NFL quarterback, puts it right against the rear window, cracking the glass with a sharp, "Kalomp - Keer-rack!"

 

"Wha' the," you think. "What's this? Weapons-grade, Rosa Klebb footwear for Seniors?"

 

"Don'chu' worry 'bout it, Driver. She’s alright," You say, giving her one last glance.

 

"What about the pooch?", the driver inquires, glancing at his side mirror.

 

"Aah, poodles are a dime a dozen."

 

texture: homemade

The Original Dramatic Flowerscapes....

 

www.flickr.com/photos/wilsonaxpe/sets/72157626924815842/

 

I was recently interviewed by Digital Photo magazine who wanted to know more about the technique behind the Dramatic Flowerscapes. I thought it might be interesting to share the interview with you....

 

How long have you been keen on photography?

I've been shooting for over 15 years now, though I'd say I've really stepped things up in the past five or six.

 

Tell us about what made you want to shoot this particular picture?

I've been working on my series of 'dramatic flowerscapes' (link below) for the past three of four years - in fact, four of the images were shortlisted for the Landscape Photographer of the Year 6 competition, one making the exhibition and the book as well as the Sunday Times coverage of the Awards, chosen by their picture editor.

 

What were you trying to achieve with this picture?

I'm trying to achieve on a small-scale what the dramatic land & sea-scaper usually sees on a large-scale. With 'Reach', I wanted capture the energy and competition among these small plants jostling to get closest to the sun.

 

What camera and lens did you use?

Nikon D700 and Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 (friends have suggested it's 'welded' to the front of my camera!)

 

Tell us about how you shot the image?

The idea was to bring the same techniques - narrow aperture, grad filtering - that I use in landscapes to the tiny world of flowers. Add in a blast of flash from an SB900 and you have a range of 'dramatic flowerscapes' which have probably been the biggest source of attention on my portfolio over the past couple of year.

 

Does this image fit in with your usual approach to photography, or did you try anything different to shoot this?

It fits with my usual approach to shooting landscapes - apart from the flash element - but I really fought my instincts around how to shoot flowers. I have a bunch of macro-shots from the same field which I've never published because, while technically fine, they don't offer anything like the drama and scale achieved by the wide-angle.

 

What problems or challenges did you encounter when shooting this picture?

One of the hardest thing is keeping the shape and scale with tiny objects that are moving all the time - especially if there is wind, even a gentle one. The other, inevitably, is the light. As with a large scale dawn or dusk shoot, there's a very small window when the light is right and the shape in the sky and the subject align. I'm lucky this field is pretty close to my home, so I was able to keep an eye on the conditions and anticipate the right time to get out there.

 

Tell us briefly about any imaging or Photoshop work you did?

I use Lightroom 4 and work mostly on shadows, contrast and clarity.

 

Did you find anything tricky in the Photoshop work you did?

The trickiest part was keeping the colours in balance.... You really need the tones in the sky and the daisies to be working with each other.

 

Do you have a favourite kind of photography, and does this image fit into it? (Eg landscapes, portraits, buildings, still life, macro, wildlfe)

I'm up for anything that offers a dramatic edge, so hopefully this image fits into that.... I'm mostly drawn to seascapes, cityscapes and landscapes – winter preferred – and occasionally venture into sports and portraiture. More recently, I've developed a fascination with knackered looking objects and buildings!

 

What are the top five tips you'd share with other readers when it comes to shooting images like this?

Shoot at dusk or dawn

Think shape, not flowers

Get down low to shoot up (the sky is key)

Open the camera wide (Reach was 16mm (on full frame))

And make sure you've always got spare batteries for your flash - they're very hungry in low light!

 

What's the best piece of advice you've received on photography?

Compete - it's the best way to improve - and 'get it right in field', especially your composition. There's not much even the best PS technique can do with a poorly shaped image.

  

I get a lot of mail asking questions about my photography, my processing, etc. I'm always happy to answer but I just thought it'd be easier to put all of this out here....

 

And all of this is just how I do it. I don't believe there's one right way to do anything ~ you figure out what you're comfortable with and you do it. As an example, the Nikon vs. Canon debate bugs me to no end ~ they're both good. Get what you're comfortable with. I use Nikon because my film camera was a Nikon. If you're thinking of getting a dSLR then go to a camera store and hold them both ~ see what works for you. It's the same with everything else ~ just because so and so does it one way doesn't mean that's the way you have to do it. Try different things a figure it out for yourself ~ being comfortable doing something seems so important to me.

 

Photography:

 

Go out there and take pictures. Take your camera with you everywhere. Take a lot of pictures. Try different things. I go out in the afternoons just to shoot flowers around my neighborhood, or to throw one of my kids in front of some bright colored wall.

 

1) My #1 suggestion to people is to buy a 50mm lens. Shooting on a really low aperture is what creates the shallow depth of field in a lot of my pictures, and the 50mm lens is perfect if that's the look you want. It's my favorite lens.

 

2) Lenses make a HUGE difference. I would rather invest in good lenses then camera body.

 

3) I am a "focus and recompose" person: I have my focus mode set to S (C drives me absolutely batty). So I focus on what I want and then move the camera to get the composition I want; it's hard to explain if you're not used to it. I've tried moving focal points around but I get better results doing it this way.

 

4) For portraits 95% of the time I focus on the eyes. I think that's what people are drawn to, and what should be the sharpest.

 

5) I try to leave room for post-processing cropping. I am very picky about my cropping and I'm drawn to the square crop (or 6x7) these days so when I take my pictures I tend to keep that in mind.

 

6) I use matrix metering most of the time. Spot metering occasionally, if the lighting is tricky.

 

7) I shoot aperture priority 95% of the time. I know how to shoot manually, but A works just as well for me and it's aperture I usually want to control. If I need to I'll adjust the exposure compensation, but I do that rarely.

 

8) I shoot RAW. I like fiddling with stuff, so RAW works for me. Mainly I love it for fixing the white balance, but I also do almost all my black and white conversions in Adobe Camera RAW.

 

9) I pay attention to my histograms ~ I make a concerted effort not to blow my highlights. I don't care too much about shadows.

 

10) Pay attention to light ~ I read some book long ago that said all photography is is capturing light (you should hear Cindy squeal about good light, seriously). If you're doing portraits, make sure you can see the catchlight in their eyes ~ position them near a window, or a reflective surface. And shoot at different times to get a feel for different light ~ morning vs. sunset, etc. There's no bad time to take a picture (though 1pm on a sunny day with no shade is challenging) but there's definitely better times to do so.

 

11) Look through the viewfinder and figure out what's in your shot. I know that sounds redundant but it actually took me a long time to make this a habit. What's appearing in the picture that's going to distract from the subject? Take it out, or move.

 

12) If you are going to shoot wide open, understand what's going to be in the focal plane. Position your lens directly parellel to your subject. If you're shooting kids, get down to their level. If you're shooting flowers, try different angles.

 

13) Your shutter speed should never be less than your focal length, to avoid blur due to camera shake (so if you're using a 50mm lens, you want to be at at least 1/60 ss)

 

Photoshop:

 

I love Photoshop ~ not everyone does. Some people set up their cameras so they need to do less post-processing but I enjoy that aspect, almost as much as the actual shooting. Very rarely I have something SOOC that I think doesn't need any adjustment. I believe that film has been developed to create a certain look (so if you want vivid landscapes you shoot Velvia, pretty portraits you shoot Portra) and tons of stuff occurs in the darkroom during development. So I use Photoshop to get the look I like.

 

1) I do have actions for sale now

 

2) I own a ton of actions but mostly just to learn how others do stuff. If I use an action on something I post I make note of it (I love lilyblue's honey action and her black and whites)

 

3) I adjust the individual color curves on almost every picture. I am going to make public a few tutorials I put up for a group, which will be in a set with this 365 ~ it shows what I'm talking about

 

4) I pay attention to my histogram in Photoshop, as well. I really don't like blown highlights, lol. What I mean by this is ~ if you open your histogram, the right hand side of it pertains to the highlights in your picture. If the edge of the histogram is up against that wall, it means your highlights are getting clipped and information is lost. Google it because I'm not explaining it right but I think it's really important.

 

5) I love gradient map adjustment layers ~ they tone down colors and add richness to black and whites. I will generally add a black to white gradient map set to 10-25% opacity on my pictures.

 

6) I'm a huge fan of the "Apply Image" function, under "Image". I choose the green channel and set it to soft light. Then I adjust the opacity of the layer down, anywhere from 85% to 20% ~ it just depends

 

That's all I can think of. Ask questions if you have any and I'll answer them to the best of my ability.

 

And I just need to add that I feel like I learn something new weekly ~ I read, I shoot, I get inspiration to try something ~ it all leads me to try new things and experiment.

 

And hopefully you see that there really is no magic. It's just figuring things out.

It's been a while I haven't gone photo-strolling around Seattle. Yesterday, I got home from work and drove out to Alki Beach to watch the light show over Seattle skyline. This was my 2nd attempt shooting at Alki. I've been all over the city but limited at Alki Beach because I didn't own a remote control so there was no point in getting that long exposure to expose this city lights. The last time when I was here I even left the tripod at home so I had to hand held hehe. I always enjoy capturing city lights and I guess I'm just fascinated with the glow and how it's reflected on the water creating wide colorful rainbow.

 

I've been seeing a lot of beautiful Mt.Rainier shot and I'm so itching to head up there to hunt for wild flowers. been planning and planning but every time I'm ready to head out the door the weather was just either clear sky with no cloud or gloomy with no lights. However, I woke up 1 morning getting ready for work and looked out the window and saw one of the best sunrise of the year but I had to work. That's the fundamental of life is being unpredictable. I'm still haven't give up hope for wild flower on Mt.Rainier yet and I'm waiting for that partly cloud weekend and hopefully weather will be optimal for shooting next week.

 

Thank you friends for stopping by. Enjoy the light show :-) and your weekend!

 

Comments and critiques are welcome.

 

D300s

Nikkor 50mm f/1.8

Tiffen 3 stops ND

(4 minutes exposure)

 

© Hai Nguyen Photography | All Rights Reserved | Please do not use without my permission, thank you.

Last night, instead of shooting fireworks, I took this picture.

 

This is the song to go with this

 

Update:

She is feeling much better and if all goes well tonight, we are off in the morning. Woot!

Thanks for all your support! xoxo

 

© All rights reserved. Use without permission is illegal.

explore #235

 

the world is simple. if you want to love, then love. if you want to live, then live. don't let anyone stop you from doing anything.

live with a sense of duality and symbiosis: if you love one, then they will love you; not everything is replaceable, but most are reproducible and can evolve.

 

thankyouthankyouthankyou for my last explore front page #8 #1 :OO, which is the highest i've ever gotten, (although i have NO idea how it made front page...)

and also i hit 13,000+ views today, <3

 

replaced for my 52 weeks.

woah, second upload in two days?

i was gonna upload this tomorrow. didn't feel like it. my parents are just UGH, they've taken my texting away for 3 weeks now and they say they're still not giving it back. i don't understand why, i have all A's and i'm the opposite of a slacker.

 

i'm supposed to be doing my homework right now, but don't feel like it. today was all right i presume.

i've spend more than an hour staring at this and trying to get it right, took me three tries. i've got to admit, no matter how measly it sounds, this is one of the hardest things i've edited. mainly because that fish is fake haha. (stock credit here) those are flowers floating in the jar by the way.

but this may be one of my favorite photos i've ever uploaded, which is pretty big for me.

inspired of course: this and this. (two of my absolute favorite photographers)

tomorrow better pass by fast so i can see my friend in new york <3

i won't be able to go on flickr for the weekend, so until then, goodbye laaves (:

 

tumblr!

ask me anything

“See how nature—trees, flowers, grass—grows in silence; see the stars, the moon and the sun—how they move in silence...we need silence to be able to touch souls. “

 

~ Mother Teresa (1910-1997)

 

A lot of people say that it's hard to find silence and peace of mind if one is living in a big and diverse city. Well for me it's not difficult as I grew up in a big city in my hometown and moved to another big city, 9,000 miles away from home. This time it's diverse and quite complicated if one is not used to being around with different nationalities. I was able to adapt right away as I always apply my simple rule #8 :)

 

I find my own silence and solitude wherever I may be - in my own space, in the corner of my house, through meditation in between busy schedule or by looking at the flowers by my window pane :)

 

Have a happy and peaceful Sunday dear friends!

 

There was a break in the clouds yesterday, but I was unable to enjoy it. I was at the DMV, renewing my license…happy birthday.

 

When I arrived the hostess gave me a golden ticket printed with a letter followed by a number..G124.

 

“Have uh seat and wait til it’s called.” she chirps…”NEXT!”

 

I took my place in one of the many ancient plastic chairs that adorned the wait area. My first priority was scanning the televisions to see what letter they were at in the order of operations. The screens (and there are many) usually have at least one with a nice movie about the US National Parks playing (without noise), to lighten the mood. It’s centered next to the screens with the letter number combos scrolling up. I looked and no parks movie….but I quickly noticed G120 was just called. Good…I think, it won’t be long now…4 numbers off.

 

My second order of business was to scan the room and see what type of circus freak show I was cast in the middle of. For some reason the DMV office always feels like the crowd on a Jerry Springer episode. People, all amped up on any assortment of substances from cocaine to caffeine….there because they want something, and they want it NOW. Good stuff. In my immediate vicinity there was the following cast of characters; An older lady and a little girl having a spelling lesson (it was actually a game of hangman…but they were working on spelling…I think). A kid who used to be in my class 6 years ago, whom I didn’t recognize because he hadn’t cut his hair since. His girlfriend who was also in my class, but wasn’t happy to be at the DMV…I assumed she was mad, because she dropped at least 8 F bombs in the matter of 30 seconds. A lady who checked her ticket constantly against the screen…like she was in a Keno hall. A man who may or may not have been of the living. I didn’t see him breath once. He was there when I left. Last, but not least Barbie and Ken who may not even have known where they were…they were too alive.

 

“B039...” Said the voice, as one of the screens changed. “…Please go to window number 5”

 

2 minutes later….

 

“E123…..Please go to window number 8”

 

5 minutes later…

 

“A047.…Please go to window number 3”

 

This went on for a while…I assumed that each window, or set of windows was responsible for a certain letter….but this was not the case.

 

“F131.…please go to window number 5.”

 

I was lost….they didn’t organize it by window…it didn’t go in alphabetic order. It appeared random.

 

20 minutes after I entered.

 

“G121.…please go to window number 8”

 

Ugh.

 

“I wondur how they duh-cide which gets it and which is nex?” said the Keno lady…still anticipating her number coming up, but glancing my way.

 

“I have no idea…I’ve been trying to figure it out myself.” I said, trying to have a conversation. She was already intently looking at the screens again.

 

After 40 minutes… “G124.….” BINGO! I quickly paid my fee, and had a renewed license….or so I thought.

 

“Sir…if you’d go down to window 11...they’ll take your picture for your license.”

 

More waiting.

 

The photo window was being overwhelmed by a lady from Ohio…who drove a motorcycle…or did at one point…but her license wasn’t transferring properly to California. I heard the whole story. 19 times at least. SO did the DMV lady, but She and Ohio motorcycle lady were speaking two entirely different languages to each other.

 

The Ohio biker lady would explain something…which didn’t compute with the DMV lady…who would leave, go mentor a with a supervisor of some kind…then return…explain the situation again…and the “cycle” would start over. Ohio biker lady would turn to the line that was forming for photos, and apologize.

 

“I’m sorry…I got this bike license thingy…”

 

Why people apologize at a place like this is beyond me. She wasn’t sorry. She was ticked at the DMV…and wanted her situation dealt with. She really didn’t care about us, or our lousy photo hair. Finally…they agreed that she would need to go call Ohio and get some papers faxed over. The next contestant in line went through the entire photo process…computerized fingerprinting (several times), name signing, the whole sh’bang…only to find out she wasn’t even there for a license…it was a driving permit.

 

“So do I take my test now?”

 

“HGHGHHHH?” said the DMV guy..

 

“I need my permit test I thought?” squeaked the girl.

 

“fhhhht. Oh. Ok.”

 

That was fun.

 

“Oh….Kay….look at Garfield.” Said the DMV man.

 

I smile, like I’m trying. My hair is bad.

 

BRIGHT flash

 

“Uh…one more.”

 

I screwed up the first photo. I wasn‘t, “looking at Garfield.” Which was a postcard of the fat orange cat, located under the camera. I was looking at the lens…ON the camera…which, apparently, was wrong. My next photo had really bad hair, and a bad smile. Then I had to do the electro-finger print thing…which, let me just say, is just a bad piece of technology. Let me paraphrase the process.

 

“Place yer right thumb finger on the sensor.”

 

*placing finger on sensor*

 

“Lift ‘et…”

 

*lifting thumb*

 

“Set’et back down…on the sensor.”

 

*placing thumb on sensor*

 

“Lift et…place it on the sensor high’r”

 

*placing finger on sensor…higher up*

 

“hold it….uh left’et up…”

 

5 minutes more we did that dance, and then, finally, I was out.

 

While I was sitting there I did come up with an idea for a self portrait I might try…if I ever figure out how to do one that doesn’t make me look like I got shot.

 

Enjoy the sunset from the opposite direction of Mt Shasta and Bunny Flats…bizarre how different a 180 makes.

In 1963, when I was 13, I worked over the summer and saved up some money to get a new camera: I had outgrown my Brownie Automatic for sure. ~ View On Black

 

I got a Minolta Hi-Matic 7, 35mm rangefinder. I just knew I was the second incarnation of Henri Cartier-Bresson or WeeGee – I felt like such a “photographer.” I couldn’t wait to use it. I had also gotten a roll of Kodachrome 25 with the camera. It was November and dark out, but I had to try it NOW!

 

I took my dad’s tripod (the one he used with his 8- and 16-mm, windup, Kodak movie cameras) and out I went. The Minolta had a meter built in, and shutter speeds and apertures – everything! - and I shot the whole 24 exposures on “bulb” guesstimating the time in seconds. I think 12 to 15 was my average.

 

I photo’ed buildings around my corner, cars going past, street lights. When the film came back I was amazed. I’d hit the exposures on the head. I don’t know how: beginner’s luck?

 

But what got me were the colors on those slides: the colors of the buildings were cool shadow-blue; the lights in the windows, fire warm-yellow; the head lights and taillights of cars were true white and red; streets lights gave off a greenish cast (they were fluorescent then, not yet sodium- or mercury-vapor). The sky went from reddish to black, the leaves on the trees were blue, green, tinged with red. Skin tones were orange.

 

I didn’t know anything the Kelvin–temps of light or the color temps of color slide film. But I knew I liked the heck out of these results (I hadn’t started cursing yet, so “hell” was out of the question). I couldn’t wait to show my friends.

 

I took my slides down to the photoshop that developed them and asked the old guys (anyone over 25 was an old guy, and anyone with a beard was a beatnik and a real old guy – these guys were both)…..

 

“Wha’d I do? How’d I get this? Wha' happened? This is so cool.”

 

They told me about the color of light, and the meaning of daylight and tungsten film. I was in heaven. I don’t remember their names, but I remember their patience, the smell of pipes and cigars, their smiles and playful-gruff nature… “Oh, so duh’ boy genius has kvestions now, does he, eh?”

 

I had to save up to buy another roll of film, and them save some more for the processing, making me a $5-biweekly-Kodachrome-junkie. But I was in there every other week with my experiments: outdoor film indoors – by window light and fluorescent and incandescent, outdoor film outdoors - at night, with and without flash and flashlight.

 

My fascination with photography had begun in earnest, as well as my fascination with color (when I could afford it).

 

Eventually the people in the neighborhood got used to this little gang of 13/14 year olds – me, Glenn Carter, Fred Yoos and Rick Takeuchi - wandering the streets and alleys at night taking pictures in the dark with flashlights, flashbulbs, car headlights and streetlights.

 

Do you remember: being willing to experiment; being savagely hungry to learn; being the driest of sponges plunged into a bucket of water; in danger of exploding like an overinflated balloon because there were a million things to learn, BUT you KNEW you could learn them all? Marevelous, wasn't it? I think I am still like this, but not quite to that degree. Don’t know if that would be possible, unless they develop a Viagra for the spirit. :-)))

 

I still have a few of those slides and polaroids from that time. They’ve survived although the ‘chromes tend to have that reddish tinge that aging Kodachromes get.

 

Also, I still love taking images made with daylight settings under multiple light sources in the dark. Can you tell? I saw this taking out the garbage: I ran upstairs for the camera and tripod; feeling 13 again.

 

Note: I deeply, deeply appreciate you guys. I’ve found a home with you here on flickr, where I can put up my images, add silly little stories, bare my heart, and no one laughs at me, but along with me. It is an honor, a privilege and a wee bit scary to share with you this later-in-life creative searching. Thank you.

 

266/365.

27th September 2010.

Just messing.

Still got nothing, so you've got me.

 

Edit: This is for ngairenaran....and anyone else who's interested.

 

This can't be a tutorial, because I will probably end up explaining it in such a bad way that no one will get it, but this is how I processed this particular picture....

 

I always shoot in Raw for a start, and I've started shooting in manual. I used to shoot in Aperture priority but I find it much quicker to dial up and down til I get something I like instead of the camera deciding what it thinks I want.

The picture was slightly overexposed and I was stood with a window behind me. The camera settings were f/1.8 1/250s ISO 400 with a 50mm prime lens.

I start by opeing the picture up in Adobe Camera Raw (which it will do automatically if you try to edit a Raw file in any case)...

In ACR I pushed the exposure up a bit, set Fill Light to 100%, Black 100%, Brightness +85, Contrast +100, Clarity +100, Vibrance -100 and Saturation +13.

I then opened it in Photoshop Elements.

All I did there was crop how I wanted it, dodge the highlights in my hair (the light, I don't have actual highlights!) and eyes and burn the shadows in the hair. So it made more of a contrast between the light and dark tones to give me sparkley eyes eg. I do this on a low opacity and build up the effect.

I'm not sure how this works in actual Photoshop but in PSE I open the texture I want to use into PSE then copy and paste it onto the picture. I then made a colours adjustment to that layer (Enhancements/Colour/Adjust Colour) I slightly altered the reds in the midtones, then erased the parts of the texture I didn't want with the eraser tool (which was all but the corners of the texture). In photoshop I think you have to use layer masks and black and white brushes for removing and returning detail.

Next I made an adjustment layer - circle half black half white - and chose photo filters. Opted for green - erased everything but the colour in the eyes and the edges of the picture.

Finally I flattened and saved. And uploaded to Flickr :)

 

Ok, I'll never make a teacher will I? But at least you might get some idea of what I did and how you can do it !!

 

Any questions, just fmail me :)

 

~ Unknown

 

Front Page Explore #11 Thanks to Tracey for the SS.

 

NO INVITES PLEASE.Thanks so much for your visits and also for any comments and faves. I really do appreciate them all heaps. :-)

 

I sometimes get asked asked HOW I DO MY WATER DROP SHOTS and usually f/mail contacts but thought I would post some info here.

 

For today's image I used a sheet of large colored stickers as the background picture for the refraction, set up the yellow daisy in front and positioned the droplet on a petal with a syringe, then adjusted the background sheet (approx 6-8 inches back or whatever, depending on desired result) so I would see the pic in the drop. I use Canon 100mm macro lens with Canon EF25 II extension tube and MANUAL focus to get the biggest, clearest droplet possible.

 

I shoot my droplet shots indoors as it's mostly somewhat breezy or very windy where we are but have good light from large windows! I hope this is helpful!!! It can be a little time consuming, even frustrating to get a drop to a nice shape and stay in place! The droplet has to be positioned to get an unobscured view of the background. In this shot the smiley faces are partly obscured by a petal.

 

I find that using printed matter such as gift wrap, greeting cards with bright clear colors give the clearest refractions, such as this one.

 

I do like to use a flower for a refraction too sometimes and find the brighter color flowers give the clearer refractions. I always use a tripod when shooting water drops and also work with natural light.

 

Here are a couple of links which have great info for water drop refractions.

 

www.flickr.com/photos/cafrine/398459718/in/set-7215759442...

 

www.flickr.com/groups/macroviewers/discuss/72157594313729...

 

Additional note: The image will show upside down in the refraction so I positioned the background smilies sheet upside down so they would show right way up in the refraction.

+Muses Touch | +JoannaOrtynska | Ip | DA | FB | Twitter

 

This time it was not about a witty idea or a funny concept, but about the mood of an image. I love fairytale kind of landscapes, especially in the moonlight. You can imagine how much I love Disney, Pixar and Dreamworks movies with such lighting...which often is with Christmas!:-)

 

This photomanipulation exists out of several 3D house objects, all set up and rendered in photoshop, mixed with my personal photos. Most time went into retouching of the lights, lighting, windows etc.

 

If you are new to 3D in photoshop take these following tips into account:

 

1. Merging 3D objects together lets them inherit the same light for your scene and makes it easier to set up your perspective. You might need to use the move tools to place them correctly as sometimes after merging they can slide into eachother or get spread all over your canvas. Use for that 3d layers in the 3d panel to select the objects and move them.

 

2. 3D panel has layers similar to photoshop layers, where you can individually move the objects to your liking as mentioned in point 1.

 

3. Best is to use .obj files as they often come all textured, compared to .DAE files, that often come blank. When you get more familiar with the tools you can of course texture it yourself, which can give very cool effects.

  

As for retouching/postprocessing:

 

1. Work in 16 bit. This will reduce your posterisation tremendously, avoiding artifacts as it gives you a lot more finetuning levels per RGB channel.

 

2. You do need to flatten the image before you set it to 8 bit again. If you don't flatten the image, Photoshop will convert all layers to 8 bit, process in 8 bit and dither any colors, that it thinks it's getting, wrong. If you do not do this, you lose all benefits of the original 16 bit edit.

 

3. Color conversion before bit depth conversion

 

I love coming across patches of delicate ice formations and this area was along the edge of a very tiny creek in Griffith Woods three days ago, on 10 February 2014. It always seems so wrong if one has to walk over an area like this, destroying all those amazingly formed crystals.

 

Yesterday, after my volunteer shift, I called in at a shopping centre to see if a small computer store was still in existence. A number of years ago, they did such a good job of transferring all the data from one computer to a new one for me. The time to go through all this has again rolled around and I was hoping so much that the same store would be there. I was so relieved to find it and now have to face the nerve-wracking time of getting used to a new machine (with Windows 7, not 8!). My new computer is still in its box (since late December), waiting for the day when I finally get myself sufficiently organized to bring it out, and that day is almost here. Really, really hoping it won't be too difficult to set up and then work out how to use it. Guessing it will be maybe three days or so that I will be without a computer, so when I suddenly "disappear" next week, you will know the reason : )

 

Today, a plumber is coming to install a new kitchen tap and replace a bathroom sink and tap. I had no idea that my bathroom sink was metal and apparently the pipe beneath has completely rusted and is slowly leaking. And to think I thought that all I would need would be three new washers, lol! Shopping for new taps and clearing out the cupboards under both sinks has left me with less time recently, but this will be a good thing done.

A General Plan | Jefferson Memorial, Washington, DC

 

I'm continuing my vertorama project around DC. Two weeks ago, I went to the Jefferson Memorial around sunset. There are never many people at the Jefferson but it only takes one or two to get in the way of such a wide photo like this. I just couldn't find a 2-minute window to get my vertorama. So last weekend I went back at sunrise. This photo was taken about 5 minutes after sunrise (after I'd taken a couple verotramas from other angles). There were a couple people that popped in and out, but for the most part, I had the place to myself.

 

One thing I love about vertoramas is how, once I put it together, I can take time to appreciate the whole scene. I've been to the Jefferson Memorial plenty of times but I never noticed that the spotlights in the ceiling are green and red. I also didn't realize just how cool the dome was until I took a long look at the photo.

 

I think the photo would benefit from a single person in front of the statue (possibly staring up at the statue contemplatively) to give the whole thing a sense of scale. What do you think?

 

This picture is composed of eight sets of 5 images merged to HDR in Photomatix Pro and combined into a vertorama using Photoshop CS4.

 

Follow me on: Twitter | Google+ | Phototourism DC

 

Like what you see?: Buy Prints | Contact Me About Other Uses

A quick update as I'm home for the night before going back to hospital tomorrow.

 

This is the day Little H managed to break his femur (spiral fracture) - about 10 minutes after this shot.

 

He's still in hospital in traction but is doing well and has continued to be astoundingly upbeat even after a few weeks in hospital.

 

A few days in he could see the snow falling outside the window and asked if I could wheel him outside and push the bed down the hill....so he clearly is doing fine.

They are going to try and get him into a cast on Thursday if it does not cause him too much pain and if so we may well get home on christmas eve.

 

In a moment of weakness (still feeling bad for allowing it to happen) I agreed to build him a snow death star in the back garden the next time we get a big dump of snow. I have no Idea how i'm going to manage it but I did promise so i'll have to give it a go...

 

For the ABCs and 123s group pool, *I* is for Interior

***************************************************************************

 

For the "If These Walls Could Talk" Group, I would say this home was one of the larger homes in Belmont, California. It had survived the shocks of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. There were some cracks in the walls to show for it being about 25 miles down the peninsula from San Francisco. I lived there as a little girl in the early 1950s. This was kind of a grown-up looking room for a little girl, big and spacious, and the house had 16 other rooms besides this one. The house was over 50 years old when I lived there about 50 years ago. The walls would speak of the German spy that was hidden in the attic during the war, and of the trap door under the stairs, and the entire room dedicated to ironing, the walk in closet where I had a small children's library. Playing the game of Museum we made up...being afraid to go inside because so much creaked...so I would wait on one of the back porches, holding my dachshund, until my brothers got home from school. I got out earlier than they did. Foolish of me to think of my brothers as security and a way to feel comfortable going inside, but they were what I had to work with, with parents gone to work so much. I can still feel the softness of the pink polished cotton spread. I could tell and will tell eventually, more stories, but the ones I would like to know are the ones before I lived there. Did they drive a coach around the circular drive-way? Why was there a little raised flower bed in the shape of a rowboat? Whose idea to put a buzzer, that could be pressed with one's foot, under the carpet in the dining room? It would ring in the huge pantry and kitchen area, and summon the maid. We didn't any longer have a maid at this time in our lives, but it was fun to press the buzzer and play that we wanted more rolls or dessert or something.

 

I worked on fixing this one up. I flipped it over, because I believe the chair was as you see it here, and not in the BEFORE picture. I have other little tiny stories about my old room that I will type here in awhile.

I would really like if someone could identify which fine art artist did this print above my bed, and the name of the piece, if possible, also. The artwork is why I put this on "ID Please".

Also I put it on "I've Kept it All These years, not because of the room or the furnishings, but because I kept the slide that I made this image with, the one and only known slide of my room when I was a little girl. I have kept through 50 years of many moves, to contiguous states and overseas to Hawaii, and storage and back home and then back again for many moves. I have also kept my love of the color of pastel pink. I guess I sort of knew that technology would catch up with me, and I would be delighted I still had this picture.(scan0005mypinkbedroombelmonttualot)

 

Added more to the story on May 18, 2006

 

Several people have mentioned that I must really love pink. I do indeed. When I was a small child, even before Belmont, we lived for a time in San Francisco. I started out with a pink spread. I am not positive, but it may have been this same one. Then I wanted my headboard painted pink, and my nightstand and a pink lamp, and most of my favorite clothes were pink. I had a dolly with a pink dress. I even had a nickname. I was known as the "Little Pink Lady". I sided toward pastel pink. My folks were interior designers; so they thought the nightstand should be different, and picked a pretty wild raspberry pink for it. From age about five years, I got a few concessions from them, but mostly my room looked how they wanted it to look, and not how I did. Not in Belmont, but in San Francisco, one of my aunts, not my dearly beloved Aunt Dorothy, but one of her 3 sisters, came to live with us for awhile. Do not ask me why I was to share my bed with her, when we had a little guest room, but anyway, she became my roommate. I was a fairly compliant little kid, and I loved her, and she loved me (I thought) so we were pals. She would tease me about kicking her during her sleep, as I was a restless sleeper I guess. She would say I kicked so hard she would call me Maude the Mule. I much preferred to be called the Little Pink Lady. So I called her "The Big Pink Lady" and we giggled over that for years.

Little kids are so naive sometimes. I had no idea she was a drunk. My parents would get calls at bar closing time to come pick her up and she would be doing wild and crazy stuff. You know, on a parking garage, how they have a vertical conveyor belt, sort of one person thing for the attendants to ride up and down to the different parking levels. Well, she thought it would be fun to ride one, and fell off and broke several ribs. I had no idea why she arrived in my room at all hours of the night. She must have smelled of booze, but my parents must have too; so I did not feel offended by any smell. Maybe they didn't want to make a special guest room just for her, because they didn't want her to stay too long. She was gone as quickly as she arrived. What a bizarre deal that was. What grown woman would even want to sleep with a 5 and 6 year old?

 

Statistics for Interestingness Explore added on July 6, 2006

 

3 hours ago:484

11 hours ago:494

35 hours ago:466

2 days ago:498

3 days ago:464

4 days ago:465

5 days ago:480

 

Highest position: 464 on Monday, July 3, 2006

(since we started tracking this statistic on April 19, 2006)

Added this info from Mozill Firefox on August 27, 2006

Highest position: 454 on Friday, July 7, 2006

(since we started tracking this statistic on April 19, 2006)

 

Additional Note: In May 2007 I visited the outside of this home for the first time in close to 50 years. It was kind of melancholy for me to stand directly on the other side of this wall between the two windows, and know that I had lived there. The lady that lived there did not let me inside, but said I could look around outside, and she would lend me the key for the high gates. What a flood of memories, both good and bad, came back.

 

***************************************************************************************************

Tenuous Link: pink furniture

To whom it may concern. I leave tomorrow for Ireland. The details of this year's trip are secret of course, but trust me when i tell you that it will be dangerous. So i am posting a copy of my Last Will in preparation for the unlikely possibility that my enemies penetrate my defenses and somehow overpower me. This would require a force of human or cybernetic soldiers existing well beyond the scope of the worlds wealthiest military entities. So please do not worry, I am writing this because my lawyers are demanding it. My Will is divided into two parts, the first being a list of individuals to whom certain belongings have been awarded, and the second describes the post-mortem procedures I wish to to be performed on my body after careful examination by a qualified physician.

 

If you once found your name honored among the list of disciples, there is no guarantee that it remains. If this is the case i recommend you engage in a serious re-evaluation of your life from the perspective of the wayward child, and seek approbation as soon as I return. If the situation is reversed and you previously went conspicuously unrewarded but now find yourself illuminated among the chosen, then you should know that this reward does not mean I am happy with you. I am, simply put, short of people who are not on my revenge list. I remind you, as always, that this will is little more than a prescient announcement of the collapse of civilization, since the economic and political structures of the world will more than likely implode after the news of my demise is leaked to the public. So in addition to my will, I have provided a short survival guide detailing how to live through and possibly prosper in the impending anarchy. I offer this to you as consolation for your loss... your loss of me.

  

Part 1. Distribution of goods

 

1. The Mediterranean Island Compound. Brendan and Jen. You get the island but not the weapons. You two have never fully committed to my vision of the future and therefore I can not trust you with the arsenal. I also suggest that you avoid the western peninsula, as this is where I keep the genetically enhanced snakes.

 

2. W.M.D.'s I had given these to Brian, but now I think Marty might better be suited for this. He will more than likely forget about them and consequently they will not be used. The secret storehouse will be mine when I return.*

 

3. Videos of me cage fighting. These were lynda's, but now they go to Orange and K8. Shirtless, sweaty and mercilessly hot.

 

4. What is left of my sperm/genetic documentation. This information was to be donated to the insurrectionist rebel movement know as "The Fist of Democracy", who were going to use the data to create the perfect warrior. But now I think i will have it cloned and donated to sperm banks across the country in such prodigious numbers as to statistically outnumber any other potential father 200 to 1. The people of the world will need as much of me as they can get.

 

5. The computer map of the neuro-pathways of my brain. My lawyers engaged in a lengthy battle with the US military to regain control of this complicated Bio-software. It would be a waste to give it to any of you. I demand that this model be plugged into a computer and powered indefinitely. You may refer to it when in need of answers about life, strategic operations, or connect four.

 

6. My surfboard. Ben you asked for this. The caveat is that you may never ride it. In fact, I demand that you never even learn to surf.

 

7. Brian and suzette, As an engagement present, I am transferring ownership of my diamond mine to you both. The only problem is, it is currently staffed with slave children stolen from nearby villages so this is kind of like leaving 1,500 starving, overworked babies on your doorstep.

 

8. Albert and Juliet, You have both entered my life with the speed and fury of a level three, pandemic tropical disease. The resultant social dependence dictates that I offer you a place in the council of my future reign*. This will of course require that you are both frozen. I have alerted my Cryonics division, and on your respective 30th birthdays' you will be forcefully put to sleep.

 

8. Erin. You get my nanotechnology lab in silicon valley. I predict that you will squander the massive profits acquired from this resource. You are bad with money. Therefore all money will be placed into a trust fund. You will not be able to access this money until you have given birth to three male children. After the birth of your third son, who must be named William you may receive it in full. The choice in fathers is left to your questionable judgment.

 

9. Aieghdeigkna. I have something for you this time. I got you a pocket Chinese translator. Actually, he is less pocket sized than you might like since he is now 13. His name is Ling. Feed him well.

 

10. Tom. You get the videotapes of my old truck sitting on the street. This is my most prized possession.

 

11. Meredith: you are now the owner of my bedding design factory in SE Asia. We have a lab there filled with tiny beds in which tiny monkeys sleep to test our new products.

 

12. Trevor mcnaab. Fuck off... I will strike at you even from the grave..

 

13. Jennifer H. You get the robot guarded penthouse on Central park west. The robots have been programmed to kill you on site. They are armed with weapons such as, laser beam eyes, machine gun arms, and the ability to crush and stop your useless future right out of metaphysical existence. good luck.

 

14. Michelle, as a wedding present to you and Murat I give you the Atlantic undersea base. We have had some trouble lately with our hyper intelligent dolphins so you will have a bit of cleanup work to do once you take it over. My scientists have been telling me that the dolphins won't do any work without listening to Tina Turner.

 

15. Neinke, You still get southern Europe. I never really liked it anyway. Just check in at the Hague to collect. Oh yeah, they may "resist" at first so see #2 above. I'm sure Marty will let you borrow them.

 

16. Bryson, I have been developing a secret weapon. The weapon is designed to pull the moon closer to the earth. Earth's gravity will eventually kick in and the two planetary bodies will collide. This information was of course something I hoped would never reach the public. In fact I kind of regret building it in the first place but I was out late one night and when i got home I was sort of drunk and I guess it seemed like a good idea at the time, sooo... anyway, it's yours.

 

19. Steph, You are going to be with me on this trip so it is likely that if someone tries to kill me, I will have used your body as a shield. I therefore can not envision a situation in which you will be alive if I am dead, so I am not leaving you anything.

 

20. Corrina, You are given the apartment. You earned it. You must however seal off my room, curate it and once a year allow visitors in for a modest price.

 

18. The cadre of assassins is yours Damian. After all, you helped me train them. I can think of no one I trust them with more than you. I would ask one favor though. Please kill Trevor with them. Oh and just in case please kill Brian Ferrier as well. Thanks buddy.

 

19. Eric, We share the same birthday. In many ways we are very similar. This has forced me as i am sure it has you, to question life from the standpoint of astrology, genetics, behaviorism, sociology, psychology etc. etc. These analysis's are done in search of an answer for why we are so much alike. We are both architects, we both see the world as contemplative outsiders and we are the two greatest dancers in the world. It is for this reason that i demand we share the same death day. You have little time (if any) before they find you, better start running.

 

20. Mike Wrobel, Jon, and the rest of the "Demons of North" , You get my motorcycle. If at all possible, could you please MAKE IT FUCKING WORK! If you can't I demand that it be set on fire and pushed into the east river because I am pretty sure that it will be more useful down there than it is up here.

 

21. Kielty. You are given rights to the autobiography I paid someone to write for me.

 

22. Maureen. You get the Monster truck factory.

 

23. Ellen and Ute, you are both given architecture. All of it. From every basswood model to every non-cementatious epoxy based exterior panel slab. It is all yours, but I should warn you that it doesn't do anyone any actual good no matter how many late nights you waste on it.

 

24. Pinky, you get my hotel/internet dogfood empire. It is a rough combo.

 

24.5 Andy, my collection of priceless gems is yours. You must first solve a puzzle though. Please be at Union square at exactly 3:40 on January 31st 2008 under the statue of General Marquis de Lafayette to receive your first clue. Bring a change of underwear and whatever weapons you have.

 

25. There is a note written at the bottom which should be mailed to the president of the United States upon official statement of my death given by a qualified physician. Please send it for me.

 

26. Mom, Dad, Brianna, Virginia, James, Bwendan, Patrick... fuck it

the whole Oberlin, Dowd, Koneche, Goggin, Reilley, Gallagher, Jarabak, Cligget,

Pattersonian Tribe. As a special gift to you, just for having been born with even a shadowy resemblance to my messianic genetic coding, I offer you a seat in my future ruling council.*

(You must of course arrange and pay for your own Cryogenic storage.)

Anyone who makes it back will also be given a free yogurt.

 

To everyone else. As stated above, I offer you the knowledge that your civilizations will probably collapse shortly after they learn of my demise and therefore in the ensuing chaos, my possessions will not be of great importance to those who have received them. Please see the survival guide below.. I look forward to my awakening.

 

* See below funeral procedures explaining all matters relating to future reign.

 

Part 2. Funeral and Interment procedures

 

It is my wish that the physical manifestation of my self (ie. my body) undergo the following series of ceremonial and medical procedures after an official statement of death given by a qualified physician.

 

If I am proven dead.

1. Please carefully remove my brain. Please carefully reinsert my brain into a robot. Make sure the robot is designed with extremely powerful weapons and make sure that I am VERY relaxed at the time of insertion. (we all know what happens when the brain wakes up in the new robot body and in a fit of anxiety kills the room full of doctors.) Monitor my behavior for any signs of abnormality and then leave me alone so i can get down to business. It might be a good idea not to load the weapons until this point. Just as a precaution.

 

2. It is my wish that the liquid in my body be removed and replaced

with a gelatinous nitrogen mixture capable maintaining it's non-Newtonian, solid state at temperatures well below freezing. I then would very much appreciate being frozen. This is of course only after my brain has been removed and inserted into the Robot-Death-Machine (ummm. don't call it that publicly) described above.

 

3. After my rule is sufficiently established, a minimum of 100 years of tyranny (again please keep these descriptions to yourselves) I probably will want a body again. Since I really haven't seen anyone on this earth as strikingly handsome as myself, I will most likely want my own. Hence the freezing.

 

That is it. I do not expect much. I do expect swift and zealous obedience. Remember loyalty purchases reward. Hopefully none of this will be necessary yet but you never know. Have a good week.

 

William Oberlin

   

Letter to the president.

 

Dear mr president,

You are a puppet. Yes, sorry to have to tell it to you this way, but

you are nothing more than a figurehead who's policies and actions are the inevitable result of 60 years of armament build-up. When I return from the grave and peacefully rise to power, I look forward to sitting in your seat. Actually with my new robot body (you will see) I might have to install a much larger seat. In fact the white house of my rule will look slightly less neo-classical. The new architecture will have more of a shiny, stay-the-fuck-away, feel to it. Windows won't really be needed. All light will come from the fiber-optic treated exterior skin used to photo-voltaically power the hydrogen fuel cells and simultaneously light the sleek sexy interiors. These interiors will be occupied by models; beautiful ones in lingerie because I will have no need for a staff of weak-minded humans. My current brain, which is far superior to yours, will be augmented with state of the art processors upgraded weekly and funded with 1/3 of the world's countries' taxes. It will connected to a global network devoted to operating

the mechanical, electrical. political, and economic infrastructure of every city and suburb in the world. This will eliminate the need for a bureaucracy since I will run the entire planet myself, hence the models. They will be hot, mr. president. You are welcome to come visit occasionally. You can eat your puny-human foods, like egg sandwiches on a roll with cheese and sausage. You can have any delicious beverage you choose, it will be prepared by one of my beautiful sexy models!! We can discuss how similar my reign of terror is to your presidency, and if you get tired you can shut your brain down to take a nap while I communicate with the human colony on Z-Beta-Prime. So that is it. Hope to see you soon. The doctors will need to get me up and running quickly.

    

Survival Guide.

Ok, So if you are reading this then the world as you know it has ceased to function in a recognizable fashion. This could mean that your government has collapsed and the streets are occupied by mobs of shiv wielding looters. Or that the military, in response to what will have been referred to (i love to use pluperfect tense) as the greatest power vacuum in human history, has mobilized a coup. But whatever the case, it is certain that by now you have already killed your neighbor in an act of heroic self preservation. That's one down, 7 billion to go, because in your new world the only way to survive is to be the last one standing. This simple guide will provide the techniques and strategies that will keep you one step ahead of your post-apocalyptic competitors.

 

step one: mapping out your future.

there are two possible ways to survive in this new world and neither of them are pretty, but you will have to very quickly make your choice. You can either take a sedentary and consequently defensive approach, establishing a semi-permanent water source and agricultural life, or you can become a nomad scavenging, attacking and foraging whatever you come across. There are advantages and disadvantages to both.

The sedentary approach, if employed successfully, will allow you to lead a life of moderate comfort while the nomadic system offers you the opportunity to plunder which is equally important. Below are some simple rules to the establishment of both.

  

Sedentary Life Model

1. Do not wait for the dust of the apocalypse to clear before you join or start a settlement of humans. it is unadvisable to live in a fixed location outside the protection of a tribe or band. Those stationary few who shun the sheltered settlements in favor of isolation, will probably be forced to watch their families die at the hands of wandering raiding parties. This is usually just before being left for dead in a nuclear wasteland (if you are part of the raiding party, It should be noted that the people you leave alive tend to survive and seek revenge so be thorough and just kill them). Therefore, quickly seek out other survivors for defense and, if you have the courage, establish your role as leader.

2. Gather healthy people and valuables quickly. The strength of a society is dependant on the strength of it's citizens. Leave the old, sick, weak and injured behind. don't hesitate to remove their food, clothing and useful items as you do so. If they resist, kill them. In your world of violent resource acquisition young men and women between the ages of 16 and 30 are critical for the establishment of a well defended civilization. In the beginning these men and women will be used as farmers, builders and laborers as well as your fighting force. But soon, as your numbers grow, you will want to establish a professional military fed by the labor of the civilians. Never let this military forget who is in control. It is advised that you kill some of them in hand to hand combat duels about once a month just as a reminder.

3. Find a scientist. This can not be stressed enough. You will need a brain to your organizational brawn. In fact, find as many as possible but let us clarify the term scientist. We are not looking for meteorologists, microbiologists, agronomists, ethologists, cytologists sociologist, ect. Nor are we seeking any academic fields dependant on technologically expensive equipment. We need scientists of a practical nature. Like physicists, chemists, geologists, epidemiologists and this is the big one here, doctors, doctors, doctors. holy shit are these guys going to be cooler than they ever thought possible. You should keep them protected, give them immunity from your heavy handed legal system, shelter them and provide them with as much sex as they can handle. Their children will probably be just as valuable as they are.

4. Laws. step one, kill the lawyers, they will wrestle your newly acquired power away from you the first chance they get. Step two. establish a fighting arena to settle internal disputes because justice is best served at the hands of the individuals. Step three. establish a police force. Step four, remember that it is good to kill the troublemakers before they reach maturity. At the first sign of insurrection kill the troublemakers and his/her family. Kids love to grow up seeking revenge so don't give them the opportunity.

5. Stronghold. stronghold. stronghold. You need to keep your people and your food protected from your enemies. Caves are a good natural defense structure. If you don't have caves build walls. anyone who knows how to build, has a duty to work on your stronghold and palace ASAP. those who resist should quickly find themselves subjugated to waste management duty or thrown outside the protection of the camp.

6. Escape route. ALWAYS have a back-up plan. keep a hidden stash of food, weapons and clothing in a well fortified location far away from your settlement. If possible store enough provision to supply the minimum number of people you will need for a fresh start. If and when you are attacked and overrun take your best officers and their families with you to the new secret base. If necessary, use the lives of those subjects about whom you do not care as barter for your escape. Just make sure your conquerors don't follow.

 

Additional tips and helpful hints for the sedentary survivors.

try to keep as many skulls and disarticulated corpse parts staked or mounted around the perimeter of your encampment. This intimidates both the advancing raiding parties as well as any who might try to escape. Remember, signs and other nonverbal communication techniques might not work since few will know how to read. Since they won't be of much use to you, I suggest using the graphic designers of this world as your corpses.

Don't be too greedy. This applies to all levels of your life. Your new subjects might not appreciate your rule if they feel like you are going to swoop in any second and take their food or their women.

For some reason, children are relatively important to their parents, so try not to hurt them if possible, it breeds dissention.

 

Nomadic Life Model

 

The nomad is a hearty and healthy individual who has shunned the comforts of daily life in exchange for mobility and efficiency of resource collection. The nomad's life is an equation in search or balance. It is quite literally, an economy of means. One must travel light between water and food sources but never so light as to run short of supplies. The company of others is critical for survival, but never let your band expand large enough to outgrow your foraging intake. The successful nomad is constantly aware of his/her environment and never questions or challenges nature's wrath. The lack of shelter and protection from the elements is the Nomad's greatest enemy and the fight against this can only be fought with knowledge of your terrain. Use the rules below to help establish a working band of nomadic forgers.

 

1. Since this world will most likely be a barren wasteland of infertile soil, The foraging of the future will be based largely, if not exclusively, on the destruction of established settlements and the subsequent stripping of what few crops and storehouses they have. This will mean your foraging band (war party) will need to be fierce enough to attack and destabilize whatever strongholds you encounter. You will also require some method of transporting your spoils.

2. Find a vehicle. Even better than vehicles are pack animals. They provide companionship, Do not require gasoline or combustible fuel, and they can be used as an emergency food source.

 

3. Gather strong and healthy people to your group. Keep in mind that for every person you pick up you will need to acquire an equal amount in provisions during the raids. This can be a problem unless you have some resource wealthy targets within striking distance. At every conquered settlement it is advised to conscript new warriors from the young if needed.

 

4. Do not keep a fixed position for too long. Once you overrun a fortification, stay as long as it takes to re-supply and recoup from your attack then pack up and leave. Don't forget to arm yourself with as many weapons as are available. If you linger, you are open to retaliation from satellite camps, scavengers looking to capitalize on your work, and worse, rebellion from the conquered. Since it is not good to leave angry victims in your flank, you should kill anyone who might cause trouble before you advance.

 

5. Establish a code of law. Don't get too fancy here. Just pick some catch phrase that can be shouted by the masses but still allows sufficient room for your subjective interpretation. Just so the people know who is in charge make sure to slap your name on it. Something like "williams code, . An enemy of your brother is your enemy too. b. Stealing from your brother is stealing from the people! " Something like that. keep it simple. remember, there is no prison when you are on the move and resources are too scarce to justify mercy. Therefore, the penalty for all indiscretions should be death.

 

Additional tips:

Get a harem, you need to procreate prolifically.

Never miss an opportunity to attack. This is true even if you are outnumbered. Your enemies need to fear you more than you need your warriors.

Send the heads of your victims on a cart or a wagon to your next target just to let them know you're coming.

 

So that should do it. I recommend you keep this guide on you at all times during my trip because if something does go wrong and I don't make it, this may very well be the only possession you have left.

this is for all my friends in the northeast and also for those who are still in the throes of winter. i hope you're all keeping safe and warm. spring will soon be here.

 

after being bed-bound with the flu i was itching to take some pictures the other day but, alas, it was drizzly and cold. so i thought i'd do some "still life" vignettes instead. this is not a studio shot. i don't have a studio. not flash photography either. i don't know how to use my flash that well - hehe. i depended entirely on ambient lighting which was coming from the windows behind me. added my own subtle textures.

 

LARGE IS BETTER

Canon EOS 6D - f/8 - 1/60sec - 100mm - ISO 200

 

Explanation: I microwaved this CD in the name of Science, uhhh..... in the name of a Macro Mondays challenge ;)

 

- Microwaving a CD or compact disc produces plasma and a firework-like display of sparks.

The CD ends up with an interesting burned pattern. As you might imagine, you'll never be able to hear the music or read the data ever again!

 

It's easy to microwave a CD, but there's a chance of ruining your microwave or harming your health.

Here's how to microwave a CD safely.

 

- 1. Choose a CD that you don't mind ruining. You'll never be able to play it again after microwaving the CD.

 

- 2. Prop the CD up against a glass of water or damp paper towel. Do not place the CD against a metal object. It's not a great plan to run your microwave with nothing in it except the CD.

 

- 3. Close the microwave door and nuke the CD for about 5 seconds. Be prepared to stop the microwave when the CD starts smoking. These fumes are unhealthy when inhaled. A well-aired room beforehand, such as an open window near the oven, will help eliminate the smoke effectively.You'll see a glow and sparks almost as soon as your turn on the microwave.

 

- 4. Allow the CD to cool before removing it. The heated metal and plastic is hot and can burn you.

Avoid inhaling vapors from the microwaved CD. Melted plastic produces toxins. Similarly, vaporized aluminum isn't good for you.

 

- 5. Discard the CD and wipe down the microwave.

 

You'll certainly ruin the CD in the name of science ;-), but you should be aware you may ruin your microwave also.

There is a risk that a stray spark might damage the mechanism of the microwave. This will not be covered by the manufacturer warranty. You can minimize the risk to your microwave by using the minimum time you need to see the effect.

   

Fountains Abbey is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. It is located three miles south-west of Ripon in North Yorkshire, near to the village of Aldfield. Founded in 1132, the abbey operated for over 400 years, until 1539, when Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The abbey is a Grade I listed building owned by the National Trust and part of the designated Studley Royal Park including the Ruins of Fountains Abbey UNESCO World Heritage Site.

After a dispute and riot in 1132 at the Benedictine house of St Mary's Abbey, in York, 13 monks were expelled (among them Saint Robert of Newminster) and, after unsuccessfully attempting to return to the early 6th-century Rule of St Benedict, were taken into the protection of Thurstan, Archbishop of York. He provided them with land in the valley of the River Skell, a tributary of the Ure. The enclosed valley had all the natural features needed for the creation of a monastery, providing shelter from the weather, stone and timber for building, and a supply of running water. After enduring a harsh winter in 1133, the monks applied to join the Cistercian order and in 1135 became the second house of that order in northern England, after Rievaulx. The monks subjected themselves to Clairvaux Abbey, in Burgundy which was under the rule of St Bernard. Under the guidance of Geoffrey of Ainai, a monk sent from Clairvaux, the group learned how to celebrate the seven Canonical Hours and were shown how to construct wooden buildings in accordance with Cistercian practice.

After Henry Murdac was elected to the abbacy in 1143, the small stone church and timber claustral buildings were replaced. Within three years, an aisled nave had been added to the stone church, and the first permanent claustral buildings built in stone and roofed in tile had been completed.

In 1146 an angry mob, displeased with Murdac's role in opposing the election of William FitzHerbert to the archbishopric of York, attacked the abbey and burnt down all but the church and some surrounding buildings. The community recovered swiftly from the attack and founded four daughter houses. Henry Murdac resigned the abbacy in 1147 to become the Archbishop of York and was replaced first by Maurice, Abbot of Rievaulx then, on the resignation of Maurice, by Thorald. Thorald was forced by Henry Murdac to resign after two years in office. The next abbot, Richard, held the post until his death in 1170 and restored the abbey's stability and prosperity. In 20 years as abbot, he supervised a huge building programme which involved completing repairs to the damaged church and building more accommodation for the increasing number of recruits. Only the chapter house was completed before he died and the work was ably continued by his successor, Robert of Pipewell, under whose rule the abbey gained a reputation for caring for the needy.

The next abbot was William who presided over the abbey from 1180 to 1190 and he was succeeded by Ralph Haget, who had entered Fountains at the age of 30 as a novice, after pursuing a military career. During the European famine of 1194, Haget ordered the construction of shelters in the vicinity of the abbey and provided daily food rations to the poor enhancing the abbey's reputation for caring for the poor and attracting more grants from wealthy benefactors.

In the first half of the 13th century Fountains increased in reputation and prosperity under the next three abbots, John of York (1203–1211), John of Hessle (1211–1220) and John of Kent (1220–1247). They were burdened with an inordinate amount of administrative duties and increasing demands for money in taxation and levies, but managed to complete another massive expansion of the abbey's buildings. This included enlarging the church and building an infirmary. In the second half of the 13th century the abbey was in more straitened circumstances. It was presided over by eleven abbots, and became financially unstable largely due to forward selling its wool crop, and the abbey was criticised for its dire material and physical state when it was visited by Archbishop John Romeyn in 1294. The run of disasters that befell the community continued into the early 14th century when northern England was invaded by the Scots and there were further demands for taxes. The culmination of these misfortunes was the Black Death of 1349–1349. The loss of manpower and income due to the ravages of the plague was almost ruinous.

A further complication arose as a result of the Papal Schism of 1378–1409. Fountains Abbey along with other English Cistercian houses was told to break off any contact with the mother house of Citeaux, which supported a rival pope. This resulted in the abbots forming their own chapter to rule the order in England and consequently they became increasingly involved in internecine politics. In 1410, following the death of Abbott Burley of Fountains, the community was riven by several years of turmoil over the election of his successor. Contending candidates John Ripon, Abbot of Meaux, and Roger Frank, a monk of Fountains were locked in discord until 1415 when Ripon was finally appointed and presided until his death in 1434. Under abbots John Greenwell (1442–1471), Thomas Swinton (1471–8), John Darnton (1478–95), who undertook some much needed restoration of the fabric of the abbey including notable work on the church, and Marmaduke Huby (1495–1526) Fountains regained stability and prosperity.

When Marmaduke Huby died he was succeeded by William Thirsk who was accused by the royal commissioners of immorality and inadequacy and dismissed from the abbacy and replaced by Marmaduke Bradley, a monk of the abbey who had reported Thirsk's supposed offences, testified against him and offered the authorities six hundred marks for the abbacy. In 1539 Bradley surrendered the abbey when Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

Interior of the abbey church looking down the nave

The abbey precinct covered 70 acres surrounded by an 11foot wall built in the 13th century, some parts of which are still visible to the south and west of the abbey. The area consists of three concentric zones cut by the River Skell flowing from west to east across the site. The church and claustral buildings stand at the centre of the precinct north of the Skell, the inner court containing the domestic buildings stretches down to the river and the outer court housing the industrial and agricultural buildings lies on the river's south bank. The early abbey buildings were added to and altered over time, causing deviations from the strict Cistercian type. Outside the walls were the abbey's granges.

The original abbey church was built of wood and "was probably" two-stories high; it was, however, quickly replaced in stone. The church was damaged in the attack on the abbey in 1146 and was rebuilt, in a larger scale, on the same site. Building work was completed c.1170. This structure, completed around 1170, was 300 foot long and had 11 bays in the side aisles. A lantern tower was added at the crossing of the church in the late 12th century. The presbytery at the eastern end of the church was much altered in the 13th century. The church's greatly lengthened choir, commenced by Abbot John of York, 1203–11, and carried on by his successor terminates, like that of Durham Cathedral, in an eastern transept, the work of Abbot John of Kent, 1220–47. The 160-foot (49 m) tall tower, which was added not long before the dissolution, by Abbot Huby, 1494–1526, is in an unusual position at the northern end of the north transept and bears Huby's motto 'Soli Deo Honor et Gloria'. The sacristry adjoined the south transept.

The cloister, which had arcading of black marble from Nidderdale and white sandstone, is in the centre of the precinct and to the south of the church. The three-aisled chapter-house and parlour open from the eastern walk of the cloister and the refectory, with the kitchen and buttery attached, are at right angles to its southern walk. Parallel with the western walk is an immense vaulted substructure serving as cellars and store-rooms, which supported the dormitory of the conversi (lay brothers) above. This building extended across the river and, at its south-west corner, were the latrines, which were built above the swiftly flowing stream. The monks' dormitory was in its usual position above the chapter-house, to the south of the transept. Peculiarities of this arrangement include the position of the kitchen, between the refectory and calefactory, and of the infirmary above the river to the west, adjoining the guest-houses.

The abbot's house, one of the largest in all of England, is located to the east of the latrine block, where portions of it are suspended on arches over the River Skell. It was built in the mid-twelfth-century as a modest single-storey structure, then, from the fourteenth-century, underwent extensive expansion and remodelling to end up in the 16th century as a grand dwelling with fine bay windows and grand fireplaces. The great hall was an expansive room 171 by 69 feet.

Among other apartments were a domestic oratory or chapel, 46 by 23 feet and a kitchen, 50 by 38 feet.

The Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 was a factor that led to a downturn in the prosperity of the abbey in the early fourteenth century. Areas of the north of England as far south as York were looted by the Scots. Then the number of lay-brothers being recruited to the order reduced considerably. The abbey chose to take advantage of the relaxation of the edict on leasing property that had been enacted by the General Chapter of the order in 1208 and leased some of their properties. Others were staffed by hired labour and remained in hand under the supervision of bailiffs. In 1535 Fountains had an interest in 138mills and the total taxable income of the Fountains estate was £1,115, making it the richest Cistercian monastery in England.

The Abbey buildings and over 500 acres of land were sold by the Crown, on 1 October 1540, to Sir Richard Gresham, the London merchant, father of the founder of the Royal Exchange, Sir Thomas Gresham. Gresham sold some of the fabric of the site, stone, timber, lead, as building materials to help to defray the cost of purchase. The site was acquired in 1597 by Sir Stephen Proctor, who used stone from the monastic complex to build Fountains Hall. Between 1627 and 1767 the estate was owned by the Messenger family who sold it to William Aislaby, who was responsible for combining it with the Studley Royal Estate. The archaeological excavation of the site was begun under the supervision of John Richard Walbran, a Ripon antiquary who, in 1846, had published a paper on the Necessity of clearing out the Conventual Church of Fountains. In 1966 the Abbey was placed in the guardianship of the Department of the Environment and the estate was purchased by the West Riding County Council who transferred ownership to the North Yorkshire County Council in 1974. The National Trust bought the 674 acre Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal estate from North Yorkshire County Council in 1983.

In 1986 the parkland in which the abbey is situated and the abbey was designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

It is currently owned by the National Trust and maintained by English Heritage. The trust owns Studley Royal Park, Fountains Hall, to which there is partial public access, and St Mary's Church, designed by William Burges and built around 1873, all of which are significant features of the World Heritage Site. The Porter's Lodge, which was once the gatehouse to the abbey, houses a modern exhibition area with displays about the history of Fountains Abbey and how the monks lived.

In January 2010, Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal became two of the first National Trust properties to be included in Google Street View, using the Google Trike.

 

See BIG on BlackMagic

 

How about some acoustic Punk Rock: Against Me! - Jordan's First Choice right click and open in new window/tab

 

INVITES ARE GREAT, BUT PLEASE IN MODERATION

 

All my public photos are free for personal use

Creative Commons license

View On Black

 

So I'm doing laundry... loads of it... I've done about 7 or 8, so far. And I look across the room and see my tripod. The light... not so bad. My camera begging to be used. I must shoot, but how? The kids are running around, coming in unexpectedly in and out of my bedroom where I'm folding. My son is going out the backdoor testing out his new Air-soft gun... an early birthday present. I really don't want him to see me through the window... he already teases me enough about my other self portraits.

 

I hear my husband, who works at home, milling around. While he supports my camera habit, he doesn't quite get it. I don't quite get it, but I'm propelled. He walks in and is turned on by sight of me doing housework, but a cacophony of hollering reminds us that we are not alone.

 

My husband leaves for some afternoon coffee. The kids sound occupied. My son is now studying the manual. I finally have my moment.... no time to lose.

 

The dead batteries have not been replaced in my remote, so I have get up and down off the floor hoping that my face is in focus. I'm working up a sweat. After several trial and errors, I think I get at least one useable image.

 

I must resist the urge to process the image right away. Another load is folded. An argument between the girls is refereed. My husbands opens the door, says something and leaves again to his office. I comfort the little one.

 

And now... I can see I have something. Out of all of them, I see one, maybe two. I make a mental note to get batteries. SOOC or process? Several versions of the same image are made. I weigh the merits of each. Finally I see one that... satisfies.

I would like to thank all of you for the many compliments and awards received on my last post (High Sierra Sunrise); thank you so much.

For this picture I used the same editing techniques as I did with my last post. Reading through it; you may think it’s a lot of procedures and work, but the flow and editing is fairly easy. Lightroom, Nik Collection and Photmatix, all have great tutorials. The learning curve is much faster and easier than Photoshop.

Now for the title (Waiting); I was waiting for the sunrise to come over the mountain ridge. But, with many of my titles it symbolizes a message, which I hope will resonate with the reader. Waiting also symbolizes the long struggle we Targets have in making social and legal changes.

I seldom speak of my health issues, but I want you to understand the inhumane depth that the perpetrators involved in Gang Stalking, Community Based Stalking and Workplace Mobbing will lower themselves to. I’ve mentioned in previous post that that my coworkers were told to blow cigarette smoke in my face and to expose it to me, as often as possible. This has been going on for years, not just from coworkers, but also many of the other residents in Yosemite National Park. What I didn’t tell you was that I had cancer; colon cancer. I had a large tumor removed and a section of my colon removed on June 3rd. While recovering from this major surgery; I had people throughout the park, setting up to expose me to their cigarette smoke. While trying to rest, sleep and recover; my neighbors would slam their doors, stomp on the floor in the hallway, cough loudly right outside my door, slam trash and recycle container lids, pull trucks right outside my window and honk their horn. These are just a few example of the tactics what these parasites are capable of and how morally inept they truly are.

I tell you this not for empathy, I’m doing fine and bounce back quickly. I tell you this because I want you to truly understand how sick and twisted these people are. I tell you this because I want you to know how these groups psychologically and emotionally harass their Targets. I tell you this because I don’t want my daughter exposed to this, your children exposed to this.

Recently Facebook reviled that they were performing Social Experiments with its members. They wanted to know if they could affect the emotional state of its members. Many people have become outraged and they should be. This has been going on for decades by many organizations. Also recently, the Veterans Administration has come under fire. For years their administrators thought they were above reproach. Whistleblowers were retaliated against; many that wanted to speak out were intimidated to be quiet. It finally caught up with them; administrators’ and many top officials fired.

There will come a day when the acts of these people and the ones that cover up for them, will be exposed for their involvement in Gang Stalking, Community Based Stalking and Workplace Mobbing.

Help us bring Social Change through Photography; bring awareness and stop Gang Stalking, Community Based Stalking and Workplace Mobbing. We are trying to make these changes one community at a time. So, here is a contact page for Yosemite National Park: www.nps.gov/yose/contacts.htm. Once on this page; click on ask a question or make a comment. This is your National Park please take the time to contact them; tell them to put a stop to Gang Stalking, Community Based Stalking and Workplace Mobbing.

These immoral and illegal acts are allowed in Yosemite National Park by Law Enforcement, encouraged and performed by its Contractors. Thank you for taking the time to visit my photostream.

 

Arches is a great little National Park to photograph. Unlike Yellowstone, which requires hundred of miles of driving, Arches is a manageable park with most of the classic sites within reach of parking your car.

 

Photographing Arches is also made very pleasant since nearby is the handy gateway town of Moab, Utah. This also makes it a great base to photograph nearby Canyonlands National Park and Dead Horse Point State Park.

 

Some photo and travel tips regarding my trip to Arches National Park and vicinity:

 

Think small: Fly into a smaller regional airport. Rather than flying into a big airport hub like Salt Lake City and driving five hours to get to Moab, I flew into Grand Junction, Colorado and drove an hour and half along a scenic highway to get to my destination. In addition, the much smaller regional airports are a breeze for travelers as opposed to the behemoth airports that require miles of walking and tons of headaches.

 

Get an alarm clock: Many people have e-mailed me asking how I get such brilliant colors in my photographs. Get up early and stay out late to photograph at sunrise and sunset when nature's light returns the favor of your early rising with deep saturated colors.

 

Read before you see: Before I even click my shutter button I do extensive research of the places I photograph. I read guidebooks, magazines and photo website forums for advice on the best shot locations. Also, I'll read books that feature my trip destination to give me a better appreciation of the places I'll discover. For example, for my trip to Savannah, GA I read John Berendt's "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil." For this trip I read the classic, "Desert Solitaire: A Season In the Wilderness," by Edward Abbey.

 

Rock Steady: To get those super sharp photos you'll need a tripod. I travel with a very lightweight carbon fiber tripod that is small enough to fit into my carry on luggage. Good landscape photography requires shooting in weak light (sunrise and sunset) and small apertures. Canon "L" lenses will deliver some great shots for you but if your camera isn't steady you will get blurry photos. Invest in a good tripod before you invest in quality lenses.

 

Seek Inspiration to be Inspired: In downtown Moab, UT you can visit Tom Till's photography gallery. Yes, you can duplicate his classic shots but this will inspire you to search deeper to find your own "classics" while improving your photography skills.

 

What a Bargain: Invest in a National Park Pass. If you want to meet Europeans there is no need to go to Europe just visit your local National Park. I have met many more Europeans than Americans in the many National Parks I have visited. There's a reason why so many foreign travelers visit our parks because the wondrous beauty of our national treasures are unparalleled. Visit our National Parks before some of our national treasures are gone.

 

This is a sunrise shot of Turret Arch looking through the North Window. Get here early to catch a spectacular light show. In the Windows section of the park take the trail toward the North Window and hike right under it until you see a trail that you can scramble up on to get to a ledge. From here you can shoot the classic photo that you see above. That little white speck you see on the upper left hand side is the moon.

 

Be a Traveler not a Tourist!

 

Equipment used:

Canon EOS 5D ,Tamron SP AF 17-35mm f/2.8-4 Di LD IF

 

Happy Travels!

 

Text and photo copyright by :copyright:Sam Antonio Photography

 

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I finally got out. It took a cleverly disguised family vacation to get me out…but I did it. Seriously though, the photography portion was bonus, the vacation was for my family who despite my best efforts continues to love, support, and put up with me and my $*** through it all. I’m gone a lot, and this was really a great chance for us to get out and spend some quality time together in the confines of a luxury cruise ship run by mice….well, one mouse in particular his name is Mickey.

 

I don’t care how old you are that mouse knows how to throw down a good time. The Disney empire has built its reputation on providing entertainment for families, and they certainly didn’t disappoint on their latest cruise ship, ‘The Dream’

 

I’ve never been on a cruise of any kind before, unless sleeping outside, freezing in the cold on top of a life preserver storage device while sailing to the Greek Islands counts. I went into this cruise with no expectations. My only goal was that I would be allowed to eat as much food as I could stuff in my face whenever I felt like it. That goal was met, and exceeded. There was food everywhere, and they always brought me more when I asked. The first night I slammed 3 dinners along with the starters, salad/soup, and desserts. I spent a good portion of my trip working on what I affectionately call ‘my cruise chub’

 

The food alone was worth the whole thing in my opinion. However there was much more to do. They have an on board water-coaster which was incredibly fun, and occupied the majority of our time between dinner and our nightly show. That ‘tweener’ time was perfect as the first and second dinner and first and second show times were switching and the rides and pools were virtually empty for about 40 minutes. When there are over 1,200 kids on a boat, the lines and crowds in the pools can get quite extreme. It was nice to have that little window of quiet time where just the boys and I could ride the slide and not have to wait an hour in line.

There were plenty of things on the boat for the kids to do, which was great. The wife and I could check them into a club, and leave them there as long as we wanted. Until 1am if we desired.

 

Unlike most of the Disney Empire, the cruise ships actually cater more to adults. This boat had 5 or 6 bars that were reserved strictly for adults. You could participate in games shows, or just sit and listen to music while enjoying your $15 adult beverage.

I might go into more detail on the cruise at some point. Even though it was set up as a vacation, and I was planning on relaxing the entire time on the boat. I think I woke fairly early every day and stayed up way too late every night. I wanted to make sure I maximized every single bit of time on the ship and got my full money worth.

 

When we got off the boat it was time to spend the next 4 days focused on photography. It was warm, and there were beaches and pools. The family was kind enough to endure my shenanigans while I drove up and down the roads of Southern Florida looking for things to take photos of.

 

My first morning was spent at Blowing Rocks Preserve. I scouted it out the night before, and found the locations I wanted to shoot, then the next morning while my family slept…I set out to make some photos of this bizarre section of the mostly flat and boring Florida coastline.

 

Floridians are crazy for trying to give you a ticket. There are cameras at nearly every intersection that start taking photos of cars seconds after the light turns yellow. They throw up toll roads ever 2 miles to collect money from you, and then charge you again when you get off on an exit. We tried to avoid using our “sun-pass” in the rental car, because the company places additional charges on you every time you have to use it in addition to the charges the tolls take. Florida must be in cahoots with the rental car companies because nearly half of the toll stations aren’t manned by any workers…you have no choice but to use the sun-pass or have a bill sent to your house. When you’re in a city they put up no parking signs every 40 feet to let you know that they don’t want you to park there. I saw many streets that had at least a million no parking signs. Many roads dead end into pay to park lots that trap you and trying to get more money from you.

 

What does this have to do with Blowing Rocks you ask?

 

Well, because of my extreme fear of being towed for parking near a closed park and near one of those no parking signs…I had to park down the road from blowing rocks about a mile. Big thanks to my contact Michael Pancier who told me that you had to park and walk in, which I did. I walked in the soft sand for about a mile until I got to the rocks. Compared to the west coast…the blowing rocks aren’t that anything amazing. However their otherworldly curves, and jaggedness mixed with the great light gold and orange colors that comprise them make the rocks interesting to shoot.

 

The whole area is a 6-10 foot high shelf. This shelf is gradually being beaten and morphed by the surf and wind. You can stand on the shelf and look out over the ocean and see below you some more interesting shapes poking up from the sand. To really photograph this area and use these interesting rock shapes as a foreground, you need to get off the shelf and on the lower level where the rocks and waves interact. Once you’ve lowered yourself and your gear to this lower region, you instantly become open to wave attack. It’s not easy to scramble back up the shelf. The rocks are pointy and sharp, and I was barefoot. The Atlantic Ocean has small waves compared to the west coast….I didn’t give it any credit.

 

While I was down on this little ledge kind located 1/3 of the way up from the sand (about 5 feet below the shelf top) I started to notice that the water occasionally would climb up to my little ledge and soak my feet. Some waves would hit below me and send up a nice little splash that would have me scrambling to cover my gear. The power of the waves wasn’t intense, it was just more annoying. One wave in particular came in larger than I’d expected, and passed my shelf covering me in water up to mid-thigh. I really should’ve taken this as a good indicator as to what the sea could do here. The water wasn’t cold, and the wave didn’t even cause me to lose traction on the rock…so I blew it off as a “big set”

 

Three waves later another big wave came in…and this one played sneak attack. It crashed under the area I was on, and then shot up through a hole in the rocks, and came down on top of me AND my camera.

 

Splooooooooooooooooooooosh!!!!

 

Covered EVERYTHING.

 

“OK I’m done!” I screamed out. I always scream out the most energized manly things when I’ve been had.

 

I quickly threw my filter and my glasses up on top of the ledge, and then set about getting me and my camera back up to safety. I couldn’t even dry off as I had no real dry spots left on my clothing. When I got back to the top I took off my shirt found the only patch of dry cloth (located somewhere between the back and armpit area of the left side) and dried off my camera.

 

Thank God it still worked. I know I need to get a backup camera at some point, and there is a plan in place to try and do that eventually. I really dodged a bullet this time. The camera worked and I ended up getting this shot after the wave from a bit farther down the beach.

 

Now that I’ve gotten out for some personal photography, it’s back to workshop madness. I have 10 different full workshop classes in the next 8 weeks. Then I’m taking all of July off.

 

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For the past few weeks I haven’t had a chance to go out and shoot hence why I haven’t uploaded a photo during this time. A couple days ago I decided to finally go to Vancouver to take some photos of Gastown during Blue-Hour. This was the first time that I have photographed Gastown at night and this certainly won't be the last as it is very beautiful with all the lights on! While composing this shot I tried to minimize the amount of distortion, but because I was shooting fairly wide and tilting the camera upwards, there is some major distortion in the shot. I tried to correct it in Lightroom and this did fix all the distortion but the composition was negatively affected. In the end I decided to keep the distortion and I think it kind of adds to the shot as the slanted buildings kind of lead your eyes towards the Harbour Centre in the background.

 

I edited both a color and black and white version and choosing between the two was probably one of the hardest decisions of my life, ok it wasn't that hard but it was quite difficult choosing between the two ;) Both of them were good in their own ways and in the end I decided to go with the color version (obviously) , however I think in the future I might also upload the black and white version. This is an HDR photo made from 6 exposures bracketed at -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2. It was taken at f/8, ISO 100, @ 18mm with a Shutter Speed of 5 seconds.

 

Here's the Original:

www.flickr.com/photos/vicktion/12581089603/

How it was Processed:

1. Used Lightroom to change the WB, remove the distortion, vignetting, chromatic aberrations and noise and exported each as Tiffs.

2. Imported the exposures into Photomatix where I tonemapped the image.

3. I then opened the tonemapped photo and the original exposures in Photoshop where I:

- Blended in parts from the original pictures using Luminance Masks

- Removed some distracting things with the clone stamp and healing brush

- Did some minor noise reduction with noiseware

- Added some detail with topaz adjust 4

4. Finally I reimported into Lightroom where I:

- Cropped the photo

- Adjusted the exposure, contrast and WB

- Adjusted the exposure sliders

- Adjusted the clarity and saturation

- Adjusted the Tone Curve

- Selectively adjusted the saturation of some colors

- Selectively adjusted parts of the image with various graduated filters, radial filters & adjustment brushes

- Added some sharpening and a vignette

How much can one person love another?

A universe exists in time and space,

Placed within the boundaries of one place,

Pressed into a point far from forever.

Yet love comes to us from some quite other,

Visiting our sorrow with its grace,

Answering our rage with its embrace,

Lending us the wisdom of its wonder.

Even as I say this, you are there,

Nestling in where need undoes the day,

Taking up your small infinity.

Inside my window, you are everywhere,

Nor could I tell how much such love might weigh,

Even were it salient as the sea.

 

JUST FOR ALL LOVELY FRIENDS IN THE LOVE OCCASION:)

 

To know her:-

The genus Hibiscus contains over 200 different flowering plants. Also known as the rose mallow, the genus includes both annual and perennial plants, shrubs and trees. Two of the more popular varieties of the hibiscus include the scarlet rose mallow (Hibiscus coccineus) and rose of Sharon (Hibiscus syriacus). Both plants do well in USDA Zones 5 through 8. The flowers can range in color from white to bright red, and the hibiscus has alternate leaves.

 

Many varieties of hibiscus are used around the world in herbal medicine, as a food product and as a natural shampoo.

 

This captured from my sweet garden:)

 

I was out window shopping with a friend and while I was leaving, I glimpsed of what I thought was an unfamiliar small boxy car. I had to investigate! When I came upon it, my jaw dropped and my eyes bulged. Without hesitation, I took many photos(8) before the owner came back.

 

An old friend and co-worker years ago, said she had one when they were new. She told me when ever she went in for service, the mechanics had no idea what it was. That shows how uncommon they were even when new!

 

This one wasn't anywhere near new, but it's a survivor and is still living in the town it was sold used at. How about this for a rare oddity!

 

Sold used by Coquitlam Chrysler.

Saint Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin, also known as The National Cathedral and Collegiate Church of Saint Patrick, Dublin, or in the Irish language as Árd Eaglais Naomh Pádraig, founded in 1191, is the larger of Dublin's two Church of Ireland cathedrals, and the largest church in Ireland, with a 43-metre (140 feet) spire.[1] The other cathedral, Christ Church, is the diocesan cathedral of the diocese of Dublin and Glendalough.

 

Background.

 

Unusually, it is not the seat of a bishop today, as the Archbishop of Dublin has his seat in Christ Church Cathedral. Since 1870, the Church has designated St Patrick's as the National Cathedral for the whole island, drawing chapter members from each of the twelve dioceses of the Church of Ireland. The Dean is the ordinary for the cathedral; this office has existed since 1219. The most famous office holder is Jonathan Swift.

 

Status.

There is almost no precedent for a two-cathedral city, and some believe it was intended that St Patrick's, a secular (diocesan clergy who are not members of a religious order, i.e. under a rule and, therefore, 'regular') cathedral, would replace Christ Church, a cathedral managed by an order.[citation needed]

A confrontational situation persisted, with considerable tension, over the decades after the establishment of St. Patrick's, and was eventually settled, more-or-less, by the signing of a six-point agreement of 1300, Pacis Compositio. Still extant, and in force until 1870, it provided that:

•The consecration and enthronement of the Archbishop of Dublin was to take place at Christ Church - records show that this provision was not always followed, with many Archbishops enthroned in both, and at least two in Saint Patrick's only

•Christ Church had formal precedence, as the mother and senior cathedral of the diocese

•Christ Church was to retain the cross, mitre and ring of each deceased Archbishop of Dublin

•Deceased Archbishops of Dublin were to be buried alternately in each of the two cathedrals, unless they personally willed otherwise

•The annual consecration of chrism oil for the diocese was to take place at Christ Church

•The two cathedrals were to act as one, and shared equally in their freedoms

Over the following centuries, the two cathedrals functioned together in the diocese, until in the period of disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, the current designation of one as the cathedral of Dublin and Glendalough, and one as the National Cathedral, was developed.

History.

Pre-Reformation period

In 1192, John Comyn, first Anglo-Norman Archbishop of Dublin, elevated one of the four Dublin Celtic parish churches, the one dedicated to St. Patrick, beside a holy well of the same name and on an island between two branches of the River Poddle, to the status of a collegiate church, i.e., a church with a body of clergy devoted to both worship and learning. The new collegiate church fell outside the City boundaries, and this move created two new civic territories, one under the Archbishop's temporal jurisdiction. The church was dedicated to "God, our Blessed Lady Mary and St. Patrick" on March 17, 1191.[2]

Comyn's charter of 1191 or 1192, which allowed for a chapter of thirteen canons, of which three held special dignities (as Chancellor, Precentor and Treasurer), was confirmed by a Papal Bull (of Pope Celestine III) within a year. The thirteen prebendaries attached to the church were provided with archepiscopal lands.

Over time, a whole complex of buildings arose in the vicinity of the cathedral, including the Palace of the St. Sepulchre (seat of the Archbishop), and legal jurisdiction was divided between a Liberty controlled by the Dean, around the cathedral, and a larger one belonging to the Archbishop, adjacent.

While it is not clear when precisely the church was further raised to the status of cathedral, a unique move in a city with an existing cathedral, it was probably after 1192, and Comyn's successor as Archbishop, Henry de Loundres, was elected in 1212 by the chapters of both Christ Church and St Patrick's, this election being recognised by Pope Innocent III. See below for more on the question of status. Henry granted a number of further charters to the Cathedral and Chapter between 1218 and 1220, and one of these in 1220 created the office of Dean to head the Cathedral,[3] the right of election being allocated solely to the canons of the Chapter.

The basis of the present building, as noted, the largest church in Ireland, was built between 1191 and 1270, though little now remains of the earliest work beyond the Baptistry. Much of the work was overseen by the previously mentioned Henry of London, a friend of the King of England and signatory of the Magna Carta, who was also involved in the construction of Dublin's city walls, and Dublin Castle.

An order from King Henry III in 1225 allowed the collection of donations from across the island for reconstruction for a period of four years, and the work, in the Early English Gothic style, lasted at least until rededication in 1254. The Lady Chapel was added around 1270.[4]

In 1300, Archbishop Ferings of Dublin arranged an agreement between the two cathedrals, the Pacis Compostio, which acknowledged both as cathedrals and made some provision to accommodate their shared status.[5] For more, see Status below.

In 1311 the Medieval University of Dublin was founded here with William de Rodyard, Dean of St Patrick's, as its first Chancellor, and the Canons as its members It never flourished, and was suppressed at the Reformation.

From the mid-14th century, and for over 500 years, the north transept of the building was used as the parish church of St Nicholas Without (i.e. the part of the Parish of St. Nicholas outside the city proper).

The tower (Minot's Tower) and west nave were rebuilt between 1362 and 1370, following a fire. The name commemorates Thomas Minot, Archbishop of Dublin 1363-75, who oversaw the rebuilding.

From the very earliest years there were problems with seepage of water, with a number of floods, especially in the later years of the 18th century, caused by the surrounding branches of the River Poddle - even in the 20th century, it is reported that the water table was within 2.3 metres (7.5 feet) of the floor.[6] This situation ensured there would never be a crypt or basement area.[7]

Reformation Period.

After the English Reformation (an uneven process between 1536 and 1564 but at St. Patrick's, effective from about 1537), St. Patrick's became an Anglican Church of Ireland Cathedral, although most of the population of the surrounding Pale remained Roman Catholic. During the confiscation process, some images within the cathedral were defaced by soldiers under Thomas Cromwell, and neglect led to collapse of the nave in 1544.

Under King Edward VI, St. Patrick's Cathedral was formally suppressed, and the building demoted back to the status of parish church. On April 25, 1547, a pension of 200 marks sterling was assigned to "Sir Edward Basnet", the Dean, followed, some months later, by pensions of £60 each to Chancellor Alien and Precentor Humphrey, and £40 to Archdeacon Power. The silver, jewels, and ornaments were transferred to the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church. The King designated part of the building for use as a court house, the Cathedral Grammar School was established in the then vicar's hall and the deanery given to the archbishop, following the transfer of the Archbishop's Palace to the Lord Deputy of Ireland. In 1549, it was further ordered that the walls be repainted and inscribed with passages from the scriptures.

In 1555 a charter of the joint monarchs Philip and Mary restored the cathedral's privileges[8] and initiated restoration and a late document of Queen Mary's reign, a deed dated 27 April 1558, comprises a release or receipt by Thomas Leverous, the new Dean, and the Chapter of St. Patrick's, of the "goods, chattels, musical instruments, etc.," belonging to the Cathedral, and which had been in the possession of the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church. It was during this reign that the patronal festival of the Blessed Virgin Mary was last celebrated (in 1558).

Following the ejection of the Catholic chapter of canons in 1559, the Catholic community continued in the 1560s-1570s at least to go on nominating canons and the principal dignitaries to St Patrick’s.

In 1560, one of Dublin's first public clocks was erected in "St. Patrick's Steeple".

 

17th Century.

By the early 17th century, the Lady Chapel was said to have been in ruins, and the arch at the east end of the choir was closed off by a lath and plaster partition wall. There was also routine flooding and a series of galleries was added to accommodate large congregations.

During the stay of Oliver Cromwell in Dublin, during his conquest of Ireland the Commonwealth's Lord Protector stabled his horses in the nave of the cathedral. This was intended to demonstrate Cromwell's disrespect for the Anglican religion, which he associated with Roman Catholicism and political Royalism.

After the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, repairs to the building were begun.

In 1666, the Cathedral Chapter offered the Lady Chapel for the use of French-speaking Huguenots who had fled to Ireland, and after some repair and preparation works, it became known as L'Eglise Française de St. Patrick. A lease was signed on 23 December 1665 and was renewed from time to time until the special services ceased in 1816, by which time the Huguenots had been fully assimilated into the city population.

In 1668 the roof, in danger of collapsing, was taken down, a new roof being completed by 1671. Buttresses were erected and the west window was replaced with a perpendicular window. Then, in the 1680s, the choir was reformed. In 1688-90, during the Williamite War in Ireland, James II and his fellow Roman Catholics briefly repossessed St. Patrick's. James attended Mass services there with his Jacobite supporters for a time, however, the victory of the Protestant Williamites in this war meant that the cathedral was restored to Anglican ownership in 1690 when James abandoned Dublin after his defeat at the Battle of the Boyne.

18th Century.

 

Throughout its long history the cathedral has contributed much to Irish life, and one key aspect of this relates to the writer and satirist Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver's Travels, who was Dean of the cathedral from 1713 to 1745. Many of his famous sermons and "Irish tracts" (such as the Drapier's Letters) were given during his stay as Dean.[9]

His grave and epitaph can be seen in the cathedral, along with those of his friend Stella. Swift took a great interest in the building, its services and music and in what would now be called social welfare, funding an almshouse for poor women and Saint Patrick's Hospital.

The Choir School, which had been founded in 1432, supplied many of its members to take part in the very first performance of Handel's Messiah in 1742.

In 1769 the cathedral spire was added by George Semple; it remains one of Dublin's landmarks.

In 1792, divine service was temporarily suspended due to the poor condition of the south wall, then 60 centimetres (2 feet) out of perpendicular, and of parts of the roof.

Chivalric chapels

•Knights of St Patrick. From 1783 until 1871 the cathedral served as the Chapel of the Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick, members of which were the Knights of St. Patrick. With the dis-establishment of the Church of Ireland in 1871 the installation ceremony moved to St. Patrick's Hall, Dublin Castle. The heraldic banners of the knights at the time of the change still hang over the choir stalls to this day.

•Knights of Saint Lazarus of Jerusalem. The Cathedral contains the so called Dunsany[citation needed] Chapel which is the spiritual home of the Military and Hospitaller Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem. The decoration of the chapel was provided for by Randall Plunkett, 19th Lord Dunsany, who established the Knights of St. Lazarus in Ireland in 1962. The Cathedral is used for investiture ceremonies and the Dean of the Cathedral is an Ecclesiastical Commander of the Order.

19th century

By 1805, the north transept was in ruins and the south transept was in a poor condition; urgent work was carried out to the nave roof, held up by scaffolding.

In 1846, the post of Dean of Saint Patrick's was united with that of Dean of Christ Church, a situation which lasted in law until 1872.

An attempt at major restoration began under the direction of Dean Pakenham (Dean, 1843–1864), limited by poor economic circumstances. The Lady Chapel was restored, the floor (then raised several metres) reduced to its original level and other urgent matters were at least partly addressed.

In the mid-19th century, a Celtic cross was found buried near the cathedral. This has been preserved and it is thought it may have marked the site of the former holy well.

The major reconstruction, paid for by Benjamin Guinness, in 1860-65, and inspired by the fear that the cathedral was in imminent danger of collapse, means that much of the current building and decoration dates from the Victorian era; medieval chantries were removed among other actions, and few records of the work survive today.

Though the rebuilding ensured the survival of the Cathedral, the failure to preserve records of the scale of the rebuild means that little is known as to how much of the current building is genuinely mediæval and how much is Victorian pastiche. Sir Benjamin's statue by JH Foley is outside the south door. His son Arthur (also a brewer) came in for humorous but gentle criticism when he donated a stained glass window of 'Rebecca at the well'; its motto read: 'I was thirsty and ye gave me drink'. In 1901 his son Edward created the adjacent "St Patrick's Park" from an area of decrepit housing, and donated a new set of bells to the cathedral.

The other great change for the Cathedral occurred in 1871, when, following disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, the newly-independent church in general synod finally resolved the "two cathedral" issue, making Christ Church the sole and undisputed Cathedral of the Dublin Diocese, and St. Patrick's the National Cathedral.

Present

 

The cathedral is the location for a number of public national ceremonies. Ireland's Remembrance Day ceremonies, hosted by the Royal British Legion and attended by the President of Ireland, take place there every November. Its carol service (the Service of Nine Lessons and Carols), celebrated twice in December, including every 24 December, is a colourful feature of Dublin life.

The funerals of two Irish presidents, Douglas Hyde and Erskine Hamilton Childers, took place there in 1949[11][12] and 1974 respectively. At President Hyde's funeral, the whole of the Irish government and opposition contingent, bar Noel Browne and Childers, stayed out in the foyer of the church. This was because at the time of the funeral, the Holy See forbade Roman Catholics from entering churches that were not Catholic. Because President Childers died in office, his state funeral was a major state occasion. The attendance included King Baudouin of the Belgians, the Vice-President of the United States, Spiro T. Agnew (representing President Nixon), Earl Mountbatten of Burma (representing Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom), British Prime Minister Harold Wilson and former prime minister Edward Heath.

In 2006, the cathedral's national prominence was used by a group of 18 Afghan refugees seeking asylum, who occupied it for several days before being persuaded to leave without trouble.

Notable features

The cathedral, which generally receives no State funding, welcomes all, with a chapel for those who come simply to pray and a small fee for those who wish to sight-see. The Cathedral website mentioned in 2006 that visitor numbers had reached around 300,000 a year.

Legend has it that Saint Patrick's was the origin of the expression "chancing your arm" (meaning to take a risk), when Gerald Mór FitzGerald, 8th Earl of Kildare, cut a hole in a door there, still to be seen, and thrust his arm through it, in an effort to call a truce in the Butler – FitzGerald dispute with another Earl, James of Ormond, in 1492.

Burials

There are over 500 people buried on the site, many under the Cathedral's floor and more outside in the graveyard. Some notable individuals include:

•Richard Northalis, Archbishop of Dublin

•John de Sandford, Archbishop of Dublin

•Hugh Inge, Archbishop of Dublin

•Marcus Beresford

•Sir John Blennerhassett and his wife

•Thomas Jones as well as his wife

•Michael Boyle

•Richard Meredith

•Michael Tregury, Archbishop of Dublin (1450–1471)

•Adam Loftus, also the first Provost of Trinity College, Dublin - in a family vault also containing his wife and two of their children

•John Cradock, Archbishop of Dublin (1772–1778)

•Frederick Schomberg, 1st Duke of Schomberg (1615/6-1690)

•Jonathan Swift, author and Dean of the Cathedral and Esther Johnson ("Stella") his companion of many years.

Choir school and grammar school

The Choir School continues and although originally all-male, now also admits girls; a Cathedral Girls' Choir was founded in 2000 and sings once or twice a week. The girls are mostly drawn from either the choir school or St. Patrick's Grammar School, which provides a secondary education. It is no longer compulsory for grammar school pupils to be in the choirs although many of the girls are and a few boys as many of them leave when their voice breaks.Choirboys are considered professional singers and are actually paid monthly for their services although the girls are not. They also sing very occasionally at weddings for the more well off and receive payment for this too. Up until 1998 they received a big discount on their education but are still offered free music lessons. While non choirboy students had 2 months' holidays during the summer, half of the boys were on duty every day during the summer and had to attend choir practice and 2 services each weekday, one service on Saturday and 2 on Sunday. This arrangement was also changed in 1998.

Organ

The Organ of St. Patrick's Cathedral is one of the largest in Ireland with over 4,000 pipes. Parts of it date from a Renatus Harris instrument of 1695. The organ was re-built in the 1890s by Henry Willis and Son, in consultation with Sir George Martin. It was restored in 1963 by J. W. Walker & Sons Ltd.

List of Organists

Friends of the cathedral

The cathedral is supported by a volunteer organisation, with both subscribing (annual and five-year) and Life members, who perform various tasks and contribute materially to the work and fabric of the cathedral. In addition, there are a range of voluntary groups performing specific tasks, such as bell-ringing, welcoming of guests and cleaning.

 

Source - Wikipedia

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This was taken last Friday and I think it turned out very good! This was taken after the sunset and because of this the lighting was perfect, even the original looked really nice straight out of the camera. I was originally going to do an HDR of this scene and bracketed the photos but when I processed it through Photomatix it didn't really look that great and because it was a panorama masking would have been a bit difficult. In the end I decided to process just the +2 exposure out of 7 exposures. For some reason this photo came out a bit soft and this could have happened either because I missed the focus (set it to infinity) or because f/8 wasn't enough to keep everything sharp. This panorama is made up of 3 photos (shot in landscape) and in the end I decided to crop it quite a bit so it's pretty much a 2 shot panorama.

Here's the Original:

www.flickr.com/photos/vicktion/9766077693

How it was Processed:

1. Used Camera Raw to remove the distortion, vignetting, chromatic aberrations and adjusted the WB and exported each as Tiffs.

2. I then imported them into Photoshop and used Photomerge (cylindrical) to merge the 3 photos into a panorama.

3. I then used the clone stamp, healing brush and patch tool to fix some of the white spots that resulted from the Photomerge and after that I added some detail with Topaz Adjust.

4. After importing it into Lightroom I:

- Adjusted the White Balance

- Adjusted the exposure, exposure sliders and added quite a bit of contrast through the white and black slider

- Added a bit of vibrance and clarity

- Added a slight S curve to the Tone Curve

- Adjusted parts of the image with a few graduated filters, adjustment brush's and the radial filter

- Cropped the image

- Added a slight vignette and finished off with some sharpening and some minor noise reduction

Tomorrow I am going on my first photo shoot for work. Shooting a featured home for the Good Life. A new magazine published by the newspaper office. I am laying out the pages and now, given the opportunity to photograph for it. I am excited and nervous! Gotta make a good impression. Praying for no rain. I need good light!! I think I could get use to taking pictures for a living (o;

 

*This is an old pic. Not the sharpest but I love the light and comp. Crazy how much I have improved since then. Still have a lot to learn, and i like that.

April:2015:

I recently sent a link tutorial on how do selective colouring with gimp, to a viewer.. i then decided to attempt the tutorial for myself...for the first time!

  

processing method: using gimp,qtpfsgui,windows microsoft visual studio 2010.

I Opened gimp 2.8, ,used the clone stamp tool to tidy up certain grass area's clicked normalize to stretch the light levels equally over the image next i used the "soft focus" tool from the fx foundry within the gimp tools, then exported and saved as JPG

  

As with all my previous hdr uploads i duplicated image x3 the 1st (original) duplicate i kept as normal, 2nd duplicate image i used the levels tool and adjusted the level from the middle to the left of the graph to 0.5 to make the image "Underexposed". next, opened 3rd image used levels tool & adjusted from the middle again to the right of the graph to 5.0 to make the image "Overexposed", next i opened Qtpfsgui free hdr software and loaded in the images as followed. 1. Original, 2.Under exposed, 3. Overexposed. clicked hdr tonemapping button,saved image as JPG, then opned up microsoft visual studio 2010, clicked auto edit, to bring out the colour & tones of the image, then closed to save.

Next i reopened Gimp, loaded the image, then followed the tutorial.

www.gimp.org/tutorials/Selective_Color/

 

i have been lately fascinated with textures. i was told that they are addicting, i think i'm now grasping why there's an addiction out there. i can't say that i must do it on all my photos but it sure does add a lot more character to it, i.e. moodiness and darkness (that i love). on the other hand i'm also a fan of clean and minimal photos, those that should be simply left alone.

 

well, you guys might see a lot more textured photos in here as i try and experiment more. i have also started to upload more non-selfies here to dilute the many many many photos of myself. and btw, my photography class starts next week. happy evenings ahead.

_________________________

the vent: how did you do that?

took a photo of myself against the window. cropped face in half. uploaded to flickr. applied gritty and sepia using picnik. uploaded to photoshop 7. added first les brumes texture, selected pinlight, slapped second les brumes texture and selected multiply. uploaded again in flickr, from picnik applied cross processed effect. then played around with saturation and rotated photo to a slight angle. voila.

 

totw, movie lines (girl interrupted)

Susanna: [narrating] Have you ever confused a dream with life? Or stolen something when you have the cash? Have you ever been blue? Or thought your train moving while sitting still? Maybe I was just crazy. Maybe it was the 60's. Or maybe I was just a girl... interrupted.

 

the vent, how did you that

totw, movie lines

fgr, mugshot, half of it.

292/365 days

8/10/09

After my passion for photography took on, I have been amazed with how differently I see the world.

 

For instance I wanted to do a shot of a roof nearby, because there where so many interesting angles of chimneys, windows and roofing converging in a corner. I don't think a normal civilian would notice the subtle details of everyday life and the world around them, they may even think I am a little weird for taking an interest and photographing a bit of roofing on what they see as nothing but another building.

 

I love that I now appreciate something as simple as an old and worn sign in an intersection, just telling what size cables where used and who installed them, and that I can even see it's potential for a cool photograph.

 

I think an interest in photography enhances ones view on people, objects and the world around us, as an interest in music enhances ones appreciation for the subtle nuances and changes in composition and rhythm.

I was in New York recently on business and had a few hours free each night so I decided to hit the tourist spots in the vicinity of Grand Central Terminal. (Special thanks to my sister-in-law for helping me navigate midtown Manhattan on a hot and rainy night.) I have to say I was not prepared for just how tripod-unfriendly NY is to us lowly hobbyist photographers. Everywhere I ventured -- Grand Central Terminal, the New York Public Library, St. Patrick's Cathedral, Rockefeller Center -- I was quickly and firmly told that my tripod was not welcome. Lucky for me, in most of those places I managed to get off a shot or two before the tripod police arrived. I certainly understand their concern for liability and impeding the flow of foot traffic, but in every case where I was using my tripod I was back against a wall, in a corner or somewhere that would in no way interfere with anyone getting from point A to point B.

 

I did learn a few things, however. Many of these places will let you use a monopod. A tripod, with the legs unsplayed, looks alot like a monopod. A tripod with the legs only slightly splayed also looks like a monopod. Lesson: splay the legs ever so slightly but enough so that the tripod will stand on its own, then shoot until the tripod police come and get you on a technicality, i.e., that your monopod has three legs. The other thing I discovered is that if you don't extend the legs and you place the tripod on something other than the floor (like on a table, a bannister, a ledge, etc.), the tripod police will generally look the other way. One other lesson: some places, like Grand Central, will give you a permit to use a tripod if you ask in advance. They limit you to a specific window of opportunity and it can't be during rush hour (which, in NY, apparently extends to 8:00 p.m., so my permit was good from 8:00 to midnight). Do not, however, attempt to pick up your permit before your allotted time or the tripod police will be very unhappy with you.

 

Okay, so I'm guessing this photograph gets snapped 1,000 times a day from the Top of the Rock at Rockefeller Center. Despite overcast skies and a sunset that was a complete bust, I claimed my square foot of ledge and stood shoulder to shoulder with the rest of the crowd waiting for an hour for something to happen. (Tripod, splayed but unextended, carefully balanced on a small square ledge.) No sunset color, no dramatic clouds -- just a little blue hour light before the sky faded to black. Maybe next time . .

 

(Oh, and this looks a little better if you give it a click to view large on black.)

The Abandoned Pennhurst Asylum

May 25th, 2014

 

Some info on this historic location:

 

“Pennhurst is the scariest place I have ever seen. Period. I have traveled all over the country visiting haunted places and attractions and nothing compares to this incredible, dilapidated campus. Last October, I was approached by the owners of Pennhurst Associates, and asked if I would like to be a partner in their haunted attraction. At first I was skeptical because everyone thinks this industry is easy, with a “get rich quick” attitude, and we all know how much work is involved and how hard it is to be successful. I was really skeptical…until I visited Pennhurst. The day I drove into this huge complex of brick structures, I was hooked. I knew this place had the potential to be the greatest haunted attraction ever. With a ton of money, corporate sponsors, the right build crew, and a great plan, Pennhurst Asylum could come to life and entertain the hard core haunters. Not only does this place have an incredible ambiance, a built in cult following, and a treasure trove of unique props, it has a history; a history riddled with accusations of torture, abuse and neglect. A history of mental patients chained to the walls in dark tunnels, children left for years in cribs, sexual abuse by the staff and even murder. All this happened behind the walls of Pennhurst State School, Spring City, Pennsylvania.

 

Pennhurst was constructed and opened in 1908 as a state school for the mentally and physically disabled. Pennhurst's property was vast, covering 120 acres. Created to house over 10,000 patients at a point in time, Pennhurst was one of the largest institutions of its kind in Pennsylvania. Half of Pennhurst's residents were committed by court order and the other half were brought by a parent or other guardian. It was devoted strictly to the care, treatment and education of the disabled. Originally named Pennhurst Home for the Feeble Minded and Epileptic, it finally was just called Pennhurst State School. Pennhurst employed a large number of staff to help assist in maintaining the facility. This staff included a board of trustees, medical staff, dental staff, and specialists in psychology, social services, accounting, and various fields of education. The grounds of Pennhurst included a 300-bed hospital, which had a full nursing staff and two surgeons on call at all times. Others at Pennhurst included members of the clergy and farming experts who grew most of Pennhurst's food . Pennhurst was an essentially self-sufficient community, its 1,400-acre site containing a firehouse, general store, barber shop, movie theatre, auditorium and even a greenhouse. The buildings of Pennhurst were named after towns in Pennsylvania such as Chester and Devon. The original buildings were designed by architect Phillip H. Johnson. All of Pennhurst's electricity was generated by an on-site power plant. A cemetery lay on the property, as well as baseball and recreational fields for the residents. Many of Pennhurst's buildings were strictly for storage; however, the majority were dormitory and hospital-style living quarters for the residents. Many of the buildings had security screens that were accessed on the inside, to prevent patients from escaping, or jumping to their deaths. Most of the stairwells had security fences to keep patients from jumping over the railings. Many of the buildings are linked by an underground tunnel system designed for transportation of handicapped patients to and from the dormitory, recreational buildings and dietary.

 

Pennhurst was often accused of dehuminazitation and was said to have provided no help to the mentally challenged. The institution had a long history of staff difficulties and negative public image, for example, a 1968 report by NBC called "Suffer the Little Children". Pennhurst State School was closed in 1986 following several allegations of abuse. These allegations led to the first lawsuit of its kind in the United States, Pennhurst State School and Hospital vs. Halderman, which asserted that the mentally retarded have a constitutional right to living quarters and an education. Terry Lee Halderman had been a resident of the school, and upon release she filed suit in the district court on behalf of herself and all other residents of Pennhurst. The complaint alleged that conditions at Pennhurst were unsanitary, inhumane and dangerous, that these living conditions violated the fourteenth amendment, and that Pennhurst used cruel and unusual punishment in violation of the eighth and fourteenth amendments. After a 32-day trial and an immense investigation, prosecutors concluded that the conditions at Pennhurst were not only dangerous, with physical and mental abuse of its patients, but also inadequate for the care and habilitation for the mentally retarded. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania also concluded that the physical, mental, and intellectual skills of most patients had deteriorated while in Pennhurst.

 

In 1986, Pennhurst was ordered closed, and began a program of de-institutionalism that lasted several years. Once the buildings were closed, they began to rapidly deteriorate from lack of heating, moisture invasion and vandalism. Thousands of people began to illegally tour the property spray painting everything in sight and breaking all the glass in the place. Theft was rampant and the destruction of the property was in full swing. Patients were thrown out and a large homeless contingent developed in the area.

 

Pennhurst fell into complete ruin as the complex was shut down. Buildings were abandoned as they were, with patient’s clothes and belonging strewn about. Furniture, cabinets and medical equipment were left to decay as if someone had just got up and walked out the front door. This is the place that will eventually resurrect into one of the most studied properties in the ghost hunter media, and will become an amazing haunted attraction.

 

As I research the history of this place, I begin to realize the potential of Pennhurst as an intriguing location for a haunted attraction. This place is really haunted. Several reputable Ghost Hunter groups have documented audible recordings, temperature changes, and unexplained movement of objects in the buildings of Pennhurst. This is the kind of environment I want to build the next generation of haunted house; a proven haunted location.

 

My team, headed by John Brady, Shawn Sieger, Jim Souflous, Todd Beringer, Rob Sieger and others search the complex for valuable props. We wander deep into the tunnels that stitch the complex. We move into the basements of maintenance buildings, storage areas, dormitories and dietary in search of unique items that will set this haunt apart from all other. We find a huge electro-mechanical device that has to be the control for the electrotherapy department. It is so old that it used electrical tube circuits developed in the 30’s. Insulators and other unrecognizable devices are strewn about the room. This is a huge find. As we cruise through the old abandoned hospital, we harvest giant 48” surgical lights that are suspended from the rotting ceilings. They are mounted on tracks that allow the lights to be moved to focus on the unsuspecting patients. These will be perfect in the rooms for our haunt. We find medical cabinets, drawers, storage lockers, operating tables are everywhere. This is a veritable treasure trove of props for our attraction. As we move through the dark corridors, with flashlights moving side to side, I can’t keep the feelings of growing anticipation from my mind. I know there is something out there but can’t put my finger on it. I come around the corner and enter a small room to the right, and there it is; the morgue. I recognize it because it has two drawer slides and a refrigeration unit on top. This is what we came here to find. This will be one of the most unique features of our attraction; a real morgue scene. Stainless steel tables with large drains, stainless steel cabinets, lab equipment and a real, 1930’s autopsy table! I am blown away by this scene. I can picture the thousands of customers coming through our attraction knowing that everything in here is REAL. My arms have gooseflesh!

 

Back at the Administration building, construction is moving forward. All the asbestos has been abated, the floors have been repaired, roof repaired, windows replaced, and structural inspections have been completed. The building is safe for use as an amusement building. Now the hard work of turning this into one of the most complex haunted houses is under way. A full electrical upgrade needs to be completed. Smart lighting, imbedded audio systems and fiber optical controls will be installed. Pneumatic infrastructure will be run throughout the building so props can be installed in any room. A lot of work must be completed in a few short months in preparation for the 2010 season.

 

We want this attraction to be a full experience of Pennhurst, but we need to work the audience up slowly so they won’t chicken out right away. This place is so creepy, that we need to get the ticket sales completed before they see the complex. A state of the art POS system will be installed by Interactive Ticketing, and can handle the thousands of expected customers. This system will track every ticket sold, and with the aid of digital scanners that are integrated with the internet, and keep track of each customer. Once the customer has bought their ticket, they will be guided to the walkway that surrounds the complex. This walkway will act as a huge queue line to the main entrance of the haunt, but will take them on a tour around several other buildings before entering the Administration building. As the customers walk the 800’ long walkway, they will experience the vastness of Pennhurst. With over 10 buildings in view, most in bad condition, they will be able to witness the downfall of this once beautiful campus. The once beautiful courtyards are now overgrown and the children’s playground equipment lay rotting all around. As the people approach the Admin building, they will be diverted to the side and then around to the front and into the main entrance. A large stone portico greets the crowd as they are ushered into the attraction. A unique feature of Pennhurst will be the museum. Many local residents have a strong feeling that the memories of the atrocities that occurred here should be preserved in some way so that they will not re-occur in the future. With this in mind, we felt that the construction of a Pennhurst Museum was in order. We have reconstructed four rooms on the first floor that will act as an indoor queue line and, at the same time, teach the public about the history of this magnificent place. With high tech videos, historical photos and artifacts from the past, the customers will be able to go back in time and witness the rise and fall of Pennhurst, as it happened. As they move slowly through the museum, they will notice that the rooms are beginning to decay. By the time they enter the great corridor the building has fallen into disrepair. This is when they will enter the scariest haunted house imaginable.

 

With an asylum theme in mind, and real, antique hospital equipment on hand, we began to build our attraction. We painted the entire interior with a special barrier sealant that encapsulates any lead paint and is also 100% flameproof. Rotted flooring has been replaced, and roof leaks have been plugged. We install MDF board as a wainscote and paint it to look like the marble that was part of the original building, but stolen long ago. We want an old time feeling to envelope the customers; a feeling of going back in time. The first room you enter is the intake office, complete with a psychiatrist giving you the Rorschach test, otherwise known as the ink blot test. As the Dr. engages the crowd, slides flip by on a large screen. After the intake, you enter the de-lousing showers, where shower heads spew out a combination of fog, air and CO2, giving it a cold feel. Other rooms include the dietary unit with copious use of existing cafeteria items like tray holders, rolling carts, plastic ware, cups, plates, tables and ovens. Pneumatic and actor scares abound in this haunt as there are a large number of great setups and hiding spots throughout the building. Moving upstairs, we have a large room with the ceiling removed. It shows the expansive architecture of the building, and the roofline looms over 35’ above your head. The focus in this room is the old, female actor in the corner, who is sitting in a vintage wheelchair. She is spot lighted with down lighting that also shows beds, furniture and other belongings. As she distracts the crowd, a switch is flipped and flood lights reveal the height of the ceiling, filled with another animatronic surprise.

 

Another part of the building is an area that has suffered a moderate fire. Door frames and headers are charred, and the smell of burnt wood is still perceptible. The area that was burned housed two sound proof cells; small rooms where patients could be locked away and their screams could be totally muffled. The floors, walls and ceilings are 6” thick with heavy insulation stuffed between the studs. The interiors are lined with sound proof tiles, and the exterior is sheathed in another layer of sound proofing. Even the doors are 8” thick and insulated. As you walk into these rooms, you can feel the air get heavy, the sounds deaden and you can imagine how the patients felt being locked up in the pitch dark with no one hearing your screams.

 

As you can imagine, the really cool rooms are left for last. With tons of great, original props, we build out sets that appear to be real operating rooms. One room is set up to be themed as a lobotomy operating room. Steel tables, medical cabinets and surgical equipment are everywhere. Actors bring off the scare and make this scene believable. The next room is our autopsy chamber. This room is decorated with the original equipment we found in the old hospital. The cabinets mounted to the walls are stainless steel, and look brand new, even after 50 or more years. The large sink structure, with an industrial size in-sinkerator, and long overflow drain, is up against the far wall. On the right is the original two drawer morgue unit, moved here from the hospital basement, and restored to its original form. The drawers roll out as easily as they did when first installed, and the refrigeration unit above the drawers adds to the realism of the scene. To top it off, an antique autopsy table stands in the center of the room. I bought the table at a funeral home auction 15 years ago and it has now found a new home. Overhead is a huge surgical style lamp, measuring over 40” across, and fitted with a friction gear that allows one to direct the light in any direction.

 

Another great room design we are using is the shock therapy room. This room has tile walls and floor, large overhead lights (harvested from the depths of building c) and the original electroconvulsive shock therapy machine retrieved from the hospital. Most modern ECT machines deliver a brief-pulse current, which is thought to cause fewer cognitive effects than the sine-wave currents which were originally used in ECT. Our machine is of the sine wave type, and caused unconsciousness and convulsions for 15 to 30 seconds. It is a large stainless steel console with dials and meters, and long electrode leads still attached. Our shock table is hinged in the center, and can tilt down for easy loading and unloading of the patient. The table has a latch where the actor can drop the foot of the table and attack the audience. This coupled with bang sticks, strobe lights, fog machines and a blistering 400 watt soundtrack make this one of the premier rooms at Pennhurst. In all, Pennhurst Asylum will have 18 complete rooms, not including the 4 room used in the museum. All of these rooms are highly detailed to be realistic in every way.

 

We have really strived to mix fact with fiction, folklore with fear, to come up with some of our unique room designs. There have been accounts of an old dentist chair that was located in the deep recesses of Mayflower, one of the more notorious dorms at Pennhurst. This chair is a little different than the ones you and I are used too; it has restraining straps attached to the arms, legs and headrest. This chair was reportedly used to remove the teeth of patients that were prone to biting the staff here. Imagine yourself being strapped into this device and having all your teeth ripped out without any kind of medication. This is just one more example of how unique this location is.

 

The most intriguing part of Pennhurst is their tunnel complex. All of the buildings on the campus are connected by above ground walkways with tunnels under them. These tunnels are 10 feet high, 8 feet wide and thousands of feet long. Concrete floors, tile walls and concrete ceilings create an incredible echo effect at certain intersections. In fact, I have looked behind myself several times to see if there is someone following me a few feet back. The echoes are so distinct you can hear whispers from hundreds of feet away.

 

As the guests are scared out of the last room in the Asylum, they find themselves in a large foyer with paintings and photographs on the walls. This is the queue line for the tunnels. Once through the lines, the guests are ushered down a long set of stairs and into the basement. Once there, with a temperature drop of at least 20 degrees, they are let through the double doors that lead to the exit…900 feet away. Scenes and actors appear at intersections along the way. Glass jars with cages around them contain the only lighting down here, and they are all connected to commercial lighting controls that are programmed to flicker, dim and occasionally go completely dark. We also added several subsonic bass tubes that cannot be heard, only felt. This will induce an uneasy feeling in all who enter the tunnels. Special chicken exits have been designed into the tunnel system and I’m sure will be used many times. This will be the scariest part of this attraction. The best part of the tunnel system is that it will contain our guests on their way back to the main entrance. People coming into the show along the walkways above will hear the screams emanating from the tunnels below them. They will hear the reactions to our show before they even enter the walkways leading to our haunt. What better way to elevate the anticipation and fear level than to hear, first hand, how scary this place is. If this place is scary to seasoned haunters, imagine how the general public will feel.

 

Another unique feature of Pennhurst is that it is really haunted. Featured on the Travel Channel, the Ghost Adventures crew have recorded many strange voices, noises and unexplained movement and documented this in their shows. The Pennhurst Ghost Tours, open to professional and amateur ghost hunters, has been a huge success, with recordings, photos and accounts of physical contact throughout the Pennhurst complex. So, if you want to get scared, come to Pennhurst Asylum. You may even witness the supernatural… whether you want to or not.”

 

SOURCE: www.pennhurstasylum.com/index2.html#/history

Day 8,302 of my life.

January 11th, 2012.

Consecutive day 2.

"Living with the imaginary"

 

You know those days when you really just want to create something different to anything you've ever created before. I've been having a lot of those days lately but haven't acted till now. Here's a self portrait I had some fun with today. Plain window light, funky texture and drawn in bird. I wanted to superimpose a real bird onto my head but thought that was too boring. Too expected. So I drew it in instead. I like how it mixes the real with the imaginary. I like living with the imaginary.

 

Edited using Photoshop Action "Autumnal Beauty" from the shop. Buy it here: bit.ly/owUrrk

 

WEBSITE - www.alexbeadonphotography.com

BLOG - www.alexbeadonphotography.com/blog

FACEBOOK - www.facebook.com/alex.beadon.photography

TWITTER - www.twitter.com/alexbeadon

This cute newborn boy is 12 days old. Amazing how beautiful life is at the very beginning, and how fast time goes by. I'll probably look at this picture again in 15 or 20 years (a blink of an eye, isn't it?) and he will be a grown up.

 

On the side, what does landscape photography have in common with photographing newborns? It depicts beauty, is very challenging, and both a child and the weather can be just as uncooperative :) What is different? You don't often use ND filters with newborns.

 

Exif: ISO 100 ; f/1.8 ; 1/60 ; @50mm

Window light

This little chipmunk comes to visit and eat the seed dropped from the bird feeder often. He used to come every day until a squirrel decided to be a regular visitor. Sometimes they are there together but not too often. This was taken through one of my kitchen windows and I used the flash to see what effect I would get. I kind of like it but not sure how any of you would like it. Hope everyone has a great Saturday and thank you for all your warm support yesterday. I'm fine...just tired!! Thank you all so much. Love you all!! Hugs :) Time to get ready for work again!

 

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I took this when I went to Vancouver a couple weeks ago. For some reason I had no plans of taking a picture of the Vancouver Space Museum and just decided to set up my tripod. The end result actually turned out very good and I'm glad I took a picture of it. This is a very unique building that really reminds me of a UFO, not really too sure what the Crab is doing in front of a Space Museum though haha. For this picture I spend a lot more time in photoshop editing it with various adjustment layers and masks. This is an HDR image made from 5 exposures taken at -2, -1, 0, 1, 2.

Here's the Original:

www.flickr.com/photos/vicktion/7958167578/

How it was processed:

1. Imported into camera raw to correct the white balance, removed the Chromatic Aberations and vignetting and then exported as Tiffs.

2. Tonemapped with photomatix.

3. I imported into photoshop and I masked out parts of the original exposures and fixed the ghosting. I then used the clone stamp tool and healing brush to remove some spots in the sky and foreground. I then added a slight Gaussian blur and set that layer to overlay and lowered the opacity. I used topaz adjust to correct the exposure, added some detail and then I removed the noise with Topaz denoise. I then applied various adjustment layers and finished with my watermark.

4. I then imported it into lightroom where I adjusted the exposure with the new exposure sliders and added some clarity and vibrance. I then added some sharpening and added a slight vignette.

Taken at f/8, 1/320s, ISO 100 @10 mm.

Taken with a Canon T3i + Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6mm lens.

   

I uploaded this picture of the cedar stick and yucca during a Navajo Shoe Game tournament, not only to give some insight into the game, but to primarily demonstrate the low light capabilities of the Canon EOS 6D. As a photographer who documents the indigenous cultures of the American Southwest, I often find myself in ceremonies where discretion and respect are paramount, so using speedlites or strobes is out of the question. This is why I purchased the Canon 6D, to take the ISO to the max in the field and this camera does not disappoint.

 

The above picture was shot at 200mm at f/2.8 using my Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 Di LD (IF) Macro Lens at ISO 25,600 with the Noise Reduction setting at 25 in Lightroom 4.3. Then exported to Photoshop CS4 for selective sharping. As you can see, much of the detail in the plane of focus is still present after my workflow's post-processing.

 

I am thrilled with the camera's ISO performance but what really made me confident of my 6D purchase was the usefulness of the silent shutter mode. You can imagine how important it is not to disturb the proceedings at a solemn event. At the shoe game tournament, the silent shutter mode was perfect. Not once did I feel self-conscious about my full frame's shutter noise during the game while the 6D was in Silent Shutter Mode.

 

Image taken during the 4th Annual Navajo Nation Museum Shoe Game Tournament in Window Rock, Arizona on Dec, 31st. 2012

 

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~Explore #38~ ETA Front Page Explore today. WOW--flattered! Thanks everyone so much. :) XX

 

So..the bear on the right has quickly become the love of the middle bear's life. He won't let go of him. I got a better pose of him up higher--I'll post later. The little fuzzy hat was from H&M's fall collection last year. Oh and a word about the camera settings. This was the FIRST time I took a shot with "studio" light. One large softbox from camera right. The softbox arrived this week but still waiting on the triggers to go wireless. Since it wasn't wireless it was very close to the camera. It was also one of the first times I shot outside of Manual. I used Av..I wasn't pleased with the lack of control though and switched back to manual later in the shoot. It ended up giving me a 1/8 shutter speed on Av. I hate not having full control!!!!!! I was floored to see the 1/8 shutter. LUCKY he was sleeping (for blurring sake), but I think generally when flash is used shutters are maximized so you can safely go very low with no blur. No tripod either. I'm a natural light girl, so this is all foreign territory to me. I would really love to master studio lighting though---so much to learn. I think I'll always prefer natural, but I was pretty happy with how natural this turned out using partial natural light (windows facing him and camera left) and the softbox 100 cm to camera right. The blanket is clipped on the clothes rack bar with these clips: cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=140298173.... These are GREAT clips. Very strong and hold well in place. Worth the investment if you are using something that isn't holding the way you'd like it to. The blanket is from Ikea--a soft wool tan and cream blend. Less than 30 Euros.

El Aconcagua, con sus 6960,8 metros de altura sobre el nivel del mar, se recorta contra el cielo brillante del amanecer. Es impresionante como este cerro, la mas alta del continente americano, sobresale entre las cerros circundantes, es verdaderamente el coloso de América...

 

ENGLISH CAPTION: "Colossus..." The Aconcagua, with its 6,960.8 meters above sea level, is silhouetted against the bright morning sky. It is amazing how this mountain, the highest in the Americas, stands out among the surrounding mountains, it is truly the American colossus...

 

1/200 sec @ ƒ/5.6 @ ISO 100

Canon EOS 6D

Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM

 

Mis fotos/My pictures: Facebook / Flickr / 500px / Fine Art America

:copyright: Todos los Derechos Reservados, No usar sin mi consentimiento.

:copyright: All Rights Reserved, Don't use without permission.

High-dynamic-range imaging (HDRI or HDR) is a set of techniques used in imaging and photography to reproduce a greater dynamic range of luminosity than possible using standard digital imaging or photographic techniques. HDR images can represent more accurately the range of intensity levels found in real scenes, from direct sunlight to faint starlight, and is often captured by way of a plurality of differently exposed pictures of the same subject matter.[1][2][3][4]

 

Non-HDR cameras take photographs with a limited exposure range, resulting in the loss of detail in bright or dark areas. HDR compensates for this loss of detail by capturing multiple photographs at different exposure levels and combining them to produce a photograph representative of a broader tonal range.

 

The two primary types of HDR images are computer renderings and images resulting from merging multiple low-dynamic-range (LDR)[5] or standard-dynamic-range (SDR)[6] photographs. HDR images can also be acquired using special image sensors, like oversampled binary image sensor. Tone mapping methods, which reduce overall contrast to facilitate display of HDR images on devices with lower dynamic range, can be applied to produce images with preserved or exaggerated local contrast for artistic effect.

In photography, dynamic range is measured in EV differences (known as stops) between the brightest and darkest parts of the image that show detail. An increase of one EV or one stop is a doubling of the amount of light. Compare that, for example, 210=1024:

High-dynamic-range photographs are generally achieved by capturing multiple standard photographs, often using exposure bracketing, and then merging them into an HDR image. Digital photographs are often encoded in a camera's raw image format, because 8 bit JPEG encoding doesn't offer enough values to allow fine transitions (and introduces undesirable effects due to the lossy compression).

 

The images from any camera that allows manual exposure control can be used to create HDR images. This includes film cameras, though the images may need to be digitized so they can be processed with software HDR methods.

 

Some cameras have an auto exposure bracketing (AEB) feature with a far greater dynamic range than others, from the 3 EV of the Canon EOS 40D, to the 18 EV of the Canon EOS-1D Mark II.[10] As the popularity of this imaging method grows, several camera manufactures are now offering built-in HDR features. For example, the Pentax K-7 DSLR has an HDR mode that captures an HDR image and outputs (only) a tone mapped JPEG file.[11] The Canon PowerShot G12, Canon PowerShot S95 and Canon PowerShot S100 offer similar features in a smaller format.[12] Even some smartphones now include HDR modes, and most platforms have apps that provide HDR picture taking.[13]

 

Color film negatives and slides consist of multiple film layers that respond to light differently. As a consequence, transparent originals (especially positive slides) feature a very high dynamic range.[14]

 

Camera characteristics

Camera characteristics such as gamma curves, sensor resolution, noise, photometric calibration and spectral calibration affect resulting high-dynamic-range images.[15][15]

 

Tone mapping

Main article: Tone mapping

Tone mapping reduces the dynamic range, or contrast ratio, of an entire image while retaining localized contrast.

 

Software

Several software applications are available on the PC, Mac and Linux platforms for producing HDR files and tone mapped images. Notable titles include

Adobe Photoshop

Dynamic Photo HDR

HDR PhotoStudio

Luminance HDR

Oloneo PhotoEngine

Photomatix Pro

PTGui

Comparison with traditional digital images

Information stored in high-dynamic-range images typically corresponds to the physical values of luminance or radiance that can be observed in the real world. This is different from traditional digital images, which represent colors that should appear on a monitor or a paper print. Therefore, HDR image formats are often called scene-referred, in contrast to traditional digital images, which are device-referred or output-referred. Furthermore, traditional images are usually encoded for the human visual system (maximizing the visual information stored in the fixed number of bits), which is usually called gamma encoding or gamma correction. The values stored for HDR images are often gamma compressed (power law) or logarithmically encoded, or floating-point linear values, since fixed-point linear encodings are increasingly inefficient over higher dynamic ranges.[16][17][18]

 

HDR images often don't use fixed ranges per color channel—other than for traditional images—to represent many more colors over a much wider dynamic range. For that purpose, they don't use integer values to represent the single color channels (e.g.m, 0..255 in an 8 bit per pixel interval for red, green and blue) but instead use a floating point representation. Common are 16-bit (half precision) or 32-bit floating point numbers to represent HDR pixels. However, when the appropriate transfer function is used, HDR pixels for some applications can be represented with as few as 10–12 bits for luminance and 8 bits for chrominance without introducing any visible quantization artifacts.

The idea of using several exposures to fix a too-extreme range of luminance was pioneered as early as the 1850s by Gustave Le Gray to render seascapes showing both the sky and the sea. Such rendering was impossible at the time using standard methods, the luminosity range being too extreme. Le Gray used one negative for the sky, and another one with a longer exposure for the sea, and combined the two into one picture in positive.[20]

 

Manual tone mapping was accomplished by dodging and burning – selectively increasing or decreasing the exposure of regions of the photograph to yield better tonality reproduction. This is effective because the dynamic range of the negative is significantly higher than would be available on the finished positive paper print when that is exposed via the negative in a uniform manner. An excellent example is the photograph Schweitzer at the Lamp by W. Eugene Smith, from his 1954 photo essay A Man of Mercy on Dr. Albert Schweitzer and his humanitarian work in French Equatorial Africa. The image took 5 days to reproduce the tonal range of the scene, which ranges from a bright lamp (relative to the scene) to a dark shadow.[22]

 

Ansel Adams elevated dodging and burning to an art form. Many of his famous prints were manipulated in the darkroom with these two methods. Adams wrote a comprehensive book on producing prints called The Print, which features dodging and burning prominently, in the context of his Zone System.

 

With the advent of color photography, tone mapping in the darkroom was no longer possible, due to the specific timing needed during the developing process of color film. Photographers looked to film manufacturers to design new film stocks with improved response over the years, or shot in black and white to use tone mapping methods.

Film capable of directly recording high-dynamic-range images was developed by Charles Wyckoff and EG&G "in the course of a contract with the Department of the Air Force".[23] This XR film had three emulsion layers, an upper layer having an ASA speed rating of 400, a middle layer with an intermediate rating, and a lower layer with an ASA rating of 0.004. The film was processed in a manner similar to color films, and each layer produced a different color.[24] The dynamic range of this extended range film has been estimated as 1:108.[25] It has been used to photograph nuclear explosions,[26] for astronomical photography,[27] for spectrographic research,[28] and for medical imaging.[29] Wyckoff's detailed pictures of nuclear explosions appeared on the cover of Life magazine in the mid-1950s.

 

Late-twentieth century[edit]

The concept of neighborhood tone mapping was applied to video cameras by a group from the Technion in Israel led by Prof. Y.Y.Zeevi who filed for a patent on this concept in 1988.[30] In 1993 the first commercial medical camera was introduced that performed real time capturing of multiple images with different exposures, and producing an HDR video image, by the same group.[31]

 

Modern HDR imaging uses a completely different approach, based on making a high-dynamic-range luminance or light map using only global image operations (across the entire image), and then tone mapping this result. Global HDR was first introduced in 1993[1] resulting in a mathematical theory of differently exposed pictures of the same subject matter that was published in 1995 by Steve Mann and Rosalind Picard.[2]

 

The advent of consumer digital cameras produced a new demand for HDR imaging to improve the light response of digital camera sensors, which had a much smaller dynamic range than film. Steve Mann developed and patented the global-HDR method for producing digital images having extended dynamic range at the MIT Media Laboratory.[32] Mann's method involved a two-step procedure: (1) generate one floating point image array by global-only image operations (operations that affect all pixels identically, without regard to their local neighborhoods); and then (2) convert this image array, using local neighborhood processing (tone-remapping, etc.), into an HDR image. The image array generated by the first step of Mann's process is called a lightspace image, lightspace picture, or radiance map. Another benefit of global-HDR imaging is that it provides access to the intermediate light or radiance map, which has been used for computer vision, and other image processing operations.[32]

 

In 2005, Adobe Systems introduced several new features in Photoshop CS2 including Merge to HDR, 32 bit floating point image support, and HDR tone mapping.

 

While custom high-dynamic-range digital video solutions had been developed for industrial manufacturing during the 1980s, it was not until the early 2000s that several scholarly research efforts used consumer-grade sensors and cameras.[34] A few companies such as RED[35] and Arri[36] have been developing digital sensors capable of a higher dynamic range. RED EPIC-X can capture HDRx images with a user selectable 1-3 stops of additional highlight latitude in the 'x' channel. The 'x' channel can be merged with the normal channel in post production software. With the advent of low-cost consumer digital cameras, many amateurs began posting tone mapped HDR time-lapse videos on the Internet, essentially a sequence of still photographs in quick succession. In 2010 the independent studio Soviet Montage produced an example of HDR video from disparately exposed video streams using a beam splitter and consumer grade HD video cameras.[37] Similar methods have been described in the academic literature in 2001[38] and 2007.[39]

 

Modern movies have often been filmed with cameras featuring a higher dynamic range, and legacy movies can be upgraded even if manual intervention would be needed for some frames (as this happened in the past with black&white films’ upgrade to color). Also, special effects, especially those in which real and synthetic footage are seamlessly mixed, require both HDR shooting and rendering. HDR video is also needed in all applications in which capturing temporal aspects of changes in the scene demands high accuracy. This is especially important in monitoring of some industrial processes such as welding, predictive driver assistance systems in automotive industry, surveillance systems, to name just a few possible applications. HDR video can be also considered to speed up the image acquisition in all applications, in which a large number of static HDR images are needed, as for example in image-based methods in computer graphics. Finally, with the spread of TV sets with enhanced dynamic range, broadcasting HDR video may become important, but may take a long time to occur due to standardization issues. For this particular application, enhancing current low-dynamic range rendering (LDR) video signal to HDR by intelligent TV sets seems to be a more viable near-term solution.

 

More and more CMOS image sensors now have high dynamic range capability within the pixels themselves. Such pixels are intrinsically non-linear (by design) so that the wide dynamic range of the scene is non-linearly compressed into a smaller dynamic range electronic representation inside the pixel.[41] Such sensors are used in extreme dynamic range applications like welding or automotive.

 

Some other sensors designed for use in security applications can automatically provide two or more images for each frame, with changing exposure. For example a sensor for 30fps video will give out 60fps with the odd frames at a short exposure time and the even frames at a longer exposure time. Some of the sensor may even combine the two images on-chip so that a wider dynamic range without in-pixel compression is directly available to the user for display or processing.

 

Quelle:

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-dynamic-range_imaging

 

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Dynamic_Range_Image

  

Photography (see section below for etymology) is the art, science and practice of creating durable images by recording light or other electromagnetic radiation, either chemically by means of a light-sensitive material such as photographic film, or electronically by means of an image sensor.[1] Typically, a lens is used to focus the light reflected or emitted from objects into a real image on the light-sensitive surface inside a camera during a timed exposure. The result in an electronic image sensor is an electrical charge at each pixel, which is electronically processed and stored in a digital image file for subsequent display or processing.

 

The result in a photographic emulsion is an invisible latent image, which is later chemically developed into a visible image, either negative or positive depending on the purpose of the photographic material and the method of processing. A negative image on film is traditionally used to photographically create a positive image on a paper base, known as a print, either by using an enlarger or by contact printing.

 

Photography has many uses for business, science, manufacturing (e.g. photolithography), art, recreational purposes, and mass communication.

 

The word "photography" was created from the Greek roots φωτός (phōtos), genitive of φῶς (phōs), "light"[2] and γραφή (graphé) "representation by means of lines" or "drawing",[3] together meaning "drawing with light".[4]

 

Several people may have coined the same new term from these roots independently. Hercules Florence, a French painter and inventor living in Campinas, Brazil, used the French form of the word, photographie, in private notes which a Brazilian photography historian believes were written in 1834.[5] Johann von Maedler, a Berlin astronomer, is credited in a 1932 German history of photography as having used it in an article published on 25 February 1839 in the German newspaper Vossische Zeitung.[6] Both of these claims are now widely reported but apparently neither has ever been independently confirmed as beyond reasonable doubt. Credit has traditionally been given to Sir John Herschel both for coining the word and for introducing it to the public. His uses of it in private correspondence prior to 25 February 1839 and at his Royal Society lecture on the subject in London on 14 March 1839 have long been amply documented and accepted as settled fact.

 

History and evolution

Precursor technologies

Photography is the result of combining several technical discoveries. Long before the first photographs were made, Chinese philosopher Mo Di and Greek mathematicians Aristotle and Euclid described a pinhole camera in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE.[8][9] In the 6th century CE, Byzantine mathematician Anthemius of Tralles used a type of camera obscura in his experiments,[10] Ibn al-Haytham (Alhazen) (965–1040) studied the camera obscura and pinhole camera,[9][11] Albertus Magnus (1193–1280) discovered silver nitrate,[12] and Georg Fabricius (1516–71) discovered silver chloride.[13] Techniques described in the Book of Optics are capable of producing primitive photographs using medieval materials. [14][15][16]

 

Daniele Barbaro described a diaphragm in 1566.[17] Wilhelm Homberg described how light darkened some chemicals (photochemical effect) in 1694.[18] The fiction book Giphantie, published in 1760, by French author Tiphaigne de la Roche, described what can be interpreted as photography.[17]

 

The discovery of the camera obscura that provides an image of a scene dates back to ancient China. Leonardo da Vinci mentions natural cameras obscura that are formed by dark caves on the edge of a sunlit valley. A hole in the cave wall will act as a pinhole camera and project a laterally reversed, upside down image on a piece of paper. So the birth of photography was primarily concerned with developing a means to fix and retain the image produced by the camera obscura.

 

The first success of reproducing images without a camera occurred when Thomas Wedgwood, from the famous family of potters, obtained copies of paintings on leather using silver salts. Since he had no way of permanently fixing those reproductions (stabilizing the image by washing out the non-exposed silver salts), they would turn completely black in the light and thus had to be kept in a dark room for viewing.

 

Renaissance painters used the camera obscura which, in fact, gives the optical rendering in color that dominates Western Art. The camera obscura literally means "dark chamber" in Latin. It is a box with a hole in it which allows light to go through and create an image onto the piece of paper.

 

First camera photography (1820s)

Invented in the early decades of the 19th century, photography by means of the camera seemed able to capture more detail and information than traditional media, such as painting and sculpture.[19] Photography as a usable process goes back to the 1820s with the development of chemical photography. The first permanent photoetching was an image produced in 1822 by the French inventor Nicéphore Niépce, but it was destroyed in a later attempt to make prints from it.[7] Niépce was successful again in 1825. He made the View from the Window at Le Gras, the earliest surviving photograph from nature (i.e., of the image of a real-world scene, as formed in a camera obscura by a lens), in 1826 or 1827.[20]

 

Because Niépce's camera photographs required an extremely long exposure (at least eight hours and probably several days), he sought to greatly improve his bitumen process or replace it with one that was more practical. Working in partnership with Louis Daguerre, he developed a somewhat more sensitive process that produced visually superior results, but it still required a few hours of exposure in the camera. Niépce died in 1833 and Daguerre then redirected the experiments toward the light-sensitive silver halides, which Niépce had abandoned many years earlier because of his inability to make the images he captured with them light-fast and permanent. Daguerre's efforts culminated in what would later be named the daguerreotype process, the essential elements of which were in place in 1837. The required exposure time was measured in minutes instead of hours. Daguerre took the earliest confirmed photograph of a person in 1838 while capturing a view of a Paris street: unlike the other pedestrian and horse-drawn traffic on the busy boulevard, which appears deserted, one man having his boots polished stood sufficiently still throughout the approximately ten-minute-long exposure to be visible. Eventually, France agreed to pay Daguerre a pension for his process in exchange for the right to present his invention to the world as the gift of France, which occurred on 19 August 1839.

Meanwhile, in Brazil, Hercules Florence had already created his own process in 1832, naming it Photographie, and an English inventor, William Fox Talbot, had created another method of making a reasonably light-fast silver process image but had kept his work secret. After reading about Daguerre's invention in January 1839, Talbot published his method and set about improving on it. At first, like other pre-daguerreotype processes, Talbot's paper-based photography typically required hours-long exposures in the camera, but in 1840 he created the calotype process, with exposures comparable to the daguerreotype. In both its original and calotype forms, Talbot's process, unlike Daguerre's, created a translucent negative which could be used to print multiple positive copies, the basis of most chemical photography up to the present day. Daguerreotypes could only be replicated by rephotographing them with a camera.[21] Talbot's famous tiny paper negative of the Oriel window in Lacock Abbey, one of a number of camera photographs he made in the summer of 1835, may be the oldest camera negative in existence.[22][23]

 

John Herschel made many contributions to the new field. He invented the cyanotype process, later familiar as the "blueprint". He was the first to use the terms "photography", "negative" and "positive". He had discovered in 1819 that sodium thiosulphate was a solvent of silver halides, and in 1839 he informed Talbot (and, indirectly, Daguerre) that it could be used to "fix" silver-halide-based photographs and make them completely light-fast. He made the first glass negative in late 1839.

 

In the March 1851 issue of The Chemist, Frederick Scott Archer published his wet plate collodion process. It became the most widely used photographic medium until the gelatin dry plate, introduced in the 1870s, eventually replaced it. There are three subsets to the collodion process; the Ambrotype (a positive image on glass), the Ferrotype or Tintype (a positive image on metal) and the glass negative, which was used to make positive prints on albumen or salted paper.

 

Many advances in photographic glass plates and printing were made during the rest of the 19th century. In 1884, George Eastman developed an early type of film to replace photographic plates, leading to the technology used by film cameras today.

 

In 1891, Gabriel Lippmann introduced a process for making natural-color photographs based on the optical phenomenon of the interference of light waves. His scientifically elegant and important but ultimately impractical invention earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1908.

 

Black-and-white

See also: Monochrome photography

All photography was originally monochrome, or black-and-white. Even after color film was readily available, black-and-white photography continued to dominate for decades, due to its lower cost and its "classic" photographic look. The tones and contrast between light and dark shadows define black and white photography.[24] It is important to note that some monochromatic pictures are not always pure blacks and whites, but also contain other hues depending on the process. The cyanotype process produces an image composed of blue tones. The albumen process, first used more than 150 years ago, produces brown tones.

 

Many photographers continue to produce some monochrome images, often because of the established archival permanence of well processed silver halide based materials. Some full color digital images are processed using a variety of techniques to create black and whites, and some manufacturers produce digital cameras that exclusively shoot monochrome.

 

Color

Color photography was explored beginning in the mid-19th century. Early experiments in color required extremely long exposures (hours or days for camera images) and could not "fix" the photograph to prevent the color from quickly fading when exposed to white light.

 

The first permanent color photograph was taken in 1861 using the three-color-separation principle first published by physicist James Clerk Maxwell in 1855. Maxwell's idea was to take three separate black-and-white photographs through red, green and blue filters. This provides the photographer with the three basic channels required to recreate a color image.

 

Transparent prints of the images could be projected through similar color filters and superimposed on the projection screen, an additive method of color reproduction. A color print on paper could be produced by superimposing carbon prints of the three images made in their complementary colors, a subtractive method of color reproduction pioneered by Louis Ducos du Hauron in the late 1860s.

 

Russian photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii made extensive use of this color separation technique, employing a special camera which successively exposed the three color-filtered images on different parts of an oblong plate. Because his exposures were not simultaneous, unsteady subjects exhibited color "fringes" or, if rapidly moving through the scene, appeared as brightly colored ghosts in the resulting projected or printed images.

 

The development of color photography was hindered by the limited sensitivity of early photographic materials, which were mostly sensitive to blue, only slightly sensitive to green, and virtually insensitive to red. The discovery of dye sensitization by photochemist Hermann Vogel in 1873 suddenly made it possible to add sensitivity to green, yellow and even red. Improved color sensitizers and ongoing improvements in the overall sensitivity of emulsions steadily reduced the once-prohibitive long exposure times required for color, bringing it ever closer to commercial viability.

 

Autochrome, the first commercially successful color process, was introduced by the Lumière brothers in 1907. Autochrome plates incorporated a mosaic color filter layer made of dyed grains of potato starch, which allowed the three color components to be recorded as adjacent microscopic image fragments. After an Autochrome plate was reversal processed to produce a positive transparency, the starch grains served to illuminate each fragment with the correct color and the tiny colored points blended together in the eye, synthesizing the color of the subject by the additive method. Autochrome plates were one of several varieties of additive color screen plates and films marketed between the 1890s and the 1950s.

 

Kodachrome, the first modern "integral tripack" (or "monopack") color film, was introduced by Kodak in 1935. It captured the three color components in a multilayer emulsion. One layer was sensitized to record the red-dominated part of the spectrum, another layer recorded only the green part and a third recorded only the blue. Without special film processing, the result would simply be three superimposed black-and-white images, but complementary cyan, magenta, and yellow dye images were created in those layers by adding color couplers during a complex processing procedure.

 

Agfa's similarly structured Agfacolor Neu was introduced in 1936. Unlike Kodachrome, the color couplers in Agfacolor Neu were incorporated into the emulsion layers during manufacture, which greatly simplified the processing. Currently available color films still employ a multilayer emulsion and the same principles, most closely resembling Agfa's product.

 

Instant color film, used in a special camera which yielded a unique finished color print only a minute or two after the exposure, was introduced by Polaroid in 1963.

 

Color photography may form images as positive transparencies, which can be used in a slide projector, or as color negatives intended for use in creating positive color enlargements on specially coated paper. The latter is now the most common form of film (non-digital) color photography owing to the introduction of automated photo printing equipment.

 

Digital photography

Main article: Digital photography

See also: Digital camera and Digital versus film photography

In 1981, Sony unveiled the first consumer camera to use a charge-coupled device for imaging, eliminating the need for film: the Sony Mavica. While the Mavica saved images to disk, the images were displayed on television, and the camera was not fully digital. In 1991, Kodak unveiled the DCS 100, the first commercially available digital single lens reflex camera. Although its high cost precluded uses other than photojournalism and professional photography, commercial digital photography was born.

 

Digital imaging uses an electronic image sensor to record the image as a set of electronic data rather than as chemical changes on film. [25] An important difference between digital and chemical photography is that chemical photography resists photo manipulation because it involves film and photographic paper, while digital imaging is a highly manipulative medium. This difference allows for a degree of image post-processing that is comparatively difficult in film-based photography and permits different communicative potentials and applications.

  

Photography gained the interest of many scientists and artists from its inception. Scientists have used photography to record and study movements, such as Eadweard Muybridge's study of human and animal locomotion in 1887. Artists are equally interested by these aspects but also try to explore avenues other than the photo-mechanical representation of reality, such as the pictorialist movement.

 

Military, police, and security forces use photography for surveillance, recognition and data storage. Photography is used by amateurs to preserve memories, to capture special moments, to tell stories, to send messages, and as a source of entertainment. High speed photography allows for visualizing events that are too fast for the human eye.

 

Technical aspects

Main article: Camera

The camera is the image-forming device, and photographic film or a silicon electronic image sensor is the sensing medium. The respective recording medium can be the film itself, or a digital electronic or magnetic memory.[26]

 

Photographers control the camera and lens to "expose" the light recording material (such as film) to the required amount of light to form a "latent image" (on film) or RAW file (in digital cameras) which, after appropriate processing, is converted to a usable image. Digital cameras use an electronic image sensor based on light-sensitive electronics such as charge-coupled device (CCD) or complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The resulting digital image is stored electronically, but can be reproduced on paper or film.

 

The camera (or 'camera obscura') is a dark room or chamber from which, as far as possible, all light is excluded except the light that forms the image. The subject being photographed, however, must be illuminated. Cameras can range from small to very large, a whole room that is kept dark while the object to be photographed is in another room where it is properly illuminated. This was common for reproduction photography of flat copy when large film negatives were used (see Process camera).

 

As soon as photographic materials became "fast" (sensitive) enough for taking candid or surreptitious pictures, small "detective" cameras were made, some actually disguised as a book or handbag or pocket watch (the Ticka camera) or even worn hidden behind an Ascot necktie with a tie pin that was really the lens.

 

The movie camera is a type of photographic camera which takes a rapid sequence of photographs on strips of film. In contrast to a still camera, which captures a single snapshot at a time, the movie camera takes a series of images, each called a "frame". This is accomplished through an intermittent mechanism. The frames are later played back in a movie projector at a specific speed, called the "frame rate" (number of frames per second). While viewing, a person's eyes and brain merge the separate pictures together to create the illusion of motion.[27]

 

Camera controls are interrelated. The total amount of light reaching the film plane (the 'exposure') changes with the duration of exposure, aperture of the lens, and on the effective focal length of the lens (which in variable focal length lenses, can force a change in aperture as the lens is zoomed). Changing any of these controls can alter the exposure. Many cameras may be set to adjust most or all of these controls automatically. This automatic functionality is useful for occasional photographers in many situations.

 

The duration of an exposure is referred to as shutter speed, often even in cameras that do not have a physical shutter, and is typically measured in fractions of a second. It is quite possible to have exposures from one up to several seconds, usually for still-life subjects, and for night scenes exposure times can be several hours. However, for a subject that is in motion use a fast shutter speed. This will prevent the photograph from coming out blurry.[29]

 

The effective aperture is expressed by an f-number or f-stop (derived from focal ratio), which is proportional to the ratio of the focal length to the diameter of the aperture. Longer lenses will pass less light even though the diameter of the aperture is the same due to the greater distance the light has to travel; shorter lenses (a shorter focal length) will be brighter with the same size of aperture.

 

The smaller the f/number, the larger the effective aperture. The present system of f/numbers to give the effective aperture of a lens was standardized by an international convention. There were earlier, different series of numbers in older cameras.

 

If the f-number is decreased by a factor of √2, the aperture diameter is increased by the same factor, and its area is increased by a factor of 2. The f-stops that might be found on a typical lens include 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22, 32, where going up "one stop" (using lower f-stop numbers) doubles the amount of light reaching the film, and stopping down one stop halves the amount of light.

 

Image capture can be achieved through various combinations of shutter speed, aperture, and film or sensor speed. Different (but related) settings of aperture and shutter speed enable photographs to be taken under various conditions of film or sensor speed, lighting and motion of subjects and/or camera, and desired depth of field. A slower speed film will exhibit less "grain", and a slower speed setting on an electronic sensor will exhibit less "noise", while higher film and sensor speeds allow for a faster shutter speed, which reduces motion blur or allows the use of a smaller aperture to increase the depth of field.

 

For example, a wider aperture is used for lower light and a lower aperture for more light. If a subject is in motion, then a high shutter speed may be needed. A tripod can also be helpful in that it enables a slower shutter speed to be used.

 

For example, f/8 at 8 ms (1/125 of a second) and f/5.6 at 4 ms (1/250 of a second) yield the same amount of light. The chosen combination has an impact on the final result. The aperture and focal length of the lens determine the depth of field, which refers to the range of distances from the lens that will be in focus. A longer lens or a wider aperture will result in "shallow" depth of field (i.e. only a small plane of the image will be in sharp focus). This is often useful for isolating subjects from backgrounds as in individual portraits or macro photography.

 

Conversely, a shorter lens, or a smaller aperture, will result in more of the image being in focus. This is generally more desirable when photographing landscapes or groups of people. With very small apertures, such as pinholes, a wide range of distance can be brought into focus, but sharpness is severely degraded by diffraction with such small apertures. Generally, the highest degree of "sharpness" is achieved at an aperture near the middle of a lens's range (for example, f/8 for a lens with available apertures of f/2.8 to f/16). However, as lens technology improves, lenses are becoming capable of making increasingly sharp images at wider apertures.

 

Image capture is only part of the image forming process. Regardless of material, some process must be employed to render the latent image captured by the camera into a viewable image. With slide film, the developed film is just mounted for projection. Print film requires the developed film negative to be printed onto photographic paper or transparency. Digital images may be uploaded to an image server (e.g., a photo-sharing web site), viewed on a television, or transferred to a computer or digital photo frame. Every type can be printed on more "classical" mediums such as regular paper or photographic paper for examples.

 

Prior to the rendering of a viewable image, modifications can be made using several controls. Many of these controls are similar to controls during image capture, while some are exclusive to the rendering process. Most printing controls have equivalent digital concepts, but some create different effects. For example, dodging and burning controls are different between digital and film processes. Other printing modifications include:

Digital point-and-shoot cameras have become widespread consumer products, outselling film cameras, and including new features such as video and audio recording. Kodak announced in January 2004 that it would no longer sell reloadable 35 mm cameras in western Europe, Canada and the United States after the end of that year. Kodak was at that time a minor player in the reloadable film cameras market. In January 2006, Nikon followed suit and announced that they will stop the production of all but two models of their film cameras: the low-end Nikon FM10, and the high-end Nikon F6. On 25 May 2006, Canon announced they will stop developing new film SLR cameras.[34] Though most new camera designs are now digital, a new 6x6cm/6x7cm medium format film camera was introduced in 2008 in a cooperation between Fuji and Voigtländer.[35][36]

 

According to a survey made by Kodak in 2007 when the majority of photography was already digital, 75 percent of professional photographers say they will continue to use film, even though some embrace digital.[37]

 

The PMA say that in the year 2000 nearly a billion rolls of film were sold each year and by 2011 a mere 20 million rolls, plus 31 million single-use cameras.[38]

 

Quelle:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photography

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fotografie

 

Fountains Abbey is one of the largest and best preserved ruined Cistercian monasteries in England. It is located three miles south-west of Ripon in North Yorkshire, near to the village of Aldfield. Founded in 1132, the abbey operated for over 400 years, until 1539, when Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The abbey is a Grade I listed building owned by the National Trust and part of the designated Studley Royal Park including the Ruins of Fountains Abbey UNESCO World Heritage Site.

After a dispute and riot in 1132 at the Benedictine house of St Mary's Abbey, in York, 13 monks were expelled (among them Saint Robert of Newminster) and, after unsuccessfully attempting to return to the early 6th-century Rule of St Benedict, were taken into the protection of Thurstan, Archbishop of York. He provided them with land in the valley of the River Skell, a tributary of the Ure. The enclosed valley had all the natural features needed for the creation of a monastery, providing shelter from the weather, stone and timber for building, and a supply of running water. After enduring a harsh winter in 1133, the monks applied to join the Cistercian order and in 1135 became the second house of that order in northern England, after Rievaulx. The monks subjected themselves to Clairvaux Abbey, in Burgundy which was under the rule of St Bernard. Under the guidance of Geoffrey of Ainai, a monk sent from Clairvaux, the group learned how to celebrate the seven Canonical Hours and were shown how to construct wooden buildings in accordance with Cistercian practice.

After Henry Murdac was elected to the abbacy in 1143, the small stone church and timber claustral buildings were replaced. Within three years, an aisled nave had been added to the stone church, and the first permanent claustral buildings built in stone and roofed in tile had been completed.

In 1146 an angry mob, displeased with Murdac's role in opposing the election of William FitzHerbert to the archbishopric of York, attacked the abbey and burnt down all but the church and some surrounding buildings. The community recovered swiftly from the attack and founded four daughter houses. Henry Murdac resigned the abbacy in 1147 to become the Archbishop of York and was replaced first by Maurice, Abbot of Rievaulx then, on the resignation of Maurice, by Thorald. Thorald was forced by Henry Murdac to resign after two years in office. The next abbot, Richard, held the post until his death in 1170 and restored the abbey's stability and prosperity. In 20 years as abbot, he supervised a huge building programme which involved completing repairs to the damaged church and building more accommodation for the increasing number of recruits. Only the chapter house was completed before he died and the work was ably continued by his successor, Robert of Pipewell, under whose rule the abbey gained a reputation for caring for the needy.

The next abbot was William who presided over the abbey from 1180 to 1190 and he was succeeded by Ralph Haget, who had entered Fountains at the age of 30 as a novice, after pursuing a military career. During the European famine of 1194, Haget ordered the construction of shelters in the vicinity of the abbey and provided daily food rations to the poor enhancing the abbey's reputation for caring for the poor and attracting more grants from wealthy benefactors.

In the first half of the 13th century Fountains increased in reputation and prosperity under the next three abbots, John of York (1203–1211), John of Hessle (1211–1220) and John of Kent (1220–1247). They were burdened with an inordinate amount of administrative duties and increasing demands for money in taxation and levies, but managed to complete another massive expansion of the abbey's buildings. This included enlarging the church and building an infirmary. In the second half of the 13th century the abbey was in more straitened circumstances. It was presided over by eleven abbots, and became financially unstable largely due to forward selling its wool crop, and the abbey was criticised for its dire material and physical state when it was visited by Archbishop John Romeyn in 1294. The run of disasters that befell the community continued into the early 14th century when northern England was invaded by the Scots and there were further demands for taxes. The culmination of these misfortunes was the Black Death of 1349–1349. The loss of manpower and income due to the ravages of the plague was almost ruinous.

A further complication arose as a result of the Papal Schism of 1378–1409. Fountains Abbey along with other English Cistercian houses was told to break off any contact with the mother house of Citeaux, which supported a rival pope. This resulted in the abbots forming their own chapter to rule the order in England and consequently they became increasingly involved in internecine politics. In 1410, following the death of Abbott Burley of Fountains, the community was riven by several years of turmoil over the election of his successor. Contending candidates John Ripon, Abbot of Meaux, and Roger Frank, a monk of Fountains were locked in discord until 1415 when Ripon was finally appointed and presided until his death in 1434. Under abbots John Greenwell (1442–1471), Thomas Swinton (1471–8), John Darnton (1478–95), who undertook some much needed restoration of the fabric of the abbey including notable work on the church, and Marmaduke Huby (1495–1526) Fountains regained stability and prosperity.

When Marmaduke Huby died he was succeeded by William Thirsk who was accused by the royal commissioners of immorality and inadequacy and dismissed from the abbacy and replaced by Marmaduke Bradley, a monk of the abbey who had reported Thirsk's supposed offences, testified against him and offered the authorities six hundred marks for the abbacy. In 1539 Bradley surrendered the abbey when Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

Interior of the abbey church looking down the nave

The abbey precinct covered 70 acres surrounded by an 11foot wall built in the 13th century, some parts of which are still visible to the south and west of the abbey. The area consists of three concentric zones cut by the River Skell flowing from west to east across the site. The church and claustral buildings stand at the centre of the precinct north of the Skell, the inner court containing the domestic buildings stretches down to the river and the outer court housing the industrial and agricultural buildings lies on the river's south bank. The early abbey buildings were added to and altered over time, causing deviations from the strict Cistercian type. Outside the walls were the abbey's granges.

The original abbey church was built of wood and "was probably" two-stories high; it was, however, quickly replaced in stone. The church was damaged in the attack on the abbey in 1146 and was rebuilt, in a larger scale, on the same site. Building work was completed c.1170. This structure, completed around 1170, was 300 foot long and had 11 bays in the side aisles. A lantern tower was added at the crossing of the church in the late 12th century. The presbytery at the eastern end of the church was much altered in the 13th century. The church's greatly lengthened choir, commenced by Abbot John of York, 1203–11, and carried on by his successor terminates, like that of Durham Cathedral, in an eastern transept, the work of Abbot John of Kent, 1220–47. The 160-foot (49 m) tall tower, which was added not long before the dissolution, by Abbot Huby, 1494–1526, is in an unusual position at the northern end of the north transept and bears Huby's motto 'Soli Deo Honor et Gloria'. The sacristry adjoined the south transept.

The cloister, which had arcading of black marble from Nidderdale and white sandstone, is in the centre of the precinct and to the south of the church. The three-aisled chapter-house and parlour open from the eastern walk of the cloister and the refectory, with the kitchen and buttery attached, are at right angles to its southern walk. Parallel with the western walk is an immense vaulted substructure serving as cellars and store-rooms, which supported the dormitory of the conversi (lay brothers) above. This building extended across the river and, at its south-west corner, were the latrines, which were built above the swiftly flowing stream. The monks' dormitory was in its usual position above the chapter-house, to the south of the transept. Peculiarities of this arrangement include the position of the kitchen, between the refectory and calefactory, and of the infirmary above the river to the west, adjoining the guest-houses.

The abbot's house, one of the largest in all of England, is located to the east of the latrine block, where portions of it are suspended on arches over the River Skell. It was built in the mid-twelfth-century as a modest single-storey structure, then, from the fourteenth-century, underwent extensive expansion and remodelling to end up in the 16th century as a grand dwelling with fine bay windows and grand fireplaces. The great hall was an expansive room 171 by 69 feet.

Among other apartments were a domestic oratory or chapel, 46 by 23 feet and a kitchen, 50 by 38 feet.

The Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 was a factor that led to a downturn in the prosperity of the abbey in the early fourteenth century. Areas of the north of England as far south as York were looted by the Scots. Then the number of lay-brothers being recruited to the order reduced considerably. The abbey chose to take advantage of the relaxation of the edict on leasing property that had been enacted by the General Chapter of the order in 1208 and leased some of their properties. Others were staffed by hired labour and remained in hand under the supervision of bailiffs. In 1535 Fountains had an interest in 138mills and the total taxable income of the Fountains estate was £1,115, making it the richest Cistercian monastery in England.

The Abbey buildings and over 500 acres of land were sold by the Crown, on 1 October 1540, to Sir Richard Gresham, the London merchant, father of the founder of the Royal Exchange, Sir Thomas Gresham. Gresham sold some of the fabric of the site, stone, timber, lead, as building materials to help to defray the cost of purchase. The site was acquired in 1597 by Sir Stephen Proctor, who used stone from the monastic complex to build Fountains Hall. Between 1627 and 1767 the estate was owned by the Messenger family who sold it to William Aislaby, who was responsible for combining it with the Studley Royal Estate. The archaeological excavation of the site was begun under the supervision of John Richard Walbran, a Ripon antiquary who, in 1846, had published a paper on the Necessity of clearing out the Conventual Church of Fountains. In 1966 the Abbey was placed in the guardianship of the Department of the Environment and the estate was purchased by the West Riding County Council who transferred ownership to the North Yorkshire County Council in 1974. The National Trust bought the 674 acre Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal estate from North Yorkshire County Council in 1983.

In 1986 the parkland in which the abbey is situated and the abbey was designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

It is currently owned by the National Trust and maintained by English Heritage. The trust owns Studley Royal Park, Fountains Hall, to which there is partial public access, and St Mary's Church, designed by William Burges and built around 1873, all of which are significant features of the World Heritage Site. The Porter's Lodge, which was once the gatehouse to the abbey, houses a modern exhibition area with displays about the history of Fountains Abbey and how the monks lived.

In January 2010, Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal became two of the first National Trust properties to be included in Google Street View, using the Google Trike.

 

A photo of Mt. Moran and the north end of the Teton Mountain Range, reflected in Jackson Lake (elevation 6,772'). Jackson Lake is big. It is a natural lake that the Snake River flows into, through, and out of. However, at the turn of the century a dam was constructed across the outlet to raise the natural level of the lake (for more water for farm irrigation).

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Here is a clip from Wikipedia about the Jackson Lake dam:

 

The first Jackson Lake Dam was a log-crib dam constructed in 1906–7 across the outlet of Jackson Lake, a natural lake. That dam raised the lake level by 22 feet, but the dam failed in 1910. An new concrete and earthen dam was constructed in stages between 1911 and 1916, raising the maximum lake level to 30 feet above the lake's natural elevation, providing a storage capacity of 847,000 acre feet. The new dam was designed by Frank A. Banks, who would later supervise the construction of Grand Coulee Dam.

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It is interesting to look at a big map of the Snake River headwaters drainage. We now know how truly big the Yellowstone caldera, that holds Yellowstone Lake really is, and all the water flowing into and out of Yellowstone Lake flows to the Atlantic side of the Continental divide.

 

A little creek called Grouse Creek (which flows to the Atlantic) is not far away from Surprise Creek (which flows to the Heart River, into the Snake River, and on to the Pacific Ocean).

 

On a Friday morning drive with my wife, I was pleased to see that Jackson Lake was relatively "wind and wave" free, so I pulled our car over, climbed down the roots of a large conifer, to get lakeside, and snapped yet another set of "reflection photographs".

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These photographs were taken on a 2,700 mile 11 day road trip in June of 2013. My wife and I left our home in Eastern Washington on Sunday the 9th of June and drove to Kalispell, Montana where we spent night one. We enjoyed back road driving from St. Regis to Kalispell with wonderful views of Flathead Lake.

 

Day two, we left Kalispell and chose to drive highway 2 to Browning, Montana. The Going to the Sun highway through Glacier NP was closed and we had traveled that road several times. Rain arrived big time by the time we reached Browning. My wife paid a visit on the local Blackfoot casino in Browning, while I gassed up the car (Our little Honda Fit got 41.4 mpg on this trip), and bought "travel food" for us a.k.a. "junk food".

 

The Blackfoot Indians we saw in Browning were a handsome, tall athletic group and I could see why other tribes once feared them, as did the early pioneers, who attempted to travel their territory.

 

The drive from Browning to Great Falls was some of the most beautiful big open big sky country I have ever seen. Even with the rain it was beautiful. Stopping to read many of the historic makers, I was surprised that the encounter (that left two Blackfoot Indians dead and Capt. Lewis (of Lewis and Clark fame), with a few of his men, running for a fortuitous reunion with some of his men on the Missouri River) - - was in such big open country.

 

When I read the journals of Lewis and Clark I had mistakenly assumed the event took place in forested mountains, much like the Lochsa River country of Idaho. We spend the night at Great Falls.

 

I wanted to visit the "Great Falls" of the Missouri River. Once again my preconceived notions and knowledge were...wrong. I didn't realize that Lewis and Clarks portage of 18 miles was around a whole series of waterfall, not just one great big one with a tough canyon requiring the long portage.

 

There are five waterfalls on the Missouri River that the Lewis and Clark expedition had to portage around, at least there "were five". One is no underwater. Great Falls is the lowest and biggest; then moving up the Missouri River there is Crooked Falls; Rainbow Falls; Colter Falls (under water now) and Black Eagle Falls.

 

My wife and I made a point of visiting each of the four fall that can still be seen. Dams impact all of them with dams built right across the top of Black Eagle and Great Falls. Another dam diverts the water around Rainbow and Crooked falls, much of the time so very little water was passing over them. Still, it was so interesting to see where this part of the Lewis and Clark expedition took place. We visited the Lewis and Clark visitor center and found it really well done and informative. We spent the second night of our road trip at Great Falls.

 

Day three. I didn't want to wait until 10 am for the Charlie Russell museum to open in Great Falls to open so we headed from Great Falls to Bozeman. We took highway 89 south and got snowed on at King Hill summit. Still, the weather showed some signs of improvement and the scenery was great on our drive. We checked into our motel room early at Bozeman and rested up for an early start to Yellowstone NP and Grand Teton NP the next morning.

 

Day four. The sun came out. What a beautiful morning. We drove the scenic Gallatin River route (highway 89) down to West Yellowstone, where we had breakfast and gave our son a call on his cell phone. We had plans to meet up with them a time share they had in Jackson, Wyoming and spend Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday night with them.

 

We didn't know when we called them that they were headed for Yellowstone and wanted to take the same hike we intended to take (for different reasons). We agreed to look for each other at the Midway Geyser Basin at the Grand Prismatic parking lot OR at the trail head parking lot for Fairy Falls.

 

We arrived within minutes of each other (they coming from Jackson and we coming from Bozeman) at the Grand Prismatic parking lot. Then off we all went (son, daughter in law, granddaughter, my wife, and me) to the trailhead for the Fairy Falls hike.

 

At a point on the trail to Fairy Falls you can take an "unofficial" tread up a hill covered with downed timber, and get a panoramic view of Grand Prismatic. At that point on the trail, I took leave of the group and made my way up to the top of the hill (the best photos were at about halfway up the hill so all the extra hiking did for me, was give me some extra exercise - - which I can always use).

 

I hurried to catch up with the "group" but they had arrived at Fairy Falls about 15 minutes ahead of me, and were ready to return, soon after I arrived. I took a fun turn at carrying our 8 month old granddaughter in the nice Osprey poco daypack, my wife and I had got for her. She enjoyed trying to unscrew my Tilley hat from my head as we hiked along the trail. What fun!

 

After the Fairy Falls hike my wife and I headed straight for Grand Teton NP to do a few drives and short hikes on our own, while the kids remained in Yellowstone for most of the rest of the day. We all met up in Jackson and all got a good night's sleep at their time share, which was within walking distance of downtown and had three bedrooms.

 

Day Five. The most event filled day of our road trip. The girls (Grandma, Mom, and Granddaughter slept in before going window shopping in Jackson). My son and I got up around 4 am, put together our day hiking gear and headed out for the Leigh Lake trailhead for a nice early morning hike. Since we had lots of time until "daylight", we went to Oxbow Bend for some photo ops and made several other photo ops stops before starting our hike. The two of us had the trail to ourselves. We hiked the length of Leigh Lake to the trail junction for Trapper and Bearpaw Lakes.

 

The morning was cool, and the sight of the Grand Tetons (Mt. Moran @ 12,605') were spectacular. Little wind ripped the lakes so we got some good reflection photographs.

 

We rejoined the gals at Jackson and Grandpa and Grandma OMT did a little baby sitting so our son and daughter-in-law could get out take a good drive and hike on their own.

 

Day Six. On this morning, my wife and I got up early and took off for some drives and hikes of our own in Teton NP. The highlight of the morning was a drive up the Gros Ventre River (we saw a big healthy cinnamon colored black bear) and a trip up Signal Peak. What views from up there! We returned to Jackson mid afternoon for another stint of enjoyable "baby sitting", while our son and daughter-in-law went out to and to a cowboy concert with friends staying at nearby Wilson, Wyoming. A good time was had by all.

 

Day Seven: The kids headed home to Utah and my wife and I headed down scenic back roads to Evanston, Wyoming where we spent the night.

 

Day Eight: My wife and I were hoping that highway 150 through the high Uintas would be open and snow free - - and it was. So we took our time driving that scenic road, scouting campgrounds and trail heads for future reference, for later this year. We eventually made it to the kids place where I spent Sunday and Monday night - - before heading back to Washington state (Grandma OMT stayed on with the "Junior Ranger" (our granddaughter) for awhile longer.

 

Day Ten: I decided to take a scenic route back home and because I had not brought any car camping gear I had justified a trip to REI to buy the least expensive car camping tent I could buy (and a super cheap ground pad and sleeping bag at Wally Mart).

 

I then took off early (real early) Tuesday morning and drove the interstate to Twin Falls, Idaho. There I turned north up to Stanley, then across through camas blossom covered meadows to Lowman, Banks, then north to McCall, Idaho.

 

I found a small campground on Goose Creek north of McCall. It was two miles off the highway on a dirt road, and was just what I was looking for. I paid my five dollars "senior rate" for my campsite and found I was the only one camped for the night (the next morning I saw where one other party "tent camping" had joined me nearby.

 

A character "camp host" with a metal detector and few teeth, kept the little campground (Last Chance Campground), it spotless good order and so I built a fire and watched the clouds float by until crawling into my cheap tent, in my rated to 40 degrees poly Ozark brand $15 sleeping bag...and slept like a log. Much happier than I would have been in a motel room, and besides I now have another tent and a sleeping bag (throw in a $7 closed foam sleeping pad as well).

 

Day 11. Up the road to Riggins and photo ops along the Salmon River. At White Bird, I did something I have always intended to do but never taken the time. I left highway 95 to drive the old White Bird hill route (old highway 95), and walk the White Bird Battlefield (Nez Perce won that one). It had been over 40 years since I had driven that scenic road. I was in college at Washington State University then, and that was the only road to travel between Riggins and Grangeville .... way back then.

 

Photo ops as I drove Camas Prairie with the tail end of the rapeseed blossoms still covering many of the fields, then a visit to the new Nez Perce visitor center at Lapwai. Thai food in Lewiston and I was soon on my way home. Quite a trip!

 

Will be busy printing and framing in nice large, matted formats and frames and museum glass! Five of these photos will be printed on 40" x 60" floating wall mounted metal sheets! I think I know which--will share photos of the photos hanging on the walls!

 

And I am mounting some on plexiglass/acryllic--front mounting them! Some I am printing on lossy fuji-crystal archival paper too, and then front mounting 40"x60" versions to plexiglass--will send photos!

 

The secret to HDR photography is that you want people to say, "Woe dude--that's unreal!" And not, "Dude--that's not real!" "Unreal" is the word they use when they're trying to figure out the photo--what makes it cool--is it a photo? Is it painted? How'd it come to be--how'd you bend the light that way? "That's not real," is what they say if you have the saturation/HDR/ etc. turned up too high. :)

 

Some (almost) final edits for my Los Angeles Gallery Show! Printing them on metallic paper at 13" x 19" and mounting and framing them on a 4mm 18x24 white mat and 2" dark wood frame. Also printing some 40" x 70" whihc is over three feet by five feet! Wish you all could come (and hang out with the goddesses)!

 

Let me know your favs.!

 

New Instagram!

instagram.com/45surf

 

Videos!

vimeo.com/45surf

 

Nikon D800E / D800 HDR Anelope Valley Ghosts in Slot Canyonfor Gallery Show!

 

Yay! I booked a major photography show at a major LA gallery in December! Will also be giving some lectures on the story--the Hero's Journey Mythology--behind the photography!

 

Join/like my facebook!

www.facebook.com/45surfHerosJourneyMythology

 

Follow me on facebook!

www.facebook.com/elliot.mcgucken

 

Preparing for some gallery shows this fall to celebrate 300,000,000 views! Printing a few dozen photographs in ~ 30"x40" formats and mounting/framing. Here are some close-to-final edits. HDR photography 7 exposures shot at 1EV and combined in photomatix: 36 megapixel Nikon D800E with the awesome Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G ED AF-S Nikkor Wide Angle Zoom Lens. 45SURF Hero's Journey Mythology Photography!

 

Epic Scenic HDR Landscaps Shot with Nikon D800E: Hero's Journey Mythology Photography!

 

Shot with the Nikon Nikkor wide-angle 14-24 mm 2.8 lens!

 

Seven exposures @ 1EV finished in photomatix.

 

Enjoy the Hero's Journey Mythology Photography, and all the best on a hero's journey of your own making!

 

These were shot with Nikon's best D800 with the 14-24mm wide-angle Nikkor lens. 7 exposures were taken at 1 EV intervals, and combined in photomatix to bring out the shadows and highlights.

 

Rather large HDR (high dynamic range) photo--you can see great detail both near and far! View the detail at full size!

 

The Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G ED AF-S Nikkor Wide Angle Zoom Lens rocks!

 

High Dynamic Range (HDR) photos rock in capturing the full dynamic range of the scene!

 

All the best on your epic hero's journey from Johnny Ranger McCoy!

 

The Delicate Arch in Arches National Park Utah! Nikon D800E Dr. Elliot McGucken Fine Art Landscape & Nature Photography for Los Angeles Fine Art Gallery Show !

 

Zion National Park Utah! Nikon D800E Dr. Elliot McGucken Fine Art Landscape & Nature Photography for Los Angeles Fine Art Gallery Show !

 

Yosemite! Nikon D800E Dr. Elliot McGucken Fine Art Landscape & Nature Photography for Los Angeles Fine Art Gallery Show !

 

Yosemite El Capitan Reflected in the Merced River! Nikon D800E Dr. Elliot McGucken Fine Art Landscape & Nature Photography for Los Angeles Fine Art Gallery Show !

 

Big Sur Sunset Window Rock on Pfeiffer BEach! Nikon D800E Dr. Elliot McGucken Fine Art Landscape & Nature Photography for Los Angeles Fine Art Gallery Show !

Shot of Olivia inside the house, just window light here.

Kind of scary when you take pics of your Kids and see them as a child yet in the picture you can see them as much older sometimes-how do you stop them growing up :-) :-)

Shot: 1/100th sec @ f2.8, 185mm, ISO 800

 

This will probably be my only upload before Christmas (been crazy busy lately with little flickr time),so have a very good Christmas all.

 

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