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At the end of Hatchie Station Road on the border of Madison and Haywood counties in West Tennessee is this abandoned steel truss bridge spanning the Hatchie River. The bridge was built in 1929 and today has no roadbed; some locals say it never did have a roadbed and never was used. Others say the bridge was abandoned by 1944. The local lore also claims there was never a road on the far side of the bridge, which is the eastern border of the Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge. A nearby sign labels the area "Mr. Charlie Luke Landing, Hatchie Station, Big Black Creek Historical."

Un joli paysage buccolique près de "The Hatchie River" dans le Tennessee (USA), calme....

While driving through the Hatchie Bottom near the Hatchie River in Tennessee, we stopped at an old wooden bridge and I saw this golden view of a creek which ran off from the Hatchie River.

 

Read more about this photo: www.jaiart.com/blog/2013/6/a-golden-surprise

  

View more of my photos on my website at www.jaiart.com

After a long day of photographing beautiful, hidden places, I stumbled on this gem. Under a bridge at the edge of the Hatchie River in Tennessee, I took a moment to rest and enjoy the beauty of this scene.

 

View more of my work on my website at www.jaiart.com

While driving through the Hatchie Bottom near the Hatchie River in Tennessee, we stopped at an old wooden bridge and I saw this golden view of a creek which ran off from the Hatchie River.

 

Read more about this photo: www.jaiart.com/blog/2013/6/a-golden-surprise

 

View more of my photos on my website at www.jaiart.com

Located in the upper plateaus of southwestern Tennessee near the headwaters of the Big Hatchie River, Hardeman County was formed from the Jackson Purchase and attached to Hardin County, then to Madison County, before the Tennessee General Assembly officially created it in 1823. The county was named in honor of Colonel Thomas Jones Hardeman (1788-1854), a veteran of the Creek War and the War of 1812 who served as the first county court clerk. He was commissioner of the town of Bolivar before moving to Texas in 1835 where he was a prominent figure in the fight for Texas independence and a congressman in the Republic of Texas.

 

The Hardeman County Courthouse, located in Bolivar, Tennessee, was built in 1868 by Architect/Contractor Willis, Sloan, and Trigg. An addition was completed in 1955. The designing Architect was Eason, Anthony, McKinnie, & Cox and construction was completed by Forcum-James Company.

 

Hardeman County is the location of two of Tennessee's three private prisons, the Whiteville Correctional Facility and the Hardeman County Correctional Center; both are medium-security facilities for men.

 

Three bracketed photos were taken with a handheld Nikon D7200 and combined with Photomatix to create this HDR image. Additional adjustments were made in Photoshop CS6.

 

"For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future." ~Jeremiah 29:11

Collection: Painter (Milton McFarland, Sr.) Collection

Call number: PI/1988.0006

System ID: 98334.

Link to the catalog

 

Hatchie River.

 

Please see our profile page for information on ordering.

 

Scanned as tiff in 2008/04/02 by MDAH.

 

Credit: Courtesy of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Collection: Painter (Milton McFarland, Sr.) Collection

Call number: PI/1988.0006

System ID: 98337.

Link to the catalog

 

Hatchie River from Bridge. West.

 

Please see our profile page for information on ordering.

 

Scanned as tiff in 2008/04/02 by MDAH.

 

Credit: Courtesy of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Two boaters enjoyed a Sunday afternoon ride on the Hatchie River the day I was there photographing. They made it look like so much fun, I just wanted to jump on board with them!

 

View more of my photos on my website at www.jaiart.com

Hardeman County is located in the southwestern corner of Tennessee, bordering Mississippi and bisected by the Hatchie River. With a 668 square mile area, the county is the fifth largest in Tennessee. The 2000 census placed the population at 28,105. With fertile soil and gently rolling hills, Hardeman County is renown throughout the southeast as the “hardwood capital of Tennessee.” The county seat is the City of Bolivar; other municipalities include Grand Junction, Hickory Valley, Hornsby, Middleton, Saulsbury, Silerton, Toone and Whiteville.

Summary Data

 

State or Country of birth: Norway

 

Home prior to enlistment: Spring Grove, Minnesota

 

Occupation prior to enlistment: farm laborer

 

Service: Co. K, 46th Illinois Infantry - October 1861 - January 1866

 

Rank at enlistment: private

 

Highest rank attained: sergeant

 

Principal combat experience:

Fort Donnelson, Tennessee

Shiloh, Tennessee

Corinth, Mississippi

Hatchie River

Vicksburg, Mississippi

Jackson, Mississippi

Fort Blakely, Alabama

 

Casualties: none

 

Photograph by: unknown

 

Inscription in period ink on back: "Amonson"

  

About 1857 John Amundson Rostin (the son of Amund Rostin) left Norway, which was then a possession on Russia, to settle as a farm laborer in Spring Grove, Minnesota, in the extreme southeast corner of the state. On October 4, 1861, John and several other Norwegians were recruited at Caledonia, Minnesota by Oley Johnson, a fellow countryman, to serve in Company K, Forty-sixth Illinois Infantry for three years. The recruiting officer omitted his last name and he was known in the service as John Amonson.

 

Amonson was mustered into the service on December 30, 1861, at Camp Butler, near Springfield, Illinois. The Forty-sixth Illinois was an active regiment and saw action in Tennessee at the battles of Fort Donnelson (February 14 - 16, 1862) and Shiloh (April 6 & 7, 1862). Amonson had been admitted to the regimental hospital in early April with a fever but was discharged the day before the Battle of Shiloh. He and his regiment were soon in the thick of the action in what would later be remembered as one of the bloodiest battles of the war.

 

Reaching the battlefield between 9:00 and 10:00 o'clock Sunday morning April 6, the regiment's colonel, John A. Davis, later reported their role in the day's fight. "A regiment posted about 200 yards in front of our line gave way under the enemy's fire, and retreated through my line, which was lying down. As soon as it passed my men rose, dressed their line, and immediately commenced pouring a destructive fire upon the enemy. The regiment posted on our right having given way, and the enemy keeping up a hot fire along my whole front and raking crossfire upon my right flank, killing and wounding over one-half of my right companies, badly cutting up my other companies, and 8 of my line officers, 2 color bearers, and the major wounded, I deemed it my duty, without further orders, to withdraw my command, which I did, to a position beyond the brow of the hill, where I again formed them."1

 

A little later in the day, while the regiment was providing support for a battery of artillery, the men were again subjected to a confederate attack. Colonel Davis continued his report. "I formed my command...and moved up in line within 200 yards of the enemy, when a brisk and destructive fire was opened upon our whole line. Planting our colors in front of our line of battle, I ordered my command to shelter themselves behind trees and logs as best they could within range of the enemy, and kept up a constant fire until after the regiment on our right had given way and fallen back across the ravine, when I ordered my men to fall back into the ravine, and moving them by the left flank, I took them out of range of the enemy's guns."2

 

The men lay on their arms all night. In the morning they advanced until their pickets were driven in. Colonel Davis’ report continues, "...we found the enemy in strength along the whole line of our front, and when within 200 yards the fire opened upon both sides. My men loaded and fired with the coolness of veterans, and I had another horse shot under me in the midst of the engagement, and while raging with the utmost fury my men determined that they had fallen back for the last time, and while they were receiving the fire of the enemy and delivering their own with the utmost coolness I was wounded and carried off the field. Lieutenant-Colonel Jones reports that my men still stood firm, holding their ground, although outflanked, with the colors of the Forty-sixth and the rebels planted within 30 yards of each other, until re-enforced and the enemy driven back for the last time, when the Forty-sixth was ordered by General Hurlbut in person to its quarters...Too much praise cannot be awarded to the gallant officers and men of the Forty-sixth, who helped to win our signal victory."3

 

The regiment later took part in the siege of Corinth, Mississippi (May 1862), and then spent the summer at Memphis, Tennessee. The Forty-sixth was in action again at the battle of Hatchie River (October 5, 1862), the siege of Vicksburg (April - July 1863) and the siege of Jackson (July 1863).

 

Through most of the Vicksburg siege, from April until June 30, 1863, John Amonson was on detached service with the Provost Guard at Brigade Headquarters. He was apparently promoted to corporal about this time. Amonson re-enlisted as a veteran volunteer on December 20, 1863 and was re-appointed corporal in the veteranized regiment. In April 1864 he spent ten days in the hospital for intestinal fever.

 

The regiment participated in the Battle of Jackson, Mississippi on July 7, 1864. For the rest of the year and the early part of 1865, the regiment went on various expeditions to parts of Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana, Tennessee and Alabama. Also, starting in August 1864, John Amonson was periodically in and out of the regimental hospital with dysentery. In April 1865, the Forty-sixth Illinois participated in the siege of Fort Blakely, Alabama and then occupied the city of Mobile.

 

Amonson was appointed sergeant on December 31, 1865 and was mustered out with his regiment at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on January 20, 1866. He returned to Minnesota, and in 1867 married Betsy Olson, a recently arrived young Norwegian woman. In civilian life he reverted to using the name John A. Rosten and moved to northern Minnesota before finally settling in Wisconsin in 1872. He apparently had no difficulty in receiving a pension under the name John Amonson, but after his death in 1892 his wife had to explain how she could be the widow of John Amonson when her married name was Rosten.

 

In 1897 her claim was supported by Oley Johnson who provided the following statement to the Pension Office. "I have every reason to believe that John Amonson, whom I myself enlisted on the 4th day of October 1861, is the John A. Rostin. That was his name before the war but was left off when the said John Amonson enlisted."4

 

Mathias Halverson also provided and affidavit, saying, "I was acquainted with John Amundson in 1861 before [he] enlisted. When I first knew him he went by the name of John Rostin. But he enlisted by the name John Amundson. All through the war he would once in a while get a letter from some friend with the name of John Rostin. I can positively swear that it is the same man. We served together for over five years in K Co. 46 Illinois Veteran Volunteer Infantry."5

  

Notes for John Amonson

1. Official Records of the War of the Rebellion

2. ibid.

3. ibid.

4. United States Archives, Pension Records

5. ibid.

  

The first people to come to Hardeman County looking for permanent residence came in 1819-20. They came from middle Tennessee, Virginia, South Carolina, North Carolina and Kentucky. The first town in Hardeman County was established in 1823 on the banks of the Big Hatchie, the Indian name for the river. It was appropriately called Hatchie Town. The new site, the county seat, still bore the name Hatchie until by Act of the Tennessee State Legislature, on October 18, 1825, it was changed to Bolivar. Bolivar was named for Gen. Simon Bolivar, the South American patriot and liberator.

Hardeman County was officially organized on October 16, 1823, and was named for Thomas Jones Hardeman, a veteran of the War of 1812, who served as the first county court clerk and a commissioner for Bolivar before moving to Texas in 1835.

Hatchie River Bridge-My grandfather aka King Fish fished the Hatchie Bottom all through my childhood. I am pretty sure he knew these waters better than anyone.

We visited the National Wildlife Refuge at the Hatchie River Bottoms south of Brownsville Saturday. Really neat place to see!

 

Hatchie River in Bolivar, Tn

Hatchie River in Bolivar, Tn

When one stands at the mouth of the river, there is always a bit of awe at its massive size.

 

View more of my photos on my website at www.jaiart.com

 

Fred Hall

A very intereesting photo.

These men are armed with teh "Henry rifle", the precursor to the famous winchester rifle. Very unusual for whole units to be armed with it.

The men appears to belong to the 15th corps, Army of the Tenessee due to the flag which says "Siege of Corinth" and the diamond shaped badge on their chests which was an official symbol of the 15th corps from Feb 1865 onwards. (It might have been an unofficial symbol earlier than that date though)

 

Brendan C.H.

Yep, they're members of the 7th Illinois Infantry, who were indeed in the 15th Corps from Sept 1864 on:

 

7th Regiment Infantry (3 Years)

Regiment organized at Cairo, Ill., July 25, 1861. Attached to District of Cairo to October, 1861. Cook's 4th Brigade, District of Cairo, to February, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, District of West Tennessee, and Army of the Tennessee, to July, 1862. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, District of Corinth, Dept. of the Tennessee, to November, 1862. 3rd Brigade, District of Corinth, Left Wing 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. of the Tennessee, to December, 1862. 3rd Brigade, District of Corinth, 17th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, District of Corinth, 16th Army Corps, to March, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 16th Army Corps, to September, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 4th Division, 15th Army Corps, to July, 1865.

 

SERVICE.--Moved to Ironton, Mo., thence to Cape Girardeau, Mo., August 23, 1861. Duty there and at Fort Holt, Ky., until February, 1862. Expedition toward Columbus, Ky., September 21-22, 1861. Skirmish at Mansfield's Creek September 22. Expedition to Elliott's Mills during Belmont November 6-7. Reconnaissance of Columbus, Ky., January 13-20, 1862. Movements against Fort Henry, Tenn., February 2-6. Investment and capture of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 12-16. Expedition to Clarksville and Nashville, Tenn., February 19-21. Moved to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., arriving there March 22. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 11. Duty at Corinth, Miss., until October. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Hatchie River October 5-12. Duty at Corinth until April, 1863. Dodge's Expedition to Intercept Forest, and operations in West Tennessee, December 18, 1862, to January 3, 1863. Dodge's Expedition to Northern Alabama April 15-May 8. Iuka, Miss., April 16. Great Bear Creek, Cherokee Station and Lundy's Lane April 17. Rock Cut, near Tuscumbia, April 22. Tuscumbia April 23. Town Creek April 28. Guard Railroad from Bethel to Jackson, Tenn., May 12 to June 8. Regiment mounted June 18 and engaged in scout and patrol duty through West Tennessee until October, participating in numerous expeditions and skirmishes. Expedition from Corinth to Henderson, Tenn., September 11-16. Skirmish at Clark's Creek Church September 13. Henderson's Station September 14. Expedition into West Tennessee September 27-October 1. Swallow's Bluff September 30. At Chewalla October 4-26. Moved to Iuka October 26, thence marched to Pulaski, Tenn., November 1-12. Scout to Lawrenceburg November 17-19. Scout duty around Pulaski until December 22. Skirmishes near Florence December 1. Near Eastport December 2. Scout to Florence December 11-17. Shoal Creek, near Wayland Springs, December 12. Regiment Veteranize December 22 and mustered in as Veterans January 5, 1864. Veterans on furlough January and February, 1864. Return to Pulaski February 23-27. Duty at Florence, Ala., patrolling Tennessee River until June. At Florence, Sweetwater and Centre Store until June 14. Repulse of Roddy's attack on Florence May 7. Decatur May 8. Pulaski May 13. Regiment dismounted and moved to Chattanooga, Tenn., June 14-17, thence to Tilton, Ga., and patrol Railroad from Dalton to Resaca, Ga., until July 7. Moved to Rome, Ga., July 7, and duty there until October. (Non-Veterans mustered out July 29, 1864.) Action at Etowah River September 15. Operations against Hood September 29-November 3. Defense of Allatoona Pass October 4-5. Reconnaissance from Rome on Cave Springs Road and skirmishes October 12-13. March to the sea November 15-December 10. Regiment remounted November 21. Ogeechee Canal December 9. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Hinesville December 16. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Hickory Hill, S.C., February 1. Salkehatchie Swamps February 2-5. Fishburn's Plantation, near Lane's Bridge, Salkehatchie, February 6. South Edisto River February 9. North Edisto River February 11-12. Columbia February 15-17. Lynch's Creek February 26. Cheraw March 2-3. Expedition from Cheraw to Florence and skirmishes March 4-6. Battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 19-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24, and of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. March to Washington, D.C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 19. Grand Review May 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June, and duty there until July. Mustered out July 9, 1865.

 

Regiment lost during service 8 Officers and 81 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 174 Enlisted men by disease. Total 266.

 

Brendan C.H.

In the Civil War, an army usually contained several corps. A corps denoted a broad military organization, typically comprised of 3-4 divisions. A division in turn usually had 3-4 brigades, and a brigade contained 4-6 infantry regiments. The regiment was often viewed as the "building block" unit of CW armies. The 7th Illinois Infantry Regiment was at this time part of the 3rd Brigade, 4th Division, 15th Army Corps.

 

Brendan C.H.

There was a Union Army of Tennessee and a Confederate Army of Tennessee (though neither was comprised solely of troops from the state of Tennessee). The Union army was named for the Tennessee River, while the Confederate one was named for the state.

 

Fred Hall

There was a Confederate Army of the Potomac and a Union Army of the Virginia in the war too :)

 

Fred Hall

Confusion over the early uniforms on both sides which tended to be both gray and blue on both sides interchangelably.

A particular New York militia regiment for instance had gray uniform by default.

And a union zouave regiment were also dressed as a contemporary confederate zouave regiment which caused some serious confusion during the First bull run battle.

1865 map of Memphis, TN and the surrounding area including Fort Pickering

 

view much larger: www.flickr.com/photos/51992558@N00/5620667108/sizes/o

 

Places noted on map:

- Orphan Asylum

- Hebrew Cemetery

- St. Peter's Cemetery

- Memphis Charity Hospital

- Elmwood Hospital

- Greenlaw's Addition

- Winchester Cemetery

- Market House (2 of 'em)

- M&C.R.R. (Memphis & Charleston) Depot and rail line

- Gas Works

- Auction Square

- M.&O. (Memphis & Ohio) Depot and rail line

- Court Square

- Morris Cemetery

- M.&T. (Memphis & Tennessee) Depot and rail line

- Overton Tract

- Cotton Slide

- Fort Pickering and its keep

- Wolf River

- Loosa Hatchie (a.k.a. Loosahatchie River - the word "hatchie" means "river" in the local Chickasaw language and several related Native American languages of the southeast)

- Mississippi River

- Hopefield

- Hopefield Lake

- M.&L.R.R. (Memphis & Little Rock) Depot and rail line

 

Reprinted in the 1895 "Atlas to accompany the official records of the Union and Confederate armies." Published under the direction of the Hons. Redfield Proctor, Stephen B. Elkins and Daniel S. Lamont, secretaries of war, by Maj. George B. Davis, U.S. Army, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, civilian expert, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley, civilian expert, Board of Publication. Compiled by Capt. Calvin D. Cowles, 23d U.S. Infantry. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1891-1895.

Battle of Davis Bridge

October 5, 1862

 

CWPT has worked to preserve more than 195 acres of this 1862 Tennessee battlefield. We are currently working to save an additional 20 acres of this important hallowed ground.

 

Photo: David Duncan

 

www.civilwar.org/davisbridge

Battle of Davis Bridge

October 5, 1862

 

CWPT has worked to preserve more than 195 acres of this 1862 Tennessee battlefield. We are currently working to save an additional 20 acres of this important hallowed ground.

  

www.civilwar.org/davisbridge

n 1823, the first hamlet in Hardeman County was established along the banks of the river whose name the village bore, Hatchie Town. Given its location near the river, the town suffered from chronic pestilence and flooding and was ultimately relocated a mile to the south. An Act of the Tennessee State Legislature on October 18, 1825 designated Hatchie the county seat, but shortly afterward, its name was changed to Bolivar in honor of the famed South American patriot and liberator, Simon Bolivar.

Ord - Weitzel Gate

 

The Ord-Weizel Gate was located at the northwest corner of the boundry fence. The Red Sandstone posts were an integral part of that installation. The gate was a single stone column on each side of the road with a double wrought iron inclosure. Ord was inscribed on the south column and Weitzel on the north column. There was a bronze tablet fastened to each Red Sandstone post. On each was an eagle in bold relief. Under the eagle on the south tablet was Arlington National Cemetery. On the north tablet was United States of America. These tables are now on the posts of the relocated Ord-Weitzel Gate. The roadway was 12 feet wide.

 

The gate was named in honor of Civil War Generals Edward Otho Cresap Ord and Godfrey Weitzel.

 

Edward Otho Cresap Ord was born Oct. 18, 1818. He graduated from the United States Military Academy in July 1939 and commissioned in the Artillery. He served in the Seminole War in 1840. He was sent in the Ship Lexington from N.Y. around Cape Horn to Calif. in 1847 and fought on the frontier in Indian Fighting. He was promoted to Captain in 1850.

 

In 1859 he was in the expedition suppressing John Brown's Raid at Harpers Ferry, W.Va. He was promoted to Brig. Gen. of Volunteers in 1861. He commanded the 3d Brigade, McCall's Division, defending Washington, D.C. from Oct. 3, 1861 to March 13, 1962. He led the attack against Gen. J.E.B. Stuart at Dranesville, Va. He commanded brigades in the Potomac and Rappahannock Districts. On May 2, 1862 he was promoted to Major General, United States Volunteers and commanded Ord's Division, Rappahannock. In Tenn. he commanded the left wing of that Army (2d Division, 2d Division Cornith District and Jackson District) at Cornith and Hatchie. He was severely wounded at Hatchie. During the Vicksburg campaign he commanded the XII Corps and was in the capture of Jackson, Miss. in 1863. He was wounded a second time at Fort Harrison. He served with Gen. George Crook, in 1864, in the campaign directed against Stauton, Va. He commanded the VIII and later the XVIII Army Corps in Va. and N.C. During the siege of Petersburg and the Appomattox campaign, he commanded the XXIV Corps and the Department of Virginia. In 1865 he assumed command of the Army of the James and the Department of N.C. He retired as a Brig. Gen. in 1880 and was placed on the retired list in 1881 as a Maj. Gen. He died on July 22, 1883 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery in Section 2, Grave 982.

 

Fort Ord in Calif. is named in his honor.

 

Godfrey Weitzel was born Nov. 1, 1835. He graduated from the United States Military Academy number 2 of 34 in July 1855. He was commissioned in the Engineers. He served in the fortification of New Orleans from 1855-59. He was an instructor in Engineering at West Point 1859-61. He was on the expedition to Fort Pickens, Fla., to save the Union in 1861. On Oct. 9, 1861 he was made Chief Engineer of the fortifications of Cincinnati, Ohio, and then of Washington.

 

He was Chief Engineer under Gen. Benjamin Butler in the expedition against New Orleans. As Assistant Military Commander of New Orleans he was promoted to Brig. Gen., United States Volunteers. He commanded the 2d Brigade, XIX Corps and commanded the 1st Division XIX Corps at Thibodeaux, La., and Port Hudson on the expedition to Sabian Pass. In the Department of Virginia he commanded the 2d Division, XVIII Army Corps in the operations before Richmond at Swift's Creek and Drewry's Bluff and was Chief Engineer of the Army of the James until Sept. 30, 1864. He was promoted to Maj. Gen. of Volunteers in 1864 and brevetted Col. in the Regular Army for gallantry at the capture of Fort Harrison, Va. He commanded the XVIII Corps, Va., in the capture of Petersburg and the Appomattox campaign. He was in command of the occupation forces which marched into Richmond, Va., on April 3, 1865. Later in 1865 he commanded the Rio Grande District.

 

He was mustered out of the Volunteers in 1866 but returned to duty with the Corps of Engineers and was promoted to Maj. He was associated with the construction of ship canals at falls of the Ohio River and Saulte Sainte Marie, Mich., and the Light House at Stannards Rock in Lake Superior. He died on active duty as a Lt. Col. of Engineers on March 19, 1884.

 

He is not buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Adjutant, 53rd ILL. Infantry

History of Cherokee County Kansas and its representative citizens, ed. & comp. by Nathaniel Thompson Allison, 1904

THOMAS C. WEAVER, one of the honored survivors of the great Civil War, who is a well known business citizen of Baxter Springs, and a justice of the peace in Cherokee County, was born in Kosciusko County, Indiana, July 14, 1840, and is a son of George and Hannah (Moss) Weaver.

 

The Weaver family has descended from Dutch, Scotch and Irish ancestry. The father of our subject was born in Clark County, Ohio, where he was educated and engaged in a mercantile business until the age of 25 years, when he removed to Kosciusko County, Indiana, and embarked in cattle dealing, continuing in this business until 1854. The remainder of his life was spent in farming in DeWitt County, Illinois, where he died at the advanced age of 89 years. He married Hannah Moss, whose parents were natives of Ohio; she died at the age of 83 years. They had issue as follows: Louisa, wife of A. D. Cackley, who was in an express transfer business at Clinton, Illinois, but is now retired; Josephine, wife of J. D. Mitchell, who was a farmer and stock-raiser of DeWitt County, Illinois; Thomas C., of this sketch: Henry, who died in infancy; Martha and Caroline, who died in childhood; Mary and Horace (twins), who died in infancy; Harvey V., who is manager of a sanitarium at Onarga, Iroquois County, Illinois; and Charles F., who is a merchant at Atlanta, Illinois.

 

Thomas C. Weaver received his early education in the schools of DeWitt County, Illinois, which he attended during the winter seasons until he became of age. His summers were devoted to agricultural pursuits on his father's farm. The stirring events of the early months of 1861 aroused his loyalty and he testified to the reality of his patriotism by enlisting for service in the Civil War, on July 13, 1861, and he was mustered into the army on August 5th, entering Company C, 41st Reg., Illinois Vol. Inf. He served two years and reenlisted as a veteran, on December 18, 1863. On April 12, 1864, he was transferred to the Veteran Battalion and was promoted to the rank of sergeant-major. Later he was transferred to the 53d Reg., Illinois Vol. Inf., as sergeant major, on April 24, 1865, and was promoted to the rank of 1st lieutenant, to date from April 7, 1865. He was finally mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, on July 22, 1865. It will thus be seen that Mr. Weaver served over four years and during this time he participated in many of the most serious battles of the war, including: Fort Donelson, Fort Heilman, siege of Vicksburg, Hatchie River, Bentonville, Coldwater, Jackson and many minor ones.

 

After the close of the war, Mr. Weaver returned to the peaceful pursuit of farming, in which he continued until 1882 in DeWitt County, Illinois, and then came to Cherokee County, Kansas, and engaged in a hardware business for two years, and subsequently spent four years in the grocery business. Since then his time has been engaged in the management of a successful insurance business at Baxter Springs and in attending to his magisterial duties as justice of the peace.

 

On September 20, 1870, Mr. Weaver was married to Ella Scroggin, who is a daughter of Humphrey Scroggin, a farmer of Logan County, Illinois. The five children of this marriage were: Edwin, who died aged two years; Alberta Maud, who died aged 12 years; George, who died aged four years: Olive (Mrs. W. C. Anderson),of Fort Scott, Kansas; and Nellie, who resides at home. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

From his earliest voting days, Mr. Weaver has been a stanch supporter of the Republican party, and he has frequently been called upon to assume the duties of office. In Illinois he was a member of the local School Board and held the same office at Baxter Springs, of which city he was treasurer for six years. For the past seven years he has filled his present judicial position, the powers of which he has many times used to quietly settle differences without resorting to continued litigation. His decisions have been very generally supported and his personal integrity has never been questioned.

 

Since the organization of the camp of the Modern Woodmen of America at Baxter Springs in 1889, Mr. Weaver has served as clerk. He is a member and the treasurer of the local lodge of the Ancient Order of United Workmen; belongs also to the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is serving his fourth term as commander of the local G. A. R. post, of which he is a charter member.

  

Identifier: newdollaratlasof00rand

Title: New dollar atlas of the United States and Dominion of Canada ..

Year: 1884 (1880s)

Authors: Rand McNally and Company

Subjects:

Publisher: Chicago

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

in June, and on July 1-4 the State was readmitted. The iifteenth amendment was rat-ified in 18T0, and the constitution now in force was adopted in 1875. Io/nil at ton.—Census of 1880: Males, 623,629; Females, 639,876; Native,1,252,:71; Foreign, 9,734; White, 662,185; Colored, 600,32U, including -4 Chinese,and 213 Indians and Half-breeds. 79 STATE OF TENNESSEE.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Topograjyliy,—The greatest length of Tennessee east andwest is 432 miles; greatest breadth, 109 miles; and area, 42,U50square miles, or 26,912,000 acres. The Appalachian mountainsseparate Tennessee from North Carolina. The State is popu-larly divided into three sections: East Tennessee, extendingfrom the North Carolina border to about the middle of the Cum-berland table land; Middle Tennessee, thence to the Tennesseeriver; and West Tennessee, occupying the territory betweenthe Tennessee and Mississippi rivers. The Mississippi formsthe western boundary, and, with the Tennessee and Cumberland, drains about three-fourths of the State. Other rivers are the Clinch, the Holston, the Forked Deer andits branches, the Big Hatchie and Wolf river. The Tennessee and Cumberland arenavigable for a considerable distance, and the other rivers afford valuable water power.Climate.—The climate of the State is mild and remarkably salubrious. Owingto the great elevation of the eastern division and the

  

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Identifier: buildersofpyrami00will

Title: The builders of the pyramid; the story of Shelby County: its resources and developments

Year: 1897 (1890s)

Authors: Williams, Joseph R

Subjects: Nashville (Tenn.). Tennessee Centennial and International Exposition, 1897

Publisher: Memphis, De Garis printing company

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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i* w By Transfer,22 N 06 :registered:hc f tovvi of f hclby a^ouutjj, I—THE ABORIGINES. Apply a carpenters square to the extreme Southwestern cornerof the map of Tennessee so as to cut off a little piece of the Statein the shape of almost a perfect square, and the territory of ShelbyCounty is geographically located. On the North and East it lies in the arms of its sister countiesof Tipton and Fayette : on the South the great State of Mississippiserves as its footstool, while the waves of the lordly Father ofWaters bathe its entire Western boundary. It is a goodly tract ofland, well watered and heavily wooded with valuable timber. Thesurface of the country is undulating, rising into sunny hillsides andfalling into rich bottom lands. Wolf river, with its tributaries,breaks through the Southern portion of the Eastern line and HowsWestward and Northward. Hatchie river rolls into the Countyfrom the Northeast and sends its limpid waters to join the tawnywaves of Wolf just before the double current e

  

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This abandoned bridge was actually never finished. Not one car rolled across it. It's located in Haywood County over the Hatchie River.

Identifier: officersofarmyna00powe

Title: Officers of the army and navy (regular) who served in the Civil War

Year: 1892 (1890s)

Authors: Powell, William H. (William Henry), 1838-1901 Shippen, Edward, 1826-1911

Subjects: United States. Army

Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa. : L.R. Hamersly & Co.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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61, and was promoted first lieutenant Sep-tember 1, 1861. He served in the Western army, andwas engaged in the blockade of the Mississippi Riveragainst steamers bringing munitions of war capturedby Confederates at Baton Rouge Arsenal to St. Louis.He participated in the expedition to Southwest Missouri,and was afterwards on recruiting service and with hisregiment at Camp of Instruction near St. Louis. lieparticipated in Fremonts expedition to Southwest Mis-souri, and was in the regular brigade from October, 1861,to February, 1862, when he was transferred to the Armyof the Mississippi, and assigned to a cavalry division.He was engaged in the capture of Camp Jackson, withtwelve hundred rebel prisoners, May 10, 1861 ; at thecapture of Jefferson City, Missouri, June 15, 1861, andparticipated in the following actions, battles, and skir-mishes : Booneville, Missouri; Blackwater, Missouri;New Madrid and Island No. 10; with gun-boats at PointPleasant, Fort Pillow, Farmington, siege of Corinth,

 

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Hatchie River, Jacinto, Rienzi, Blackland, Booneville,Tuscumbia, 1 lolly Springs, Iuka, Corinth, Daviss Bridge,The Hatchie, Ripley, Waterford, Lumpkins Mills, Tal-lahatchie Bridge, Lamar, Coffeeville, Fort Hindman, PortGibson, Bayou Pierre, Hankinsons Ferry, Raymond,Clinton, Jackson, Champion Hills, Big Black; assault,siege, and surrender of Vicksburg. Lieutenant MacMurray was promoted captain of FirstMissouri Light Artillery Nov. I, 1863 ; was at St. Louisto Feb., 1865; in charge of reconstruction of fortifica-tions at New Madrid, and served with the Powder RiverIndian Expedition, on the march from Franklin, Mis-souri, to the valley of the Powder River, Montana, from|une 1 to Nov. 12, 1865, having been engaged withSioux, Cheyennes, and Arapahoes near YellowstoneRiver, in September. He was honorably mustered outof the volunteer service Nov. 20, 1865. Captain MacMurray entered the regular service Feb-ruary 2^, 1866, as second lieutenant of the first Artil-lery ; was promoted first lieu

  

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Map of Tippah County, Mississippi c1835

General Land Office

 

Alcorn County, MIssissippi c1835

General Land Office Maps

Chickasaw Meridian

 

The areas around the Hatchie river are changing into wetlands as the Hatchie River runs over its banks. This will provide thousands of acres for the waterfowl that arrive here every year.

Identifier: officersofarmyna01powe

Title: Officers of the army and navy (volunteer) who served in the civil war

Year: 1893 (1890s)

Authors: Powell, William H. (William Henry), 1838-1901, ed

Subjects:

Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa., L. R. Hamersly & co.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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oned atBenicia until 1858, when he was on frontier duty at FortMiller, California, and participated in the Spokane Expe-dition ; was engaged in the combat of Four Lakes, Sep-tember 1, 1858 ; combat of Spokane Plain, September 5,1858 ; skirmish of Spokane River, September 8, 1858,—thecelebrated chief, Rogue River John, surrendering to him.In 1859 he was stationed at Fort Monroe, and was in theHarpers Ferry Expedition to suppress the John Brownraid. He was commissioned brigadier-general of volun-teers, for services in the war, September 4, 1861, andcommanded the Third Brigade, Pennsylvania Reserves.His first engagement of the war was at Dranesvillc, wherehe defeated the Confederates, under General Jeb. Stewart,after a sharp contest lasting several hours. In this fighthe pointed and fired the first cannon himself, the shellcausing great havoc among the enemy. General John F.Reynolds said at the time, I knew, if there was a fight tobe scared up, Ord would find it. He was brevetted lieu-

 

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tenant-colonel for gallantry in that battle. In May, 1862,he commanded a division in the Army of the Rappahan-nock ; in June and August, Corinth, Mississippi. In Mayhe was promoted major-general of volunteers, and com-manded left wing, Army of Tennessee ; was engaged inthe battle of Iuka ; fought the battle of the Hatchie. Hewas severely wounded,and had to be carried from the field.After his recovery he was given the 18th Army Corps,before Vicksburg. He was with Gen. Grant during theconference and surrender of Gen. Pemberton. He wasengaged in the capture of Jackson, Miss.; Feb. 16, 1864,commanding the 18th Army Corps and all troops inthe Middle Department. He was then given the Eigh-teenth Army Corps, and took part in the movementsbefore Petersburg; and, crossing his army to the northside of the James on the 29th of September, led theforces that carried the strong fortifications and long lineof intrenchments below Chapins Farm known as FortHarrison. During the assault he was severely

  

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Title: American malacological bulletin

Identifier: americanmal6719881990amer

Year: 1983 (1980s)

Authors: American Malacological Union

Subjects: Mollusks; Mollusks

Publisher: [Hattiesburg, Miss. ?] : [American Malacological Union]

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

  

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20 AMER. MALAC. BULL. 6(1) (1988)

 

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2 50 Fig. 1. Map showing the major tributary rivers to the Cumberland, Tennessee and Mississippi rivers in the State of Tennessee. and Clench (1925), Ortmann (1925), Isom et al. (1973) and Ahlstedt (1983). Isom (1969) compared mussel faunas col- lected in 1965 from the Tennessee River with those recorded prior to impoundment. Scruggs (1960) and Isom and Gooch (1986) made similar pre and post-impoundment comparisons. Yokley (1972) compared the ecology and stocks of species in Kentucky Reservoir. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program, detailed col- lections from the Clinch, Powell, Nolichucky, Holston, Elk, Duck and Buffalo rivers (Ahlstedt, 1986). Unionids of the Cumberland River system in Tennessee were studied by Wilson and Clark (1914), Neel and Allen (1964), Isom era/. (1979), Parmalee et al. (1980), Clarke (1981, 1985), Call and Parmalee (1982), Schmidt (1982), Sickel (1982), Starnes and Bogan (1982) and Stansbery et al. (1983). The fauna in the Cumberland River appears similar to that of the Tennessee River, but has not been as thoroughly surveyed and future work could uncover significant differences. Of the 87 mussel taxa recorded from the Tennessee River, the 69 taxa recorded from the Duck River, and the 78 taxa recorded from the Cumberland River, Ortmann (1924) considered 45 of these to be unique to the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers and referred to them as "Cumberlandian". Ortmann (1925) defined the downriver limits of the Cumber- landian fauna to be Clarksville, Tennessee, on the Cumberland River; Muscle Shoals, Alabama, on the Tennessee River; and between Columbia and Centerville on the Duck River. Below these limits, Interior Basin molluscan species replaced the Cumberlandian species. Ortmann later liberalized these limits, suggesting that some Cumberlandian species had emigrated into the Ohio River as well as into the Interior Basin. Reports of unionids from the Mississippi River tributaries in Tennessee have been limited to Ortmann (1926a) and van der Schalie and van der Schalie (1950). Recent col- lections from the Hatchie River (D. Manning, pers. comm.) suggest a diverse fauna. With the exception of the Hatchie River, direct Mississippi River tributaries in Tennessee have suffered extensive channelization resulting in major altera- tions of their biological communities and a significant reduc- tion of the unionid fauna. The mussel fauna of the Conasauga River located in the southeast corner of Tennessee is relatively unknown with Hurd (1974), van der Schalie (1981) and museum records pro- viding the only information on this northern Coosa River tributary. TAXONOMY Table 1 lists unionid taxa found in the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers in Tennessee. A comparison is made of the nomenclature used by Bickel (1968) and Morrison (1970) with the names used in this paper (Table 1). The American Malacological Union List of Common and Scientific Names [Turgeon et al. (in press)] is incorporated as the basis for the taxonomy used in this paper. However, the status of many named subspecific varieties and ecophenotypes has not been resolved. We list them here for clarity. Since the report by Bickel (1968), almost half of the taxa have undergone tax- onomic revision. Morrison (1970) and Johnson (1978) declared Plagiola Rafinesque, 1819 available over Dysnomia Agassiz, 1852, but due to taxonomic questions about the type species, we have chosen to use Epioblasma Rafinesque, 1831, the next available generic name. Similarly, the change from Carun- culina Simpson in Baker, 1898 to Toxolasma Rafinesque, 1831 involves five taxa (see Bogan and Parmalee, 1983). Additional- ly, 12 taxa have been added to the state's total list of species while two, Fusconaia undata, (Barnes, 1823) and Amblema peruviana (Lamarck, 1819) have been synonymized. Bickel (1968) used 25 taxa originally described by Rafinesque. Morrison (1970) included 26 nomenclatural changes based on the priority of Rafinesque descriptions. In

  

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Identifier: birdseyeviewofou00dodg

Title: A bird's-eye view of our Civil War

Year: 1897 (1890s)

Authors: Dodge, Theodore Ayrault, 1842-1909

Subjects:

Publisher: Boston, New York, Houghton, Mifflin and Company

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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wo thousand men, at Ripley, the latter asSeptember 28. . i tt • • i senior takmg command. He is wise enough to see that a successful attack upon isolated Corinth willthrust Grant back, as Bragg has served Buell, and neutralizeall his victories. Full of his purpose Van Dorn with his wontedenergy moves upon Corinth and marshals his army on the 1862.J lUKA AND CORINTH. 91 north-west of the town. His position sev-ers Rosecrans force from Grants. Van ^P ^^^ eiDorns plan is to feint upon Rosecransleft, thereby drawingtroops from his right, and then to throw Price upon thedepleted wing and crush it. He attacks. At an earlystage of the battle a gap is opened in Rosecrans line. Intothis breach Van Dorn is not slow to press. Our left andcentre is borne back, but the right remainingintact, wheels and threatens Van Dorns ex-posed flanks. Darkness brings the combat to a close. The forces of each are about equal. The night is spentin reforming the troops for the morrow. Van Dorn pur- October 3.

 

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Corinth. Oetober 3-4, 1862. poses to assault at dawn, but is belated by subordinates.When, however, he does attack, it is with characteristicvigor. Part of his troops actually enter the city, and for 92 BIRDS-EYE VIEW OF OUR CIVIL WAR. [1862. about an hour cannot be ejected. But Rosecrans holds hisown ; Yan Dorn j&nds that he cannot worst him, and, fear-ing an attack upon his rear, determines on retreat. Thishe skilfully effects, under cover of renewed October 4. attack. Rosecrans makes no motion to follow. In falling backVan Dorn runs across Ord at the fords of the Hatchie river,and had Rosecrans been at his heels, Van Dorn might havebeen badly used up. But by ably manoeuvring his rear-guard. Van Dorn manages to elude Ord, crosses theHatchie a trifle to the east and escapes. TJie Confederate loss and ours were not far from twothousand five hundred each. We took two thousandprisoners. Shortly after, Van Dorn was displaced by Pemberton,while Rosecrans was promoted to BuelFs October

  

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Taken in Lauderdale County, TN on April 12, 2008.

Identifier: greatcivilwarhis020tome

Title: The great Civil War : a history of the late rebellion, with biographical sketches of leading statesmen also distinguished naval and military commanders, etc.

Year: 1862 (1860s)

Authors: Tomes, Robert, 1817-1882 Smith, Benjamin G

Subjects:

Publisher: New York : Virtue and Yorston

Contributing Library: Boston Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

  

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Magruder. His gallantry at Contreras, Churubusco, and Chapulte-pec won for him raj)id promotion, andtoward the close of the Mexican war hewas brevetted a major. He was subse-quently in command at Fort Hamilton,but in 1852 resigned his rank in thearmy. At the commencement of thecivil war, Jackson is reputed to havehesitated as to which side he would join.His perplexity was owing to the factthat though he himself was a Virginian,his marriage with a Northern womanhad created ties with the North whichhe was reluctant to sever. His father-in-law, a clergyman, is said to have vis-ited and urged him to remain loyal tothe United States. They spent severalhours in prayer together ; but after astruggle which Jackson confessed to be sore, he declared, I must go withVirginia, and entered the service ofthe Southern Confederacy, of which heproved himself to be one of the mostalert and able officers, having well-earned, by his stubborn resistance to theprogress of our armies, his title of Stonewall.

 

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XiU^rttt aceorimp to tucolthtxr • & Yvrst^n, in thr lUricx offie» ofU- niwUuUce/ert/iKSiKitfitff ATTACK ON FORT WRIGHT. 265 CHAPTER XXIV. The Enemy at Fort Wright.—Tbeir Defences.—Bombardment of Fort Wright.-Departure of Pope.—Attack upon theUnion Fleet.—Evacuation of Forts Wright, Pillow, and Kandolph.—The Enemys Fleet covering Memphis.—The Union ram Fleet.—Attack on the Enemys Gun-boats.—Great naval Victory.—Surrender of Memphis.—Expe-dition up the White River.—Explosion of the Mound City.—Capture of the Enemys forts on the White Elver. 1862. Aftee the capture of Island No. 10,the enemy who escaped fled downthe Mississippi to their next strong-hold on the river. This was FortWright, in Tennessee, situated on abend of the Mississippi, on its easternside, a short distance above the mouthof the Hatchie River. It is 162 milesbelow Cairo and 78 miles above Mem-phis. A chronicler* thus describes theenemys defences at Fort Wright: The main fort is planted on

  

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Taken in Lauderdale County, TN on April 12, 2008.

At first I thought I was watching a Beaver.. but the tail was different and no big teeth so I assumed this was a River Otter as otter's are supposed to be plentiful at the Hatchie Wildlife Refuge. Now after more research I think this is indeed a Muskrat. His body is shorter than an Otter and he was less playful. Anyone who can clarify this for me?

Taken in Lauderdale County, TN on April 12, 2008.

The Hatchie River where the Davis bridge crossed the stream. Without a solid bridge, it would be very difficult for an 19th Century army to ford this river.

 

Photo by: Michael Noirot

www.BattlefieldPortraits.com/

ThisMightyScourge.com/

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