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At the end of Hatchie Station Road on the border of Madison and Haywood counties in West Tennessee is this abandoned steel truss bridge spanning the Hatchie River. The bridge was built in 1929 and today has no roadbed; some locals say it never did have a roadbed and never was used. Others say the bridge was abandoned by 1944. The local lore also claims there was never a road on the far side of the bridge, which is the eastern border of the Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge. A nearby sign labels the area "Mr. Charlie Luke Landing, Hatchie Station, Big Black Creek Historical."

After a long day of photographing beautiful, hidden places, I stumbled on this gem. Under a bridge at the edge of the Hatchie River in Tennessee, I took a moment to rest and enjoy the beauty of this scene.

 

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While driving through the Hatchie Bottom near the Hatchie River in Tennessee, we stopped at an old wooden bridge and I saw this golden view of a creek which ran off from the Hatchie River.

 

Read more about this photo: www.jaiart.com/blog/2013/6/a-golden-surprise

 

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Located in the upper plateaus of southwestern Tennessee near the headwaters of the Big Hatchie River, Hardeman County was formed from the Jackson Purchase and attached to Hardin County, then to Madison County, before the Tennessee General Assembly officially created it in 1823. The county was named in honor of Colonel Thomas Jones Hardeman (1788-1854), a veteran of the Creek War and the War of 1812 who served as the first county court clerk. He was commissioner of the town of Bolivar before moving to Texas in 1835 where he was a prominent figure in the fight for Texas independence and a congressman in the Republic of Texas.

 

The Hardeman County Courthouse, located in Bolivar, Tennessee, was built in 1868 by Architect/Contractor Willis, Sloan, and Trigg. An addition was completed in 1955. The designing Architect was Eason, Anthony, McKinnie, & Cox and construction was completed by Forcum-James Company.

 

Hardeman County is the location of two of Tennessee's three private prisons, the Whiteville Correctional Facility and the Hardeman County Correctional Center; both are medium-security facilities for men.

 

Three bracketed photos were taken with a handheld Nikon D7200 and combined with Photomatix to create this HDR image. Additional adjustments were made in Photoshop CS6.

 

"For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future." ~Jeremiah 29:11

Collection: Painter (Milton McFarland, Sr.) Collection

Call number: PI/1988.0006

System ID: 98334.

Link to the catalog

 

Hatchie River.

 

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Scanned as tiff in 2008/04/02 by MDAH.

 

Credit: Courtesy of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Collection: Painter (Milton McFarland, Sr.) Collection

Call number: PI/1988.0006

System ID: 98337.

Link to the catalog

 

Hatchie River from Bridge. West.

 

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Scanned as tiff in 2008/04/02 by MDAH.

 

Credit: Courtesy of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Two boaters enjoyed a Sunday afternoon ride on the Hatchie River the day I was there photographing. They made it look like so much fun, I just wanted to jump on board with them!

 

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Hardeman County is located in the southwestern corner of Tennessee, bordering Mississippi and bisected by the Hatchie River. With a 668 square mile area, the county is the fifth largest in Tennessee. The 2000 census placed the population at 28,105. With fertile soil and gently rolling hills, Hardeman County is renown throughout the southeast as the “hardwood capital of Tennessee.” The county seat is the City of Bolivar; other municipalities include Grand Junction, Hickory Valley, Hornsby, Middleton, Saulsbury, Silerton, Toone and Whiteville.

The Hatchie is swollen from the recent rains and with more rain on the way, slowy the water is filling the areas around the river where the wood ducks and other water fowl will spend the winter.

We visited the National Wildlife Refuge at the Hatchie River Bottoms south of Brownsville Saturday. Really neat place to see!

 

Hatchie River in Bolivar, Tn

Hatchie River in Bolivar, Tn

1865 map of Memphis, TN and the surrounding area including Fort Pickering

 

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Places noted on map:

- Orphan Asylum

- Hebrew Cemetery

- St. Peter's Cemetery

- Memphis Charity Hospital

- Elmwood Hospital

- Greenlaw's Addition

- Winchester Cemetery

- Market House (2 of 'em)

- M&C.R.R. (Memphis & Charleston) Depot and rail line

- Gas Works

- Auction Square

- M.&O. (Memphis & Ohio) Depot and rail line

- Court Square

- Morris Cemetery

- M.&T. (Memphis & Tennessee) Depot and rail line

- Overton Tract

- Cotton Slide

- Fort Pickering and its keep

- Wolf River

- Loosa Hatchie (a.k.a. Loosahatchie River - the word "hatchie" means "river" in the local Chickasaw language and several related Native American languages of the southeast)

- Mississippi River

- Hopefield

- Hopefield Lake

- M.&L.R.R. (Memphis & Little Rock) Depot and rail line

 

Reprinted in the 1895 "Atlas to accompany the official records of the Union and Confederate armies." Published under the direction of the Hons. Redfield Proctor, Stephen B. Elkins and Daniel S. Lamont, secretaries of war, by Maj. George B. Davis, U.S. Army, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, civilian expert, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley, civilian expert, Board of Publication. Compiled by Capt. Calvin D. Cowles, 23d U.S. Infantry. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1891-1895.

Company K, A 41st Illinios Infantry and Company K, 53rd Illinois Infantry

THE VALIANT BOYS OF THE 41ST, ILL. REGIMENT

14 April 1864 , Clinton, Dewitt, IL, USA

 

Return of Companies, C, F, and K

Their Reception.

 

On Monday evening, a telegraphic dispatch from Capt. M. DANISON to Col. WARNER announced to the citizens of Clinton that the boys of companies C, F and K, of the 41st Ill. Vet. Vol. Regt., who have re-enlisted, would arrive in town on the morning train from the south.

 

Accordingly, hasty preparations were made for their reception and entertainment, and in the morning, the drum's martial roll, the fife's stirring notes, and the cannon's thundering roar aroused the citizens to bustling activity—men, women and children alike were in feverish excitement, all anxious to do "Honor to the Brave." None seemed more desirous to do their duty in this respect than the Veteran 20th.

 

On the arrival of the train, the citizens and soldiers were at the depot, formed a procession, and escorted the 41st boys to the square, where Hon. L. WELDON delivered an address, as usual, appropriate, soul-inspiring, and filled with thrilling patriotism.

 

At the appointed hour—2½ o'clock—dinner was announced, in Jones' Hall, to which the soldiers were invited and given the place of honor—the table on which the choicest dainties, the richest delicacies and best food prepared for the occasion. The citizens joined in the repast; and many who thought when they entered the hall they could not eat a mouthful, inspired by the rejoicing of those around them, found room in which to stow away a goodly portion of the good things which tempted their appetites. We happened to be among this number.

 

At the commencement of the dinner, a number of ladies and gentlemen sung "Won't we be a happy People." In the evening came the inevitable dance.

 

The hall was handsomely decorated with appropriate banners, flags, evergreens, and the words, "Welcome 41st."

 

To describe the table would be but a repetition of what we have said on former occasions. Let it suffice that it was complete. The Ladies Loyal League, and the ladies assisting them, are entitled their full meed of praise.

 

Mr. James DeLAND raised $50 during the day to defray the expenses.

 

The people are greatly indebted to these noble boys for the part they have taken in defense of the country. Theirs is a brilliant record—one of which we should all feel proud.

 

Companies C, F, and K were organized in Clinton in July and August 1861 and took a prominent part in the following battles, skirmishes [and] sieges, where all displayed the utmost bravery.

 

Fort Henry, Tenn. Feb. 5, 1862 Fort Donelson, Tenn. Feb. 13 and 14, 1862 Shiloh, Tenn. April 6 and 7, 1862 Siege of Corinth, Miss. April 18, 1863 Hatchie River, Tenn. Oct. 5, 1862 Skirmish at Hernando, Miss. April 19, 1863 Cold Water River, Miss. April 19, 1863 Siege of Vicksburg, Miss. 47 days (no date given) Jackson, Miss. (no date given) Sherman's Raid into Mississippi (no date given)

At Memphis, Tenn., in 1863, the 41st was challenged to meet the 14th Ill. in a prize drill, for a silver bugle, to be purchased by the officers of the defeated regiment. The contest was for superiority in soldierly appearance and bearing, cleanliness of clothing and arms, command of arms, and marching. The judges unhesitatingly decided in favor of the 41st; and it has ever since been known as the "Silver Bugle Regiment."

 

The boys who are at home are as follows:

 

COMP. C—Capt. M. Danison, Carl Swantz, David Woods, David Warrenburg, Hayden Murry, John Short, Edward R. Bay, Joseph Ware, Thomas Clifton, John W. Dine, Johnathan King, Thomas C. Weaver—12.

 

COMP. F—Serg't I. M. Jones, Owen Morgan, Henry Rodgers, Isaac Reese, Levi Mastin, Thomas B. Young, Joseph Kerr, Abner McUmber, William Wymer, Nicholas Berschard—10.

 

COMP. K—Capt. Wingardner, 1st Lieut. Thomas Kelly, 2d Lieut. James Warren, Serg't A. Snyder, Serg't Solomon Gregory, Enoch Gregory, John E. Gandy, Benjamin F. Frazy, Edmund J. Deverse, John H. Doughman, George Mencer, Curtis Wray, Thomas A. Clark, James Jones, William H. Smith, Edward Connard, and Harrison Duncan—17.

 

In addition to these, we have Quarter Master Sergeant John M. Robinson, of company C, [and] Serg't John McPherson and Isaac N. Peterson, of Comp G.

 

Capt. Kannan and Silas Langerbach, of company A, and F. M. Wheeler, of company B, Charles Harrington, Gen. Furguson, and C. F. Bently, of company E were here on a visit.

 

The original number of Co. C was 101.

 

The original number of Co. F was 96.

 

The original number of Co. K was 64.

 

The Veterans of the 41st have a furlough of 30 days from the 12th.

 

But one thing occurred to mar the joy and hilarity of the day. Tillman LANE, engaged in firing the cannon, was severely wounded from the premature discharge of the piece. Three fingers on the right hand were blown off and his left hand greatly injured. It is feared that amputation of his right hand may be necessary. This sad accident threw a gloomy pall of sorrow over the otherwise joyful occasion.

  

Stephen M. Van Camp, private, Company A, 15th Illinois Infantry. Native of Pennsylvania. Died May 1. 1911 at the Old Soldiers Home, Boise, Id.

 

15th Regiment, Illinois Infantry - Organized at Freeport, Ill., and mustered in May 24, 1861. Ordered to Alton, Ill., June 1, 1861, and duty there till July 15, 1861. Moved to St. Charles, Mo., thence to Hannibal, Jefferson Barracks and Rolla, Mo., July 15-August 7. Advance toward Columbus August 29-September 8. Join Fremont's Army at Tipton, Mo., October 1. Attached to Dept. of Missouri to February, 1862. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, District West Tennessee, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, District of West Tennessee, and Army of the Tennessee, to July, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, District of Memphis, Tenn., to September, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, District of Jackson, Tenn., to November, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, Right Wing 13th Army Corps (Old), Dept. of the Tennessee, to December, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 17th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, to January, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 16th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 13th Army Corps, to August, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 17th Army Corps, to November, 1864. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 17th Army Corps, to April, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 17th Army Corps, to June, 1865. Dept. of Missouri to September, 1865.

 

SERVICE.-Fremont's advance on Springfield, Mo., October 13-November 3, 1861. Moved to Sedalia, thence to Otterville, and duty there till February, 1862. Moved to St. Louis, Mo., thence to Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 1-16. Capture of Fort Donelson February 16. Expedition to Crump's Landing and occupation of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., March 14-17. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. March to Memphis, Tenn., via Grand Junction, Holly Springs and Lagrange, June 1-July 21. Duty at Memphis till September 6. March to Bolivar and forced march to Hatchie River September 6-October 4. Battle of Hatchie River, or Metamora, October 5. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign. Operations on the Mississippi Central R. R. from Bolivar to Coffeeville October 31, 1862, to January 10, 1863. Duty at Memphis, Tenn., till May, 1863. Ordered to Vicksburg, Miss., May 13. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., May 22-July 4. Advance on Jackson, Miss., July 4-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Assault on Jackson July 12. Reconnoissance to Pearl River July 15. Moved to Natchez, Miss., August 15, and duty there till November 10. Expedition to Harrisonburg September 1-7. Near Harrisonburg and capture of Fort Beauregard September 4. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., November 10, and duty there till February, 1864. Meridian Campaign February 3-March 5. Champion's Hill, Baker's Creek, February 4. Movement to Cairo, Ill., thence to Clifton, Tenn., and march to Ackworth, Ga., via Huntsville and Decatur, Ala., and Rome, Ga., April 28-June 8. Atlanta Campaign June 8 to September 8. Assigned to garrison duty at Allatoona Pass, Ackworth, Big Shanty and Marietta till November. Regiment consolidated with 14th Illinois Infantry July 1, 1864, as 14th and 15th Illinois Battalion Infantry. Action at Big Shanty October 3 (2 Cos.). Ackworth October 4 (3 Cos.). Morris Station October 4 (Detachment). Allatoona Pass October 5 (Detachment). March to the sea November 15-December 10. Siege of Savannah December 10-21. Campaign of the Carolinas January to April, 1865. Pocotaliga, S. C., January 14-16. Combahee River January 25. Salkehatchie Swamps February 2-5. Rivers' Bridge, Salkehatchie River, February 3. South Edisto River, Binnaker's Bridge, February 9. Orangeburg, North Edisto River, February 11-12. Columbia February 15-17. Cheraw March 3. Battle of Bentonville March 19-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 24, and of Raleigh April 14. Bennett's House April 26. Surrender of Johnston and his army. Regiment reorganized at Raleigh, N. C., April 28, 1865, from 14th and 15th Battalion Infantry. March to Washington, D. C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 19. Grand Review May 24. Moved to Louisville, Ky., June 7-10, thence to St. Louis, Mo., and Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. March to Fort Kearney July 1-14, and duty on the plains till September 1. Ordered to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Mustered out at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, September 16, 1865.

 

Regiment lost during service 6 Officers and 81 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 5 Officers and 135 Enlisted men by disease. Total 227.

Identifier: buildersofpyrami00will

Title: The builders of the pyramid; the story of Shelby County: its resources and developments

Year: 1897 (1890s)

Authors: Williams, Joseph R

Subjects: Nashville (Tenn.). Tennessee Centennial and International Exposition, 1897

Publisher: Memphis, De Garis printing company

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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ls, according to the intelligence and disposition to work dis-played by the negro. In the alluvial lands of the creek and riverbottoms the yield is satisfactory to the most sanguine. Farmsalong Wolf and Hatchie rivers, Big Creek and the Mississippiriver, are wonderfully productive, often yielding from fifteen hun-dred to seventeen hundred pounds of seed cotton to the acre. Where the farmer is also the owner, even upon the long-usedlands of the old plantations, the fields are robed in white and ex-cellent crops of cotton and corn are produced. Fortunately forShelby the number of small farms is rapidly increasing. Thisoperates in a two-fold way to the benefit of the County. First, itsets at rest and forever buries the idea of equality between thenegro and the white farm laborers—an idea that has done much toprevent immigration to the Southern country. Second, it assuresthe wisest and most economical system of farming—that which ismstigated by the love of the owner for his farm home.

 

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39KING COTTON. For years Shelby County was thegreatest cotton producing county in theland. Of recent years, owing to thediversified crops put in by the farmers tomeet the demands of the large and grow-ing city of Memphis, the yield of cottonhas not been so large, and Shelby haswillingly and to its advantage taken thethird place as a cotton county, whileWashington County, Mississippi, has advanced to the front. Thecotton of Shelby County, though, is regarded as being of a higherclass grade than that of the fertile fields of the Mississippi riverbottom. It is cleaner, purer; perhaps the staple, as a rule, is atrifle longer, and it commands, generally, a better price. As early as 1845, Col. John Pope, a pioneer of Shelby, thewinner of the Crystal Palace prize for the best bale of cotton, andChaiiman of the Committee on Agriculture of the first InternalImprovement Convention that met in Memphis in that year, sub-mitted a luminous and elaborate report on the conditions of agri-culture. Cot

  

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Adjutant, 53rd ILL. Infantry

History of Cherokee County Kansas and its representative citizens, ed. & comp. by Nathaniel Thompson Allison, 1904

THOMAS C. WEAVER, one of the honored survivors of the great Civil War, who is a well known business citizen of Baxter Springs, and a justice of the peace in Cherokee County, was born in Kosciusko County, Indiana, July 14, 1840, and is a son of George and Hannah (Moss) Weaver.

 

The Weaver family has descended from Dutch, Scotch and Irish ancestry. The father of our subject was born in Clark County, Ohio, where he was educated and engaged in a mercantile business until the age of 25 years, when he removed to Kosciusko County, Indiana, and embarked in cattle dealing, continuing in this business until 1854. The remainder of his life was spent in farming in DeWitt County, Illinois, where he died at the advanced age of 89 years. He married Hannah Moss, whose parents were natives of Ohio; she died at the age of 83 years. They had issue as follows: Louisa, wife of A. D. Cackley, who was in an express transfer business at Clinton, Illinois, but is now retired; Josephine, wife of J. D. Mitchell, who was a farmer and stock-raiser of DeWitt County, Illinois; Thomas C., of this sketch: Henry, who died in infancy; Martha and Caroline, who died in childhood; Mary and Horace (twins), who died in infancy; Harvey V., who is manager of a sanitarium at Onarga, Iroquois County, Illinois; and Charles F., who is a merchant at Atlanta, Illinois.

 

Thomas C. Weaver received his early education in the schools of DeWitt County, Illinois, which he attended during the winter seasons until he became of age. His summers were devoted to agricultural pursuits on his father's farm. The stirring events of the early months of 1861 aroused his loyalty and he testified to the reality of his patriotism by enlisting for service in the Civil War, on July 13, 1861, and he was mustered into the army on August 5th, entering Company C, 41st Reg., Illinois Vol. Inf. He served two years and reenlisted as a veteran, on December 18, 1863. On April 12, 1864, he was transferred to the Veteran Battalion and was promoted to the rank of sergeant-major. Later he was transferred to the 53d Reg., Illinois Vol. Inf., as sergeant major, on April 24, 1865, and was promoted to the rank of 1st lieutenant, to date from April 7, 1865. He was finally mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, on July 22, 1865. It will thus be seen that Mr. Weaver served over four years and during this time he participated in many of the most serious battles of the war, including: Fort Donelson, Fort Heilman, siege of Vicksburg, Hatchie River, Bentonville, Coldwater, Jackson and many minor ones.

 

After the close of the war, Mr. Weaver returned to the peaceful pursuit of farming, in which he continued until 1882 in DeWitt County, Illinois, and then came to Cherokee County, Kansas, and engaged in a hardware business for two years, and subsequently spent four years in the grocery business. Since then his time has been engaged in the management of a successful insurance business at Baxter Springs and in attending to his magisterial duties as justice of the peace.

 

On September 20, 1870, Mr. Weaver was married to Ella Scroggin, who is a daughter of Humphrey Scroggin, a farmer of Logan County, Illinois. The five children of this marriage were: Edwin, who died aged two years; Alberta Maud, who died aged 12 years; George, who died aged four years: Olive (Mrs. W. C. Anderson),of Fort Scott, Kansas; and Nellie, who resides at home. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal Church.

 

From his earliest voting days, Mr. Weaver has been a stanch supporter of the Republican party, and he has frequently been called upon to assume the duties of office. In Illinois he was a member of the local School Board and held the same office at Baxter Springs, of which city he was treasurer for six years. For the past seven years he has filled his present judicial position, the powers of which he has many times used to quietly settle differences without resorting to continued litigation. His decisions have been very generally supported and his personal integrity has never been questioned.

 

Since the organization of the camp of the Modern Woodmen of America at Baxter Springs in 1889, Mr. Weaver has served as clerk. He is a member and the treasurer of the local lodge of the Ancient Order of United Workmen; belongs also to the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is serving his fourth term as commander of the local G. A. R. post, of which he is a charter member.

  

Identifier: newdollaratlasof00rand

Title: New dollar atlas of the United States and Dominion of Canada ..

Year: 1884 (1880s)

Authors: Rand McNally and Company

Subjects:

Publisher: Chicago

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

  

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in June, and on July 1-4 the State was readmitted. The iifteenth amendment was rat-ified in 18T0, and the constitution now in force was adopted in 1875. Io/nil at ton.—Census of 1880: Males, 623,629; Females, 639,876; Native,1,252,:71; Foreign, 9,734; White, 662,185; Colored, 600,32U, including -4 Chinese,and 213 Indians and Half-breeds. 79 STATE OF TENNESSEE.

 

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Topograjyliy,—The greatest length of Tennessee east andwest is 432 miles; greatest breadth, 109 miles; and area, 42,U50square miles, or 26,912,000 acres. The Appalachian mountainsseparate Tennessee from North Carolina. The State is popu-larly divided into three sections: East Tennessee, extendingfrom the North Carolina border to about the middle of the Cum-berland table land; Middle Tennessee, thence to the Tennesseeriver; and West Tennessee, occupying the territory betweenthe Tennessee and Mississippi rivers. The Mississippi formsthe western boundary, and, with the Tennessee and Cumberland, drains about three-fourths of the State. Other rivers are the Clinch, the Holston, the Forked Deer andits branches, the Big Hatchie and Wolf river. The Tennessee and Cumberland arenavigable for a considerable distance, and the other rivers afford valuable water power.Climate.—The climate of the State is mild and remarkably salubrious. Owingto the great elevation of the eastern division and the

  

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Identifier: officersofarmyna00powe

Title: Officers of the army and navy (regular) who served in the Civil War

Year: 1892 (1890s)

Authors: Powell, William H. (William Henry), 1838-1901 Shippen, Edward, 1826-1911

Subjects: United States. Army

Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa. : L.R. Hamersly & Co.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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61, and was promoted first lieutenant Sep-tember 1, 1861. He served in the Western army, andwas engaged in the blockade of the Mississippi Riveragainst steamers bringing munitions of war capturedby Confederates at Baton Rouge Arsenal to St. Louis.He participated in the expedition to Southwest Missouri,and was afterwards on recruiting service and with hisregiment at Camp of Instruction near St. Louis. lieparticipated in Fremonts expedition to Southwest Mis-souri, and was in the regular brigade from October, 1861,to February, 1862, when he was transferred to the Armyof the Mississippi, and assigned to a cavalry division.He was engaged in the capture of Camp Jackson, withtwelve hundred rebel prisoners, May 10, 1861 ; at thecapture of Jefferson City, Missouri, June 15, 1861, andparticipated in the following actions, battles, and skir-mishes : Booneville, Missouri; Blackwater, Missouri;New Madrid and Island No. 10; with gun-boats at PointPleasant, Fort Pillow, Farmington, siege of Corinth,

 

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Hatchie River, Jacinto, Rienzi, Blackland, Booneville,Tuscumbia, 1 lolly Springs, Iuka, Corinth, Daviss Bridge,The Hatchie, Ripley, Waterford, Lumpkins Mills, Tal-lahatchie Bridge, Lamar, Coffeeville, Fort Hindman, PortGibson, Bayou Pierre, Hankinsons Ferry, Raymond,Clinton, Jackson, Champion Hills, Big Black; assault,siege, and surrender of Vicksburg. Lieutenant MacMurray was promoted captain of FirstMissouri Light Artillery Nov. I, 1863 ; was at St. Louisto Feb., 1865; in charge of reconstruction of fortifica-tions at New Madrid, and served with the Powder RiverIndian Expedition, on the march from Franklin, Mis-souri, to the valley of the Powder River, Montana, from|une 1 to Nov. 12, 1865, having been engaged withSioux, Cheyennes, and Arapahoes near YellowstoneRiver, in September. He was honorably mustered outof the volunteer service Nov. 20, 1865. Captain MacMurray entered the regular service Feb-ruary 2^, 1866, as second lieutenant of the first Artil-lery ; was promoted first lieu

  

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Map of Tippah County, Mississippi c1835

General Land Office

 

Illinois Central railroad swing bridge across the Hatchie River at Rialto Tennessee is abandoned.

Lower Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge

Taken in Lauderdale County, TN on April 12, 2008.

Taken in Lauderdale County, TN on April 12, 2008.

At first I thought I was watching a Beaver.. but the tail was different and no big teeth so I assumed this was a River Otter as otter's are supposed to be plentiful at the Hatchie Wildlife Refuge. Now after more research I think this is indeed a Muskrat. His body is shorter than an Otter and he was less playful. Anyone who can clarify this for me?

Taken in Lauderdale County, TN on April 12, 2008.

Taken in Lauderdale County, TN on April 12, 2008.

Site looking over the Hatchie River and Davis Bridge.

greensblueandgray.com

This worn sign is at the site of the Davis bridge, on the Hatchie River.

 

Photo by: Michael Noirot

www.BattlefieldPortraits.com/

ThisMightyScourge.com/

Westbound I40 crossing the Hatchie River basin.

The battle began with the Union Army on this ridge, moved down the field to the Hatchie River, crossed the river, proceeded up the next ridge, mistakes were made, the Confederate Army escaped back to Holly Springs and safety.

Title: Annual catalogue and price list of the Royal Palm Nurseries : tropical and semi-tropical trees and plants and rare exotics for the greenhouse or lawn

Identifier: annualcataloguep1888roya

Year: 1888 (1880s)

Authors: Royal Palm Nurseries; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Nurseries (Horticulture), Florida, Catalogs; Tropical plants, Catalogs; Fruit trees, Catalogs; Citrus fruit industry, Catalogs; Fruit, Catalogs; Plants, Ornamental, Catalogs

Publisher: [Manatee, F. L. ] : Royal Palm Nurseries

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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54 REASONER BROS., MANATEE, FLORIDA. XII. TiLLANDSIAS BrOMELIADS. " These, as with all great trees in the tropical forests, zvere loaded with parasites— vriesias, lo?ig ragged-looking cact , bromelias, epiphytal orchids, and the like. Tilland- sias, too, of the kind known as ' wild pines ' sat snugly in the forks, or on the upper sur- faces of the great limbs, flourishing as luxuriantly as if their roots rested in the richest soil.''''—Mayne Reid. ANANASSA sativa. (See Tropical Fruit Plants.) BILLBBRGIA splendens. |i each. TILLANDSIA Bartramii. A small neat species, with brilliant red bracts and purple flowers. 25 cents each. T. bracteata. One of the largest Wild Pines or Air Plants. Full-grown plants are one to two feet in diameter and height, spikes often eighteen inches or more in length ; the large brilliant crimson bracts and flower stalk, and purple blossoms, are very showy, and remain beautiful for weeks. A most valuable plant for conservatory or bay window, enduring a low temperature, (though but little frost,) requiring no care except an occasional spraying. Attach to wood, or hang in a small wire basket. Very small, 5 cents each, 50 cents per dozen ; large, 25 cents each. T. bulbosa. Not native above the Caloosa- hatchie river. Very odd and pretty. Leaves six to ten inches in length, often faintly striped cross-wise like the x^r^ Zebrina ; base of the plant bulb-like. 25 cents each. T. csespitosa. A species with long grass- like leaves, varying in color from grey to red ; usually found in swamps and moist places, most frequently on the "Pop-Ash " or Swamp Ash. 10 cents each. T. Cubana (?). A grand species from Cuba, with leaves like an immense Billbergia, the plant two or more feet in height, and often with a spread of three feet. Will flour- ish in air or soil. %\ to $3 each. T. juncea. "A stout and very neat species, with polished stems a foot or two high, of a brilliant red color."—A. H. Curtiss. 50 cts. each. TlllA^K^'DSTK-Continued. T. recurvata. A small species, differing but little, except in size, from seedlings of T. usneoides. 15 cents each. T. usneoides. The Long Moss, Black Moss or Spanish Moss of the South. Very effective in decorations. Now used to a great extent in the North. $1.50 per bushel crate, price of crate inclusive. T. Utrlculata. The largest native species. Leaves an inch or two in width, and two feet or more in length in full-grown plants. Stems very tall, three to five feet, branched and many-flowered, but not so showy as T. bracteata. 25 and 50 cents each. T. Zahnii. {Zebrina.) A small exotic species, very rare. Leaves striped cross-wise with distinct bars of purple and gray. %\ each. T. sp. from Guatamala. Leaves green, serrated. $1 each.

 

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TILLANDSIA BRACTEATA.

  

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Title: Canadian forest industries 1903

Identifier: canadianforest1903donm

Year: 1903 (1900s)

Authors:

Subjects: Lumbering; Forests and forestry; Forest products; Wood-pulp industry; Wood-using industries

Publisher: Don Mills, Ont. : Southam Business Publications

Contributing Library: Fisher - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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October, 1903 THE CANADA LUMBERMAN 23 At Halifax I met a lumberman from Newfoundland, who said that the export of sawn lumber from the island this season would exceed fifty million feet. The Henry M. Whitney concern, of Boston, will put out about half of this, and will have loaded twenty steameis besides several barques before the latter part of October. Labor is scarce on the island, and it is said that there are fully 2500 men now permanently engaged in lumber- ing in the colony. Whilst I was at Chatham, N.B., the Head Line steamship " Teslin Head" put in there from Quebec. She was loaded with a cargo of lumber consigned for the Imperial Government. An all-night run took me through the Metapedia valley and past the famed summer resorts of Bic, Little Metis, Cacouna, and Riviere de Loup. I arrived at Quebec in time to see the brilliant spectacle of the illumination of the British and French fleets of warships and the departure of the vice-regal party. One word before I close this trip. The Intercolonial Railway deserve praise for their fine service. The parlor, sleeping, and dining- car appointments are perfect—equal to anything I have seen on the biggest U.S. lines. The trainmen are the politest I have ever met, and although the journey is long it is one filled w'th pleasure, and at times, entrancing beauty. I arrived in Toronto 'afely. My mileage book showed 3,127 miles of railway travel and about fifty miles by elec- tric road and boat, an average of about 160 miles for every working day. I was tired out by the rapid journey, but like the Great Sacred Black Cat, "still in the ring." J.R.H. DEVELOPMENT OF THE CIRCULAR SAW. By D- W. Baird. The publication of some reminiscences of old- time saw mills in a recent issue of the South- ern Lumberman served to bring out a great deal of imformation, more or less reliable, in regard to the primintive methods of convert- ing timber into lumber. While the saw was one among the earliest tools to be used, the degree of perfection attained in saws of all description in use at the present time was arrived at by slow process of evolution and progress that extended over many centuries. The first users of the saw doubtless realized at a very early date that its efficiency, that is, the amount of work the tool would perform, depended upon the rate of travel of its cutting edge. This proposition is so apparent that we are forced to assume that even a primitive people posses- sing sufficient intelligence to pull a saw back and forth would readily catch on to the idea. Statting with this assumption, it is astonishing that it required more than thirty centuries for a people constantly increasing in knowledge ot mechanical laws to discover the immense su- periority of a rotary over a reciprocating motion when applied to a saw, or to many other cut- ting tools. A large proportion ot mechanical force, or power, expended in operating a recip- rocating saw or other machine is absorbed in overcoming the impact. Equally as astonish- ing are the crude devices resorted to some six or seven decades ago in the effort to produce a circular saw. In this connection we present cuts of two of the earliest forms of the circular saw used in Tennessee that are fairly well authenticated. Cut No. 1 represents a saw that was oper- ated by one Thomas Scarborough in Bedford Fig. i.—The Scarborough Saw of_i84o. county, Tennessee, about the year 1840. It was simply a strip of iron about eight inches wide and probably half an inch in thickness, with steel ends in which the teeth'were formed. The hole for the mandrel, or arbor, was square. This saw was used for hewing house logs, cutting floor beams, joists, and squaring tim- ber for various purposes. As no other of its kind has ever been reported it is fair to pre- sume that this saw was not a pronounced success. Cut No. 2 is from a sketch by John H. Whitson, of Goodrich, Tenn. It represents a saw that was in operation on Hatchie river, West Tennessee, near the line between the counties of Hardin and Hardeman during the last half of the fifth decade of the past century. This saw strongly suggests the circular saw of to-day, but had only four teeth. It was driven

 

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Fig 2. -Whitson's Saw, the First Suggestion of the Circular. by horse power applied to a draught wheel of the " ground-hog" pattern, except that it was made almost wholly of wood, and was used for cutting pine lumber. Mr. Whitson, who was a half grown boy at the time when he saw it, says that according to his best recollection and belief this saw threw chips fifty feet high. These two instances will serve to show by what slow process the circular saw of the present was evolved. The step from the cir- cular to the band saw was shorter and more rapid, but still it was brought to its present degree of perfection only through tedious and costly experiments. Few of the present gen- eration realize how much they owe to the patient and slow development of inventive genius among the generations now gone. duncan & Mclennan IRON AND BRASS FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS Engines, Boilers, Gang Edgers, Shirvgle Machines, Mill Machinery, Machinery Repairs ELECTRIC PLANTS, ETC., ETC. CASTINGS OF ALL KINDS, ETC., ETC. CAMPBELLTOH, M. B.

  

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Identifier: lifedeedsofgener01nort

Title: Life and deeds of General Sherman, including the story of his great march to the sea ..

Year: 1891 (1890s)

Authors: Northrop, Henry Davenport, 1836-1909

Subjects: Sherman, William T. (William Tecumseh), 1820-1891

Publisher: Boston, Mass., Providence, R.I., Gately & O'Gorman

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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ered Colonel W. W. Wright,superintendent of military railroads, to proceed inadvance to -Newbern, and to be prepared to extendthe railroad out from Newbern to Goldsboro by the15 th of March. ** Forward, March! On the 19th of January all preparations werecomplete, and the orders of march were given.On the 25th a demonstration was made against theCombahee ferry and railroad-bridge across the Sal-kahatchie, merely to amuse the enemy, who had :evidently adopted that river as his defensive line jagainst our supposed objective, the city of Charleston. ^I reconnoitred the line in person, and saw that the ^heavy rains had swollen the river,-so that water stoodin the swamps for a breadth of more than a mile at adepth of from one to twenty feet. Not having the remotest intention of approachingChark^ston, a comparatively small force was able, by Aseeming preparations to cross over, to keep in theirfront a considerable force of the enemy disposed tocontest our advance on Charleston. On the 27th I

 

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MAP SHOWING THE ROUTE OF SHERMANS ARMY THROUGH SOUTH CAROLINA, 453 454 GENERAL SHERMAN. rode to the camp of General Hatchs division of : Fosters command, on the TuUifinney and Coosa- i hatchie rivers, and directed those places to be evacu- ; ated, as no longer of any use to us. That division i was then moved to Pocotaligo to keep up the feints .already begun, until we should, with the right wing, move higher up and cross the Salkahatchie about iRivers or Broxtons Bridge. The Seventeenth and Fifteenth corps drew^ out of i camp on the 31st of January, but the real march ^ began on the ist of February. All the roads north- ■ ward had for weeks been held by Wheelers cavalry, j who had, by details of negro laborers, felled trees, ij burned bridges, and made obstructions to impede our march. But so well organized were our pioneer bat- ] talions, and so strong and intelligent our men, that • obstructions seemed only to quicken their progress. ■] Felled trees were removed and bridges re

  

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A: Randolph Tennessee Mile 771.2 AHP

B. Hatchie River Mile 773. 5 AHP

C: Fort Pillow, Tennessee Mile 779.5AHP

Identifier: historicalencycl03bate

Title: Historical encyclopedia of Illinois, ed

Year: 1907 (1900s)

Authors: Bateman, Newton, 1822-1897, [from old catalog] ed Selby, Paul, 1825-1913, [from old catalog] joint ed McLean, Alexander, 1833- [from old catalog] ed

Subjects:

Publisher: Chicago, Munsell publishing company

  

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hed toMemphis, via Grand Junction, Lagrange, HollySprings, Moscow, Lafayette, CoUierville andGermantown, reaching its destination July 21,1864. From Memphis it moved to Bolivar andthe Big Muddy River, and on the 5th of Octo-ber took part in the battle of Metamora, onthe Hatchie River, where it suffered a lossof ninety-seven killed, wounded and missing.After various movements during the followingtwo months, on December 30th it was assignedto the definite task of gtrarding the railroadfrom Holly Springs to Waterford, Miss. Itwas engaged in the siege of Vicksburg fromJune 11 to July 4, 1863. and from the latterdate until March 15, 1866, the regiment wasin active service throughout Louisiana. Atthe date mentioned, it was mustered out ofthe service. At the organization of the Twenty-eighth Illi-nois, the number of men enlisting was 761;recruits, 959; total, 1,620; 241 killed and died;2S4 wounded. Of the 89 from McDonoughCounty, 9 were killed, 9 died and 15 were > z o wo X > rm M oo z

 

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HISTORY iW McDONOlHJH COUXTV 729 woiimled. showing a record equal to any regi-ment in the field during the war. Privates—Wagoner. Jacob THIRTIETH INFANTRY.Company B. Whe&ler. Benjamin F.FIFTIETH INFANTRY. (omuany D.rriviUis—McManislc. William R.. Willis. John J. <ompany F. Privates—Lliirke. Thaildeus S..Elvans. William H.,MeManlmle^ W.,Mvers. Nuah, .Mhertiin. Finley B..ICwalt. Nicholas.McManimie. Marion A.Perkey. Daniel.Strode, Jesse B. FIFTY-FIFTH INFANTRY. Ueutenant-ttdonel—Milton Iv.Major—G. F. Hajid.thaplaln—M. U. Haney. Company F. Haney. -Joshna R. Benton. DavidParks, John First-Lieutenant;^Hhnson. First-Sergeant—James M. Shreeves.Sergeant-George Sanford. Corporals-George H. Rogers, David M. Crambaugh. Giles F. Hand. Musician-David J. Matheny. Privates-Brady, .Archibald C..Benton. Jitshtia.Carnes. William H.,Crowl, William A.,Dewey. John C.liunlap. I.eGrand,Kads, John.Fowraker. George W.,Fugate. Robert M.,Holmes.

  

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To left of Chris is the path leading down to the Hatchie River and the remains of the bridge.

Taken in Lauderdale County, TN on April 12, 2008.

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