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The view of Glacier National Park from the top of the Grinnell Glacier Overlook, off of the Highline Trail.

 

A mile or two before reaching the Granite Park Chalet Campground on the Highline Trail, there is an opportunity to climb the Garden Wall to an overlook above the Grinnell Glacier. It's only .6 miles long, but it's a steep ascent. The views from the top are absolutely spectacular, however. This is the view to the southwest, looking out over Heavens Peak, Mt. Cannon, and Lake McDonald in between the two in the distance. You can see the Highline trail running along below in the foreground.

Granite Park Chalet was built in 1914 and 1915 by the Great Northern Railway to provide comfortable back country accommodations inside Glacier National Park. Today this rustic lodge is listed as a National Historic Landmark and it continues to provide comfortable lodging to adventurers and visitors in the Glacier National Park wilderness. I was fortunate enough to spend a few days in the chalet and caught this image early one morning.

 

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Panorama from the summit of Mt Oberlin, Glacier NP, looking from north to about southeast. Perfect day for a hike but a bit hazy for photos.

 

Lake Catani is an artificial lake in the Mount Buffalo National Park in Victoria, Australia. It was constructed in 1910 under the supervision and probably design of the Victorian Public Works engineer, Carlo Catani, to provide recreational facilities in the newly opened winter resort.

The Mount Buffalo National Park was established in 1898 with a 1166 hectare temporary reserve centred on the Eurobin Falls. In 1908 the area was increased to 9240 hectares and became permanent national park reserve. Lake Catani was completed in 1910 by construction of a mass concrete arched dam across Eurobin Creek at Haunted Gorge. The contract was let in 1908 for 2355 pounds. The dam blocked what was then known as the 'Underground River' and flooded Long Plain, in the process also covering an Aboriginal camp site. It was initially intended to provide water for the Grossman sawmill, which was milling timber for the construction of the Mount Buffalo Chalet.

Carlo Catani was appointed Public Works Engineer in 1882, and spent much of his career developing hydrological schemes such as the drainage of Koo Wee Rup and Elwood Swamps. (Wikepedia)

© all rights reserved by B℮n

 

Chopok mountain at 2,024m is the third highest peak of the Low Tatra range in central Slovakia. The peak offers a panoramatic view of High Tatra, Liptov and the valley of Hron. There is a chalet called Kamenná chata located near the summit. The highest points accessible by a chair lift are Chopok úboč 1834 m on the northern slope and Kosodrevina 1494 m on the southern slope. Jasná Nízke Tatry offers numerous trails for hiking and trekking different difficulty, from difficult, which requires a certain degree of preparation to those that are suitable for families with children or beginners. Popular hiking tracks to the highest located and the most famous peaks Ďumbier and Chopok, that are unique places to their views of the Western and High Tatras peaks. The northern and southern slopes rank among the best skiing terrains in Slovakia.

 

Easy hiking over a mountain ridge leading up the highest peak of Low Tatras. From the top of the Mt Dereše you have a wide circular view almost over the mountain ranges of Central and Northern Slovakia. Dereše is a peak 2003 m situated in a granite nucleus of the Low Tatras mountains. Its southern slopes are relatively moderate, covered by a lot of granite blocks. The northern slopes are very steep, full of wild canals and walls that create a typical glacier valley. From the top you would have beautiful view at the Demänovská Valley, Swift Valley, Skalka and the end of the Vajskovská Valley. Photo of the top of Dereše 2003m plus an additional 1 meter.

 

In Centraal-Slowakije, tussen de dalen van de rivieren de Váh en de Hron, strekt zich over een lengte van 80 kilometer het gebergte Lage Tatra uit. Na de noordelijker gelegen Hoge Tatra is dit de hoogste bergstreek van Slowakije. Er zijn drie bergtoppen die boven de 2000 meter uitstijgen. De lager gelegen delen van de Lage Tatra zijn zeer bosrijk, terwijl de hogere streken met gras begroeid zijn. Als Nationaal Park geniet het gebied speciale bescherming. Het middelpunt van de Lage Tatra in Slowakije is de berg Chopok 2024m. De noord- en zuidflank hiervan worden tot de beste skiterreinen van het land gerekend. De top is van beide zijden toegankelijk per stoeltjeslift: vanuit de valleien Demänovská dolina in het noorden en Bystrá dolina in het zuiden. Vanaf de Chopok is een route uitgezet naar de oostelijk gelegen Dumbier, de hoogste top van de streek. De tocht duurt ongeveer twee uur. Het dal Demänovská dolina, genoemd naar het plaatsje Demänova, is een prachtig wandelgebied. De vallei is een beschermd natuurgebied. Foto van een beklimmer die een foto neemt vanaf het Lage Tatra gebergte met uitzicht op het Hoge Tatra gebergte. Foto van de top van Mt. Dereše 2003m plus een extra 1 meter.

 

© all rights reserved by B℮n

 

Chopok mountain at 2,024m is the third highest peak of the Low Tatra range in central Slovakia. The peak offers a panoramatic view of High Tatra, Liptov and the valley of Hron. There is a chalet called Kamenná chata located near the summit. The highest points accessible by a chair lift are Chopok úboč 1834 m on the northern slope and Kosodrevina 1494 m on the southern slope. Jasná Nízke Tatry offers numerous trails for hiking and trekking different difficulty, from difficult, which requires a certain degree of preparation to those that are suitable for families with children or beginners. Popular hiking tracks to the highest located and the most famous peaks Ďumbier and Chopok, that are unique places to their views of the Western and High Tatras peaks. The northern and southern slopes rank among the best skiing terrains in Slovakia.

 

Easy hiking over a mountain ridge leading up the highest peak of Low Tatras. From the top of the Mt Dereše you have a wide circular view almost over the mountain ranges of Central and Northern Slovakia. Dereše is a peak 2003 m situated in a granite nucleus of the Low Tatras mountains. Its southern slopes are relatively moderate, covered by a lot of granite blocks. The northern slopes are very steep, full of wild canals and walls that create a typical glacier valley. From the top you would have beautiful view at the Demänovská Valley, Swift Valley, Skalka and the end of the Vajskovská Valley. Photo of me, on top of Dereše 2003m, taken by my daughter Samantha.

 

In Centraal-Slowakije, tussen de dalen van de rivieren de Váh en de Hron, strekt zich over een lengte van 80 kilometer het gebergte Lage Tatra uit. Na de noordelijker gelegen Hoge Tatra is dit de hoogste bergstreek van Slowakije. Er zijn drie bergtoppen die boven de 2000 meter uitstijgen. De lager gelegen delen van de Lage Tatra zijn zeer bosrijk, terwijl de hogere streken met gras begroeid zijn. Als Nationaal Park geniet het gebied speciale bescherming. Het middelpunt van de Lage Tatra in Slowakije is de berg Chopok 2024m. De noord- en zuidflank hiervan worden tot de beste skiterreinen van het land gerekend. De top is van beide zijden toegankelijk per stoeltjeslift: vanuit de valleien Demänovská dolina in het noorden en Bystrá dolina in het zuiden. Vanaf de Chopok is een route uitgezet naar de oostelijk gelegen Dumbier, de hoogste top van de streek. De tocht duurt ongeveer twee uur. Het dal Demänovská dolina, genoemd naar het plaatsje Demänova, is een prachtig wandelgebied. De vallei is een beschermd natuurgebied. Foto van een beklimmer die een foto neemt vanaf het Lage Tatra gebergte met uitzicht op het Hoge Tatra gebergte. Foto van mij bovenop de Dereše 2003m gemaakt door mijn dochter Samantha.

 

West Adams Heights

 

“Nowadays we scarcely notice the high stone gates which mark the entrances on Hobart, Harvard, and Oxford streets, south of Washington Boulevard. For one thing, the traffic is too heavy, too swift; and then, again, the gates have been obscured by intrusions of shops and stores. At the base of the stone pillars appears the inscription “West Adams Heights.” There was a time when these entranceways were formidable and haughty, for they marked the ways to one of the first elite residential areas in Los Angeles. . . In the unplanned early-day chaos of Los Angeles, West Adams Heights was obviously something very special, an island in an ocean of bungalows—approachable, but withdrawn and reclusive—one of the few surviving examples of planned urban elegance of the turn of the century.”

 

- Carey McWilliams, “The Evolution of Sugar Hill,” Script, March, 1949: 30.

 

Today West Adams Heights is still obviously something special. The past sixty years, however, have not been kind. In 1963 the Santa Monica Freeway cut through the heart of West Adams Heights, dividing the neighborhood, obscuring its continuity. In the 1970’s the city paved over the red brick streets and removed the ornate street lighting. After the neighborhood’s zoning was changed to a higher density, overzealous developers claimed several mansions for apartment buildings. Despite these challenges, however, “The Heights,” as the area was once known, has managed to regain some of its former elegance.

 

The West Adams Heights tract was laid out in 1902, in what was then a wheat field on the western edge of town. Although the freeway now creates an artificial barrier, the original neighborhood boundaries were Adams Boulevard, La Salle Ave, Washington Boulevard, and Western Avenue. Costly improvements were integrated into the development, such as 75-food wide boulevards (which were some of the first contoured streets not to follow the city grid), lots elevated from the sidewalk, ornate street lighting, and large granite monuments with red-brass electroliers at the entrance to every street. These upgrades increased the lot values, which helped ensure the tract would be an enclave for the elite.

 

One early real estate ad characterized the neighborhood stating: “West Adams Heights needs no introduction to the public: it is already recognized as being far superior to any other tract. Its high and slightly location, its beautiful view of the city and mountains make t a property unequaled by any other in the city.”

 

The early residents’ were required to sign a detailed restrictive covenant. This hand-written document required property owners to build a “first-class residence,” of at least two stories, costing no less than two-thousand dollars (at a time when a respectable home could be built for a quarter of that amount, including the land), and built no less than thirty-five feet from the property’s primary boundary. Common in early twentieth century, another clause excluded residents from selling or leasing their properties to non-Caucasians.

 

By the mid 1930’s, however, most of the restrictions had expired. Between 1938 and 1945 many prominent African-Americans began to make “The Heights” their home. According to Carey McWilliams, West Adams Heights became known “Far and wide as the famous Sugar Hill section of Los Angeles,” and enjoyed a clear preeminence over Washington’s smart Le Droit Park, St. Louis’s Enright Street, West Philadelphia, Chicago’s Westchester, and Harlem’s fabulous Sugar Hill.

 

West Adams Heights, now also known as Sugar Hill, played a major role in the Civil Rights movement in Los Angeles. In 1938 Norman Houston, president of the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company, and an African-American, purchased a home at 2211 South Hobart Boulevard. Legal Action from eight homeowners quickly ensued. During that period, other prominent African-Americans began to make Sugar Hill their home – including actress Hattie McDaniels, dentists John and Vada Summerville, actress Louise Beavers, band leader Johnny Otis, and performers Pearl Baily and Ethel Waters, and many more. On December 6, 1945, the “Sugar Hill Cases” were heard before Judge Thurmond Clark, in LA Superior Court. He made history by become the first judge in America to use the 14th Amendment to disallow the enforcement of covenant race restrictions. The Los Angeles Sentinel quoted Judge Clark: “This court is of the opinion that it is time that [African-Americans] are accorded, without reservations and evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment.” Gradually, over the last century people of nearly ever background have made historic West Adams their home.

 

The northern end of West Adams Heights is now protected as part of the Harvard Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ). The Historic West Adams area of Los Angeles (which includes West Adams Heights) boasts the highest concentration of turn-of-the-century homes west of the Mississippi, as well as the highest concentration of National Historic Landmarks, National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Districts, State Historic Landmarks, Los Angeles Cultural-Historic Monuments, and Historic Preservation Overlay Zones in the city. The entirety of West Adams Heights should be nominated as a National Register Historic District, for the quality of homes, the prominence of the architects, notoriety of the people who lived in the neighborhood, and the role it played in civil rights.

 

Perhaps a quote adapted from a fireplace mantle in the Frederick Rindge mansion best symbolizes the optimism which exists in West Adams: “California Shall be Ours as Long as the Stars Remain.”

 

01 – Harvard Street Monument – Harvard Blvd & Washington Blvd, 1902.

 

Nearly destroyed by neglect and vandals over decades of inner city decay, the Harvard and Hobart Boulevard monuments were restored in 2002.

 

02 – Frank Southerland & Grace Pirtle Hutton, and John A Pirtle Residence – 2047 La Salle Ave - 1907

 

According to the property permit, the house was built for E B Spencer in 1906. Most likely he built this house on speculation (as he did two years earlier at 2039-2041 La Salle Ave), because according to the LA County Tax Assessor’s Office, John A Pirtle purchased this property in 1907. The same year there appears an article in the LA Herald announcing the engagement of Frank Southerland Hutton to Miss Grace Pirtle, who lived with her parents at 1819 S Union Ave, and their plans to build a house in Los Angeles after their honeymoon. Another 1907 article indicates the happy couple were married and moved into their new home on La Salle Ave. But, by 1909, they’ve moved to 1827 S Normandie and John A Pirtle is shown at the La Salle house. John Pirtle was a Southern California industrialist who appears to have made his fortune in the oil fields of Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas, through a company called the Beaumont Exchange and the Oriole Oil Company. He also speculated in water, with the West Los Angeles Water Company, West Side Water Company and the Glendale Consolidated Water Company. Frank Hutton was a well-known and respected Los Angeles lawyer, a partner of the firm Schweitzer and Hutton. This 1907 house is an unassuming looking American Craftsman bungalow, which hides its actual size. Beneath the long, low slung slope of the gable is a rather large house of 2-1/2 stories. The rounded, Colonial Revival styled balcony rail is an unusual feature.

 

03 – Robert K Wilson, J Frank & Virginia N Waters, and Mark & Mamie (May) E Phelps Residence – 2039-2041 La Salle Ave – 1905 – Frank Dale Hudson and Julius W Krause

 

Dutch Colonial in West Adams Heights is a rare architectural style, probably already deemed to be passé, but two examples exist nonetheless. The other Dutch is on South Hobart, built for C I D Moore, and is turned on its side, giving it a more Cotswold appearance. This Dutch Colonial is a straight-on interpretation of the vernacular. The architect of the house is reported to be Julius W Krause. Prior to 1895 Krause was partnered with Frank Dale Hudson, of the firm Hudson and Munsell. For a time Krause was also the Superintendent of Building for the City of Los Angeles. The original builder of this house was E B Spencer, however it’s obvious he built it in 1905 on speculation (just as he did two years later the house at 2047 La Salle Ave). This house was quickly sold the same year to Robert K Wilson who Just as quickly flipped it in 1907 to J Frank Waters. Six months later Waters sold the residence to Mark and Mamie (May) E Phelps. The Phelps’s lived at this resident until Mark’s death in 1924. Mark Phelps was described as a pioneer of Los Angeles, first finding success in mining, then as a live-stock dealer. He retired just 3 months before his death. By 1926 J E Phillips who was reported to be living at this address was arrested for smuggling Moonshine Whiskey in his car. In 1943, William J Morris, a building contractor, was the resident, according to his obituary.

 

04 – Wilbur Wells & Blanche Lillian Smith Keim Residence – 2033 La Salle Ave – 1904

 

Wilbur Wells Keim graduated from the Pharmacy School at UC Berkeley in 1902. He married Miss Blanche Lillian Smith in 1903. A large reception for the couple was held at the West Adams Heights mansion of Wesley W Beckett, 2218 S Harvard Blvd. The couple began building their house on La Salle in 1904. Keim opened a pharmacy with Edward R Neill (Keim-Neill Drug Co) just a few blocks away on the Southwest corner of Washington and Normandie, at 1890 W Washington Boulevard. Their daughter, Lorraine Keim was a 1925 graduate of USC and a member of the Kappa Alpha Sorority. The house itself is a mystery. The front porch is Craftsman. The eves under the second story and the overall shape appear to be Colonial Revival. The front door with the half sidelights and smaller window openings suggest an older structure which was moved to this location and remodeled. The effect, unfortunately, isn’t quite successful.

 

05 – William A & Rose H Jenkins Residence – 2029 La Salle Ave – 1909

 

Originally the address was 1949 La Salle Ave, but a reorganization of addresses by the city to make them more uniform changed it to 2029 La Salle Ave sometime around 1909-1910.

 

06 – Frank A & Marie C Von Violand Vickery Residence – 2025 La Salle Ave – 1909

 

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The Vickery’s lived at 341 Andrews Blvd (S St Andrews Pl), in a 1907 mansion they built for $25,000. According to the LA Times and LA Herald society pages, they entertained often. In May, 1910, the Vickery’s sold their St Andrews Pl home through the Althouse Brothers for $45,000, to Mrs. Frederick Fischer, and relocated to their 2025 La Salle Ave home. After Frank Vickery’s death, auction, either the house didn’t sell at auction or his wide decided to continue living at the residence. The 1923-24 Southwestern Blue Book lists her at this location, with visiting on “Third Wednesdays. “ Mrs. Vickery was also a member of the Ebell and Friday Morning Clubs. Although this house must have been smaller and less opulent than their St Andrews Place residence, it is still a handsome American Craftsman home, with only minor alterations.

 

07 – Income property owned by Frank A Vickery – 2017 La Salle Ave – 1909

 

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The house is American Craftsman, and the architect and builder was the Alfred E Georgian, Co.

 

08 – La Salle Ave Streetscape

Looking South on La Salle Ave (from left to right):

A. 2047 La Salle Ave – Hutton-Pirtle Residence

B. 2041 La Salle Ave – Phelps Residence

C. 2029 La Salle Ave – Hull Residence

D. 2033 La Salle Ave – Keim Residence

E. 2025 La Salle Ave – Frank A & Marie C Von Violand Vickery Residence

F. 2017 La Salle Ave – Income Property owned by Frank A Vickery

 

09 – Stanley Frederick & Sue A Shaffer McClung – 1959 La Salle Ave – 1905 – Robert Farquhar Train & Robert Edmund Williams

 

Imagine this house as it might have been in 1905: the long sloping roof of natural shingles, which would have matched the color of the shingled siding; ornate rails along the porch, widows weep, and above the bay window; a full chimney and no bars on the windows or doors. The effect would have been striking, and will again when the house is one day restored. It’s one of the most significant surviving houses on La Salle. It was designed by the architecture team of Robert Farquar Train and Robert Edmund Williams (Train & Williams), for Pacific Mutual Secretary Stanley F McClung. He was part of the “Old Company” forced out of power in the early 1930’s along with his brother-in-law George Ira Cochran.

 

10 – Income property owned by Frank A Vickery – 1947 La Salle Ave – 1909

 

When Frank A Vickery passed away he left a sizable estate. Numerous properties were advertised for auction in the February 28, 2014, issue of The California Outlook, including three in West Adams Heights (1947 La Salle Ave, 2017 La Salle Ave, and 2025 La Salle Ave). Vickery had purchased these unimproved lots in 1906 from the Gopher Land Company as investments and improved the lots. Frank Vickery was a mining industrialist with many interests, including the Pan-American Hardwoods Company in Mexico and the San Gabriel River Rock Company. The house is a handsome American Craftsman residence, making use of horizontal siding to make it appear wider.

 

11 – Evan G & Matilee Loeb Evans and William A & Rose H Haley Jenkins Residence – 1929 La Salle Ave – 1903 – Allied Arts Co

 

This home is American Craftsman designed in 1903 by The Allied Arts Co (as was its neighbor at 1919 La Salle Ave), a prominent architecture firm responsible for many LA landmarks, including the recently restored Hall of Justice. A J Carlson was the contractor. Evan G Evans, from Chicago, IL, arrived in Los Angeles in the late 1990’s, and married Matilee Loeb in 1898. The Mr & Mrs Evans were prominent in the society pages. The second owner, William (Will) Jenkins, was like many of his neighbors, a Capitalist. Jenkins appears to have had his hand in many enterprises, including the Madera Canal & Irrigation Company. Mrs. Jenkins passed away August 5, 1933, at her home at 148 S Irving Blvd, survived by her husband.

 

12 – John H & Evangeline “Eva” Rose Clark Tupper and Thomas M & Mary P Sloan Residence – 1919 La Salle Ave – 1903 – Allied Arts Co

 

John H and Wilbur S Tupper were born in Evansville, Wisconsin, the children of John H and Mary Sophia Foster Tupper. In the 1800’s the brothers relocated in San Francisco found themselves in the insurance industry. Wilbur Tupper became Vice-President of Conservative Life and again both brothers moved to Los Angeles. Wilbur was destined for success and after the death of then-president Frederick Hastings Rindge, he became president of both Conservative Life and Pacific Mutual (founded by Leland Stanford). Wilbur’s house was located at 2237 S Harvard Blvd and John’s at 1919 La Salle Ave, within the same tract. In 1906 Wilbur suddenly resigned from the company in scandal involving another woman (not his wife). He fled to Chicago, abandoning his wife and position. His brother John probably suffered for his brother’s indiscretion, which may help explain his sudden departure from the neighborhood and the sale of his house to Thomas M Sloan. About the same time Thomas Sloan had been promoted to Assistant General Freight Agent of the Sante Fe Railroad. This transitional Victorian/Craftsman house was designed in 1903 by the Allied Arts Co, (as was its neighbor at 1929 La Salle Ave), a prominent architecture firm responsible for many LA landmarks, including the recently restored Hall of Justice. A J Carlson was the contractor.

 

13 – Charles Kraft Residence – 1913 La Salle Ave – 1913 – Earl E Scherich

 

A more modest and later addition to the neighborhood, this 1913 Craftsman Bungalow was built for Charles Kraft, Vice-President of the J C Huggins Co, a brokerage and loan company. The home was designed by Architect Earl E Scherich, and May L Greenwood, builder.

 

14 – Roland Paul Residence Gates – 1986 W Washington Blvd – 1905 – Sumner P Hunt and Arthur Wesley Eager (Demolished)

 

Between a bicycle shop and a convalescence home are the gates to 1986 W Washington Blvd, which remain the only evidence that a home designed by Hunt & Eager once stood here. Originally commissioned by Mrs. R Fitzpatrick of Pico Blvd, in February of 1905, it was quickly turned over to pioneer Col Charles F Howland, who lived around the corner at 1902 S Harvard Blvd. He attempted to sell it in September, 1905, to Walter Rose, but the deal apparently fell through. In November, 1905, Col Howland successfully sold the home to Roland Paul.

 

15 – Elizabeth L Kenney Residence – 2012 W Washington Blvd – 1906 – Philip Gengembre Hubert (Attributed)

 

When this home was built, Philip Gengembre Hubert, celebrated New York City architect, was listed as the owner. It was most-likely designed by him on speculation. His residence was already established in 1903 at 2144 S Hobart Blvd. Hubert was responsible for designing many New York City landmarks, including the Chelsea Hotel, and after nearly 40 years in practice Hubert retired to Los Angeles, where he died in 1911. This home was sold to Elizabeth L Kenney, the second female to graduate the law department at Stanford University and continued her education at Northwestern University in Chicago. Kenney became the first practicing female attorney in Los Angeles in 1897, entering into practice with her uncle. The house, unfortunately, has been mistreated with a layer of stucco and aluminum windows. We can only hope evidence of the house’s original nature lies underneath.

 

16 – Commercial Block – 2034 W Washington Blvd (formerly the home of Nathaniel Dryden, 1902 S Harvard Blvd)

 

Evidence of how quickly Los Angeles was changing in the early 20th Century can be seen in this attractive commercial block. Nathaniel Dryden, an architect and engineer who built the Brand Library in Glendale and the Robinson Mansion in Beverly Hills, built his home on this corner in 1903. Just 20 years later it had been replaced by a commercial building already. Such was the value of land in the quick-growing city.

 

17 – Clara Pitt Durant Residence – 1909 S Harvard Blvd. 1908. Sumner P Hunt and Arthur Wesley Eager

 

Barely visible from the street, the current owners prefer to be hidden by the trees and shrubs. This large Craftsman home was designed by Hunt & Eager for Ms. Clara Pitt Durant. A divorcee from Michigan, Ms. Pitt took her settlement and began a new life in Los Angeles. The history of the house is recorded at: www.invisiblemanor.com

  

18 – Charles Clifford and Belle Case Gibbons Residence – 1915 S Oxford Ave – 1903 – Frank M Tyler.

 

This house, designed by Frank M Tyler, is unusual for the neighborhood because it is completely sheathed in shingles, including the front porch columns. It is a Transitional Victorian/Craftsman in the Shingle Style, with Colonial and Tudor touches. It was built for Charles Clifford Gibbons and Belle Case Gibbons, who came to Los Angeles in 1884. Mr. Gibbons worked his way to from stock boy to general manager of Hale’s Dry Goods Store. His employer, Jas M Hale was a relation of San Francisco’s Hale’s Bros. Department Store, the national chain. C C Gibbons died in 1910 after an illness and in 1912 the house was sold to Matt and Mary Conway. Matt Conway made his business in real estate and land speculation. Coincidentally, the third owner, Jon Fukuto, was also a proprietor of a chain of Los Angeles grocery stores call Jonson’s Supermarkets (the name being a play on words, combining “Jon” and “Sons”). In 1945, after being released from the Gila Internment Camp in Arizona, Mr. Fukuto moved his family to Los Angeles where he established the business.

 

After departing from Granite Park Chalet we climbed over Swiftcurrent Pass and began our descent into the Many Glacier Valley.

 

This is a view from our descent of Swiftcurrent Pass - looking at the Many Glacier Valley in Glacier National Park, Montana.

The Garden Wall, a part of the Continental Divide, is a knife-edge ridge in Glacier National Park that runs from Swiftcurrent Pass to Logan Pass. The name comes from the abundant greenery and wildflowers on display in the summer. Spectacular in its own right, the Garden Wall also gives rise to notable summits such as Bishops Cap and Mount Gould (the highpoint). www.summitpost.org/garden-wall-glacier-overlook-to-swiftc...

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The Garden Wall is a steep alpine area within Glacier National Park well known during the summer months to be heavily covered in dozens of species of flowering plants and shrubs. Located along the west side of the Continental divide and extending northward from Logan Pass, the Garden Wall can be traversed via the popular Highline Trail and for a distance of over 5 mi (8.0 km) to the Granite Park Chalet. The Going-to-the-Sun Road also passes through portions of the Garden Wall northwest of Logan Pass.

 

The Weeping Wall is a short stretch of the Going-to-the-Sun Road where water cascades over the Garden Wall to the roadway below. The Garden Wall is an arête or rock spine that separates the Many Glacier region of the park from Lake McDonald valley.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_Wall

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Logan Pass is located along the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park, in the U.S. state of Montana. It is the highest point on the Going-to-the-Sun Road. The Logan Pass Visitor Center is open during the summer season just east of the pass. Wikipedia

Elevation: 6,647' (2,026 m)

Road: Going-to-the-Sun Road

Range: Lewis Range, Rocky Mountains

 

image by Photo George

copyrighted: ©2015 GCheatle

All Rights Reserved

 

locator: _GNP5308

Granite Park Chalet with an amazing view that puts our own size into perspective. 12.5 miles down, 7 more till Many Glacier (my final destination for my third night in the park - approaching halfway point for the week, 45.5 miles).

The best way to get the best views of one the best parks I have been in is to get into one of the 700 miles that needle its way through the gorgeous valleys and towering peaks of the crown of the continent.

 

And perhaps one of the most scenic trail is the Highline Trail that follows the Continental divide for some distance. A short section that was traversed by me was the Garden Wall section of the trail which is 7.6 miles long. Jaw dropping views await every turn. The orientation of the valleys and the peaks constantly change as you traverse from Logan pass to the historic Granite Park Chalet which overlooks a beautiful section of the Livingston Range at the McDonald Creek Valley.

 

It is a must do hike for anybody visiting the park and has a day to spare.

 

Here, I have tried to capture one small section of the view a couple of miles into the trail looking into the valley.

 

View Extra large for the best effect.

 

Glacier National Park

MT USA

"Built in 1910 for £3195, it was originally intended to be a larger, granite stone, castle-like chalet but, due to politics and cost, was built from locally milled timber instead."

 

"Entrenched in Australia's skiing history, it has had storeys and wings added and the occasional facelift - but has always kept its charm."

 

It comprises 98 bedrooms, 3 sitting rooms, a gracious ballroom, a stately dining room and activities centre, plus a bar which was added in 1988.

 

"Norwegian-born Hilda Samsing, who was a matron during World War I and the only woman to land at Gallipoli, managed the chalet from 1919 to 1924." It was then leased by the Victorian Railways from 1924 to 1985.

 

"Samsing fostered the growth of skiing at Mount Buffalo by importing hickory skis from Norway. She employed Fred Chalwell to teach people how to ski and soon skiers were travelling to Mount Buffalo each winter to try out the new sport."

 

"Despite its grand proportions, the chalet offered very basic accommodation and was unheated except for 10 big stone fireplaces.

 

But a Victorian Railways guide describes the 1910 chalet as ''the last word in luxury, with well-ventilated rooms'' - especially in winter it seems - and hot and cold baths."

 

"Melbourne to Mount Buffalo excursion tickets were £4, 10 shillings and covered return train fares, overnight accommodation in Bright, return coach fares up and down the mountain and six days full board at the chalet."

 

It is a popular place all year around, with summer guests enjoying rugged rocky scenery, many bushwalks and wildflowers on the plateau.

 

The chalet closed its doors in 2007 following devastating bushfires that impacted access to the mountain and it is now managed by Parks Victoria. Works are due to start soon on a $7.5M redevelopment which will see the chalet turned into a day visitor facility which will include heritage repairs, internal refurbishments, upgrades to services, external landscaping, a new terraced cafe, and a larger car park. It is expected to re-open in 2016.

 

Sources: www.smh.com.au

Information signboard on site

Many Glacier is an area within Glacier National Park which is located in the U.S. state of Montana. The Many Glacier region is located north of the Going-to-the-Sun Road, on the east side of the park. Lake Sherburne is the large lake in the area and the Many Glacier Hotel, the largest hotel within the park, is along the shore of the adjacent Swiftcurrent Lake. The Many Glacier Hotel and surrounding buildings are a National Historic Landmark, with original construction dating back to 1915. Many Glacier is surrounded by the high peaks of the Lewis Range, and numerous hiking trails can be accessed from the area. The region is noted for numerous lakes, waterfalls and dense coniferous forests interspersed with alpine meadows. Major sites in the immediate vicinity that can be accessed by trails include Lake Josephine, Grinnell Lake, Grinnell Glacier, Cracker Lake, Granite Park Chalet, Iceberg Cirque and the Ptarmigan Tunnel, which is a hiking tunnel carved through the mountainside during the 1930s. Tour boats allow visitors an opportunity to venture onto Swiftcurrent Lake. Other activities in the region include ranger guided nature hikes, horseback riding, fishing and camping.

The Chalet off the Highline Trail at Glacier.

"Built in 1910 for £3195, it was originally intended to be a larger, granite stone, castle-like chalet but, due to politics and cost, was built from locally milled timber instead."

 

"Entrenched in Australia's skiing history, it has had storeys and wings added and the occasional facelift - but has always kept its charm."

 

It comprises 98 bedrooms, 3 sitting rooms, a gracious ballroom, a stately dining room and activities centre, plus a bar which was added in 1988.

 

"Norwegian-born Hilda Samsing, who was a matron during World War I and the only woman to land at Gallipoli, managed the chalet from 1919 to 1924." It was then leased by the Victorian Railways from 1924 to 1985.

 

"Samsing fostered the growth of skiing at Mount Buffalo by importing hickory skis from Norway. She employed Fred Chalwell to teach people how to ski and soon skiers were travelling to Mount Buffalo each winter to try out the new sport."

 

"Despite its grand proportions, the chalet offered very basic accommodation and was unheated except for 10 big stone fireplaces.

 

But a Victorian Railways guide describes the 1910 chalet as ''the last word in luxury, with well-ventilated rooms'' - especially in winter it seems - and hot and cold baths."

 

"Melbourne to Mount Buffalo excursion tickets were £4, 10 shillings and covered return train fares, overnight accommodation in Bright, return coach fares up and down the mountain and six days full board at the chalet."

 

It is a popular place all year around, with summer guests enjoying rugged rocky scenery, many bushwalks and wildflowers on the plateau.

 

The chalet closed its doors in 2007 following devastating bushfires that impacted access to the mountain and it is now managed by Parks Victoria. Works are due to start soon on a $7.5M redevelopment which will see the chalet turned into a day visitor facility which will include heritage repairs, internal refurbishments, upgrades to services, external landscaping, a new terraced cafe, and a larger car park. It is expected to re-open in 2016.

 

Sources: www.smh.com.au

Information signboard on site

   

This panorama was taken durning a rainstorm from Granite Park Chalet in Glacier National Park. August 8, 2011

 

It is 5 photos stitched together.

  

Right when I set up for this shot a bunch of people walked through and stopped on the bridge for a look. I had to wait a while to finally take the shot and then hope that no one would walk by because I had my ND 3.0 filter on.

 

This was taken on the trail that eventually goes to Granite Chalet.

There is a spur off the Highline Trail that takes you up to the top of the Garden Wall for a view of Grinnell Glacier. The view is spectacular but the trail is grueling. A sign incorrectly lists the distance as 1 km. It was only after reaching the top that I remembered reading that it is really one mile of brutally steep trail to get here, a distance confirmed by my GPS. The climb would be just as steep but not as grueling if one was starting off fresh from the nearby Granite Park Chalet in the morning.

 

©2014 Timothy Linn

All Rights Reserved

Haystack Butte comes in view around a blind curve on the Highline Trail. The sun broke out thru the clouds just then to light it up nicely.

 

Haystack Butte isn't very tall by Glacier Park standards (7486'/2282 meters), particularly with the backside of impressive Mt. Gould behind it along the Continental Divide, but it is a favorite destination for hikers, coming in halfway from Logan Pass and Granite Park Chalet, approximately 3.5 miles of easy walking.

 

The famous Weeping Wall is right below Haystack Butte where The Going To The Sun Road cuts across. During the early summer it provides a free car wash, and some grumbles by those in convertibles.

 

Thanks again for keeping me company on the Highline Trail. We're about halfway thru the images I'm going to post from this incredible trek.

 

Happy Friday!

After lunch at Bullhead Lake we walked to the end of it to see what we could see (not much) before heading back. After this lake the trail climbs steeply up to Swiftcurrent Pass and then over to the Granite Park Chalet where we were yesterday.

Highline Trail

Granite Park Chalet is on the ridge running through the middle of the right half of the pano.

Glacier National Park

Montana

An awesome hike from the "Loop" on the "Going to the Sun" road in Glacier National Park, to the Granite Park Chalet. Unfortunately, the heavy snow pack has all the trails above the chalet closed.

Looking back over the archives, I came across this striking image from Glacier National Park, taken while hiking on the highline trail very close to the Granite Park Chalet.

What struck me about this image was the monumental views I remembered getting from the trail. High above the treeline with nothing to block your views, your eyes get treated to some unforgettable vistas of snow-capped peaks, green valleys and tumbling waterfalls all around. And that is what I had hoped to capture with this image.

 

The sharp distinction between the snowline and the green meadows, taken durin early July, was quite an interesting feature in the scene. But what is missing from the scene is the vast spread of wildflowers, such as beargrass and glacier lilies that blanketed the visible green meadows everywhere

 

A place worth remembering and returning back to!

 

Glacier National Park

MT USA

Once you get past "the ledge" along the Highline Trail in Glacier National Park, you'll swear you can hear Julie Andrews singing "The Hills are Alive with the Sound of Music"!

www.hikinginglacier.com/highline-loop.htm

Granite Park Chalet, Glacier National Park, July 2006

Granite Chalet is a 99 year old rustic lodge in the middle of mountains which means you cannot drive to this one! A 8 mile moderately difficult hike ( takes about 5-6 hours, if you are fit) along the spectacular Highline Trail takes one to this Chalet which is near the edge of tree line - you can see the decreased tree density. The trail itself is very pretty - wildflowers, waterfalls and wildlife - and runs along the Continental Divide!

 

Due to its location, it is open only 70 odd days a year and is usually booked months in advance - 2013 season is fully sold out, of course.

 

www.graniteparkchalet.com/index.html

07/11/2011 -Glacier / Bob Marshall Wilderness Area, Day 3, Hike and overnight at the Granite Park Chalet.

I wanted to come up with a different view of the Chalet then I did the previous year. I think I like it.

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