new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged Granite Park Chalet

Moraine Lake, Alberta

3-Shot Pano

This chalet is the nominal finish for the Highline Trail. Once we arrived it represented the half way point. We hiked back to Logan Pass after we reached the chalet. www.valleyimagery.com.au

Heaven's peak looming large over the Granite Park Chalet in Glacier National Park, Montana. Taken from the trek up to Swiftcurrent fire lookout.

After hiking a bit of the Highline Trail we headed back to Granite Park Chalet, then decided to attempt to climb to the observation point at the top of Swiftcurrent Mountain. The additional 2.2 miles took us nearly two hours to complete! It was well worth it as the view was one of the most spectacular in all of Glacier National Park.

 

This image is of Swiftcurrent Glacier which was to the south.

This photo shows the pathway to the Grinnel Glacier overlook from the Highline Trail. This deviation from the trail is 0.8 miles long and 1000ft of hard climbing. The next image shows the view from this stunning lookout. www.valleyimagery.com.au

Encountered on the Loop Trail between Going-to-the-Sun Road and Granite Park Chalet. Glacier National Park.

This is the nominal finish for the Highline Trail, For us this represented the half way point. We hiked back to Logan Pass after we reached the chalet. www.valleyimagery.com

© all rights reserved by B℮n

 

Chopok mountain at 2,024m is the third highest peak of the Low Tatra range in central Slovakia. The peak offers a panoramatic view of High Tatra, Liptov and the valley of Hron. There is a chalet called Kamenná chata located near the summit. The highest points accessible by a chair lift are Chopok úboč 1834 m on the northern slope and Kosodrevina 1494 m on the southern slope. Jasná Nízke Tatry offers numerous trails for hiking and trekking different difficulty, from difficult, which requires a certain degree of preparation to those that are suitable for families with children or beginners. Popular hiking tracks to the highest located and the most famous peaks Ďumbier and Chopok, that are unique places to their views of the Western and High Tatras peaks. The northern and southern slopes rank among the best skiing terrains in Slovakia.

 

Easy hiking over a mountain ridge leading up the highest peak of Low Tatras. From the top of the Mt Dereše you have a wide circular view almost over the mountain ranges of Central and Northern Slovakia. Dereše is a peak 2003 m situated in a granite nucleus of the Low Tatras mountains. Its southern slopes are relatively moderate, covered by a lot of granite blocks. The northern slopes are very steep, full of wild canals and walls that create a typical glacier valley. From the top you would have beautiful view at the Demänovská Valley, Swift Valley, Skalka and the end of the Vajskovská Valley. Photo of the top of Dereše 2003m plus an additional 1 meter.

 

In Centraal-Slowakije, tussen de dalen van de rivieren de Váh en de Hron, strekt zich over een lengte van 80 kilometer het gebergte Lage Tatra uit. Na de noordelijker gelegen Hoge Tatra is dit de hoogste bergstreek van Slowakije. Er zijn drie bergtoppen die boven de 2000 meter uitstijgen. De lager gelegen delen van de Lage Tatra zijn zeer bosrijk, terwijl de hogere streken met gras begroeid zijn. Als Nationaal Park geniet het gebied speciale bescherming. Het middelpunt van de Lage Tatra in Slowakije is de berg Chopok 2024m. De noord- en zuidflank hiervan worden tot de beste skiterreinen van het land gerekend. De top is van beide zijden toegankelijk per stoeltjeslift: vanuit de valleien Demänovská dolina in het noorden en Bystrá dolina in het zuiden. Vanaf de Chopok is een route uitgezet naar de oostelijk gelegen Dumbier, de hoogste top van de streek. De tocht duurt ongeveer twee uur. Het dal Demänovská dolina, genoemd naar het plaatsje Demänova, is een prachtig wandelgebied. De vallei is een beschermd natuurgebied. Foto van een beklimmer die een foto neemt vanaf het Lage Tatra gebergte met uitzicht op het Hoge Tatra gebergte. Foto van de top van Mt. Dereše 2003m plus een extra 1 meter.

 

© all rights reserved by B℮n

 

Chopok mountain at 2,024m is the third highest peak of the Low Tatra range in central Slovakia. The peak offers a panoramatic view of High Tatra, Liptov and the valley of Hron. There is a chalet called Kamenná chata located near the summit. The highest points accessible by a chair lift are Chopok úboč 1834 m on the northern slope and Kosodrevina 1494 m on the southern slope. Jasná Nízke Tatry offers numerous trails for hiking and trekking different difficulty, from difficult, which requires a certain degree of preparation to those that are suitable for families with children or beginners. Popular hiking tracks to the highest located and the most famous peaks Ďumbier and Chopok, that are unique places to their views of the Western and High Tatras peaks. The northern and southern slopes rank among the best skiing terrains in Slovakia.

 

Easy hiking over a mountain ridge leading up the highest peak of Low Tatras. From the top of the Mt Dereše you have a wide circular view almost over the mountain ranges of Central and Northern Slovakia. Dereše is a peak 2003 m situated in a granite nucleus of the Low Tatras mountains. Its southern slopes are relatively moderate, covered by a lot of granite blocks. The northern slopes are very steep, full of wild canals and walls that create a typical glacier valley. From the top you would have beautiful view at the Demänovská Valley, Swift Valley, Skalka and the end of the Vajskovská Valley. Photo of me, on top of Dereše 2003m, taken by my daughter Samantha.

 

In Centraal-Slowakije, tussen de dalen van de rivieren de Váh en de Hron, strekt zich over een lengte van 80 kilometer het gebergte Lage Tatra uit. Na de noordelijker gelegen Hoge Tatra is dit de hoogste bergstreek van Slowakije. Er zijn drie bergtoppen die boven de 2000 meter uitstijgen. De lager gelegen delen van de Lage Tatra zijn zeer bosrijk, terwijl de hogere streken met gras begroeid zijn. Als Nationaal Park geniet het gebied speciale bescherming. Het middelpunt van de Lage Tatra in Slowakije is de berg Chopok 2024m. De noord- en zuidflank hiervan worden tot de beste skiterreinen van het land gerekend. De top is van beide zijden toegankelijk per stoeltjeslift: vanuit de valleien Demänovská dolina in het noorden en Bystrá dolina in het zuiden. Vanaf de Chopok is een route uitgezet naar de oostelijk gelegen Dumbier, de hoogste top van de streek. De tocht duurt ongeveer twee uur. Het dal Demänovská dolina, genoemd naar het plaatsje Demänova, is een prachtig wandelgebied. De vallei is een beschermd natuurgebied. Foto van een beklimmer die een foto neemt vanaf het Lage Tatra gebergte met uitzicht op het Hoge Tatra gebergte. Foto van mij bovenop de Dereše 2003m gemaakt door mijn dochter Samantha.

 

Details best viewed in Original Size

 

According to Wikipedia, the Two Medicine General Store, formerly part of the Two Medicine Chalet, is a historic building in Glacier National Park. The chalet was originally built in 1914 by the Glacier Park Company, a subsidiary of the Great Northern Railway, as part of the railway's extensive program of visitor services development at Glacier. The chalet originally featured a complex of log buildings, all built in the rustic style, which provided dining and lodging facilities. Overnight accommodations at the chalet ended with the onset of World War II, and the other buildings at the site were intentionally burned in 1956. President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave a national radio address from this building on August 5, 1934, while on a visit to Glacier. The Two Medicine General Store is a National Historic Landmark, one of five sites in the Great Northern Railway Buildings that have earned such a designation. While the two other surviving chalets, Granite Park Chalet and Sperry Chalet, were constructed of stone, the Two Medicine Chalet complex was of log construction.

 

Two Medicine General Store at Glacier National Park, Montana

 

Granite Park Chalet and the Livingstone Range in Glacier National Park.

Many Glacier is an area within Glacier National Park which is located in the U.S. state of Montana. The Many Glacier region is located north of the Going-to-the-Sun Road, on the east side of the park. Lake Sherburne is the large lake in the area and the Many Glacier Hotel, the largest hotel within the park, is along the shore of the adjacent Swiftcurrent Lake. The Many Glacier Hotel and surrounding buildings are a National Historic Landmark, with original construction dating back to 1915. Many Glacier is surrounded by the high peaks of the Lewis Range, and numerous hiking trails can be accessed from the area. The region is noted for numerous lakes, waterfalls and dense coniferous forests interspersed with alpine meadows. Major sites in the immediate vicinity that can be accessed by trails include Lake Josephine, Grinnell Lake, Grinnell Glacier, Cracker Lake, Granite Park Chalet, Iceberg Cirque and the Ptarmigan Tunnel, which is a hiking tunnel carved through the mountainside during the 1930s. Tour boats allow visitors an opportunity to venture onto Swiftcurrent Lake. Other activities in the region include ranger guided nature hikes, horseback riding, fishing and camping.

A mile up a spur from the Highline / Continental Divide Trail near Granite Park. Lake McDonald visible near the horizon at far left. Granite Park Chalet visible as a white dot at the far right tip of the upper dark green tree patch on the table at left center. Upper Grinnell, Grinell, Josephine, and Sherburne Lakes front to back at left. Glacier National Park, Montana.

 

(All images copyrighted. Copying my photos is not ok w/out permission. LINKING to this page via Flickr "share" functionality is ok. See my Profile for queries regarding any other usage.)

 

Sun breaking through the clouds in the Glacier Park backcountry.

HDR panorama of the Ovens Valley looking towards Bright captured from a lookout in front of The Chalet at Mt Buffalo, Victoria, Australia.

 

Details best viewed in Original Size

 

According to Wikipedia, the Lake McDonald Lodge is a historic lodge located on the southeast shore of Lake McDonald. It is a 3-1/2-story structure built in a Swiss chalet style based on Kirtland Cutter's design. The foundation and first floor walls are built of stone, with a wood-frame superstructure. The lobby is a large, open space that extends to the third story. It has a massive fireplace and a concrete floor scored in a flagstone pattern, with messages in several Indian languages inscribed into it. The rustic lodge is a National Historic Landmark and is a member of Historic Hotels of America, the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The Lake McDonald Lodge, initially known as the Lewis Glacier Hotel, was the second hotel on the site. The first, the Snyder Hotel, was built by George Snyder in 1895. The Lewis Glacier Hotel lodge was built in 1913 by John Lewis who bought the land, amounting to about 285 acres (115 ha), in 1904-5 and had the hotel built during a period when the Great Northern Railway was building other hotels and backcountry chalets, including Many Glacier Hotel, Glacier Park Lodge, Granite Park Chalet, Sperry Chalet, and Two Medicine Store. This movement was part of a trend by railroads during that time to build destination resorts in areas of exceptional scenic value. Railroads wanted to attract tourists and created resorts that were equal to the scenery, and private operators like John Lewis had to build equally impressive facilities in order to keep up. The hotel was built in 1913-14, working through the winter months, and opened in June 1914. It was designed to continue the Swiss cottage theme already developed by the Great Northern Railway hotels. In 1930, the Great Northern Railway acquired the hotel through its subsidiary, the Glacier Park Hotel Company and changed its name to the Lake McDonald Lodge in 1957. The lodge was damaged in a flash flood in 1964 that destroyed the fireplace. The Glacier Park Hotel Company was sold to the Dial Corporation in 1981 and then spun off with the Viad company. The lodge was extensively renovated in 1988-89, restoring details that had been obscured over time or damaged by the Snyder Creek 1964 flood. Today, the lodge maintains its historic character. The hotel also includes a number of small cottages located nearby, as well as a motor inn. The main lodge was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1987.

This panorama was created using Photoshop CS6 to stitch together vertically two landscape images captured from the second floor of the lodge.

 

Panorama of the Lake McDonald Lodge at Glacier National Park, Montana

 

A mile or so West of Swiftcurrent Pass. Montana.

 

(All images copyrighted. Copying my photos is not ok w/out permission. LINKING to this page via Flickr "share" functionality is ok. See my Profile for queries regarding any other usage.)

After departing from Granite Park Chalet we climbed over Swiftcurrent Pass and began our descent into the Many Glacier Valley.

 

This is a view from our descent of Swiftcurrent Pass - looking at the Many Glacier Valley in Glacier National Park, Montana.

Our next big hike started at the Loop Trail parking area. The original goal was to climb the 4.6 mile trail to Granite Park Chalet. Heaven's Peak is in the background.

A quiet, almost-winter day. The new roof (finished this past spring) is weathering nicely and blends with the building.

 

Designed in 1913 by Otto Moberg, the three-storey structure is a good example of what architectural historian Hal Kalman calls the CPR Swiss Chalet style. Its dark log siding, granite steps and multi-paned windows give it an air of another time, particularly when the front is covered in wisteria in the summer.

Lake Catani is an artificial lake in the Mount Buffalo National Park in Victoria, Australia. It was constructed in 1910 under the supervision and probably design of the Victorian Public Works engineer, Carlo Catani, to provide recreational facilities in the newly opened winter resort.

The Mount Buffalo National Park was established in 1898 with a 1166 hectare temporary reserve centred on the Eurobin Falls. In 1908 the area was increased to 9240 hectares and became permanent national park reserve. Lake Catani was completed in 1910 by construction of a mass concrete arched dam across Eurobin Creek at Haunted Gorge. The contract was let in 1908 for 2355 pounds. The dam blocked what was then known as the 'Underground River' and flooded Long Plain, in the process also covering an Aboriginal camp site. It was initially intended to provide water for the Grossman sawmill, which was milling timber for the construction of the Mount Buffalo Chalet.

Carlo Catani was appointed Public Works Engineer in 1882, and spent much of his career developing hydrological schemes such as the drainage of Koo Wee Rup and Elwood Swamps. (Wikepedia)

Granite Park Chalet and Heaven's Peak, Glacier National Park, Montana

And now the way I saw it.

 

Sign says:

"In the 1920's large parties of tourists gathered on horseback at the Many Glacier Hotel. The Hotel was part of a network of Chalets built a day ride apart....a way for guests to cross the parks wild roadless interior while spending nights in relative comfort and security. Sperry and Granite Park Chalets continue to play their historic roles by lodging overnight hikers.

 

A blend of rustic materials and Swiss chalet style, the Hotel's architecture expresses the paradox of Glacier National Park tourism....the attempt to balance development with the forces of wilderness. The Swiss motif grew out of a campaign to attract vacationers to America's Alps."

 

Happy Friday!

 

"Built in 1910 for £3195, it was originally intended to be a larger, granite stone, castle-like chalet but, due to politics and cost, was built from locally milled timber instead."

 

"Entrenched in Australia's skiing history, it has had storeys and wings added and the occasional facelift - but has always kept its charm."

 

It comprises 98 bedrooms, 3 sitting rooms, a gracious ballroom, a stately dining room and activities centre, plus a bar which was added in 1988.

 

"Norwegian-born Hilda Samsing, who was a matron during World War I and the only woman to land at Gallipoli, managed the chalet from 1919 to 1924." It was then leased by the Victorian Railways from 1924 to 1985.

 

"Samsing fostered the growth of skiing at Mount Buffalo by importing hickory skis from Norway. She employed Fred Chalwell to teach people how to ski and soon skiers were travelling to Mount Buffalo each winter to try out the new sport."

 

"Despite its grand proportions, the chalet offered very basic accommodation and was unheated except for 10 big stone fireplaces.

 

But a Victorian Railways guide describes the 1910 chalet as ''the last word in luxury, with well-ventilated rooms'' - especially in winter it seems - and hot and cold baths."

 

"Melbourne to Mount Buffalo excursion tickets were £4, 10 shillings and covered return train fares, overnight accommodation in Bright, return coach fares up and down the mountain and six days full board at the chalet."

 

It is a popular place all year around, with summer guests enjoying rugged rocky scenery, many bushwalks and wildflowers on the plateau.

 

The chalet closed its doors in 2007 following devastating bushfires that impacted access to the mountain and it is now managed by Parks Victoria. Works are due to start soon on a $7.5M redevelopment which will see the chalet turned into a day visitor facility which will include heritage repairs, internal refurbishments, upgrades to services, external landscaping, a new terraced cafe, and a larger car park. It is expected to re-open in 2016.

 

Sources: www.smh.com.au

Information signboard on site

"Built in 1910 for £3195, it was originally intended to be a larger, granite stone, castle-like chalet but, due to politics and cost, was built from locally milled timber instead."

 

"Entrenched in Australia's skiing history, it has had storeys and wings added and the occasional facelift - but has always kept its charm."

 

It comprises 98 bedrooms, 3 sitting rooms, a gracious ballroom, a stately dining room and activities centre, plus a bar which was added in 1988.

 

"Norwegian-born Hilda Samsing, who was a matron during World War I and the only woman to land at Gallipoli, managed the chalet from 1919 to 1924." It was then leased by the Victorian Railways from 1924 to 1985.

 

"Samsing fostered the growth of skiing at Mount Buffalo by importing hickory skis from Norway. She employed Fred Chalwell to teach people how to ski and soon skiers were travelling to Mount Buffalo each winter to try out the new sport."

 

"Despite its grand proportions, the chalet offered very basic accommodation and was unheated except for 10 big stone fireplaces.

 

But a Victorian Railways guide describes the 1910 chalet as ''the last word in luxury, with well-ventilated rooms'' - especially in winter it seems - and hot and cold baths."

 

"Melbourne to Mount Buffalo excursion tickets were £4, 10 shillings and covered return train fares, overnight accommodation in Bright, return coach fares up and down the mountain and six days full board at the chalet."

 

It is a popular place all year around, with summer guests enjoying rugged rocky scenery, many bushwalks and wildflowers on the plateau.

 

The chalet closed its doors in 2007 following devastating bushfires that impacted access to the mountain and it is now managed by Parks Victoria. Works are due to start soon on a $7.5M redevelopment which will see the chalet turned into a day visitor facility which will include heritage repairs, internal refurbishments, upgrades to services, external landscaping, a new terraced cafe, and a larger car park. It is expected to re-open in 2016.

 

Sources: www.smh.com.au

Information signboard on site

 

"Built in 1910 for £3195, it was originally intended to be a larger, granite stone, castle-like chalet but, due to politics and cost, was built from locally milled timber instead."

 

"Entrenched in Australia's skiing history, it has had storeys and wings added and the occasional facelift - but has always kept its charm."

 

It comprises 98 bedrooms, 3 sitting rooms, a gracious ballroom, a stately dining room and activities centre, plus a bar which was added in 1988.

 

"Norwegian-born Hilda Samsing, who was a matron during World War I and the only woman to land at Gallipoli, managed the chalet from 1919 to 1924." It was then leased by the Victorian Railways from 1924 to 1985.

 

"Samsing fostered the growth of skiing at Mount Buffalo by importing hickory skis from Norway. She employed Fred Chalwell to teach people how to ski and soon skiers were travelling to Mount Buffalo each winter to try out the new sport."

 

"Despite its grand proportions, the chalet offered very basic accommodation and was unheated except for 10 big stone fireplaces.

 

But a Victorian Railways guide describes the 1910 chalet as ''the last word in luxury, with well-ventilated rooms'' - especially in winter it seems - and hot and cold baths."

 

"Melbourne to Mount Buffalo excursion tickets were £4, 10 shillings and covered return train fares, overnight accommodation in Bright, return coach fares up and down the mountain and six days full board at the chalet."

 

It is a popular place all year around, with summer guests enjoying rugged rocky scenery, many bushwalks and wildflowers on the plateau.

 

The chalet closed its doors in 2007 following devastating bushfires that impacted access to the mountain and it is now managed by Parks Victoria. Works are due to start soon on a $7.5M redevelopment which will see the chalet turned into a day visitor facility which will include heritage repairs, internal refurbishments, upgrades to services, external landscaping, a new terraced cafe, and a larger car park. It is expected to re-open in 2016.

 

Sources: www.smh.com.au

Information signboard on site

   

On the trail heading to Grinnell Glacier Overlook approximately one mile from the Granite Park Chalet in Glacier National Park, Montana. Granite Park Chalet and the Livingston Range are pictured in the background.

Looking back over the archives, I came across this striking image from Glacier National Park, taken while hiking on the highline trail very close to the Granite Park Chalet.

What struck me about this image was the monumental views I remembered getting from the trail. High above the treeline with nothing to block your views, your eyes get treated to some unforgettable vistas of snow-capped peaks, green valleys and tumbling waterfalls all around. And that is what I had hoped to capture with this image.

 

The sharp distinction between the snowline and the green meadows, taken durin early July, was quite an interesting feature in the scene. But what is missing from the scene is the vast spread of wildflowers, such as beargrass and glacier lilies that blanketed the visible green meadows everywhere

 

A place worth remembering and returning back to!

 

Glacier National Park

MT USA

"Built in 1910 for £3195, it was originally intended to be a larger, granite stone, castle-like chalet but, due to politics and cost, was built from locally milled timber instead."

 

"Entrenched in Australia's skiing history, it has had storeys and wings added and the occasional facelift - but has always kept its charm."

 

It comprises 98 bedrooms, 3 sitting rooms, a gracious ballroom, a stately dining room and activities centre, plus a bar which was added in 1988.

 

"Norwegian-born Hilda Samsing, who was a matron during World War I and the only woman to land at Gallipoli, managed the chalet from 1919 to 1924." It was then leased by the Victorian Railways from 1924 to 1985.

 

"Samsing fostered the growth of skiing at Mount Buffalo by importing hickory skis from Norway. She employed Fred Chalwell to teach people how to ski and soon skiers were travelling to Mount Buffalo each winter to try out the new sport."

 

"Despite its grand proportions, the chalet offered very basic accommodation and was unheated except for 10 big stone fireplaces.

 

But a Victorian Railways guide describes the 1910 chalet as ''the last word in luxury, with well-ventilated rooms'' - especially in winter it seems - and hot and cold baths."

 

"Melbourne to Mount Buffalo excursion tickets were £4, 10 shillings and covered return train fares, overnight accommodation in Bright, return coach fares up and down the mountain and six days full board at the chalet."

 

It is a popular place all year around, with summer guests enjoying rugged rocky scenery, many bushwalks and wildflowers on the plateau.

 

The chalet closed its doors in 2007 following devastating bushfires that impacted access to the mountain and it is now managed by Parks Victoria. Works are due to start soon on a $7.5M redevelopment which will see the chalet turned into a day visitor facility which will include heritage repairs, internal refurbishments, upgrades to services, external landscaping, a new terraced cafe, and a larger car park. It is expected to re-open in 2016.

 

Sources: www.smh.com.au

Information signboard on site

Glacier National Park. Montana. Granite Park Chalet was built in 1914 and 1915 by the Great Northern Railway to provide comfortable back country accommodations inside Glacier National Park. It was the last of the chalets built by the railroad and one of the only two back country chalets that have survived. Today this rustic lodge is listed as a National Historic Landmark and it continues to provide comfortable lodging to adventurers and visitors in the Glacier National Park wilderness.

Granite Park Chalet is a welcome stop along the Highline Trail in Glacier National Park. Built in 1914 by Great Northern Railway, it is a National Historic Landmark and, on this day. was the cherry on top of a spectacular hike among the wildflowers.

Granite Chalet is a 99 year old rustic lodge in the middle of mountains which means you cannot drive to this one! A 8 mile moderately difficult hike ( takes about 5-6 hours, if you are fit) along the spectacular Highline Trail takes one to this Chalet which is near the edge of tree line - you can see the decreased tree density. The trail itself is very pretty - wildflowers, waterfalls and wildlife - and runs along the Continental Divide!

 

Due to its location, it is open only 70 odd days a year and is usually booked months in advance - 2013 season is fully sold out, of course.

 

www.graniteparkchalet.com/index.html

Haystack Butte comes in view around a blind curve on the Highline Trail. The sun broke out thru the clouds just then to light it up nicely.

 

Haystack Butte isn't very tall by Glacier Park standards (7486'/2282 meters), particularly with the backside of impressive Mt. Gould behind it along the Continental Divide, but it is a favorite destination for hikers, coming in halfway from Logan Pass and Granite Park Chalet, approximately 3.5 miles of easy walking.

 

The famous Weeping Wall is right below Haystack Butte where The Going To The Sun Road cuts across. During the early summer it provides a free car wash, and some grumbles by those in convertibles.

 

Thanks again for keeping me company on the Highline Trail. We're about halfway thru the images I'm going to post from this incredible trek.

 

Happy Friday!

This is one of my favorite shots from my "redemption" trip to Glacier NP.

 

The day began with a great sunrise with no resulting photos. Unfortunately it does suck to see great clouds only to find no composition or photograph to show.

 

After the missed opportunity at a great sunrise, we were on our way to start the Highline Trail from Logan Pass to the Loop.

 

While hiking towards our final destination it was mostly cloudy up to Haystack Butte. After passing Granite Park Chalet, the weather and rain moved in and rained for the remainder of the hike. It would soon let up by the end of the hike and ethereal weather resided in the valleys.

 

The remainder of the day was just relaxing at Logan Pass and making our way back down the Sun Road. Part of the relaxation was just sitting in the car watching the fog dance around the mountains.

 

Mount Oberlin really dresses well with a shroud of fog.

 

Glacier National Park

August 2019

The Garden Wall, a part of the Continental Divide, is a knife-edge ridge in Glacier National Park that runs from Swiftcurrent Pass to Logan Pass. The name comes from the abundant greenery and wildflowers on display in the summer. Spectacular in its own right, the Garden Wall also gives rise to notable summits such as Bishops Cap and Mount Gould (the highpoint). www.summitpost.org/garden-wall-glacier-overlook-to-swiftc...

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

The Garden Wall is a steep alpine area within Glacier National Park well known during the summer months to be heavily covered in dozens of species of flowering plants and shrubs. Located along the west side of the Continental divide and extending northward from Logan Pass, the Garden Wall can be traversed via the popular Highline Trail and for a distance of over 5 mi (8.0 km) to the Granite Park Chalet. The Going-to-the-Sun Road also passes through portions of the Garden Wall northwest of Logan Pass.

 

The Weeping Wall is a short stretch of the Going-to-the-Sun Road where water cascades over the Garden Wall to the roadway below. The Garden Wall is an arête or rock spine that separates the Many Glacier region of the park from Lake McDonald valley.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_Wall

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Logan Pass is located along the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park, in the U.S. state of Montana. It is the highest point on the Going-to-the-Sun Road. The Logan Pass Visitor Center is open during the summer season just east of the pass. Wikipedia

Elevation: 6,647' (2,026 m)

Road: Going-to-the-Sun Road

Range: Lewis Range, Rocky Mountains

 

image by Photo George

copyrighted: ©2015 GCheatle

All Rights Reserved

 

locator: _GNP5308

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 43 44