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Join Drink and Click™ Founder, Juan Gonzalez, and myself LIVE tonight at 9:30PM CST for EP2 of The Drink and Click™ Show - about photography and social photowalking.

 

Go to my Google+ Page tonight to watch the show: plus.google.com/u/0/+LotusCarroll/posts

RSVP for the Event and ask questions during the show here: plus.google.com/u/0/events/cjcg4hhalb0fr8lg5310gujf0ps

 

We'll have a great lineup of panelists including Sara Collaton, Jordan Oram, Holger Feroudj, Allan Cabrera, Ana Andres, and Joel Horwath. They'll be talking about their experiences, sharing photos, and sharing some tips on the best places to take photos in their cities.

 

Additionally, we'll talk about last month's Photography Challenge Theme: Leading Lines. We'll share some tips about using Leading Lines in your photos. We'll also announce the winners of the challenge LIVE ON AIR! Thanks to our May prize sponsors Think Tank Photo, Gary Fong Flash Diffusers, and Trey Ratcliff's Stuck In Customs.

 

We hope you tune in and hang out with us as we discuss photography and enjoy some great images from the people you see online and in your local area. See you at 9:30PM CST! If you can't tune in live, look for our wrap-up posts and view the show on the Drink and Click™ YouTube Account later. www.youtube.com/user/DrinkandClick

 

More information about Drink and Click™ drinkandclick.com/

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Join Juan Gonzalez and Lotus Carroll LIVE TONIGHT! December 11th at 9:30PM CST as we hang out, have a few drinks, and welcome guest Dave Morrow and panelists Alexis Coram, Casey McCallister, Jason Jakober, & Jeff Moreau to talk star photography. You can view the show right here: http://goo.gl/tLwi0I at the Event Page (viewer will appear at show time) or on my G+ profile and ask questions that we'll answer live.

 

We'll be unveiling the 3 winners of the Drink and Click™ November Challenge: "Transportation" live during the show. Thanks to our fantastic prize sponsors: Think Tank Photo, Gary Fong Flash Diffusers, and Pan Am http://goo.gl/T8mDZD

 

That's not all! If you're paying close attention to Dave during the show, you'll be able to answer a special question at the end (the show only lasts one hour, so don't miss out) and win a giveaway of Dave's Star Photography Post Processing Tutorial (3 Videos) AND his "Under The Stars" Lightroom Presets - see here for more details:http://goo.gl/fG5OEo

 

We'll also see some great photos from all of our panelists and I'm sure there will be plenty of laughs, so please RSVP now at this link: http://goo.gl/tLwi0I and then join us TONIGHT!

 

Hope to see you all watching. :)

 

* * * * *

 

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Available for licensing on Getty Images : If you interested this photo,please download from this link >> www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/fireworks-marina-bay-san...

 

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My trip to Singapore was a complete success on many levels. Not only was I able to capture some beautiful imagery while enjoying the spectacular iLight Event, but I also made some great new friends and contacts in the process. When you combine the compelling beauty of Singapore with the openness towards photography you get a very special city. As a traveler, I’m often forbidden from shooting areas with a tripod but Singapore seems to welcome it. It’s an absolute pleasure to walk the perimeter of Marina Bay and find dozens of photographers shooting with tripods and enjoying the fantastic spectacle of light.

 

Thank you to everyone for making me feel so at home in Singapore and a very special thank you to my friend Edward Adios for making all this happen. I’m already looking forward to my next visit in June. :)

 

Getting the hang of the new mobile lifestyle.

 

On another note, I can’t tell you how happy I am to be editing photos again. The past few weeks have been a whirlwind of events compounded by an overwhelming sense of freedom mixed with obligation. Managing a 100% on the road lifestyle with full time blogging, shooting, and photo processing is a tricky operation and the last few weeks have been a real wake up call for me. I learned a lot about time management vs time enjoyment and I’m discovering that living life must always come first. So while I feel like I’m relearning how to balance my life, I’m relishing in the simple pleasure of creating something beautiful.

 

And just as my life has been a collection of experiences that have led me to where I am today, this photo shares an important similarity. It’s a culmination of many techniques that I’ve learned over the years combined together to create something I call: Advanced Dynamic Blending. This photo is a great example because in essence, what you’re seeing is a single image that blends a dynamic 2 hours of time.

 

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Taken 121 Photo for Startrails : Temple Forest in Saraburi Province at Thailand วัดป่าสว่างบุญ จังหวัดสระบุรี

 

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Chong Nonsi Station is a BTS skytrain station in the sixth round of Birthday celebration. (BTS Skytrain) line across the canal level Silom Rd. Of Narathiwat Road. Bangrak area. Bangkok CBD Sathorn and Silom. Is connected to the Bus Rapid Transit (Bangkok BRT) line Sathorn - Sathorn Laburnum station.

 

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Dance of Light || Announcing: HDR Workshop Singapore

 

From the first time I visited Singapore, I knew that it was going to become one of my favorite places for photography. Not only is it unique and beautiful city, but it’s also home to a wonderful community of very talented photographers. It’s truly a rare visual paradise that begs to be photographed. It’s no surprise that it’s quickly becoming one of my favorite destinations of all time. I’m literally drawn to it like a moth to a flame, or in this case, a moth to an awesome laser show. :)

 

That’s why I’m extremely pleased to announce my upcoming Secrets of HDR & Post-processing Workshop, on June 9th in Singapore. I’ll be covering my complete production workflow in an all day class followed by a guided “hands-on” photo walk around The Marina Bay Area. If you’re in the area and want to learn all about how I create my photographs, I’d love to have you!

 

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* All comments are welcome & Monkey Business is strongly encouraged. If you have questions, I would love to hear them. Check me out at BlameTheMonkey.comThanks for viewing!

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Even though I didn’t get out much to shooting Dubai a couple weeks ago, I made sure to get out to The Meydan Bridge. A big thanks goes to Daniel Cheong not only for driving me out there, but also for the great conversation and company. I always love connecting with fellow photographers and Daniel and I share a lot of the same philosophies on post-processing. In my opinion, he has some of the most beautiful photos of Dubai in existence - really stunning stuff. I recommend check out his Flickr Page to see some of the photos I’m talking about.

 

The Meydan Bridge is a VIP entrance to the Meydan Racecourse, a mega structure that is able to accommodate over 60,000 spectators in a 1 mile long grandstand. When not used for races it serves as a business and conference integrated facility. The thing is, like many other things in Dubai, it’s only used once (or so) a year. The rest of the time it’s mostly abandoned and this beautiful bridge is blocked from access. It was a strange feeling actually - to be standing on this opulent mega structure, in the middle of the desert, miles away from the city, and with nobody around. Half the lights were busted too. I guess after Tom Cruise was finished driving over it in Mission Impossible 3, they really didn’t have a need to maintain it anymore.

 

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* All comments are welcome & Monkey Business is strongly encouraged. If you have questions, I would love to hear them. Check me out at BlameTheMonkey.comThanks for viewing!

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Kirkjufell at night 29.03.2014 in Iceland

 

Available for licensing on Getty Images : If you interested this photo,please download from this link>> www.gettyimages.com : Aurora Activity_Kirkjufell at Iceland

 

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Taken 6 photo vertical and merge in PS

 

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HDR photograph of an industrial looking car park, Mold, UK by Timothy Selvage.

 

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This one's for you...

 

How many more nights will I have to spend living on the road in the back of my van away from my travel companion, my soul mate, my inspiration? Missing you loads and hoping these days, weeks and months of being apart will end before it becomes years. Texts, email, phone and facetime just don't cut it.

 

Reunited with my D800. This shot was a x7bkt converted to 32-bit HDR and adjusted in lightroom. Tonemapped in photomatix, and then reduced the opacity of the HDR with the darkest exposure to bring back the shadows. Pixel peepers and tech heads please note that i'm no longer uploading the high-res images but if you want access to them for any reason contact me via G+ or Facebook.

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Công ty Ecocycle Việt Nam là doanh nghiệp 10 năm làm việc trong lĩnh vực xử lý chất thải hận hạnh là 1 trong những đơn vị áp dụng thành công công nghệ đồng xử lý

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Taken some 100m above my home.

 

23 images over more than 2hours, each 6min exposure, ISO400, Walimex 8mm

Start: 09:51 p.m. End: 00:04 a.m.

 

Submitted to the Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2013 Competition www.rmg.co.uk/visit/exhibitions/astronomy-photographer-of...

Gallery and Prints ❙ ❙ ❙ My Google Plus ❙ ❙ ❙ My 500px ❙ ❙ ❙ My FB Photography Page

 

My First Picture to hit more than 20.000 Views and more than 1.000 Favs

 

Def view in large with L for more details ... In max details there are even some windows in Empire State Building and BoA Tower where you can see the sky through the buildings ... ;)

 

Manhattan is the oldest and the most densely populated of the five boroughs of New York City. Located primarily on Manhattan Island at the mouth of the Hudson River, the boundaries of the borough are identical to those of New York County, an original county of the state of New York. The borough and county consist of Manhattan Island and several small adjacent islands: Roosevelt Island, Randall's Island, Wards Island, Governors Island, Liberty Island, part of Ellis Island,[1] Mill Rock, and U Thant Island; as well as Marble Hill, a very small area on the mainland bordering the Bronx. The original city of New York began at the southern end of Manhattan, expanded northwards, and then between 1874 and 1898, annexed land from surrounding counties.

 

The County of New York is the most densely populated county in the United States, and one of the most densely populated areas in the world, with a 2008 population of 1,634,795[2] living in a land area of 22.96 square miles (59.47 km²), or 71,201 residents per square mile (27,485/km²). It is also one of the wealthiest counties in the United States, with a 2005 personal income per capita above $100,000.[3] Manhattan is the third-largest of New York's five boroughs in population, and its smallest borough in size.

 

Manhattan is a major commercial, financial, and cultural center of both the United States and the world.[4][5][6] Anchored by Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, New York City vies with the City of London as the financial capital of the world[7][8][9][10][11][12][13] and is home of both the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ. Many major radio, television, and telecommunications companies in the United States are based here, as well as many news, magazine, book, and other media publishers.

 

Manhattan has many famous landmarks, tourist attractions, museums, and universities. It is also home to the headquarters of the United Nations. It is the center of New York City and the New York metropolitan region, hosting the seat of city government and a large portion of the area's employment, business, and entertainment activities. As a result, residents of New York City's other boroughs such as Brooklyn and Queens often refer to a trip to Manhattan as "going to the city",[14] despite the comparable populations between those boroughs.

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via WordPress ift.tt/2OBJRhF

 

Google Dark Wallpapers – Wallpaper – google cityview | google cityview

 

Search In Pics: Google Story Time, Not Evil Umbrellas & Google Japan … – google cityview | google cityview

 

Plan for Google’s Mountain View campus « Inhabitat – Green Design, Innovation, Architecture … – google cityview | google cityview

 

CityView – google cityview | google cityview

 

Petronas Twin Towers – google cityview | google cityview

 

22 CITY VIEW DR Mermaid PEI Canada google – Michael Poczynek | Top … – google cityview | google cityview

 

City View- KEW is at bottom left | kewbirmingham.co.uk – google cityview | google cityview

 

File:Google plus icon.svg – Wikimedia Commons – google cityview | google cityview

 

Malaysia – Kuala Lumpur – Dusk at Petronas Twin Towers & The As Syakirin Mosque – google cityview | google cityview

 

google glass city view – SiliconANGLE – google cityview | google cityview

 

Google Street View New York – Das STA Travel Blog – google cityview | google cityview

 

City View Apartments Apartments – Chattanooga, TN | Apartments.com – google cityview | google cityview

 

Google Map of Luxembourg (City), Grand Duchy of Luxembourg – Nations Online Project – google cityview | google cityview

 

Amazon.com: CasesByLorraine Nexus 22X Soft Case, London City View … – google cityview | google cityview

 

google-maps-discoverbooktravel: Restaurant Review: City View Cafe, Hanoi – google cityview | google cityview

 

Murder on Google Street View? – CNN – google cityview | google cityview

 

City Street View | www.pixshark.com – Images Galleries With A Bite! – google cityview | google cityview

 

City View Theme for KLWP – Apps on Google Play – google cityview | google cityview

 

Brazil City View PowerPoint Template, Backgrounds & Google Slides … – google cityview | google cityview

 

Street View – Explore natural wonders and world landmarks – google cityview | google cityview

 

Googleがあらゆるサービスを支えるデータセンターの様子を公開中 – GIGAZINE – google cityview | google cityview

 

Google Chrome – скачать Гугл Хром для Windows – google cityview | google cityview

 

The post 22 Top Risks Of Google Cityview | google cityview appeared first on City View.

 

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Marina Bay Lights || Blame The Monkey 2.0

 

A big thanks to everyone who has supported me over the last year and half. From blamethemonkey.com to Flickr, I’ve really felt the love from everyone and things have been growing rapidly. Thank you so much -- I sincerely appreciate it.

 

We don’t have a team of people working at blamethemonkey.com. It’s just myself and my wife +Naomi Locardi . Everything you see is the result of a true love for photography and a passion to freely give away knowledge, experience, and information. I do this purely because I love it and she helps me purely because I’ve cleverly tricked her into loving me. (I find that subliminal messages work the best).

 

Over the next week, significant updates will be coming to blamethemonkey.com, starting with the re-design followed by new content and tutorials. -- (Not to worry, all the before and afters will stay in place). -- Hopefully we can prevent taking the site down in the process but if things start acting funny, you’ll know the reason. So, please bear with me over the next week as I enter my sleepless, caffeine driven - obsessive - get things freaking done mode. : Hopefully we’ll come out with something wonderful when it’s all said and done.

 

This is all in preparation for a huge life change in March. In 2011, with a comical blend of insomnia and jet lag, I flew 220,000 miles to feed my passion for Travel and Destination Photography, almost always with a return ticket. But as of March, after we finish relinquishing all of our personal possessions, there will be no more round trips, no more going home, and no more looking back. The world will become our new home with 22 countries planned for this year alone.

 

I openly invite you to come share the world with us and learn how to create beautiful photography in the process.

 

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About this photo

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Marina Bay Sands and The Helix Bridge

 

With only 2 days to explore Singapore last week, I hit the big areas first - and they don’t get much bigger than Marina Bay. And what could possibly make one of the most opulent places in the world more attractive? How about a laser light show? Now that’s cool!

 

Trust me - having only a few days in this amazing city was a complete tease but thankfully, I’ll be back there very soon. :)

 

From Wikipedia:

 

Marina Bay Sands is an integrated resort fronting Marina Bay in Singapore. Developed by Las Vegas Sands, it is billed as the world's most expensive standalone casino property at $8 billion, including cost of the prime land. With the casino complete, the resort features a 2,561-room hotel, a 1,300,000-square-foot (120,000 m2) convention-exhibition centre, the 800,000-square-foot (74,000 m2) The Shoppes at Marina Bay Sands mall, an iconic ArtScience museum, two large theatres, seven "celebrity chef" restaurants, two floating Crystal Pavilions, an ice skating rink, and the world's largest atrium casino with 500 tables and 1,600 slot machines. The complex is topped by a 340m-long SkyPark with a capacity of 3,900 people and a 150m infinity swimming pool, set on top of the world's largest public cantilevered platform, which overhangs the north tower by 67m.

 

The Helix Bridge , previously known as the Double Helix Bridge , is a pedestrian bridge linking Marina Centre with Marina South in the Marina Bay area in Singapore. It was officially opened on 24 April 2010 at 9 pm, however only half was opened due to ongoing construction at the Marina Bay Sands.

 

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* All comments are welcome & Monkey Business is strongly encouraged. If you have questions, I would love to hear them. Check me out at BlameTheMonkey.comThanks for viewing!

HDR photograph of an industrial looking car park, Mold, UK by Timothy Selvage.

 

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Straight out of camera, shot in RAW format.

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4 Image vertorama of the beautiful milky way in the glen.

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Le pont du Gard

Géographie

PaysFrance

RégionLanguedoc-Roussillon

DépartementGard

LocalitéVers-Pont-du-Gard

Coordonnées géographiques43° 56′ 50″ N 4° 32′ 08″ E

Fonction

FranchitGardon

FonctionAqueduc

Caractéristiques techniques

TypePont à voûtes en plein cintre

Longueur3e étage : 360 m

2e étage : 275 m

Hauteur48 m

Matériau(x)Pierre, calcaire molassique, carrière de Vers-Pont-du-Gard

Construction

Constructionier siècle, entre 40 et 50 après J.-C.

Historique

ProtectionLogo monument historique Classé MH (1840)

Patrimoine mondial (1985)

Site classé (2013)

Géolocalisation sur la carte : France

(Voir situation sur carte : France) Pont du Gard

(Voir situation sur carte : Gard)

(Voir situation sur carte : Languedoc-Roussillon)

modifier Consultez la documentation du modèle

  

Parcours de l'aqueduc romain de Nîmes.

  

Le bassin de distribution d’eau de Nîmes ou castellum divisorium.

  

Courbure du pont.

  

L'aqueduc, au sommet du pont.

Le pont du Gard est un pont-aqueduc romain à trois niveaux, situé à Vers-Pont-du-Gard entre Uzès et Nîmes, dans le département du Gard (France). Il enjambe le Gardon, ou Gard. Probablement bâti dans la première moitié du ier siècle, il assurait la continuité de l'aqueduc romain qui conduisait l’eau d’Uzès à Nîmes. Les dernières recherches montreraient que son fonctionnement cessa au début du vie siècle.

 

Au Moyen Âge, les piles du second étage furent échancrées et l'ouvrage fut utilisé comme pont routier. L'architecture exceptionnelle du pont du Gard attira l'attention dès le xvie siècle, qui dès lors bénéficia de restaurations régulières destinées à préserver son intégrité. Un pont routier lui fut accolé en 1743-1747. Plus haut pont-aqueduc connu du monde romain, il a été classé monument historique en 18401 et inscrit sur la liste du patrimoine mondial de l'Unesco en décembre 19852. Le site a fait l'objet d'importants aménagements en 2000.

 

L'aqueduc romain de Nîmes

Le pont du Gard est la partie monumentale d'un aqueduc de plus de 50 km de longueur (52 702 m), qui apportait l'eau de la Fontaine d'Eure, située au pied d'Uzès, jusqu'à la ville romaine de Nemausus, aujourd'hui Nîmes3, alors à son apogée. Les eaux de la source proviennent en partie de la rivière d'Alzon, qui passe par les environs d'Uzès, et des eaux récoltées du mont Bouquet, situé plus près d'Alès. L'aqueduc proprement dit est un chef-d'œuvre d'ingénierie, témoignage de l'extraordinaire maîtrise des constructeurs anciens : le dénivelé entre les points de départ et d'arrivée n'est que de 12,6 m, la pente moyenne générale étant de 24,8 cm par km. À cause du relief, l'aqueduc serpente à travers les petites montagnes et vallées des garrigues d'Uzès et de Nîmes4.

 

L'aqueduc de Nîmes a sans doute été construit au ier siècle de notre ère, comme en atteste la céramique. Des tunnels datant de l'époque d'Auguste ont dû être contournés, ce qui montre que la construction de l'aqueduc est postérieure, et les monnaies retrouvées dans les réservoirs de la ville de Nîmes, où étaient recueillies les eaux de l'aqueduc, ne sont pas antérieures au règne de l'empereur Claude (41-54). On pense donc que la construction de l'aqueduc dont fait partie le pont du Gard doit se situer entre les années 40 et 505. On estime à mille le nombre d'ouvriers, travaillant sur cinq années intenses.

 

Son débit moyen a été estimé à 40 000 mètres cubes d'eau par jour2, soit 400 litres d'eau par seconde. L'eau courante mettait une journée entière pour parvenir par gravité de son point de captage jusqu'à l'ouvrage de répartition, sorte de château d'eau appelé castellum divisorium, encore visible rue de la Lampèze à Nîmes. Nemausus possédait un certain nombre de puits, ainsi qu'une source proche : la construction de l'aqueduc ne relevait donc pas d'une nécessité vitale, mais plutôt d'un ouvrage de prestige, destiné à l'alimentation des thermes, bains, jardins et autres fontaines de la ville. De fait le pont symbolise le génie scientifique romain. Le défi était d'autant plus grand que le pont devait résister aux crues redoutables du Gardon.

 

Dès le ive siècle cependant, l'entretien commença à faire défaut, tandis que des dépôts calcaires occupaient les deux tiers, parfois les trois quarts, de la conduite. On estime à présent qu'il avait cessé de fonctionner au commencement du vie siècle, à l'époque où, suite à la bataille de Vouillé, les Francs prirent le contrôle de la région d'Uzès, tandis que les Wisigoths se maintenaient à Nîmes : on a retrouvé des céramiques contemporaines dans les couches d'abandon, et l'aqueduc servit alors de carrière de pierre (des concrétions détachées des parois du canal ont été utilisées par les riverains pour leurs propres constructions et pour couvrir des sarcophages du cimetière de Saint-Baudile à Nîmes)6.

 

Architecture du pont du Gard[modifier | modifier le code]

Description[modifier | modifier le code]

Construit sur trois étages avec des pierres extraites sur les lieux mêmes dans les carrières romaines environnantes, le sommet du pont domine le GardNote 1, en basses eaux, à 48,77 m de hauteur, et, sur sa plus grande longueur, l'ouvrage mesure actuellement 275 m. Jadis il mesurait 360 m de long.

 

Étage inférieur : 6 arches, 142,35 m de longueur, 6,36 m de largeur, 21,87 m de hauteur.

Étage moyen : 11 arches, 242,55 m de longueur, 4,56 m de largeur, 19,50 m de hauteur.

Étage supérieur : 35 arches, 275 m de long, 3,06 m de largeur, 7,40 m de hauteur. Cet étage a perdu 12 arches, et mesurait initialement 360 m ; il était précédé d'une culée de 130 m de long ; à l'origine de cette culée a été découvert en 1988 un ouvrage de régulation7. Les arches avaient 16 pieds romains d'ouverture (4,75 m), tandis que les piles avaient environ 10 pieds sur 10 (3 m).

Canal :1,80 m de hauteur, 1,20 m de largeur, pente de 0,4 %.

L'observation de la face interne des piliers en grand appareil du deuxième étage du pont révèle le travail des bâtisseurs romains : techniques de taille des blocs (traces de coup d'escoude) et techniques de construction (blocs posés en carreau et boutisse et blocs saillants pour la mise en place des échafaudages). En s'approchant, on constate la précision des assemblages : chaque bloc était lié aux autres par ciselage des joints sur place.

 

De nombreuses traces et gravures parsèment la surface du pont. Ce sont des marques d'assemblage indiquant la place des claveaux de voûtes, par exemple, « FRS II » (frons sinistra II, c'est-à-dire « face gauche 2 ») ou des symboles comme le « phallus », symbole apotropaïque (c'est-à-dire « servant à détourner des influences maléfiques »), ou bien encore des marques diverses laissées par les bâtisseurs de toutes époques pour qui le pont du Gard était l'étape obligée.

 

Le pont présente une courbure convexe de ses étages supérieurs du côté amont. Cette déformation a longtemps été attribuée à la volonté des constructeurs d'assurer la résistance de l'ouvrage, comme on le ferait pour un barrage-voûte. Suite à des mesures de micro-topographie exécutées en 1989, on l'interprète à présent comme le résultat d'une dilatation diurne sous l'effet de l'ensoleillement, qui provoque un déplacement d'environ 5 mm ; les pierres retrouvent leur place au cours de la nuit. La répétition de ce phénomène au cours des siècles aurait conduit à la forme actuelle du pont8.

 

Construction[modifier | modifier le code]

Le pont a été entièrement construit à sec, c'est-à-dire sans l'aide de mortier, les pierres — dont certaines pèsent six tonnes — étant maintenues par des tenons de chêne. Seule la partie la plus élevée, à la hauteur du canal, est faite de moellons liés au mortier9. Le calcaire coquillier est issu de la carrière de l'Estel située à environ 700 m en aval du monument, au bord du Gardon10. Ce matériau, connu localement comme « pierre de Vers », présente une texture assez grossière, se prêtant très bien à la taille.

 

Le cœur de la canalisation (où circulait l'eau) se signale par son système d'étanchéité : un béton romain à base de chaux, badigeonné d'une peinture rougeâtre, à base d'oxyde ferrique, qui évite la dégradation due au calcaire. Les canalisations font environ 1,80 m de haut.

 

Sur place, les blocs étaient montés grâce à une cage à écureuil dans laquelle les ouvriers prenaient place, apportant la puissance nécessaire au treuil. Un échafaudage complexe fut érigé pour soutenir le pont pendant la construction, dont les faces portent toujours les marques : on distingue un peu partout les appuis d'échafaudages et, sur les piles, les arêtes saillantes qui soutenaient les assemblages de bois semi-circulaires destinés au maintien des voûtes. On suppose que la construction a duré de trois à cinq ans (une quinzaine d'années pour l'ensemble de l'aqueduc de Nîmes), avec 800 à 1 000 ouvriers sur le chantier. On a évalué à 11 000 000 le nombre de blocs de pierre utilisés et à 50 400 tonnes le poids de l'ensemble. Chacune des grandes voûtes est constituée de voûtes indépendantes accolées (quatre à l'étage inférieur, trois au second étage), ce qui donne à l'ensemble la capacité de résister aux légers mouvements et tassements inévitables avec le temps. Cette partition de la voûte en anneaux indépendants ne se rencontre qu'en Narbonnaise, par exemple aux ponts romains de Sommières, Boisseron, Ambrussum, Nages-et-Solorgues.

  

Partie de la paroi où on peut voir les pierres saillantes servant de points d'appui aux échafaudages

L'aqueduc situé au troisième niveau a un plancher constitué de mortier et de cailloux et des parois en moellons. Sa taille permettait à un homme d'en assurer aisément l'entretien. L'étanchéité est assurée par un mortier de tuileau, de couleur rougeâtre.

 

Le pont après l'abandon de l'aqueduc[modifier | modifier le code]

Dégradation[modifier | modifier le code]

Du Moyen Âge au xviiie siècle, le pont a subi des dégradations notables. À une époque inconnue, mais vraisemblablement aux alentours du xiie siècle, douze arches du troisième étage furent détruites et les pierres récupérées comme matériau de construction11. Par la suite, il fut utilisé comme passage pour traverser la rivière : les piles du second niveau furent échancrées afin de laisser plus de place au trafic croissant, mais cela déstabilisa dangereusement l'ensemble de la structure.

 

Redécouverte et restaurations[modifier | modifier le code]

  

Le pont routier accolé au xviiie siècle

  

Gravure de Charles-Louis Clérisseau en 1804, montrant l'état fortement dégradé du pont à cette date

La Renaissance, qui haussa l'Antiquité au rang de modèle absolu, ne manqua pas de s'intéresser au pont du Gard, l'un des plus spectaculaires monuments romains subsistant en France.

 

Charles IX passa devant le pont en décembre 1564 lors de son tour de France royal (1564-1566), accompagné par la Cour et par ceux qui étaient les Grands du royaume, son frère le duc d’Anjou, Henri de Navarre, les cardinaux de Bourbon et de Lorraine12.

 

Dès 1647, l'évêque de Nîmes alerte les États de Languedoc sur le danger de ruine que présente le pont. Il précise, dans son adresse aux députés, qu'un fonds de 1 500 livres avait déjà été constitué pour les réparations à faire, mais qu'il était bloqué « entre les mains […] de bourgeois de la ville du Saint-Esprit »13.

 

Le 10 janvier 1660, Louis XIV et la Cour, alors dans le Midi de la France à l'occasion de la négociation de la paix des Pyrénées, allèrent voir le pont du Gard14.

 

En 1696, Nicolas de Lamoignon de Basville, intendant de Languedoc, inquiet pour la stabilité de l'édifice, fit faire un devis pour la réparation par l'abbé Henri de Laurens et Augustin-Charles d'Aviler, architecte de la Province. Les travaux, pris en charge par les États de Languedoc, durèrent jusqu'en 1704 : les échancrures dans les piles furent en partie colmatées et, contournant chaque pile, des passages en encorbellement furent aménagés pour élargir la voie15.

 

En 1730, dans le premier tome de l'Histoire générale de Languedoc, dom Claude Devic et dom Joseph Vaissète firent le point des connaissances du moment sur le pont du Gard. En l'absence de textes antiques et à une époque où l'archéologie n'en était qu'à ses premiers balbutiements, la datation était très incertaine : ils rappelaient que Nicolas Bergier dans son Histoire des grands chemins de l'Empire romain (1622)16 attribuait la construction de l'aqueduc à Agrippa (vers -63 - vers -12) ; ils étaient plutôt d'avis que c'était Hadrien (76-138) qui l'avait fait bâtir. Mais le parcours du canal était connu, et ils relevaient à propos qu'il était destiné à amener l'eau de la Fontaine d'Eure jusqu'à Nîmes près de « la Tour Magne, où étoit le regorgement des eaux & le grand réservoir qui les fournissoit à la ville », à quoi ils ajoutaient avec moins de discernement « & à l'amphithéâtre pour la représentation des naumachies »17.

 

En 1743-1747, l'ingénieur Henri Pitot accola aux arches de l'étage inférieur un solide pont routier. Les échancrures furent alors définitivement colmatées. Les États de Languedoc firent poser à cette occasion une plaque de marbre sur une pile du deuxième étage du pont avec l'inscription suivante :

 

« Aquæductum struxerant Romani pontem addidit Occitania anno MDCCXLV. Cura d. Henr. Pitot e. regia scientiarum academiaNote 2. »

 

Elle fut détruite en 1793 par les révolutionnaires18.

  

L'extrémité ouest du Pont du Gard en 1891, montrant les escaliers installés par Charles Laisné permettant aux visiteurs d'entrer dans le conduit

Au xixe siècle, le monument fut à nouveau l'objet de grosses restaurations, d'abord en 1842-1846 par Charles-Auguste Questel où, entre autres, un escalier est créé à l'intérieur de la dernière pile du dernier étage pour accéder au canal, puis de 1855 à 1859, les plus importantes de l'histoire du pont, sous la direction de Jean-Charles Laisné19.

 

En 1988 et surtout 2002, le pont du Gard fut touché par de violentes inondations qui endommagèrent gravement les environs, mais ne causèrent aucun dommage à l'édifice. Pourtant lors de cette dernière crue, l'eau monta jusqu'aux trois quarts des arches du niveau inférieur, soit une hauteur inédite d'environ 20 mètresNote 3.

 

En 2000, l'État français finança, dans le cadre d'une opération Grand site national, avec l'aide de collectivités locales, de l'UNESCO et de l'Union européenne, un projet d'aménagement du site, confié à l'architecte Jean-Paul Viguier, afin d'assurer la préservation de ce monument exceptionnel, menacé par l'afflux des touristes. Il fut décidé de le rendre accessible uniquement aux piétons et d'améliorer les infrastructures destinées aux visiteurs avec, entre autres, un musée. Les nouveaux bâtiments sont imbriqués dans la roche et sont invisibles depuis le monument, dont ils imitent la couleur. Une attention particulière a été portée au paysage qui, dégradé par le tourisme de masse, a été restauré et mis en valeur par un parcours20. Enfin, l'accès à la conduite au sommet de l'aqueduc a été limité à des visites guidées.

 

Il s'agit de l'un des monuments français les plus visités, avec 1 400 000 touristes en 201121. La gestion du site est désormais assurée par un EPCC (Établissement de coopération culturelle).

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I've been there at New Year's Eve and a few days before too and found out that the celestial pole is right above the mountains form that POV there, so I spontaneously used the first day of this year for another long exposure session. Luckily we got clear blue starry skies for a few hours in the evening.

 

Start: 10:30 pm

End: 00:55 am

 

161 images stacked for the final result

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(This little guy is the kickass cushion I have on my couch, by the way). I wanted something completely over the top here :) What do you think: Is it over the top enough?

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The first settlements in Regensburg date to the Stone Age. The Celtic name Radasbona was the oldest name given to a settlement near the present city. Around AD 90 the Romans built a small "cohort-fort" in what would now be the suburbs.

 

In 179 the Roman fort Castra Regina ("fortress by the river Regen") was built for Legio III Italica during the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius.[2] It was an important camp on the most northern point of the Danube: it corresponds to what is today the core of Regensburg's Altstadt ("Old City") east of the Obere and Untere Bachgasse and West of the Schwanenplatz. It is believed that even in late Roman times it was the seat of a bishop, and St Boniface re-established the Bishopric of Regensburg in 739.

 

From the early 6th century, Regensburg was the seat of the Agilolfing ruling family. From about 530 to the first half of the 13th century, it was the capital of Bavaria. Regensburg remained an important city during the reign of Charlemagne. In 792, Regensburg hosted the ecclesiatical section of Charlemagne's General Assembly. The bishops in council condemned the heresy of Adoptionism taught by the Spanish bishops, Elipandus of Toledo and Felix of Urgel. After the partition of the Carolingian Empire, the city became the seat of the Eastern Frankish ruler, Louis II the German in 843. About two years later, in 845, fourteen Bohemian princes came to Regensburg to receive baptism there. This was the starting point of Christianization of the Czech people, and the diocese of Regensburg became the mother diocese of Prague. These events had a wide impact on the cultural history of the Czech lands, as consequently they were incorporated in the Roman Catholic and not into the Slavic-Orthodox world. The fact is well remembered, and a memorial plate at St John's Church (the alleged place of the baptism) was unveiled a few years ago, commemorating the incident in the Czech and German languages.

 

In 1096, on the way to the First Crusade, Peter the Hermit led a mob of Crusaders who attempted to force the mass conversion of the Jews of Regensburg and killed all those who resisted.[3]

 

In 1135–1146 a bridge across the Danube, the Steinerne Brücke, was built. This stone bridge opened major international trade routes between Northern Europe and Venice, and this started Regensburg's golden age as a city of wealthy trading families. Regensburg became the cultural center of southern Germany and was celebrated for its gold work and fabrics.

   

The remains of the East Tower of Porta Praetoria from Ancient Roman times

In 1245 Regensburg became a Free Imperial City and was a trade center before the shifting of trade routes in the late Middle Ages. At the end of the 15th century Regensburg became part of the Duchy of Bavaria in 1486, but its independence was restored by the Holy Roman Emperor in 1496.

 

The city adopted the Protestant Reformation in 1542, and its Town Council remained entirely Lutheran until the incorporation of the city into the Principality of Regensburg under Carl von Dalberg in 1803. A minority of the population stayed Roman Catholic and Roman Catholics were excluded from civil rights ("Bürgerrecht"). The town of Regensburg must not be confused with the Bishopric of Regensburg. Although the Imperial city had adopted the Reformation, the town remained the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop and several abbeys. Three of the latter, St. Emmeram, Niedermünster and Obermünster, were estates of their own within the Holy Roman Empire, meaning that they were granted a seat and a vote at the Imperial diet (Reichstag). So there was the unique situation that the town of Regensburg comprised five independent "states" (in terms of the Holy Roman Empire): the Protestant city itself, the Roman Catholic bishopric and the three monasteries mentioned above.

 

From 1663 to 1806, the city was the permanent seat of the Reichstag of the Holy Roman Empire. Thus Regensburg was one of the central towns of the Empire, attracting visitors in large numbers. In 1803 the city lost its status as a free city. It was handed over to the Archbishop of Mainz and Archchancellor of the Holy Roman Empire Carl von Dalberg in compensation for Mainz, which had become French under the terms of the Treaty of Lunéville in 1801. The archbishopric of Mainz was formally transferred to Regensburg. Dalberg united the bishopric, the monsteries and the town itself, making up the Principality of Regensburg (Fürstentum Regensburg). Dalberg strictly modernised public life. Most importantly he awarded equal rights to Protestants and Roman Catholics. In 1810 Dalberg ceded Regensburg to the Kingdom of Bavaria, he himself being compensated by the towns of Fulda and Hanau being given to him under the title of "Grand Duke of Frankfurt".

 

Between April 19 and April 23, 1809, Regensburg was the scene of the Battle of Ratisbon between forces commanded by Baron de Coutaud (the 65th Ligne) and retreating Austrian forces. It was eventually overrun after supplies and ammunition ran out. The city suffered severe damage during the fight with about 150 houses being burnt and others being looted.

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Used my 100-400mm lense @400mm with my ND1000 filter once again. There's been a little discussion this evening about why the sun sets that far to the west at that time. Might be because it's already one year ago people see the sun set so late. Anyway, I think a sundial would be pretty interesting for such moments, cause remembering where the sun set one year ago might be quite hard to remember. This image was heavily cropped to a resolution of 2507 x 1359.

Expressway like noodle

 

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The first settlements in Regensburg date to the Stone Age. The Celtic name Radasbona was the oldest name given to a settlement near the present city. Around AD 90 the Romans built a small "cohort-fort" in what would now be the suburbs.In 179 the Roman fort Castra Regina ("fortress by the river Regen") was built for Legio III Italica during the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius.[2] It was an important camp on the most northern point of the Danube: it corresponds to what is today the core of Regensburg's Altstadt ("Old City") east of the Obere and Untere Bachgasse and West of the Schwanenplatz. It is believed that even in late Roman times it was the seat of a bishop, and St Boniface re-established the Bishopric of Regensburg in 739.From the early 6th century, Regensburg was the seat of the Agilolfing ruling family. From about 530 to the first half of the 13th century, it was the capital of Bavaria. Regensburg remained an important city during the reign of Charlemagne. In 792, Regensburg hosted the ecclesiatical section of Charlemagne's General Assembly. The bishops in council condemned the heresy of Adoptionism taught by the Spanish bishops, Elipandus of Toledo and Felix of Urgel. After the partition of the Carolingian Empire, the city became the seat of the Eastern Frankish ruler, Louis II the German in 843. About two years later, in 845, fourteen Bohemian princes came to Regensburg to receive baptism there. This was the starting point of Christianization of the Czech people, and the diocese of Regensburg became the mother diocese of Prague. These events had a wide impact on the cultural history of the Czech lands, as consequently they were incorporated in the Roman Catholic and not into the Slavic-Orthodox world. The fact is well remembered, and a memorial plate at St John's Church (the alleged place of the baptism) was unveiled a few years ago, commemorating the incident in the Czech and German languages.In 1096, on the way to the First Crusade, Peter the Hermit led a mob of Crusaders who attempted to force the mass conversion of the Jews of Regensburg and killed all those who resisted.[3]In 1135–1146 a bridge across the Danube, the Steinerne Brücke, was built. This stone bridge opened major international trade routes between Northern Europe and Venice, and this started Regensburg's golden age as a city of wealthy trading families. Regensburg became the cultural center of southern Germany and was celebrated for its gold work and fabrics.

 

The remains of the East Tower of Porta Praetoria from Ancient Roman timesIn 1245 Regensburg became a Free Imperial City and was a trade center before the shifting of trade routes in the late Middle Ages. At the end of the 15th century Regensburg became part of the Duchy of Bavaria in 1486, but its independence was restored by the Holy Roman Emperor in 1496.The city adopted the Protestant Reformation in 1542, and its Town Council remained entirely Lutheran until the incorporation of the city into the Principality of Regensburg under Carl von Dalberg in 1803. A minority of the population stayed Roman Catholic and Roman Catholics were excluded from civil rights ("Bürgerrecht"). The town of Regensburg must not be confused with the Bishopric of Regensburg. Although the Imperial city had adopted the Reformation, the town remained the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop and several abbeys. Three of the latter, St. Emmeram, Niedermünster and Obermünster, were estates of their own within the Holy Roman Empire, meaning that they were granted a seat and a vote at the Imperial diet (Reichstag). So there was the unique situation that the town of Regensburg comprised five independent "states" (in terms of the Holy Roman Empire): the Protestant city itself, the Roman Catholic bishopric and the three monasteries mentioned above.From 1663 to 1806, the city was the permanent seat of the Reichstag of the Holy Roman Empire. Thus Regensburg was one of the central towns of the Empire, attracting visitors in large numbers. In 1803 the city lost its status as a free city. It was handed over to the Archbishop of Mainz and Archchancellor of the Holy Roman Empire Carl von Dalberg in compensation for Mainz, which had become French under the terms of the Treaty of Lunéville in 1801. The archbishopric of Mainz was formally transferred to Regensburg. Dalberg united the bishopric, the monsteries and the town itself, making up the Principality of Regensburg (Fürstentum Regensburg). Dalberg strictly modernised public life. Most importantly he awarded equal rights to Protestants and Roman Catholics. In 1810 Dalberg ceded Regensburg to the Kingdom of Bavaria, he himself being compensated by the towns of Fulda and Hanau being given to him under the title of "Grand Duke of Frankfurt".Between April 19 and April 23, 1809, Regensburg was the scene of the Battle of Ratisbon between forces commanded by Baron de Coutaud (the 65th Ligne) and retreating Austrian forces. It was eventually overrun after supplies and ammunition ran out. The city suffered severe damage during the fight with about 150 houses being burnt and others being looted.

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The crow claws holes at virgin eyes

marking their spot of deceitful lies

young girl in love, too blinded to see

love is not always what it appears to be.

Poem "The Dark" by Lu

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“Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

 

Steve Jobs, Stanford commencement speech, June 2005

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The first settlements in Regensburg date to the Stone Age. The Celtic name Radasbona was the oldest name given to a settlement near the present city. Around AD 90 the Romans built a small "cohort-fort" in what would now be the suburbs.

 

In 179 the Roman fort Castra Regina ("fortress by the river Regen") was built for Legio III Italica during the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius.[2] It was an important camp on the most northern point of the Danube: it corresponds to what is today the core of Regensburg's Altstadt ("Old City") east of the Obere and Untere Bachgasse and West of the Schwanenplatz. It is believed that even in late Roman times it was the seat of a bishop, and St Boniface re-established the Bishopric of Regensburg in 739.

 

From the early 6th century, Regensburg was the seat of the Agilolfing ruling family. From about 530 to the first half of the 13th century, it was the capital of Bavaria. Regensburg remained an important city during the reign of Charlemagne. In 792, Regensburg hosted the ecclesiatical section of Charlemagne's General Assembly. The bishops in council condemned the heresy of Adoptionism taught by the Spanish bishops, Elipandus of Toledo and Felix of Urgel. After the partition of the Carolingian Empire, the city became the seat of the Eastern Frankish ruler, Louis II the German in 843. About two years later, in 845, fourteen Bohemian princes came to Regensburg to receive baptism there. This was the starting point of Christianization of the Czech people, and the diocese of Regensburg became the mother diocese of Prague. These events had a wide impact on the cultural history of the Czech lands, as consequently they were incorporated in the Roman Catholic and not into the Slavic-Orthodox world. The fact is well remembered, and a memorial plate at St John's Church (the alleged place of the baptism) was unveiled a few years ago, commemorating the incident in the Czech and German languages.

 

In 1096, on the way to the First Crusade, Peter the Hermit led a mob of Crusaders who attempted to force the mass conversion of the Jews of Regensburg and killed all those who resisted.[3]

 

In 1135–1146 a bridge across the Danube, the Steinerne Brücke, was built. This stone bridge opened major international trade routes between Northern Europe and Venice, and this started Regensburg's golden age as a city of wealthy trading families. Regensburg became the cultural center of southern Germany and was celebrated for its gold work and fabrics.

   

The remains of the East Tower of Porta Praetoria from Ancient Roman times

In 1245 Regensburg became a Free Imperial City and was a trade center before the shifting of trade routes in the late Middle Ages. At the end of the 15th century Regensburg became part of the Duchy of Bavaria in 1486, but its independence was restored by the Holy Roman Emperor in 1496.

 

The city adopted the Protestant Reformation in 1542, and its Town Council remained entirely Lutheran until the incorporation of the city into the Principality of Regensburg under Carl von Dalberg in 1803. A minority of the population stayed Roman Catholic and Roman Catholics were excluded from civil rights ("Bürgerrecht"). The town of Regensburg must not be confused with the Bishopric of Regensburg. Although the Imperial city had adopted the Reformation, the town remained the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop and several abbeys. Three of the latter, St. Emmeram, Niedermünster and Obermünster, were estates of their own within the Holy Roman Empire, meaning that they were granted a seat and a vote at the Imperial diet (Reichstag). So there was the unique situation that the town of Regensburg comprised five independent "states" (in terms of the Holy Roman Empire): the Protestant city itself, the Roman Catholic bishopric and the three monasteries mentioned above.

 

From 1663 to 1806, the city was the permanent seat of the Reichstag of the Holy Roman Empire. Thus Regensburg was one of the central towns of the Empire, attracting visitors in large numbers. In 1803 the city lost its status as a free city. It was handed over to the Archbishop of Mainz and Archchancellor of the Holy Roman Empire Carl von Dalberg in compensation for Mainz, which had become French under the terms of the Treaty of Lunéville in 1801. The archbishopric of Mainz was formally transferred to Regensburg. Dalberg united the bishopric, the monsteries and the town itself, making up the Principality of Regensburg (Fürstentum Regensburg). Dalberg strictly modernised public life. Most importantly he awarded equal rights to Protestants and Roman Catholics. In 1810 Dalberg ceded Regensburg to the Kingdom of Bavaria, he himself being compensated by the towns of Fulda and Hanau being given to him under the title of "Grand Duke of Frankfurt".

 

Between April 19 and April 23, 1809, Regensburg was the scene of the Battle of Ratisbon between forces commanded by Baron de Coutaud (the 65th Ligne) and retreating Austrian forces. It was eventually overrun after supplies and ammunition ran out. The city suffered severe damage during the fight with about 150 houses being burnt and others being looted.

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