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Downy Rattlesnake Plantain (Goodyera pubescens) standing tall amidst the Galax. Nantahala National Forest.

 

Pentax K-1

SMC Pentax 1:1.8 55mm

Iridient Developer

Fountain County, Indiana. This is the orchid Downy Rattlesnake Plantain (Goodyera pubescens) growing with Tree Moss (Climacium americanum). A small group of the orchids were growing out of the moss on the edge of a sandstone rock wall at just about eye level for me. The nice thing about this orchid is that the leaves are beautifully variegated so the plant looks great even when not in flower. The leaves are evergreen and can be seen throughout the year.

Fountain County, Indiana. This is the orchid Downy Rattlesnake Plantain (Goodyera pubescens) growing with Tree Moss (Climacium americanum). A small group of the orchids were growing out of the moss on the edge of a sandstone rock wall at just about eye level for me. The nice thing about this orchid is that the leaves are beautifully variegated so the plant looks great even when not in flower. The leaves are evergreen and can be seen throughout the year.

Goodyera pubescens, the Downey Rattlesnake orchid.

 

A very unusual leaf colour variation - much whiter than the normal leaves. Very striking and beautiful!

 

Photographed on one of the field trips at the 2018 Native Orchid Conference, held in Annapolis, Maryland, USA.

 

IMG_7007-rev2-goodyera

Goodyera pubescens, the Downey Rattlesnake orchid.

 

A group of inflorescences of this neat little orchid. This one being visited by a small insect (a bee?). We watched it visit many different individual flowers, but didn't see any evidence of pollination... so I'm not sure of this is a pollinator at work, or just an insect passing through...

 

Photographed on one of the field trips at the 2018 Native Orchid Conference, held in Annapolis, Maryland, USA.

 

IMG_7004-rev-goodyera

Goodyera pubescens, the Downey Rattlesnake orchid.

 

We came upon this spot that had many baby plants just emerging from the moss - I count at least a dozen.

 

I liked the contrast of the leaves the moss and the log.

 

Photographed on one of the field trips at the 2018 Native Orchid Conference, held in Annapolis, Maryland, USA.

 

IMG_7017-rev-goodyera

Species from eastern North America

 

Common name: Downy rattlesnake plantain

 

Found while doing some back country exploring near Nail, Arkansas

 

Ozark National Forest, Newton County, Arkansas

Goodyera pubescens, the Downey Rattlesnake orchid.

 

The companion photograph to the next/previous one in this set. This spot that had many baby plants growing out of the bark of a rotting log. Neat!

 

I have no idea what the tiny white structures are that are emerging from the bark. Ideas?

 

Photographed on one of the field trips at the 2018 Native Orchid Conference, held in Annapolis, Maryland, USA.

 

IMG_7016-rev2-goodyera

Goodyera pubescens, the Downey Rattlesnake orchid.

 

A closer view of the a single inflorescence of this neat little orchid, with the visible hairs on the flowers and stem. These flowers appear to open sequentially, and the lower flowers age very fast. It is hard to get a photo with all the flowers open and in perfect condition. (next time!)

 

Photographed on one of the field trips at the 2018 Native Orchid Conference, held in Annapolis, Maryland, USA.

 

IMG_6986-rev-goodyera

This is a picture of Downy Rattlesnake Plantain at the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Lothian, Maryland.

Bristol Quad

Rattlesnake Plantain. Oh, look an orchid. An orchid that is not too uncommon in acidy woodlands. What a lovely leaf too. Picture and specimen by Helen Low Metzman.

 

~~~~~~~~~~{{{{{{0}}}}}}~~~~~~~~~~

 

All photographs are public domain, feel free to download and use as you wish.

 

Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler, F5.0, ISO 100, Shutter Speed 200

 

Beauty is truth, truth beauty - that is all

Ye know on earth and all ye need to know

" Ode on a Grecian Urn"

John Keats

 

You can also follow us on Instagram - account = USGSBIML Want some Useful Links to the Techniques We Use? Well now here you go Citizen:

 

Free Field Guide to Bee Genera of Marylandhttp://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Basic USGSBIML set up:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

 

USGSBIML Photoshopping Technique: Note that we now have added using the burn tool at 50% opacity set to shadows to clean up the halos that bleed into the black background from "hot" color sections of the picture.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdmx_8zqvN4

 

Bees of Maryland Organized by Taxa with information on each Genus

www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/collections

 

PDF of Basic USGSBIML Photography Set Up:

ftp://ftpext.usgs.gov/pub/er/md/laurel/Droege/How%20to%20Take%20MacroPhotographs%20of%20Insects%20BIML%20Lab2.pdf

 

Google Hangout Demonstration of Techniques:

plus.google.com/events/c5569losvskrv2nu606ltof8odo

or

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c15neFttoU

 

Excellent Technical Form on Stacking:

www.photomacrography.net/

 

Contact information:

Sam Droege

sdroege@usgs.gov

301 497 5840

 

This downy rattlesnake plantain is a fascinating plant in so many ways. First off, notice the very pretty but also very tiny pearlescent flowers tucked together toward the top of a downy supporting stalk. These uncommon woodland orchids form a symbiotic mycorrhizal relationship with certain fungi in the neighborhood so they share needed nutrients and minerals. The leaves of this downy rattlesnake plantain are even more amazing than the flowers and maybe I'll post a photo later this fall since they are evergreen. The photo won't be from this particular plant though since this flowering stage signals the swan song for the leaf cluster below and the plant as we know it here is sentenced to die when it finally blooms after living many years in a vegetative state.

Spent a long day in the Pisgah National Forest near Brevard, NC and then on up to the Blue Ridge Parkway. Late Summer and Fall usher in a host of colorful wildflowers, some of which (for this southern boy) are more often found much farther north. That's the very thing I like about the high elevations of the Blue Ridge Parkway in western North Carolina. That, plus the cooler mountain weather.

 

To get the full trip report, please go to Jim's Blog.

several years ago the same spot produced twenty flower spikes, hopefully someday:-))

This is a picture of a downy rattlesnake plantain on the North Tract of the Patuxent Research Refuge in Maryland.

Laurel Quad

An evergreen wild orchid!

Flowers are hairy with a sac-like lower lip.

Turnhole Bend

Mammoth Cave National Park, KY, USA.

 

Day trip to a couple of upstate South Carolina Heritage Preserves with my California friends, Barry Rice and Beth Salvia.

 

For the trip report, please go to Jim's Blog.

Spent a long day in the Pisgah National Forest near Brevard, NC and then on up to the Blue Ridge Parkway. Late Summer and Fall usher in a host of colorful wildflowers, some of which (for this southern boy) are more often found much farther north. That's the very thing I like about the high elevations of the Blue Ridge Parkway in western North Carolina. That, plus the cooler mountain weather.

 

To get the full trip report, please go to Jim's Blog.

Day trip to the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina in search of the Club-spur orchid. As usual, I found a great deal more than what I was initially looking for.

 

To read the trip details, please go to Jim's Blog.

This small woodland orchid was a bit past prime today at a nature preserve in LaPorte County, Indiana

Today was the big bloom of the 2020 season for Triphora trianthophoros or Three-birds orchids in the Pisgah National Forest near Brevard, North Carolina. I also managed to locate and photograph three other native orchid species on this visit.

 

To check out the full trip report, please go to Jim's Blog.

Cooper's Rock State Forest, WV

Downy rattlesnake-plantain orchid, Sevier County, Tennessee, August 2016 I visited Tennessee for a few days and saw many new species.

Spent a long day in the Pisgah National Forest near Brevard, NC and then on up to the Blue Ridge Parkway. Late Summer and Fall usher in a host of colorful wildflowers, some of which (for this southern boy) are more often found much farther north. That's the very thing I like about the high elevations of the Blue Ridge Parkway in western North Carolina. That, plus the cooler mountain weather.

 

To get the full trip report, please go to Jim's Blog.

As many of my followers and Flickr friends already know, I'm hopelessly obsessed with North America's native orchids. One of my major botanical bucket list items is to see and photograph each and every species native to my home state of Ohio. Of the 47 species to have called Ohio home at one point or another post European settlement, I've seen 46! Only one more to go and that's Siranthes romanzoffiana (which I hope to see this summer).

 

I decided to put this collage together to celebrate Ohio's diversity of orchids and showcase each species' unique beauty and architecture. Every photo was taken by me either in Ohio or on one of my many out-of-state botanical forays. I hope you enjoy this piece! It is admittedly a source of pride for me to have seen so many so far and so close to achieving a dream.

 

The botanical names for each species is listed below and listed by row, left to right:

 

Row 1: Aplectrum hyemale, Arethusa bulbosa, Calopogon tuberosus, Coeloglossum viride, Corallorhiza maculata, C. odontorhiza, C. trifida, C. wisteriana, Cypripedium acaule, C. candidum

 

Row 2: Cypripedium parviflorum var. makasin, C. pubescens, C. reginae, C. x andrewsii, Galearis spectabilis, Goodyera pubescens, G. tesellata, Hexalectris spicata, Isotria medeoloides, I. verticillata

 

Row 3: Liparis liliifolia, L. loeselii, Malaxis unifolia, Neottia cordata, Platanthera aquilonis, P. blephariglottis, P. ciliaris, P. clavellata, P. flava var. herbiola, P. grandiflora

 

Row 4: Platanthera hookeri, P. lacera, P. leucophaea, P. orbiculata, P. peramoena, P. psycodes, Pogonia ophioglossoides, Spiranthes cernua, S. lacera var. gracilis, S. lucida

 

Row 5: Spiranthes magnicamporum, S. ochroleuca, S. ovalis var. erostellata, S. tuberosa, S. vernalis, Tipularia discolor, Triphora trianthophora

Day trip to a couple of upstate South Carolina Heritage Preserves with my California friends, Barry Rice and Beth Salvia.

 

For the trip report, please go to Jim's Blog.

Spent a long day in the Pisgah National Forest near Brevard, NC and then on up to the Blue Ridge Parkway. Late Summer and Fall usher in a host of colorful wildflowers, some of which (for this southern boy) are more often found much farther north. That's the very thing I like about the high elevations of the Blue Ridge Parkway in western North Carolina. That, plus the cooler mountain weather.

 

To get the full trip report, please go to Jim's Blog.

Species from eastern North America

 

Common name: Downy rattlesnake plantain

 

Found while doing some back country exploring near Nail, Arkansas

 

Ozark National Forest, Newton County, Arkansas

The rising flower stalk with white flowers looks very similar to nodding ladies tresses, which grows in sunny wetlands rather than shaded moist deep-woods slopes.

It's peak blooming period in the mountains for this relatively easy to find species . Despite the common name, it's not a plantain, but an orchid.

Hiawassee, GA

Goodyera pubescens - Downy Rattlesnake Orchid

So-called for the striking tesselated patterns on the leaves which often persist though-out the year. They also often clump together to make large colonies.

 

2011 Native Orchid Conference field trip.

 

near Quarryville, Pennsylvania, USA.

 

IMG_1316-rev-Goodyera-pub

Rattlesnake Plantain. Oh, look an orchid. An orchid that is not too uncommon in acidy woodlands. What a lovely leaf too. Picture and specimen by Helen Low Metzman.

 

~~~~~~~~~~{{{{{{0}}}}}}~~~~~~~~~~

 

All photographs are public domain, feel free to download and use as you wish.

 

Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler, F5.0, ISO 100, Shutter Speed 200

 

Beauty is truth, truth beauty - that is all

Ye know on earth and all ye need to know

" Ode on a Grecian Urn"

John Keats

 

You can also follow us on Instagram - account = USGSBIML Want some Useful Links to the Techniques We Use? Well now here you go Citizen:

 

Free Field Guide to Bee Genera of Marylandhttp://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Basic USGSBIML set up:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

 

USGSBIML Photoshopping Technique: Note that we now have added using the burn tool at 50% opacity set to shadows to clean up the halos that bleed into the black background from "hot" color sections of the picture.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bdmx_8zqvN4

 

Bees of Maryland Organized by Taxa with information on each Genus

www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/collections

 

PDF of Basic USGSBIML Photography Set Up:

ftp://ftpext.usgs.gov/pub/er/md/laurel/Droege/How%20to%20Take%20MacroPhotographs%20of%20Insects%20BIML%20Lab2.pdf

 

Google Hangout Demonstration of Techniques:

plus.google.com/events/c5569losvskrv2nu606ltof8odo

or

www.youtube.com/watch?v=4c15neFttoU

 

Excellent Technical Form on Stacking:

www.photomacrography.net/

 

Contact information:

Sam Droege

sdroege@usgs.gov

301 497 5840

 

Another day trip to the Pisgah National Forest in Transylvania County, North Carolina. I met my south Florida friend, Chris Evans for a day in the mountains, looking for orchids to photograph.

 

To see the detailed report, please click on Jim's Blog.

(Orchid Family) | Jacks River Trail, Cohutta Wilderness, North Georgia Mountains | 02 August 2013 | USDA Plant Profile

(Goodyera pubescens). Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee.

Weekend trip with my friend, Alan Cressler, to a long section of the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina. We were fortunate to find a number of species of orchids and milkweeds, including a rare hybrid milkweed.

 

For the full trip report, please go to Jim's Blog.

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