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east and west mittens in Monument Valley at sunrise

 

the Navajo name for Monument Valley is Tsi-Bii-Ndzisgal

 

Available for sale and license

at Getty Images

Portugal The Man - "The Woods" - Play this track here.

 

Follow me on Twitter twitter.com/HotpixUK

 

¿Whats this iPod Shuffle set all about? Read about it here

 

While on a great photo walk with good drinking friend and botanical polyglot Stephen Buchan in Humbie woods, a quiet oasis a few miles south of Pencaitland, East Lotian, Scotland the other week, this track was bouncing around in my head.

 

Portugal. The Man is an American experimental rock band based in Portland, Oregon, but originally from Wasilla, Alaska. The group released their first two albums with Fearless Records.

This is a track from their 4th album, The Satanic Satanist.

 

Released on July 21, 2009 it was originally named The Satanic Satanist of the Majestic Majesty, the album title was later shortened and an acoustic counterpart entitled The Majestic Majesty was released. The Satanic Satanist is themed around memories and stories from singer John Gourley's growing up in the state of Alaska. The album was recorded with the help of record producer Paul Q. Kolderie of Pixies and Radiohead fame, and it was the band's first time recording an album with pre-production.

 

Humbie is a hamlet and rural parish in East Lothian, Scotland. It lies in the south-west of the county, approximately 10 miles south-west of Haddington and 15 miles south-east of Edinburgh. Humbie as we know it today was formed as the result of the union between Keith Marischal and Keith Hundeby in 1618. There is not much of a village, more a scattered hamlet.

 

The "T-Plan" Parish Church was rebuilt in 1800 and Gothicized in 1866 by David Bryce. The 'chancel' was added in 1932. Memorials in the churchyard include a heraldic tablet of the Borthwicks of Whitburgh of the early 17th century, and another monument to James Scriven of Ploughlandhill who died in 1668. The path down to the ample woodland winds down from the churchyard.

 

Checkout more ipod music from my photostream.

 

Keep in touch, add me as a contact www.flickr.com/relationship.gne?id=33062170@N08 so I can follow all your new uploads.

 

¿Whats this iPod Shuffle set all about? Read about it here

 

(c) Hotpix / HotpixUK Tony Smith - Hotpix.freeserve.co.uk WDCC

Northerly Island, on the east side of Burnham Harbor, about a ½ mile across the harbor, east of Soldier Field (where the Chicago Bears [football team] play). ~ View On Black

 

Northerly Island used to be Miegs Air Field. A little airport that Mayor Daley had put to the bulldozer and dug up in the middle of the night, July 20, 2006. One evening it’s an airport; the next morning it ain’t. Just like that.

 

I loved this midnight raid as the airport wouldn’t allow people to use the area (for biking, walking, fishing, picnicking, breathing, star-gazing, etc.). It also scared me (this 12:01 in the a.m., full-metal jacket, frontal assault) because, next time, this display of political will and power could just as easily be used against something I like or treasure.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=vT1fzsFqfIM – sounds of a prairie

 

But done was done: with no going back. So, there was no need, or desire for recourse, when you’re on the side that benefited from such action. There was no, and probably never will be, any recourse for the other guys. I do know, however, that good-luck-and-bad-luck, gain-and-loss, are two eerily, similar-looking sides of the same coin. So I do gloat privately at the rich man's loss of a private airfield on public land, but such feelings are hidden behind a real "concern for the due process of law."

 

I think that is called a moral or philosophical ambiguity.

 

Northerly island has been slowly morphing into a nature area, a prairie of sorts; semi-consciously designed now for more passive uses (walking, biking on the road, sitting, looking at nature, fishing) than for aggressive activities (airplanes or anything involving wacking a ball around).

 

Northerly Island is actually a peninsula. It sits between Lake Michigan to the east, while to the west, the inexorable march of money throws longer and longer silhouettes on the Island’s western shore – in the form of taller and taller buildings as the skyward reaching skyline of Chicago creeps ever closely the Island's way

 

There's that coin thing, I think.

 

But, for now, the moon rises over Lake Michigan, big as a supper plate held at arms length, bright as a flashlight shone in the eye. Birds fly about at dusk, insects too: each in search of bits of food tinier than themselves. Animals – real animals; not cats, dogs, squirrels and pigeons – scamper, bound, swoop, hover and clamber about.

 

If you care to look, there will be little bitty bones, bits of fur and bone-dry, empty carapaces slung about in the morning; remnants of the circle of life, circling, catching and eating itself. Water slaps at the shore, wind whistles through leaves, and with true, but quiet grit, stars will manage against the odds, to power their way through light polluted skies.

 

Out here, at least, Life (the kind before cities expelled it) once again runs at full gallop.

 

Bird-watchers, watch. Fishermen, fish. Walkers, walk. The spirit, revitalizes. As for those other ones, the hurried ones - the one’s who are just realizing that they haven’t breathed all day, well, they stop and breathe. So simple a thing...this breathing....yes? No?

 

The Island allows one to feel more human, more connected to this earth than does standing in any one of our manicured parks or kept up beaches; more connected even than when sitting comfortably on the couch, wine glass in hand, viewing the scene through a bay window on the 45th floor of a luxury condo with a Lake view (although the real estate marketing ads might beg to differ).

 

And, we people – just regular people, everyday, plain people, people without money, or political or social clout – get to experience it at ground level.

 

Come see it while it lasts.

 

From the movie, “Dances with Wolves.”

 

Major Fambrough: With your hero's record Sir Good Knight, you can have picked any assignment. Why did you choose such an isolated place? You wish to see the frontier?

 

Lt.John Dunbar (soon to become “Dances with Wolves”): Yes Sir, before it is gone.

 

Main texture by Susan: cathairstudios ~ www.flickr.com/photos/cathairstudios/4979847728/

 

Stars courtesy Pareeerica: www.flickr.com/photos/8078381@N03/sets/72157603745560932/

Bird brushes: Distress Jewell ~ www.flickr.com/photos/jewellofdistressed/

Skeletalmess ~ www.flickr.com/photos/skeletalmess/

There is something about water. Get me around some and I and my camera, are held hostage while being lovingly seduced. Or, in the very least, wondrously hypnotized.

 

sounds of birds by a pond: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jo9zJel3Xh4&feature=PlayList&...

 

Perhaps that is due in part to all of my water, throughout my life, having been – essentially – clean. There are advantages to living in one of the highest-ranking, first-world countries on earth.

 

View On Black (large is nice - gives more of the mood)

 

Not having to fear our environment, our food, or our water certainly ranks pretty high up there as advantages go. Although I sometimes wonder if we’ll truly get that before it is too late.

 

Still, that level of comfort with the absolute necessities certainly does allow one to romanticize things like garbage dumps, industrial sites and stagnant little ponds. After all, I’ve not had to eat from the first, live in the second or fight off the scourge of diarrhea, bacteria and viruses from the latter.

 

No deadly mosquitoes here: just the annoying ones.

 

There is nothing to keep me from giving myself over to a view of a pond seen from a little wooden bridge. I can release myself to a view that seduces me, hypnotizes me, and holds me and my cameras hostage throughout the seasons; but most especially in late spring through summer: the Time of Green, the Time of Plenty.

 

Of course, I thought about all of these things later. At the time I stood there, I can't remember anything I was thinking, or thinking of anything.

 

This is the East Pond, at the North Park Nature Village Center in Chicago, Saturday, June 13, 2009. It is a little jewel, a precious gem, an irresistible tract of natural space nestled in a desperate few acres, in the concrete, glass, steel and iron of the big city.

 

Many visitors pause at this bridge – viewing the east pond or the west. Many take photographs too. But, if musicians hear things in sound that non-musicians don’t, could that also be true of artists and photographers? Might we see things, or see things in ways, that others miss?

 

Maybe I am simply romanticizing my own, few, pitiable skills: it’s been known to happen from time to time. :-)

 

inspired by azzelle: www.flickr.com/photos/azazelle/3613892269/

www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ub_vvLCiw0&feature=em-upload... - Holy Other, "Know Where" - I do appreciate those of you who take the time to read this. It is long, and our attention spans aren't what they once were.

 

We had a storm on Halloween; a good one. Some snow, some sleet, lot’s of wind. 60 – 70 mph winds coming out of the north, blowing straight down the 300+ mile length of Lake Michigan. On the east and west coasts, those are low-end hurricane/typhoon wind speeds. For us in Chicago, these are as good as it gets. Daytime temps were in the 40’s; with the wind chills it felt like the 20’s, a far cry from our normal 55 - 64 degrees for Halloween.

 

When the wind blows from the north, it can push our southern lake water level up two to four feet. That doesn’t sound like much, but our shoreline waters here are shallow, 20 feet on average. That's not deep enough to make tall waves; the extra water transfer from up north helps. As is 4 – 6 foot waves get boating advisories. 8 - 10 footers are newsworthy. These Halloween monster waves were on all TV channels at once.

 

The waves reached up to 20-feet in height; that has happened only once before. To get 20-foot waves means some extraordinary, barely comprehensible energy is being created in the Lake. The top of the tower, the red light, is 20 – 24 feet above the normal water surface level. Normal depth here is 12 - 14 feet. There is a 30-foot wide, concrete seawall at the base of the tower that sits 8 – 10 feet above the water. I’ve never, not seen that platform. I've never seen it under water. I’ve never seen waves this high in my 64+ years of living here. Never.

 

For us, this mimicked the Sea. It was divine and extraordinary, deliciously wild, sublimely chaotic. Because the Lake is so shallow, our waves have no chance to develop a rhyme or rhythm to their movements. They swell and dip and break everywhere in tumultuous disarray; on shore as well as out into the Lake as far as the eye could see. You cannot time the waves or predict where they will crash so as to move back from the shoreline to avoid getting drenched and/or swept out to Sea (where it could be days, weeks or months before you are found - thus it is recommended you wear bright clothing for this; makes finding the body easier :-) ). It is dangerous to stand close to the water’s edge.

 

But how on earth can you not?

 

It’s said there are a hundred ways to die and, you should have no doubt, one or more of those 100 ways has your name in their hands (with a bit of a contest going as to who will get to you first). That being said, well, being swept away to die for ones photographic or video art, or for just plain and simple curiosity, or for the sheer giddiness and idiocy of being so close to something so grand, probably beats a bunch of the other ways that will surely come your way.

 

Of course, I am speaking for myself.

 

I could have resisted, but I choose not to. I suspected I was going to sacrifice a camera here. Water spray, rain and sleet were everywhere, and digital point-and-shoots aren't good bedfellows with water in any form. I only hoped to get some decent images before it said, “Argh, they got me boys, I’m a gonner,” and shut down operations, like the Terminator’s glowing red eye going dim and black when it went got crushed.

 

And digitals aren’t keen on being cold, and trying to focus with nothing to lock onto except smooth sky, clouds, water. Plus I really couldn’t see the viewer too well. All of their functions begin to slow to a crawl under these conditions - kinda' like us. Ah, to hell with it, wing it and just kept moving and shooting.

 

I was out for about 20 minutes and got 148 shots - time enough to get at least four or five good shots with cold-to-numb, cramped, claw-like fingers, I hoped, as well as to get really effing cold, stiff, and wet. I started rapid-fire sneezing; “a cold, the flu, pneumonia, Ebola,” I wondered (ah, the power of mass hysteria and panic).

 

Hey, I was not alone. A continuing parade of fifty or so people heading home from work roared into the parking lot by the Lake. So excited were they, some would jump out of their cars before they completely stopped. There was a palpable passion to look at the water, the waves, the sky, the sun and that big, `ol rainbow playing peek-a-boo over the waves with our collective inner child.

 

Most were wearing work clothes, or lightweight, mild autumn-day weather clothes. Most never saw the wave that got them. A thunderous, deep-throated “Whoomp” is all they heard, then a total body swoosh of water is what they felt. I do love those screams – a mixture of surprise and panic that reverberates up and down the lake shore: “SHIT! F*ck! Eeeek! God Damn! OMG! That’s COOOOLD!”

 

They’d get thoroughly drenched. Some didn't care, and stayed out - a child's sense of determination, exuberance and fool-hardiness. Others, looking like wet, defeated rats, would scamper and splash back to their cars as best they could with icy toes in bubbling-juicy socks in super-saturated, mushy shoes. (Did you know that when regular, leather, dress/work shoes get this wet, upon drying they morph into clogs? They do.)

 

Heaters on full blast, interior like a sauna, they’d drive off with completely fogged windows, fingers squeaking across the glass hoping for one last look back. It was the price of admission to experience this type of joy, feed their curiosity, display their nerve, and nurture their delight in seeing Nature do her thing up close and personal.

 

Not too bad a price to pay, I think - just gettin' cold and wet. At least they could tell their friends, “Hey I was there, in person. I got my pneumonia like a Man; I earned it. (achoo!)”

 

I was wearing the neoprene wading outfit I wear while wading as I fish in rivers, so I was well protected. Protected, but not invulnerable. I got mini –soaked. I think my underwear stayed dry - most of it, anyway – although even a little bit of a cold, wet butt makes for a long, itchy drive home.

 

148 shots later, the camera died. I was pretty much done too. I started my way back to the car, 100 yards of so away. I had to walk head long into that gale force wind to do so. It started sleeting, with bb sized pellets of ice whipping into my face at 60 to 70 mph. They stung like a thousand bees.

 

But I loved it. I laughed and smiled all the while in between my exclamations of ‘oouch, ow, shit, that hurts.” When I got back to the car I was wet, frozen, my face candy-apple red from the sleet, and I’d lost a camera.

 

Yes, I effing loved it.

 

It was an exquisite diversion to make on the drive home from work. And, I got four decent images out of it.

 

Texture courtesy Cleanzor.

 

If that little Canon Powershot does not survive, it will receive a dignified, respectful burial at Sea on the next full moon, right off the end of that pier. 39th St. Pier and Beach, 39th & Lake Shore Drive, Chicago.

 

  

I shall be telling this with a sigh

Somewhere ages and ages hence:

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—

I took the one less traveled by,

And that has made all the difference."

 

Robert Frost

 

Day 2 - Best Viewed Large On Black

 

Tomorrow Day 1 of a new adventure begins for me! I will be off the grid for a while and return early in the new year.... Be seeing you :-)))

 

Many thanks for all your kind comments and faves!

Best seen in Large.

 

'TONIGHT': www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_QffCZs-bg

 

'WEST SIDE STORY' trailer: www.youtube.com/watch?v=yA_aFprGzyc

 

Second Life - JAPAN DREAM KENJIN

...is from the west.

Cause I can't bear to see the man I've been

Come rising up in me again

In the arms of your mercy I find rest

Cause you know just how far the East is from the West

From one scarred hand to the other.

 

Listening to "East to West" by one of my fav bands, Casting Crowns.

 

Just got to know that their concert in the UK is on this weekend! Hopefully can get tix to the concert.

 

Explore Front Page (#5) on 27-Oct. Thanks!

View Large On Black

 

This is a strange sunset phenomena I see once in awhile. The rays such as these here are actually not in the west but are in the east as the sun goes down. They appear to be related to shadows cast by clouds based on this image, but if anyone knows what this effect is called or can explain why it does this-- please do. Edit: and flickr comes through, I knew I could count on the hive mind to find the term! Thanks goes to algo, larigan, and ER Post for finding these are anti-crepuscular rays, fascinating!

 

Note:the rays were not added in photoshop, I emphasized them here with a blend of hdr and non-hdr layers to create the final result. A total of two hdr images composed from 8 exposures 1 ev apart and two original frames were used to create the final result that best shows off the rays in the east to my tastes.

west ham united

boleyn ground

upton park

newham

london

england

:copyright:chris dorley-brown

  

My latest book “The Longest Way Round” available here

  

my website

50mm♥ | Creative | Close Up & Macro | 40+ Fav

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Technical Specs :

Camera: Canon EOS 40D

Lens: Canon EF 50mm F/ 1.8 USM

Focal Length: 50mm

Aperture: F/2.2

Shutter: 1/13 sec

ISO: 100

Exposure: (M) Manual

Other: Flexible Tripod

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My trip 2012 October - USA - Arizona - Navajo Tribal Park

(Album United States)

Here it is, the day visiting Monument Valley started! Just after buying our entrance tickets (not included in the annual pass).

In short, everything is very expensive, once on site.

Anyway, the landscape is what it is!

To make this picture, it is best to wait at the end of ARPEM Indeed, the sun illuminate the three great mounds. (well if I remember correctly)

 

Ca y est, la journée de visite de Monument Valley débuta ! Juste après avoir acheter nos billets d'entrée (non compris dans le pass annuel).

Bref, tout coûte très cher, une fois sur place.

Mais bon, le paysage reste ce qu'il est !!

Pour faire cette photo, il vaut mieux attendre en fin de d'arpem, en effet, le soleil illuminera très bien les 3 buttes. (enfin si mes souvenirs sont bons)

North-South...

Crosses my mind...

A train called "Love".......

 

W w w . R c a s t r o p h o t o . C o m

(Without Words)

  

pART of PhotoPhilosophY

_________________________________

©1999-2006 all Rights reserved, Krystian

 

Please view it on Black

 

Lighthouse

Les Sables d'Olonne (France)

Road - "The Levellers" - Play this track here..

 

¿Whats this iPod Shuffle set all about? Read about it here

 

See this shot on Alamy here

 

The Levellers are an English rock band, founded in 1988 and based in Brighton, England. Their musical style is was influenced by punk and traditional/folk music. It is unclear whether the band got its name from a democratic faction of Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army; or according to guitarist, Simon Friend, was chosen from a dictionary.

 

They are Mark Chadwick, Jeremy Cunningham, Charlie Heather, Simon Friend, Jonathan Sevink and Matt Savage. Originally, all of the band's earnings being put together in a fund from which the members were paid the same amount every day.

 

1991 saw the release of their second album, Levelling the Land, the source of this track. The LP was a massive success, entering the charts at number 14. The anthemic single "One Way", despite not reaching the Top 40, became a popular song and live favourite for years to come among the travelling and indie community. Levelling the Land is often cited as an all-time classic amongst people who were students or travellers in the early 1990s.

 

The band are still active. For a good starting point, track down 'One Way of Life: The Very Best of The Levellers'. Tell 'em I sent you :-)

 

------------------------

 

During the Jacobite rising of 1745, Edinburgh was briefly occupied by Jacobite forces before their march into England. Following their ultimate defeat at the Battle of Culloden, near Inverness, there was a period of reprisals and pacification, largely directed at the Catholic Highlanders.

 

In Edinburgh the Hanoverian monarch attempted to gain favour by supporting new developments to the north of the castle, naming streets in honour of the King and his family; George Street, Frederick Street, Hanover Street and Princes Street shown in this image at dusk, named in honour of George III's two sons.

 

The historic centre of Edinburgh is divided into two by the broad green swath of Princes Street Gardens. To the south the view is dominated by Edinburgh Castle, perched atop the extinct volcanic crag, and the long sweep of the Old Town trailing after it along the ridge. To the north lies Princes Street and the New Town. The gardens were begun in 1816 on bogland which had once been the Nor Loch.

 

One of the Edinburgh tramlines can be seen on the right. Edinburgh Trams is a forthcoming tramway system which is currently under construction in Edinburgh, Scotland. It will be the first tram system in Edinburgh since the city’s previous network, Edinburgh Corporation Tramways, shut down in 1956.

 

The new tram system was originally scheduled to come into operation in July 2011, but the estimated completion date is now 2014, and will initially consist of one line running east-west across the city. Further extensions are planned. Originally budgeted at a cost of £375 million in 2003, the tram system is now anticipated to cost over £600 million.

 

Checkout more Scots stuff from my photostream.

 

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(c) TonySmith Hotpix / HotpixUK

 

( artl )

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Pulpit Rock is coastal feature near the southern tip of the Isle of Portland, Dorset, England. The artificial stack of rock was left in the 1870s after a natural arch was cut away by quarrymen at the Bill Quarry on the famous headland, Portland Bill. The geological succession up from sea level is: Portland Cherty Series (up to the level of the neighbouring quarried platform), then Portland Freestone (the oolitic limestone quarried inland of Pulpit Rock), then a cap of thin-bedded limestones which are part of the basal Purbeck Formation.

 

The Jurassic Coast stretches over a distance of 153 kilometres (95 mi), from Orcombe Point near Exmouth, in the west, to Old Harry Rocks on the Isle of Purbeck, in the east.The coastal exposures along the coastline provide a continuous sequence of Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous rock formations spanning approximately 185 million years of the Earths history. The localities along the Jurassic Coast includes a large range of important fossil zones.

 

Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II; Lens: EF17-40mm f/4L USM; Focal length: 17.00 mm; Aperture: 22; Exposure time: 25.0 s; ISO: 50

 

All rights reserved - Copyright :copyright: Lucie Debelkova - www.luciedebelkova.com

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

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You May License This Image Here Getty Images or one of my others here All Getty Images by HBMike2000

  

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Fifty steps east from my front door is west. There the desert sun shines through clouds that are dropping snow on the mountains around me. I smiled, picked a bug out of my teeth and took my shot for Flickr Friday's Walk 50 Steps and Shoot. Is it any wonder why I moved here.

 

View on black or I'll make you eat a bug

 

for

Flickr Friday: Walk 50 Steps And Shoot

 

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Isfahan is located on the main north-south and east-west routes crossing Iran, and was once one of the largest cities in the world. It flourished from 1050 to 1722, particularly in the 16th century under the Safavid dynasty, when it became the capital of Persia for the second time in its history. Even today, the city retains much of its past glory. It is famous for its Islamic architecture, with many beautiful boulevards, covered bridges, palaces, mosques, and minarets. This led to the Persian proverb "'Esfahān nesf-e jahān ast" (Isfahan is half of the world).

 

Sheikh Lotf Allah Mosque (Masjed-e Sheikh Lotf-o-llah in Persian or مسجد شيخ لطف الّله ) or Ladies' Mosque is one of the architectural masterpieces of Safavid Iranian architecture, standing in eastern part Naghsh-i Jahan Square, Isfahan, Iran. It was built in 1615 by the orders of Shah Abbas I of the Safavid dynasty. The architect (Mimar) of the edifice was Muhammad Reza ibn Ustad Hosein Banna Isfahani. He finished construction of the mosque in 1618.

 

Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Lens focal length: 17.00 - 40.00 mm, Photo Focal length: 17.00 mm, Aperture: 4.0, Exposure time: 1/20 s, ISO: 1600

 

All rights reserved - Copyright © Lucie Debelkova www.luciedebelkova.com

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

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Buachaille Etive Mòr (Scottish Gaelic: Buachaille Eite Mòr, meaning "the great herdsman of Etive"), generally known to climbers simply as The Buachaille or The Beuckle, is a mountain at the head of Glen Etive in the Highlands of Scotland. Its almost perfect pyramidal form, as seen from the A82 road when travelling towards Glen Coe, makes it one of the most recognisable mountains in Scotland, and one of the most depicted on postcards and calendars. Buachaille Etive Mòr takes the form of a ridge nearly five miles (8 km) in length, almost entirely encircled by the River Etive and its tributaries. The ridge contains four principal tops: from north-east to south-west these are Stob Dearg (1022 m), Stob na Doire (1011 m), Stob Coire Altruim (941 m) and Stob na Bròige (956 m). Stob Dearg and Stob na Bròige are both Munros; the latter was promoted to Munro status by the Scottish Mountaineering Club in 1997.

 

The steep, craggy north-eastern face of Stob Dearg forms the classic aspect of the mountain as seen from the Kings House Hotel, and constitutes the most direct route of ascent for climbers and scramblers. Buachaille Etive Mòr is separated from its sister mountain of Buachaille Etive Beag to the west by the valley of Lairig Gartain. To the east lies Glen Etive, which provides an alternative route of ascent, heading up steep grassy slopes to the summit of Stob na Bròige.

 

Those of you that know Scotland well, know that this is rather classic view of this place, however who could resist....

 

Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II; Lens: 17.00 - 40.00 mm; Focal length: 17.00 mm; Aperture: 20; Exposure time: 32.0 s; ISO: 100

 

All rights reserved - Copyright © Lucie Debelkova www.luciedebelkova.com

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

Picture: Vanessa (East-Ouest)

Post treatment: Myself

 

Many thanks to my talented and gorgeous flickr friend East-Ouest for letting me using her picture for my experimentations-).

 

flickr.com/photos/east-west

  

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Isle of Skye - The Quirang is a fascinating rock formation on the Trotternish peninsula on Skye. It is approximately two miles north west of Staffin and six miles south east of Rubha Hunish. The Quiraing is a spectacular landslip on the eastern face of Meall na Suiramach, the northernmost summit of the Trotternish Ridge on the Isle of Skye. The whole of the Trotternish Ridge escarpment was formed by a great series of landslips; the Quiraing is the only part of the slip still moving, the road at its base near Flodigarry requires repairs each year.

 

The Trotternish Ridge lies on Skye's northernmost peninsula known as Trotternish. The northernmost summit on this ridge is known as the Quirang which has a fantastic maze of pinnacles, cliffs and flat grass tables that were formed by an ancient landslide of biblical proportions. From below these cliffs look huge, upon closer inspection you find many intricacies - scree slopes provide entrances to reveal an intricate maze of deep chasms and huge rock walls.

 

While looking at my photostream lately I realized I that hardly post any photos with any green color in them. No surprise I guess as there is hardly anything green in the Middle East. As I'm starting to prepare next trip to Scotland this June I went through some last year photos. Those of you that think that you'll come to Isle of Skye and you'll be welcomed by light like this, might be disappointed. You can get your share of rain rather than this wonderful light. Even thought the plan was to hike for one whole day around Quirang, the reality was that due to the weather condition we had only one early morning with such a wonderful light. I nearly didn't have enough strength to get out of bed after several days of late night shooting and early mornings. Mind you that sunset is around 11PM and sunrise around 4AM in June, you can imagine how much sleep you get when always try to capture the best light. Landscape photography is not an easy job, but with results like this it is definitely worth it.

 

PENTAX K20D, f/5.6, 0.011 sec (1/90), ISO 100, 26.9 mm

 

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All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

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If you always thought that Dead Sea is a kind of middle eastern peaceful pond where you will just float while reading your book (I did when I first came there few years back), think again. Early months of the year in Middle East can be rather stormy and we had experienced some snow in Jordan too. Weather across GCC was very changeable for last few weeks, which means the hot wave is just behind the door… and there we come again… 30C+,…. 40C+,…. 50C+….

 

The Dead Sea (Hebrew: יָם הַ‏‏מֶ‏ּ‏לַ‏ח‎, Yām Ha-Melaḥ, "Sea of Salt"; Arabic: البَحْر المَيّت‎, al-Baḥr l-Mayyit, "Dead Sea") is a salt lake between Israel and the West Bank to the west, and Jordan to the east. It is 422 metres (1,385 ft) below sea level, and its shores are the lowest point on the surface of the Earth on dry land. The Dead Sea is 378 m (1,240 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. It is also one of the world's saltiest bodies of water, with 33.7 percent salinity. Only Lake Assal (Djibouti), Garabogazköl and some hypersaline lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica (such as Don Juan Pond and perhaps Lake Vanda) have a higher salinity. It is 8.6 times as salty as the ocean. This salinity makes for a harsh environment where animals cannot flourish, hence its name. The Dead Sea is 67 kilometres (42 mi) long and 18 kilometres (11 mi) wide at its widest point. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River.

 

Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II; Lens: 17.00 - 40.00 mm; Focal length: 24.00 mm; Aperture: 8.0; Exposure time: 1/125 s; ISO: 100

 

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All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

National Gallery of Art, Washington DC, USA.

Walkway from the West Building to the East Building.

 

facebook page support highly appreciated! :)

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The Seven Sisters are a series of chalk cliffs by the English Channel. They form part of the South Downs in East Sussex, between the towns of Seaford and Eastbourne in southern England. They are within the Seven Sisters Country Park. They are the remnants of dry valleys in the chalk South Downs, which are gradually being eroded by the sea.

 

I had a chance to try various Canon gear in recent weeks. This shot is taken with the new 6D which is lovely full frame with GPS and WIFI... any travel photographer's dream.

 

Camera Model: Canon EOS 6D; Lens: EF17-40mm f/4L USM; Focal length: 24.00 mm; Aperture: 22; Exposure time: 30.0 s; ISO: 100

 

All rights reserved - Copyright © Lucie Debelkova www.luciedebelkova.com

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

Spring tide: A variation on yesterday's theme. Slightly different position, but this time an HDR. A blend of three exposures. I've overlayed the composite with some of the original exposures to retain detail and remove noise.

 

View Large On Black

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Bahrain Financial Harbor (commonly abbreviated as BFH) is a large-scale commercial development project, currently under construction in Manama, the capital of Bahrain. The commercial complex is located next to the King Faisal Highway, near many popular landmarks such as the Bahrain WTC, Abraj Al Lulu, Pearl Roundabout and the National Bank of Bahrain. Majority of the project is being constructed on reclaimed land. The two tallest twin-towers (Commercial East and Commercial West) are currently listed as the tallest completed towers in Bahrain, with a height of 260 m (853 ft) with 54 floors.

 

Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Lens: EF24-105mm f/4L IS USM, Photo Focal length: 35.00 mm, Aperture: 14, Exposure time: 32.0 s, ISO: 100

 

All rights reserved - Copyright :copyright: Lucie Debelkova - www.luciedebelkova.com

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

I had the opportunity to see the area of the Slide Rock Fire from the air. I was quite please. The fire burned the underbrush and left most of the trees alive. One of our favorites, West Fork State Park , is very smoky hopefully from the fires on the plateau. The large trees appeared to be spared. Basically the underbrush is smoldering and will continue burning until the monsoon rains come in July. This photo is west looking east.

  

Thank you Ted! Ted Grussing, is the extraordinary pilot of a Lambada motor glider and a World Class aerial photographer. To see Ted’s work on the slide fire between Sedona and Flagstaff: arizonahighways.wordpress.com/2014/05/22/contributors-ted...

  

tedandcorky.com and tedgrussing.com

   

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Hadrian's Wall (Latin: Vallum Aelium, "Aelian Wall") was a defensive fortification in Roman Britain. Begun in AD 122, during the rule of emperor Hadrian, it was the first of two fortifications built across Great Britain, the second being the Antonine Wall, lesser known of the two because its physical remains are less evident today. The wall was the most heavily fortified border in the Empire. In addition to its role as a military fortification, it is thought that many of the gates through the wall would have served as customs posts to allow trade and levy taxation.

 

Reasons for the construction of the wall vary, and the exact explanation has never been recorded. However, a number of theories have been presented by historians, primarily centering around an expression of Roman power and Hadrian's policy of defense before expansion. For example, on his accession to the throne in 117, Hadrian had been experiencing rebellion in Roman Britain and from the peoples of various conquered lands across the Empire, including Egypt, Judea, Libya, Mauretania. These troubles may have had a hand in Hadrian's plan to construct the wall, and his construction of limes in other areas of the Empire, but to what extent is unknown.

 

A significant portion of the wall still exists, particularly the mid-section, and for much of its length the wall can be followed on foot by Hadrian's Wall Path or by cycle on National Cycle Route 72. It is the most popular tourist attraction in Northern England. It was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.

 

Hadrian's Wall was 80 Roman miles (73 statute miles or 120 km) long, its width and height dependent on the construction materials which were available nearby. East of River Irthing the wall was made from squared stone and measured 3 metres (9.7 ft) wide and five to six metres (16–20 ft) high, while west of the river the wall was made from turf and measured 6 metres (20 ft) wide and 3.5 metres (11.5 ft) high. This does not include the wall's ditches, berms and forts. The central section measured eight Roman feet wide (7.8 ft or 2.4 m) on a 10-foot (3.0 m) base. Some parts of this section of the wall survive to a height of 10 feet (3.0 m).

 

I wanted to visit Hadrain's wall for a long time and finally I had a chance to walk along this incredible place that is equally impressive as a human effort and natural sight. I purposely picked this shot with a couple walking along the wall to give the scene true scale.

 

Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II; Lens: EF70-200mm f/4L IS USM; Focal length: 180.00 mm; Aperture: 5.6; Exposure time: 1/250 s; ISO: 100

 

All rights reserved - Copyright :copyright: Lucie Debelkova - www.luciedebelkova.com

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

West Pier ruins shortly after sunset, Brighton, UK.

 

Single exposure with hard-edged ND graduated filters (.6 + .9, the latter used as a "flat" ND filter).

 

Check out my www.facebook.com/photoss.net for info on workshops, background stories and other landscape related stuff.

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Wahiba Sands lies in the eastern region of Oman. The sands stretch from north to south 180 kilometres, east to west 80 kilometres, with high dunes, extensive woodlands and an unspoiled coastline. Some of the sand dunes are 100 meters in height. Total land area is approximately 12,000 square kilometres with about 3,000 Bedu of varying tribal origins including Janabah, Mawalik, Hikman, Amr and Wahiba.

 

I was walking around Wahiba Sand dunes sea, starting to think how many more different desert photos I can take, having recently been in 4 different deserts across Arabia. To my surprise in a minute after this thought, strong wind started to blow, creating fantastic new opportunities.

 

PENTAX K20D, f/9.5, 0.006 sec (1/180), ISO 100, 130 mm

 

All rights reserved - Copyright © Lucie Debelkova - www.luciedebelkova.com

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

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Middle East - Sultanate of Oman - Dhofar Province - Salalah Area - صلالة - Ṣalālah - Rakhyut - Rakhyot - Beach village on scenic coastal location along Indian Ocean surrounded by rugged mountains during Khareef - Rainy Season bringing misty & foggy weather

 

Salalah and Dhofar region offers visitors an enormous variety of things to see and do. The natural beauty of the surrounding area is breathtaking. You can witness the stunning views of dramatic mountains reaching right to the edge of the sea. You can experience wadis and beaches as well as the springs. Salalah is a coastal city located on the shores of the Indian Ocean, in the southern part of Oman. Although close to the Arabian desert, Salalah enjoys a pleasant tropical climate and even in the summer the temperatures are not too hot as the coastal fringe of Dhofar and Salalah is touched by the winds of the southwest monsoon between June and September. The surface winds encourage an upwelling of colder waters in the Indian Ocean which cool the over-lying moisture-laden air. The fog cools temperatures considerably, such that Salalah is a popular destination for Gulf visitors in the summer as a respite from the relentless heat. The phenomenon of this rain-bearing fog is known locally as the Khareef.

 

This photo is taken at Dhalkut beach during Khareef season. Dhalkut is located on the far west of Dhofar and has enjoyed its own merchant sea trade with the ports of the Gulf and Yemen, exporting leather, honey, figs and frankincense. This wilayat has many springs which burst forth from the wadis of the Jebel al Qamar (Mountains of the Moon). The caves and grottos in the area have provided shepherds and flocks with safe refuge from adverse weather conditions for centuries. Dalkut is 160 Kilometres west of Salalah. To reach it, you drive to al Mughsail, then up the steep winding Aqeeshan road to the Niyabat of Shahb As'eeb in the Wilayat of Rakhyut and from there to Wadi Seeq and Dalkut. The seas off Dalkut's rocky shore are full of fish and crustaceans.

 

Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Lens: EF17-40mm f/4L USM, Photo Focal length: 24.00 mm, Aperture: 11, Exposure time: 1/320 s, ISO: 100

 

All rights reserved - Copyright :copyright: Lucie Debelkova - www.luciedebelkova.com

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis) on East Head (National Trust), West Wittering, West Sussex England

East to West Video

  

Here I am Lord and I'm drowning

In your sea of forgetfulness

The chains of yesterday surround me

I yearn for peace and rest

I don't want to end up where you found me

And it echoes in my mind

Keeps me awake tonight

 

I know you've cast my sins as far

As the East is from the West

And I stand before you now

As though I've never sinned but today

I feel like I'm just one mistake away

From you leaving me this way

 

Jesus can you show me

Just how far the East is from the West

Cause I can't bear to see the man I've been

Come rising up in me again

In the arms of your mercy I find rest

Cause you know just how far the East is from the West

From one scar[r]ed hand to the other

 

I start the day the war begins

Endless reminding of my sin

Time and time again

Your [T]ruth is drowned out by the storm I'm in

Today I feel like I'm just one mistake away

From you leaving me this way

 

Jesus can you show me

Just how far the East is from the West

Cause I can't bear to see the man I've been

Come rising up in me again

In the arms of your mercy I find rest

Cause you know just how far the East is from the West

From one scar[r]ed hand to the other

 

I know you've washed me white

Turned my darkness into light

I need your peace to get me through

To get me through this night

I can't live by what I feel

But by the truth your word reveals

I'm not holding on to you

But your holding on to me

Your holding on to me

 

Jesus, you know just how far

The East is from the West

I don't have to see the man I've been

Come rising up in me again

In the arms of your mercy I find rest

(The arms of your mercy I find rest)

Cause you know just how far the East is from the West

From one scar[r]ed hand to the other(x2)

 

(Just how far, the East is from the West) (x3)

 

From one scarred hand to the other

   

Copyright© 2009 Kamoteus/RonMiguel RN

This image is protected under the United States and International Copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without written permission.

“Still round the corner there may wait

A new road or a secret gate

And though I oft have passed them by

A day will come at last when I

Shall take the hidden paths that run

West of the Moon, East of the Sun.”

― J.R.R. Tolkien

 

roid week day four

 

- impossible project color film for 600

- impossible instant lab

- jet in carina by STScI

 

it's RoidWeek 2014: RoidWeek 2014 Group

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Buachaille Etive Mòr (Scottish Gaelic: Buachaille Eite Mòr, meaning "the great herdsman of Etive"), generally known to climbers simply as The Buachaille or The Beuckle, is a mountain at the head of Glen Etive in the Highlands of Scotland. Its almost perfect pyramidal form, as seen from the A82 road when travelling towards Glen Coe, makes it one of the most recognisable mountains in Scotland, and one of the most depicted on postcards and calendars. Buachaille Etive Mòr takes the form of a ridge nearly five miles (8 km) in length, almost entirely encircled by the River Etive and its tributaries. The ridge contains four principal tops: from north-east to south-west these are Stob Dearg (1022 m), Stob na Doire (1011 m), Stob Coire Altruim (941 m) and Stob na Bròige (956 m). Stob Dearg and Stob na Bròige are both Munros; the latter was promoted to Munro status by the Scottish Mountaineering Club in 1997.

 

The steep, craggy north-eastern face of Stob Dearg forms the classic aspect of the mountain as seen from the Kings House Hotel, and constitutes the most direct route of ascent for climbers and scramblers. Buachaille Etive Mòr is separated from its sister mountain of Buachaille Etive Beag to the west by the valley of Lairig Gartain. To the east lies Glen Etive, which provides an alternative route of ascent, heading up steep grassy slopes to the summit of Stob na Bròige.

 

Those of you that know Scotland well, know that this is rather classic view of this place. Even though I have been to Scotland many times by now, this was the first time I have actually found this location. The only trouble was that this summer was extremely dry across Scotland so when I finally found this place for the first time, there was nearly no water flowing through the stream/river. I was very disappointed as I was really looking forward to capture this view myself. Luckily on our way back from Isle of Skye, some rain has fallen which brought the water back to where it belongs. This shot was taken late evening (22.15PM) with sun setting behind the mountain. 60 sec exposure time allowed to take enough light and smooth the waterfall with clouds really nicely.

 

Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Lens: EF17-40mm f/4L USM, Photo Focal length: 23.00 mm, Aperture: 20, Exposure time: 60.0 s, ISO: 125

 

All rights reserved - Copyright :copyright: Lucie Debelkova - www.luciedebelkova.com

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

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Isle of Skye - The Quirang is a fascinating rock formation on the Trotternish peninsula on Skye. It is approximately two miles north west of Staffin and six miles south east of Rubha Hunish. The Quiraing is a spectacular landslip on the eastern face of Meall na Suiramach, the northernmost summit of the Trotternish Ridge on the Isle of Skye. The whole of the Trotternish Ridge escarpment was formed by a great series of landslips; the Quiraing is the only part of the slip still moving, the road at its base near Flodigarry requires repairs each year.

 

The Trotternish Ridge lies on Skye's northernmost peninsula known as Trotternish. The northernmost summit on this ridge is known as the Quirang which has a fantastic maze of pinnacles, cliffs and flat grass tables that were formed by an ancient landslide of biblical proportions. From below these cliffs look huge, upon closer inspection you find many intricacies - scree slopes provide entrances to reveal an intricate maze of deep chasms and huge rock walls.

 

While looking at my photostream lately I realized I that hardly post any photos with any green color in them. No surprise I guess as there is hardly anything green in the Middle East. As I'm starting to prepare next trip to Scotland this June I went through some last year photos. Those of you that think that you'll come to Isle of Skye and you'll be welcomed by light like this, might be disappointed. You can get your share of rain rather than this wonderful light. Even thought the plan was to hike for one whole day around Quirang, the reality was that due to the weather condition we had only one early morning with such a wonderful light. I nearly didn't have enough strength to get out of bed after several days of late night shooting and early mornings. Mind you that sunset is around 11PM and sunrise around 4AM in June, you can imagine how much sleep you get when always try to capture the best light. Landscape photography is not an easy job, but with results like this it is definitely worth it.

 

PENTAX K20D, f/4.5, 0.033 sec (1/30), ISO 100, 14 mm

 

All rights reserved - Copyright © Lucie Debelkova www.luciedebelkova.com

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

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Isle of Skye - The Quirang is a fascinating rock formation on the Trotternish peninsula on Skye. It is approximately two miles north west of Staffin and six miles south east of Rubha Hunish. The Quiraing is a spectacular landslip on the eastern face of Meall na Suiramach, the northernmost summit of the Trotternish Ridge on the Isle of Skye. The whole of the Trotternish Ridge escarpment was formed by a great series of landslips; the Quiraing is the only part of the slip still moving, the road at its base near Flodigarry requires repairs each year.

 

The Trotternish Ridge lies on Skye's northernmost peninsula known as Trotternish. The northernmost summit on this ridge is known as the Quirang which has a fantastic maze of pinnacles, cliffs and flat grass tables that were formed by an ancient landslide of biblical proportions. From below these cliffs look huge, upon closer inspection you find many intricacies - scree slopes provide entrances to reveal an intricate maze of deep chasms and huge rock walls.

 

PENTAX K20D, f/5.6, 0.022 sec (1/45), ISO 100, 14 mm

 

All rights reserved - Copyright © Lucie Debelkova - www.luciedebelkova.com

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

Liverpool Anglican Cathedral

 

The cathedral has approximately 1700 m² of stained glass. The most splendid is the Great West Window standing at 52 feet, it was designed by Carl Edwards in 1979. The bridge spanning the central space is called the Dulverton Bridge.

 

The Nave has a height of 116ft (35.3 metres)

 

The interior of the cathedral is built in the Gothic Revival style.

 

Pink Floyd - Another Brick In The Wall

 

Thank you for your visit and your comments, they are greatly appreciated.

© All rights reserved 2012. Please do not use my images without my explicit permission.

 

Explore No. 19 My highest yet! Thanks everyone! :)

 

I'd recommend going LARGE for this shot!

 

Went down to Brighton for a few hours today, enjoyed some fish and chips! This is the West Pier at Brighton, it's been like this for a while now. I've gone for a different angle to the usual shot taken by many people here, I felt composing like this added a good leading line towards the pier.

Used te 10 stop filter to get a long exposure for that milky effect on the water!

 

Comments + Faves appreciated.

 

If you are interested in purchasing any images of mine they are available for Royalty Free purchasing. Please Flickr Mail or Email (olliesmalleyphotography@gmail.com) me for pricing.

 

Enjoy!

 

...[ Camera ] ... Canon 550D.

...[ Lens ] ... Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 @ 20mm. (Cropped)

...[ Settings ] ... 10" @ f/16, ISO 100.

...[ Editing ] ... Tweaked in LR4.

...[ Filters ] ... Hitech 10 Stop ND Filter.

 

...[ Olly's Flickr ]...[Facebook]...[Time-Lapse]...

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Rannoch Moor as a place of wonder, one of the last really wild places in Scotland. Imagine a triangular area, stood on its apex, about 10 miles across its base and about 10 miles from top to bottom. Imagine that this 50 square mile inverted triangle is a roughly level plateau that sits at an altitude of a little over 1000ft. Imagine that its surface is dotted with innumerable lochs, lochans, peat bogs, and streams; that it is surrounded by mountains that rise to over 3000ft to the south-east and the west and to over 2000ft in the north. And, finally, imagine that this area is crossed by a railway line, running a little inside the south-east side of the triangle, and a single road, running a little inside the south-west side of the triangle. Congratulations: you've just invented Rannoch Moor.

 

Most people first see Rannoch Moor when driving north from Bridge of Orchy. Near Achallader the main road and the railway line diverge and the road makes a sweeping climb up to the Rannoch Moor plateau. What you find there can be a glory of heather and lochan surrounded by distant mountains. Or it can be a grey cloud-shrouded landscape through which you catch occasional glimpses of an other-worldly landscape. If Achallader marks the southern apex of Rannoch Moor's triangle, then the other two are equally distinctive. In the north-east lies Rannoch Station and the end of the public road in from Pitlochry, 40 miles to the east.

 

PENTAX K20D, f/5.6, 0.033 sec (1/30), ISO 200, 14 mm

 

All rights reserved - Copyright :copyright: Lucie Debelkova

 

All images are exclusive property and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transmitted, manipulated or used in any way without expressed, written permission of the photographer.

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