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The Gates of Grand Dukes and Duchesses of Russia, part of the Peter and Paul Cathedral. The Mint. To the right of the gate is the Botniy house. Sobornaya Ploshchad (Cathedral Square) of the Peter and Paul Fortress. Zayachy Island. St. Petersburg.

 

Ворота Великокняжеской усыпальницы рядом с православным Петропавловским собором. Монетный двор. Справа за воротами - Ботный дом. Соборная площадь Петропавловской крепости. Заячий остров. Санкт-Петербург

The Grand Ducal Burial Vault is the purpose-built mausoleum of the Grand Dukes and Duchesses of Russia in the Peter and Paul Fortress. The Neo-Baroque domed structure is frequently mistaken for a part of the Peter and Paul Cathedral due to architectural similarities. A covered passageway leads from the mausoleum to the cathedral, where the Russian emperors and empresses lie in state.

 

The building was designed by David Grimm in 1896. It was constructed in order to remove the remains of some of the non-reigning Romanovs from the cathedral where there was scarcely any room for new burials. Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia was the first to be interred in the mausoleum in 1908. The bones of eight other royals were brought to the vault from the cathedral. The last burial, that of Grand Duke Constantine Constantinovich of Russia, took place seven years later.

 

The mausoleum was expected to hold up to sixty tombs, but by the time of the Russian Revolution there were only thirteen. The Soviets destroyed the uniform tombs with a view to converting the building into a city history museum; the tombs were later restored. Grand Duke Vladimir Kirillovich was buried in the Grand Ducal Mausoleum in 1992. The remains of his parents, Grand Duke Cyril Vladimirovich and Grand Duchess Viktoria Feodorovna, were transferred from Schloss Rosenau three years later. His wife, Grand Duchess Leonida Georgievna was buried there in 2010

 

See St Petersburg here

 

Peter and Paul Fortress, St Petersburg, Russia

Lots of strange people and monsters on the town hall of Brussels (1402 - ).

Large is better.

 

The entire facade is decorated with a total of 203 little statues representing the Dukes and Duchesses of Brabant who ruled the dukedom between the year 580 and 1564.

 

Maybe I should decorate my house the same way with my famous ancestors.

Title: California agriculturist and live stock journal

Identifier: californiaagricu6182sanjrich

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Agriculture -- California; Livestock -- California; Animal industry -- California

Publisher: San Jose

Contributing Library: The Bancroft Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

California Agriculturist and Live Stock Journal, you cannot come in here alone without mon- ey ?" Alas ! Minnie had forgotten, or was too young to understaud, that money is power, and is more necessary to make one's way through the world than anything else. She was asked where her home was and led to the returning car and sent back to town. Heart-broken and almost crying aloud, the little girl sadly took her seat and forgot all about her fine clothes in her disappoint- ment at not being allowed admittance into her favorite resort. Woodward's Gardens. The car soon passed the corner where Minnie lived, and the kind condnctor let her out and smiled at the child's frankness in acknowledging that she had no money or car ticket. She stepped down and sheepishly slipped into the house by the side gate. She found the house in an uproar because Minnie was gone, and when mamma espied the little iigure entering the dining-room decked out in borrowed finery, in spite of her anxiety and annoyance, she threw herself backwards upon the lounge and clasping her hands laughed outright. Minnie stood on the threshold looking from her mamma to nurse and then to the cook, and never ventured to smile. Then, turning on her heel, she lied upstairs, muttering to henself, "cheated out of it this time, but the first chance I get I'm going again, but I'll take her pvirse next time and then nobody'U know that I aint a lady; so there!" Letters From the Young Folks. Dear Uncle Ben:—Are you truly Uncle Ben to all the boys and girls whoso fathers and mothers take the Aqbiculturist? but you can't be Uncle Ben to everybody, I guess, for Johnny, a boy I know, says his Uncle Ned is not uncle to anybody but him. I would not be so mean if I was he, would you? And what for do you ask us children to write you a letter ? is it because you like children? Haven't you got any of your own? If you had I guess you would not care for any one else's to bother you. . I cannot write very good but mamma says I'm a master hand at asking questions, and tire her out. How can I help it, I should like to know. If folks didn't ask questions how could they ever know things that don't come in books. I should never know anything, I do believe, for I do not love to read very much. I sup- pose that is because I always have to stop and spell the big words, and that makes me forget what it was all about. I don't know how to write letters to anybody; but once our girl got sister to write a letter to her mother in Ireland and told her just what to say, and it began this way—"I now take my pen in hand to write to you," I thought that a funny way to begin. Of course a body knows that a letter written in ink must be written with a pen in the hand. But I forgot what I was going to tell you when I commenced this letter. First, I want to tell you about a little girl I know named Fanny, who has a little brother Jim. One day they went out somewhere with their papa and saw a little tiny man who was just like a small boy cU'essed up in little men's clothes. When Fanny came home she told her mother about him like this: "And he had a little coat and vest, and a little watch and chain, and he had a little cane and a little stove-pipe hat, and little boots and a little great coat, and a cigar in his mouth. He was suck a funny little man!" Then Jimmy came up and said, " and he had a itty toat, and he had itty pants, and he had itty boots on his feet, and he had a itty tane, and he had a itty hat on lop of his head, and a shrc-pipc iti. Iiis niuuf; such a funny itty man. Mammal" How everybody laughed! I mean to get Fanny to write to you some day, and tell you about her littlo brother who makes us laugh so much. I wonder if you are tall and slim, with black beard like a shoebrush under your nose. Maybe you are like Grandpa, without any hair on your head or face except behind your ears. I wish I could see you, for I do believe you are real jolly and laugh all over when you hear anything funny. I lilce jolly folks who don't be cross to children. I often won- der if some folks ever were little boys and girls, they are so cross to little folks now. But there's the dinner-bell so I miist run. Pa says we must never be late to dinner, so good- bye. From your niece you've never seen, Gekty W. Dear Uncle Ben:—I thought I would write you a few lines about my home in Santa Maria Valley and what we are doing. At pres- ent I am out on vacation. I stay at home and mother, and I run the ranch whie father is off with his thresher. It would make you laugh to see me get on the old mule to drive in the cows. We milk eleven night and morning. But the funniest part of all is to see me shoot gophers. The first time I ever shot ofl' a gun I saw an old gopher right in the middle of my flpwer-gar- den. I went to the house and got the gun and got all ready to shoot, when I thought it might kick me over like it did father once ; but then I did not care much, so I shut both my eyes, commenced to shake, pulled the trigger and shot the gopher. That gave me courage to " try, try again," and I can shoot them every time now. We have a few horses, cows, sheep and hogs which are all pets. AVhen we go in the field where they are they all come to us to be petted. Sometimes wo will take no no- tice of them just to see the fun. Then the horses will commence to pull oxir clothes, the cows will rub around and the sheep pull at our fingers, and they will keep it up till we pet them. We have a nice school-house down here, and have good times when we go to school. We have a paper in school. It is called the Youth's Assistance and all the scholars write for it. And now, Uncle Ben, you must please ex- cuse bad writing, for although I am fourteen I have not had the advantages of school that city girls have had, and I know I am a very poor writer. If Jewell had not had so many receipts for making bread I should have sent her one, for I can make good bread. Next month I hope my letter will be more interesting, for I wlU have more time. Ella. Dear Uncle Bcn:^l heard the folks say you would like little boys and girls to send you letters to put in print in the Agkicultce- IST. I have to herd the cattle in the field. We have fourteen cattle and I have got a Ut- ile saddle to ride with. I know two girls that are afraid of a hen, but I am not a coward. I can ride on horsebrck. We have got a little kitten that climbs up on our clothes. I have got a little writing-desk, and I am in the little spelling-class. I have a little looking-glass, too. At school I study pretty hard and never play. I have a tin water-cart and I play with the greyhound. We have a barn full of hay and the hens lay eggs in it. Goodbye. E0OENE WOODHAMS.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

The Leading Breeds of Cattle. BEEF BEEED3 THE SHOBT-HOENS. ^T is unnecesary to give any detailed ac- count of the origin and history of these celebrated cattle. Wherever beef is con- sumed—and where is it not?—they have played an important part in supplying the wants of man. They are known from one end of the country to the other as the Koyal Family among cattle; and no breed dares dispute with them their merited posi- tion at the head of the list. The Short-horn has been termed the rich man's breed; and at present prices the "fancy" of his kind could hardly become the property of a poor man without bankrupting him. There is a mania just now for Dukes and Duchesses, and mat- ter-of-fact farmers are disposed to discover something fishy about the immense prices realized, at recent sales for members of this family. There is no reason, however, why we should mark a man a fool because, for reasons best known to himself, he chooses to invest a largo sum of money in a small amouut of beef. He may have Ughts before him which have not shone upon us; and although we may not choose to go and do likewise, we have no special interest in the matter, and can act upon our own instincts. We cannot indulge ourselves in such expensive luxuries as Duch- esses and Dukes; but we can, .at a small out- lay, replace every scrub bull that ranges the prairies with a well-bred yearling or two-year- old Short-horn. That will commence the era of reform from the time he steps among the herd. The natural home of the Short-horn is on the rich grass lands of the West. Here he thrives amazingly. At two years old he has so waxed in strength and fatness that he is prepared for the shambles, when the scrub- stock of the country is lingering between beef and veal. That is what we want—apti- tude to carry flesh and early maturity. With- out these no man can raise beef at a profit. The modern Short-horn is not a milker, al- though descended from the most noted dairy cows of the last century, Bree<lers have so entirely lost sight of the dairy quahties of the animal in the eflbrt to secure symmetry of form and a ijropeusity to fatten, that it is now customary, among many of them, to "nurse" their calves on cows kept for the purpose, the mother not being able to afford suflicient nourishment. These, however, are fancy notions which are not expected to meet with much favor on the prairies; and bulls selected as breeders for the farmers "out West," would seldom have time to brush up for exhibition at the fairs, and the dams of their young ones would have no difficulty in suckling them, being neither of aristocratic lineage or delicate constitutions. The graz- ing portions of the State should be well-sup- plied with good Durh.im b'ood; and if it could be gradually accomplished without too vio- lent an interference with the rights of indi- viduals, we would favor the castration of all the little pestiferous, ill-shapen Texas bulls that dare attempt to repe.at themselves. HBKEFOEDS, As their name indicates, came from Hereford- shire, England, and are the only prominent rivals of the Shorthorns in size ai^d aptitude to carry flesh. They are a large, long-horned cattle of peculiar color, white about the face, belly and legs, the rest of the body being bright red. They have not succeeded in ex- citing much enthusiasm in the United States, though recent sales show that small herds have been carried as far west as Colorado and seem to meet with favor. Their admirers give statistics to show that they have, in many instances, competed successfully in the

  

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Duke is the highest a rank of nobility.

A Duke may or may not be member of the Royal Family, depending on the type of Dukedom - Royal or Noble one.

Royal Dukes are members of the Royal Family and are either sons or male-line grandsons of the Sovereign. Currently, there are only 7 Royal Dukes:

 

R- Duke of Lancaster (currently, Queen Elizabeth II) - Duke of Cornwall and Duke of Rothesay (currently, Prince Charles)

Prince Andrew) - Duke of Gloucester (currentl

- Duke of Edinburgh (currently, Prince Philip) - Duke of Cambridge (currently, Prince William) - Duke of York (currently

Prince Richard - the son of Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, the third son of George V)

son of George V) Non-Royal (Noble) Dukes are NOT members of the Royal Family (although they can be extended

- Duke of Kent (currently, Prince Edward - the son of Prince George, Duke of Kent, the fourt

h members of the Royal House) and are just representatives of Nobility,

 

Noble non Royalty Dukes,

Currently, the following 26 noble Dukedoms exist:

h Duke of Somerset) - The Duke of Richmond, Lennox, and Gordon (currently, Char

- The Duke of Norfolk (currently, Edward Fitzalan-Howard, 18th Duke of Norfolk) - The Duke of Somerset (currently, John Seymour, 19

tles Gordon-Lennox, 10th Duke of Richmond) - The Duke of Grafton (currently, Henry FitzRoy, 12th Duke of Grafton) - The Duke of Beaufort (currently, David Somerset, 11th Duke of Beaufort)

eregrine Cavendish, 12th Duke of Devonshire) - The Duke of Marlborough (curre

- The Duke of St Albans (currently, Murray Beauclerk, 14th Duke of St Albans) - The Duke of Bedford (currently, Andrew Russell, 15th Duke of Bedford) - The Duke of Devonshire (currently,

Pntly, John Spencer-Churchill, 11th Duke of Marlborough) - The Duke of Rutland (currently, David Manners, 11th Duke of Rutland) - The Duke of Hamilton and Brandon (currently, Alexander Douglas-Hamilton, 16th Duke of Hamilton)

oll) - The Duke of Montrose (currently, James Graham, 8th Duke of Montrose) - The Duke of

- The Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry (currently, Richard Scott, 10th Duke of Buccleuch) - The Duke of Argyll (currently, Torquhil Campbell, 13th Duke of Argyll) - The Duke of Atholl (currently, John Murray, 11th Duke of At

hRoxburghe (currently, Guy Innes-Ker, 10th Duke of Roxburghe) - The Duke of Manchester (currently, Alexander Montagu, 13th Duke of Manchester) - The Duke of Northumberland (currently, Ralph Percy, 12th Duke of Northumberland) - The Duke of Leinster (currently, Maurice FitzGerald, 9th Duke of Leinster)

inster) - The Duke of Fife (currently, James Carnegie, 3rd Duke of Fife)

- The Duke of Abercorn (currently, James Hamilton, 5th Duke of Abercorn) - The Duke of Wellington (currently, Arthur Wellesley, 8th Duke of Wellington) - The Duke of Sutherland (currently, Francis Egerton, 7th Duke of Sutherland) - The Duke of Westminster (currently, Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of West Members of British Nobility and Royalty are all inter-related, so all Dukes can claim a descent or relation to British Kings.

However, only Royal Dukes can claim Close relation as they have to be either sons, or male-line grandsons of the Monarch.

The Star of Alex Moscovitch

"Do you want to understand? Climb up the Star and look from it!,"

He advised General de Gaulle. Alex Moscovitch was born in Ukraine, made a brilliant career in France

© Olena Chekan July 25, 2008

© The Ukrainian Week magazine database

(From the printed edition № 30 (39) dated July 25, 2008)

 

[tyzhden.ua/Publication/3773]

 

Alex Moscovitch is also an endless space of communication and dialogue with contemporary intellectual and prominent figures: Prince Felix Yusupov (very same Prince Yusupov who shortened life of Rasputin), Edith Piaf, Jean Gabin, Coco Chanel, Serge Lifar, Mikhail Koltsov, Andrei Tarkovsky, the entire Olympia of French politics including General de Gaulle, and one finds out with surprise that General de Gaulle was not only a brave soldier and politician but also an "extraordinary delicate and even a shy person".

 

Everything mentioned above is about France. Ukraine is a trouble-free childhood and Babi Yar, where his mother, grandmother and aunt died.

 

Two persons once changed my life. It was Taras Shevchenko and Alex Moscovitch, and I had an honor to be his friend during the latest ten years of his life. My book of interviews with him was published in Moscow in 1992, though the habit to write down all our conversations remained with me.

 

He was amazing in all respects. His biography - the whole 20th century reflecting, his amazingly happy fate, his fantastic working capacity. During his work spell in the City Hall where he was responsible for the city budget, policing and land distribution the legendary «Le Ventre de Paris» (Les Halle quarter) disappeared and the ultra-modern neighborhood La Défense rose in its stead.

 

I went again through the notes from the latest meeting with Alex which took place in January 1996 and they seem timely right today.

 

WE ARE FROM OUR CHILDHOOD

 

AM “Nobody here can work normally; I simply cannot fail to see this muddle and disorder. And you are getting surprised when I start to rage and get really angry about that. Okay, you gave up your nuclear weapons, although there is absolutely nothing good in it, you will regret it many times, because nobody will reckon with you. Power and insolence rule this world. Okay, you gave up nuclear weapons, but why did you give it up so cheap? Almost for free? You should think about the future and look ahead at least a little bit. There is Russia right next to you, and it is an Empire with all the consequences. It will bring to knees anybody with its gas and oil! And don't even dare to defend them!”

 

OC “Is it your love to Ukraine?”

 

AM “Why did you decide that I love Ukraine?”

 

OC “Well, who planted cherry trees in Lucéram?”

 

AM “Kid, it's just nostalgia, a simple nostalgia. I often dream of Dnipro floods, Saint Sophia's Cathedral, Kiev and Kiev Pechersk Lavra, where my nanny Marusya always carried me around. I also dream of those endless cherry gardens in Batyieva Hora, we had our dacha there. And everyday it's getting stronger. Serge Lifar told me the same. He also dreamed of Ivana Kupala (Kupala Night) celebrations he visited in the country seat of his grandfather. He told me that when he was a little boy, one of the young local guys swept him up and jumped over the fire. He was looking for this feeling of weightlessness in dance all life long since that time.”

 

OC “Were you friends?”

 

AM “Well, Serge was my friend over a number of years. By the way, he was also born in Kyiv…Last time I met him was in Lausanne, and he was very sick then, he was dying from cancer. He would recollect the war and how in 1944 the Resistance sentenced him to death in absentia, since there were rumors circulating that he had collaborated with the Germans. Lie!

 

He just continued to work in Grand Opera during occupation. I felt that he was hurting very much that he still did not have the Order of the Legion of Honor.

 

He, who completely changed the French attitude towards dances, since before him the ballet was an addition to opera - a traditional entertainment for older gentlemen.

 

When I came back to Paris I went to my good friend Jacques Chaban-Delmas. He was a Head of a National Assembly then. I told him: “Serge Lifar is dying. He served France for over forty years, yet he doesn’t have an Order of the Legion of Honor. This is disgrace”. Fortunately we made it in time, and Serge was given this Order a couple of weeks before his death.

 

Serge enjoyed visiting me in Lucéram, telling me it was a little Ukraine.”

 

OC “Do you remember Kiev of your childhood times?”

 

AM “Of course I do. I remember our apartment on Svyatoslavska Street (current Chapaev Street – The Ukrainian Week). I remember all the books from an enormous library of my maternal grandfather. He was a head of a Kiev department of a Petersburg Bank. I remember my school and I remember my first love Zhenechka. I was trying to find her in 1966 when I came to USSR (Soviet Union) to prepare General de Gaulle's visit. She was a grandmother already at that time, and her pretty granddaughters accompanied me to the airport.”

 

FAITHFUL SCUFFLE

 

OC “You mother and your father…”

 

AM “I was raised by my grandmother and my grandfather. And I also had two gouvernantes: one of them was from Vienna and another one was from Bordeaux. Half a day I had to speak German, while another half a day I spoke French. My father was socialist revolutionary, he was either in exile or deported. Children of rich prosperous people often decide to join revolutionaries. We left Russia and traveled to France three weeks after Lenin's death, because my father understood very well how it will be going. We lived in France for the money of our relative, Kiev millionaire and sugar manufacturer Lev Brodsky. My parents came back to the birthplace in 1931, they were possessed with yearn for justice. My father was poisoned in 1935, and my mother…”

 

OC “Why did you stay?”

 

AM “I was serving in French Armed Forces. In 1933 I arrived in Moscow as a correspondent of a newspaper Matin where Mikhail Koltsov invited me to work with him as a French editor in the recently created The Moscow News. I didn't stay there for a long time, because I had a fight with Konstantin Umansky, head of the Press department of the People's Commissariat for Foreign Affairs (Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Soviet Union)|Ministry of Foreign Affairs).”

 

OC “Did you fight with fists?”

 

AM “Of course! We were rolling on the ground, he was very strong. I received a report of a People's Commissar Maxim Litvinov that was read by him in League of Nations in French, but I didn't know about that, because I was given this report in Russian. I translated it repeatedly. Of course, my text differed from the one of Litvinov. Umansky summoned me and said: “Who was that idiot who published Litvinov’s report?” I couldn’t hold myself. He still didn’t recover and come to his senses, while I was running to the French Embassy. As a person who served in The French Armed Forces I had the right for the French citizenship. Thus, I took the train in two hours. If not that story, I'd stay in USSR (Soviet Union) and I am sure I wouldn't survive it, because repressions just started.”

 

OC “Did you share your parents' political views and sympathies?”

 

AM “I shared their views regarding the necessity of justice, and I will never ever agree on limiting freedom for the sake of this justice. One should always find compromise between freedom and justice at any historical moment. Every epoch and every country should have their own compromises.”

 

WAR IS MONOTONY AND ROUTINE

 

OC “Did de Gaulle know how to do it?”

 

AM “If only France wouldn't have been defeated in 1940, de Gaulle would die a Division General. De Gaulle became catalyst of resistance, and this resistance was inevitable.”

 

OC “How did it happen that you became one of the founders of de Gaulle's Party and one of General's closest associates?”

 

AM “The story that I was among the founders of this Party is true, but the story that I was one of the closest associates is a legend. I was just one of the first people who joined him in June 1940. General addressed all the French people through the radio from London, while I had no questions whether to live in France occupied by Germans or to fight Germans.”

 

OC “When did your war start?”

 

AM “It started in 1936. I was writing some poetry at that period of time and I wrote in one of my verses: if Francisco Franco will seize Madrid, Germans will take Paris. I heard about German offensive on 10 May 1940, when I was in Paris, where I was having a ball celebrating awarding of the first officer rank. Youth is always careless and light hearted.”

 

OC “How did you get to England?"

 

AM “We dashed to the small city of Saint-Jean-de-Luz, where Englishmen embarked the rests of Polish Military on their vessels. Then there was an African Campaign (Mediterranean and Middle East theatre of World War II). De Gaulle addressed the troops on our way with the short speech that ended with the words: “Future of France is in our hands”. It was that moment when I first saw his famous gesture that became later an ordinary and well known gesture for the millions of French citizens, – he raised his hands above his head and stood motionless for some time. It’s impossible to forget it.”

 

OC “The war is…”

 

AM “It’s a colossal routine and monotony. Everyday it’s the same sort of thing. It doesn’t matter where you are, in the desert, in Alsace or in a tropical forest. Every day you sit like a donkey, waiting for an order, and then you run through the fire net, heading to some hill or to the forest, and there are shells and missiles exploding around you, to the right and to the left, the wounded scream, the slain fall. During five years I was losing my friends and I will never forget their sufferings, torments and their courage… There was a lieutenant in out battalion, he was very young, just like a child, he was a first year student of Sorbonne. The shell tore apart the bottom of his stomach in one of the first battles. He was given strong morphine injections and left to die silently in the village barn. When I bent over to him, he smiled to me and said: “They are bastards! They damaged the best thing I had!” I hate all those pathetic speeches about war, about holiness, sacrifice, because they offend memory of my friends. But anyway war gave me also unforgettable meetings. Doctor Albert Schweitzer, future Noble Prize laureate (I met him in Gabon, in the field hospital which was created by him), and he struggled to rescue my fighters for whom he was just a German. Winston Churchill looked like a big rosy-cheeked infant because he never stopped sucking his cigar. Josephine Baker was a wonderful woman, with fantastic body and wild temper. I saw her in Moulin Rouge for the first time, when I was just a young boy, and then I saw her again in the paratroopers' school in Algeria. She took the field as a volunteer.”

 

POLITICIAN WHO BOUGHT "ANDREI RUBLEV"

 

OC “You were a party functionary.”

 

AM "When de Gaulle told me that he was going to found a party, he told me that he reckoned on me. That was how I appeared to be at the origins of his de Gaullist Party and was its national speaker for years to come. I engaged twice in controversy with Maurice Thorez, who was the leader of French communists. You have to admit that it was quite difficult to get 10 thousand voices of the miners in his native region. We were met with the metal rods and bicycle chains. And in one of the most aristocratic districts of Paris, on Île Saint-Louis, where old marquises, counts and countesses, dukes and duchesses live, one respective lady suddenly asked me after my report: “Is it true, Monsieur Moscovitch, that unnatural relationships occur between the men in the colonial troops where you served during the war?” I answered her honestly, because you shouldn’t lie to your potential voters, so I told her: “Madame, even a black soldier will look to you like a beauty after six months in the desert!”

 

OC “When did you leave politics?”

 

AM “I left when de Gaulle left. Other times came, with all those intrigues and bribes. All the time when General was not in office anymore, he always called me to his residence.”

 

OC “And what was the story of selling Tarkovsky’s «Andrei Rublev»?”

 

AM “I cooperated with Sovexportfilm (Soviet Committee for Export of Movies) and once I saw this film during the closed screening in Moscow. It impressed me a lot, and I was interested in cinema, we were friends with Jean Gabin, Vittorio de Sica, Odile Versois, by the way, I don't like her sister Marina Vlady a lot. Anyway. I urgently signed a contract for selling ten films, and «Andrei Rublev» was among them, while other movies were just insignificant. There and then head of Sovexportfilm Aleksandr Davidov warned me that I had to act very fast. Actually, I just crossed the threshold of my Paris apartment on the next day, and I heard my phone ringing. “It is prohibited to sell «Andrei Rublev»,” Davidov said in an official tone. “I'm so sorry, but I have already sold all ten films,” I replied.”

 

OC “Did it correspond to the facts?”

 

AM “I sold it three days later, but the documents contained the needed data. I had a monopoly distribution rights for the Soviet movies for two years. The crowd wants bread and circuses, so let them watch the best films. I assign myself to the crowd as well. But it would be fine to add some herring, bread, potatoes and a drink of life, Vodka, to the loaf of bread.”

 

SQUEEZE ALL THE JUICE OUT OF CITRINE

 

OC “How do you see yourself from that far star General was talking about?”

 

AM “I see myself as a straight thinker and a man of sense who follows facts and makes conclusions. And my prudence doesn't prevent me from giving easy time to some of my own weaknesses. And I do it with a great pleasure. I would like to be 18–20-year-old now, so I could make the same silly things with the great pleasure and joy. Experience prevents you from enjoying your life. One should know how to squeeze the juice out of citrine, how to squeeze everything out till the last drop and drink it. It's sad only that nobody will give you another citrine after that…”

 

OC “Did you rely on yourself only in your life”

 

AM “If we are talking about decisive events, then yes, I did. And just understand, kid, human being doesn't have freedom of choice. There is almost no freedom of choice. Everything depends on biology, on the external conditions, on the heat or cold and on hell of a thing. I will keep living until everything will be fine with me. The only one thing I'd preferred to have is to have enough power to grab the gun and to pull the trigger if something will go wrong. One should leave this world timely. Why did you become so upset? It was a joke. And if to be serious: bow to Kiev, to Ukraine, when you will be back. Go to Saint Volodymyr Hill instead of me, when you will be home. I agree with Mikhail Bulgakov, it's the best place on Earth.”

 

Translated by © Julia Lugovska

 

www.linkedin.com/in/julia-lugovska

13th June 2016 at Union Chapel, London N1.

 

Country: United States - Texas. Style: Americana.

 

Lineup: Shawn Colvin (v/g), Steve Earle (v/g/octave mandolin/mandolin/harmonica).

 

Shawn Colvin (born in Vermillion, SD) and Steve Earle (born in Fort Monroe, VA and raised in San Antonio, TX) have played a handful of gigs together dating back to 1987. They were now touring to promote a duo album. Mostly songs they wrote together, plus four covers: "Baby’s in Black", "Ruby Tuesday", "Tobacco Road" and Emmylou Harris’ "Raise the Dead". This was the first time I had seen Colvin, but the sixth for Earle. With the Dukes in 96, solo in 97, 05 and 08 and the Dukes and Duchesses in 11. For photos of the last see: www.flickr.com/photos/kmlivemusic/sets/72157628018139372/.

In this photo: Earle plays a Martin M-21.

More information: steveearle.com/, www.facebook.com/SteveEarleMusic/, www.shawncolvin.com/, www.facebook.com/ShawnColvin/.

 

JOSS Kent, son of Geoffrey Kent, of Vero Beach, Florida, and the

late Andrea, Duchess of Manchester, announced his engagement, 4th February, 2000, to Sacha, daughter of Jeremy Vaughan, of London, and

Mrs James Mackinnon, of London.

Sacha, Visountess Villiers, former wife of the late Viscount Villiers,

heir to the 9th Earl of Jersey, and daughter of Peter Hooper Valpy,

announced her engagement, 4 February, 2000, to Raymond Hubbard. Lady

Villiers is the mother of the 10th Earl of Jersey

 

Andrea joss, Kent, married, thirdly, Sidney Arthur Robin George Drogo Montagu, 11th Duke of Manchester, on 25 August 1978.

Andrea Joss, Kent the Duchess of Manchester died on 21, January 1996. The Duke died in 1985. They were married seven years.

 

The 11th Duke of Manchester married, firstly, Adrienne Valerie Christie, daughter of John Kenneth Christie, on 5 February 1955. The 11th Duke of Manchester and Adrienne Valerie Christie were divorced in 1977 they were married 32 years.

 

Andrea married three times Her married name became Kent. Her married name became Whitehead.

As a result of her third marriage, to the 11th Duke of Manchester, Andrea Joss was styled as Duchess of Manchester on 25 August, 1978. From 25 August 1978, her married name became Montagu. The 11th Duke of Manchester died in 1985

They seemed happy a good marriage and, A nice life in Africa Kenya, England and 500 acre Ranch in Ashland Tennessee! They also traveled. There home was in Kenya where the Dukes family Estate has been for Centuries.

  

JOSS Kent, The son of Geoffrey Kent, of Vero Beach, Florida, and the late Andrea, 11th Duchess of Manchester. Announced his engagement, 4 February, 2000, to Sacha, daughter of Jeremy Vaughan, of London, and

Mrs James Mackinnon, of London.

Sacha, Visountess Villiers, former wife of the late Viscount Villiers,

heir to the 9th Earl of Jersey, and daughter of Peter Hooper Valpy,

announced her engagement, 4 February, 2000, to Raymond Hubbard. Lady

Villiers is the mother of the 10th Earl of Jersey.

 

Charlemagne, Emperor and King of France and Italy, the Mackinnon family of Dochgarroch, Inverness-shire.

 

Joss kent in 2002 again was illegally added is a beneficiary in the trust of the 11th Duke of Manchester as a stepson. Joss kent has a father who he speaks of, No mention of the 11th Duke of Manchester is ever mentioned in the family.

The Dukes and Duchess of Manchester have been in Kenya for centuries.

 

The Manchester family Dukes and Duchess and there blood children that's why they do DNA as a child. The Estates are to transfer not to other people's kids or step kids.

We have never met them how nice of them. How can you smile at people when your living on there land and sleeping in there beds. Breach of trust was done here.

It has to be changed as The tenth Duke of Manchester's trust has wished his family Heirs to have not someone else's family. Its easy if you never meet the very people who gave you your start. I'm sure the Manchester children and true Heirs have a different view.

Identifier: pathwayoflifetow00thom

Title: The pathway of life ... to which is added a biography of Dr. Talmage

Year: 1888 (1880s)

Authors: Thomas De Witt Talmage

Subjects:

Publisher: Historrical pub. Co.

Contributing Library: Gumberg Library, Duquesne University

Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

  

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vers and sparkling lakes, andsparkling fountains, give Jesus something to drink. If there isany pity in earth or heaven, or hell, let it now be demonstratedin behalf of this royal sufferer. The wealthy women of Jerusa-lem used to have a fund of money with which they provided wine for those peoplewho died in crucifixion—a powerful opiate to deaden the pain; but Christ wouldnot take it. He wanted to die sober, and so He refused the wine. But afterwardthey go to a cup of vinegar and soak a sponge in it, and put it on a stick ofhyssop, and then press it against the hot lips of Christ. You say the wine was ananaesthetic, and intended to relieve or deaden the pain. But the vinegar was aninsult. I am disposed to adopt the theory of the old English commentators, whobelieved that, instead of its being an opiate to soothe, it was vinegar to insult.Malaga and Burgundy for Grand Dukes and Duchesses, and costly wines fromroyal vats for bloated imperialists; but stinging acids for a dying Christ.

 

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BITTER SWEET. In some lives the saccharine seems to predominate. Life is sunshine on abank of flowers. A thousand hands to clap approval ! In December or in Jan-uary, looking across their table, they see all their family present. Health rubi-cund. Skies flamboyant. Days resilient. But in a great many cases there are (71) 72 THE PATHWAY OF LIFE. not so many sugars as acids. The annoyances, and the vexations, and the disap-pointments of life overpower the successes. There is a gravel in almost everyshoe. An Arabian legend says that there was a worm in Solomons staff, gnaw-ing its strengthaway; and thereis a weak spotin every earthlysupport that aman leans on.King George, ofEngland, forgotall the grand-eurs of histhrone because,one day, in aninterview, BeauBrummel calledhim by his firstname, and ad-dressed him as aservant, crjang: George, ringthe bell! MissLan don, hon-ored all theworld over forher poetical gen-ius, is so worriedover the evilreports set afloatregarding herthat she is fou

  

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Statues of Dukes and Duchesses of Brabant.

www.theviewdeck.com

Burg Eltz is located in Wierschem, a municipality belonging to the district of Mayen-Koblenz in the West German state of Rhineland-Palatinate. What sets Burg Eltz apart from most of the famous fairytale castles in Germany is that it doesn’t crown a hilltop. Instead, it perches on a rock spur by the Elzbach River, wrapped on all sides by the verdant Eltz Forest.

The beginning of the construction of Burg Eltz can be traced back to the 9th century. Currently, the castle is owned and maintained by the 33rd generation of the Eltz family. Down the centuries, while the castle has inspired many writers, poets and painters, it has also faced invasion and destruction attempts. When you visit, remember that you are walking the footsteps of kings and queens, knights, dukes and duchesses, princes and emperors. As Burg Eltz was one of the few significant architectures in Germany to escape destruction during World War II, travelers can still see much of the castle in an almost-original condition.

St Martin's Church in Bladon near Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England, is the Church of England parish church of Bladon-with-Woodstock. It is also the mother church of St Mary Magdalene at Woodstock, which was originally a chapel of ease. It is best known for the graves of the Spencer-Churchill family, including Sir Winston Churchill, in its churchyard. The parish of St Martin's includes Blenheim Palace, the family seat of the dukes of Marlborough. Most 'lesser members' of the Spencer-Churchill family are interred in St. Martin's parish churchyard at Bladon. With the exception of the 10th Duke and his first wife, the Dukes and Duchesses of Marlborough are buried in the Blenheim Palace chapel.

 

The first church on the current site was probably built in the 11th or 12th century. The earliest references to the church state that John de London, Henry III's chaplain, obtained from the King a grant of the Manor of Bladon, with the advowson of the Rectory in 1269. The parish registers of baptisms, marriages and burials date from 1545 and are kept at the Bodleian library in Oxford. There is no record of the church building itself until 1802, when the parish petitioned the Bishop of Oxford to grant them a new building as the old one was becoming dilapidated and dangerous. Permission was granted, the medieval church was demolished, the 4th Duke of Marlborough paid for building materials and the new church was opened in 1804. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Martin%27s_Church,_Bladon

Burg Eltz is located in Wierschem, a municipality belonging to the district of Mayen-Koblenz in the West German state of Rhineland-Palatinate. What sets Burg Eltz apart from most of the famous fairytale castles in Germany is that it doesn’t crown a hilltop. Instead, it perches on a rock spur by the Elzbach River, wrapped on all sides by the verdant Eltz Forest.

The beginning of the construction of Burg Eltz can be traced back to the 9th century. Currently, the castle is owned and maintained by the 33rd generation of the Eltz family. Down the centuries, while the castle has inspired many writers, poets and painters, it has also faced invasion and destruction attempts. When you visit, remember that you are walking the footsteps of kings and queens, knights, dukes and duchesses, princes and emperors. As Burg Eltz was one of the few significant architectures in Germany to escape destruction during World War II, travelers can still see much of the castle in an almost-original condition.

St Martin's Church in Bladon near Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England, is the Church of England parish church of Bladon-with-Woodstock. It is also the mother church of St Mary Magdalene at Woodstock, which was originally a chapel of ease. It is best known for the graves of the Spencer-Churchill family, including Sir Winston Churchill, in its churchyard. The parish of St Martin's includes Blenheim Palace, the family seat of the dukes of Marlborough. Most 'lesser members' of the Spencer-Churchill family are interred in St. Martin's parish churchyard at Bladon. With the exception of the 10th Duke and his first wife, the Dukes and Duchesses of Marlborough are buried in the Blenheim Palace chapel.

 

The first church on the current site was probably built in the 11th or 12th century. The earliest references to the church state that John de London, Henry III's chaplain, obtained from the King a grant of the Manor of Bladon, with the advowson of the Rectory in 1269. The parish registers of baptisms, marriages and burials date from 1545 and are kept at the Bodleian library in Oxford. There is no record of the church building itself until 1802, when the parish petitioned the Bishop of Oxford to grant them a new building as the old one was becoming dilapidated and dangerous. Permission was granted, the medieval church was demolished, the 4th Duke of Marlborough paid for building materials and the new church was opened in 1804.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Martin%27s_Church,_Bladon

No, not dukes and duchesses, nor kings and queens, but butterflies. Photo taken at Oliver Reservoir

St Martin's Church in Bladon near Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England, is the Church of England parish church of Bladon-with-Woodstock. It is also the mother church of St Mary Magdalene at Woodstock, which was originally a chapel of ease. It is best known for the graves of the Spencer-Churchill family, including Sir Winston Churchill, in its churchyard. The parish of St Martin's includes Blenheim Palace, the family seat of the dukes of Marlborough. Most 'lesser members' of the Spencer-Churchill family are interred in St. Martin's parish churchyard at Bladon. With the exception of the 10th Duke and his first wife, the Dukes and Duchesses of Marlborough are buried in the Blenheim Palace chapel.

 

The first church on the current site was probably built in the 11th or 12th century. The earliest references to the church state that John de London, Henry III's chaplain, obtained from the King a grant of the Manor of Bladon, with the advowson of the Rectory in 1269. The parish registers of baptisms, marriages and burials date from 1545 and are kept at the Bodleian library in Oxford. There is no record of the church building itself until 1802, when the parish petitioned the Bishop of Oxford to grant them a new building as the old one was becoming dilapidated and dangerous. Permission was granted, the medieval church was demolished, the 4th Duke of Marlborough paid for building materials and the new church was opened in 1804.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Martin%27s_Church,_Bladon

St Martin's Church in Bladon near Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England, is the Church of England parish church of Bladon-with-Woodstock. It is also the mother church of St Mary Magdalene at Woodstock, which was originally a chapel of ease. It is best known for the graves of the Spencer-Churchill family, including Sir Winston Churchill, in its churchyard. The parish of St Martin's includes Blenheim Palace, the family seat of the dukes of Marlborough. Most 'lesser members' of the Spencer-Churchill family are interred in St. Martin's parish churchyard at Bladon. With the exception of the 10th Duke and his first wife, the Dukes and Duchesses of Marlborough are buried in the Blenheim Palace chapel.

 

The first church on the current site was probably built in the 11th or 12th century. The earliest references to the church state that John de London, Henry III's chaplain, obtained from the King a grant of the Manor of Bladon, with the advowson of the Rectory in 1269. The parish registers of baptisms, marriages and burials date from 1545 and are kept at the Bodleian library in Oxford. There is no record of the church building itself until 1802, when the parish petitioned the Bishop of Oxford to grant them a new building as the old one was becoming dilapidated and dangerous. Permission was granted, the medieval church was demolished, the 4th Duke of Marlborough paid for building materials and the new church was opened in 1804. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Martin%27s_Church,_Bladon

St Martin's Church in Bladon near Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England, is the Church of England parish church of Bladon-with-Woodstock. It is also the mother church of St Mary Magdalene at Woodstock, which was originally a chapel of ease. It is best known for the graves of the Spencer-Churchill family, including Sir Winston Churchill, in its churchyard. The parish of St Martin's includes Blenheim Palace, the family seat of the dukes of Marlborough. Most 'lesser members' of the Spencer-Churchill family are interred in St. Martin's parish churchyard at Bladon. With the exception of the 10th Duke and his first wife, the Dukes and Duchesses of Marlborough are buried in the Blenheim Palace chapel.

 

The first church on the current site was probably built in the 11th or 12th century. The earliest references to the church state that John de London, Henry III's chaplain, obtained from the King a grant of the Manor of Bladon, with the advowson of the Rectory in 1269. The parish registers of baptisms, marriages and burials date from 1545 and are kept at the Bodleian library in Oxford. There is no record of the church building itself until 1802, when the parish petitioned the Bishop of Oxford to grant them a new building as the old one was becoming dilapidated and dangerous. Permission was granted, the medieval church was demolished, the 4th Duke of Marlborough paid for building materials and the new church was opened in 1804. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Martin%27s_Church,_Bladon

Jewels, the glitter of the Russian Court - Hermitage Amsterdam

One of the Hermitage’s greatest treasures is the fabulous jewellery collection. Hundreds of them superbly sparkle in Jewels!. Together with many portraits and a profusion of richly decorated gowns and ensembles once worn by the highest echelons at the Russian court in St Petersburg, they represent two centuries in fashion and jewels. Meet the country’s flamboyant empresses – Anna, Elizabeth and Catherine the Great – as well as grand dukes and duchesses, tsarinas and noble fashionistas of the nineteenth and early twentieth century. For balls and parties they wore dazzling costumes, set off by bijoux carefully selected to demonstrate identity, taste, breeding and wealth. Jewellery might also be designed to provoke or convey secret messages. Pieces were ordered from leading houses like Cartier and Fabergé. Many pieces were lost following the Russian Revolution. Jewels! presents a glittering array of surviving masterpieces, situated in ballrooms and boudoirs like those of the tsars’ Winter Palace.

 

St Martin's Church in Bladon near Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England, is the Church of England parish church of Bladon-with-Woodstock. It is also the mother church of St Mary Magdalene at Woodstock, which was originally a chapel of ease. It is best known for the graves of the Spencer-Churchill family, including Sir Winston Churchill, in its churchyard. The parish of St Martin's includes Blenheim Palace, the family seat of the dukes of Marlborough. Most 'lesser members' of the Spencer-Churchill family are interred in St. Martin's parish churchyard at Bladon. With the exception of the 10th Duke and his first wife, the Dukes and Duchesses of Marlborough are buried in the Blenheim Palace chapel.

 

The parish of St Martin's includes Blenheim Palace, the family seat of the dukes of Marlborough. Most 'lesser members' of the Spencer-Churchill family are interred in St. Martin's parish churchyard at Bladon. With the exception of the 10th Duke and his first wife, the Dukes and Duchesses of Marlborough are buried in the Blenheim Palace chapel.

 

In 1998 Sir Winston Churchill's tombstone had to be replaced because of the large number of visitors over the years having eroded it and its surrounding area. A new stone was dedicated in a ceremony attended by members of the Spencer-Churchill family.[2] However, after only eight years the gravestone had become dirty and partially eroded again. In July 2006 the area of the graveyard containing Churchill's grave was closed to the public and a cleaning and restoration project restored the gravestone.

 

The churchyard also contains the graves of Sir Winston's parents Lord Randolph Churchill and Lady Randolph Churchill, his younger brother John or Jack, his children Diana, Randolph, Sarah, Mary and his-son-in-law Christopher Soames. Other Churchill family members buried there include the 10th Duke of Marlborough along with his first wife The Hon. Alexandra Mary Cadogan and his mother, Consuelo Vanderbilt, former Duchess of Marlborough through her marriage to the 9th Duke of Marlborough, and their younger son Lord Ivor Charles Spencer-Churchill.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Martin%27s_Church,_Bladon

Jewels, the glitter of the Russian Court - Hermitage Amsterdam

One of the Hermitage’s greatest treasures is the fabulous jewellery collection. Hundreds of them superbly sparkle in Jewels!. Together with many portraits and a profusion of richly decorated gowns and ensembles once worn by the highest echelons at the Russian court in St Petersburg, they represent two centuries in fashion and jewels. Meet the country’s flamboyant empresses – Anna, Elizabeth and Catherine the Great – as well as grand dukes and duchesses, tsarinas and noble fashionistas of the nineteenth and early twentieth century. For balls and parties they wore dazzling costumes, set off by bijoux carefully selected to demonstrate identity, taste, breeding and wealth. Jewellery might also be designed to provoke or convey secret messages. Pieces were ordered from leading houses like Cartier and Fabergé. Many pieces were lost following the Russian Revolution. Jewels! presents a glittering array of surviving masterpieces, situated in ballrooms and boudoirs like those of the tsars’ Winter Palace.

 

The Town Hall of Brussels, on the world famous, magnificent Grand Place, is one of the most impressive gothic (especially civil) buildings that I know!

Brabantine Gothic style, 1402-1455. Brussels was a wealthy and dutch speaking city then.

Beautifully renovated/cleaned in the 1990's.

 

The tower is no less than 96 meters high and a landmark in Brussels' skyline.

Atop the spire stands a 5-meter-high gilt metal statue of the archangel Michael, patron saint of Brussels, slaying a dragon or devil.

 

As a true Brabantian *myself*, I always feel pride for this monument, which was built to represent the growing power (and pride) of Brussels as the capital of the Dukedom of Brabant, rivalling the city of Leuven.

  

After the bombardment and destruction of Brussels in August 1695 by the French troops of De Villeroy, in command of the armies of Louis XIV, only the tower and the outside walls of the Town Hall had been saved! Restoration works started almost immediately after the catastrophe. In the 17th and 18th centuries the original decorative statues withered away or disappeared. By 1840 a complete restoration was necessary. It was then that the entire facade became decorated with a total of 203 little statues representing the Dukes and Duchesses of Brabant who ruled the Dukedom between the year 580 and 1564.

The Grand Ducal Burial Vault (The building was designed by David Grimm in 1896)is the purpose-built mausoleum of the Grand Dukes and Duchesses of Russia in the Peter and Paul Fortress. The Neo-Baroque domed structure is frequently mistaken for a part of the Peter and Paul Cathedral due to architectural similarities. A covered passageway leads from the mausoleum to the cathedral, where the Russian emperors and empresses lie in state.

Thanks to those who lowered the hedge on the right considerably, it's possible now to have a better view of this derelict post-Reformation church building. Thanks also to the Maher brothers, living nearby, for great comversations down the years!

 

Many interesting headstones to be seen here, both Catholic and Protestant, three mausoleums, and more.

 

Some Dukes and Duchesses of St. Alban's lived across the road in Newtownanner. Then, nearby, there's Anner Castle, onetime home of the Anglo-Norman Mandeville family for years. Across the river Suir lie the remains of Tickincor Castle, also Derrinlaur Castle. There are scant remains of the pre-Reformation church at the far side of the building here.

The present dayThe Anna Amalia Bibliothek. This library burnt down, along with some of its priceless collection of books in September 2004. However, after three years' restoration it re-opened again on 24 October 2007, the birthday of its patron and perhaps three quarters of the books are being restored

The wikipedia page of the building is here

The building was known as the Zentralbibliothek der nationalen Forschungs- und. Gedenkstâtten der klassischen deutschen Literatur in DDR times, a fact airbrushed out of the Wikipedia history, indeed most East German websites seem to omit any reference to the period 1945- 1989 and indeed to the period 1933-1945. One minute it is 1930 (or 1830 even) and suddenly it is 1995 and all the dukes and duchesses of the 18th century are the rage again as if everything were in aspic for 150 years... Well, quite a lot did happen in German history in the meantime, quite a lot of it rather inconvenient.....

Well, at least we can't blame the GDR leadership for allowing it to burn down. 37 oil paintings of the aristocracy also were burnt to a cinder, and these are not being replaced.

The bust in front of the lighthouse like building is of Pushkin as seen here

Now a bit about the building - Formerly known as the French or Green castlee, built 1563-69 probably by Nicol Gromann for Duke Johann Wilhelm to the south of his castle. The tower - the Wendeltreppenturm - dates from 1761-6 Much rebuilt according to later fashions, with since 1975 the original baroque colours reintroduced. The library itself was founded in the building in 1691 by Duke Wilhelm Ernst. The name Anna-Amalia stems from the name of the Duchess of Sachs-Weimar-Eisenach who ruled in 1766 when the tower was added and the ducal collection of fine books was removed here.

Behind the soviet truck, the Schloss.

After the death of Peter the Great in 1725 his coffin was first placed in the Alexander Nevsky Monastery, and then moved to the Peter and Paul Cathedral and buried on May 29, 1731. From then on all Russian emperors and empresses up to and including Alexander III were buried here, except for Tsar Peter II (buried in the Moscow Kremlin in 1730) and the murdered Ivan VI (buried in Shlisselburg Fortress in 1764). A total of 41 tombs are located here, including a number of grand dukes and duchesses - the children and grandchildren of the emperors. In 1865, all the headstones were replaced with the same type of white marble sarcophagi with gilded bronze crosses. Imperial tombs are decorated with double-headed eagles. Only two of the sarcophagi differ from the others. They were manufactured at the Peterhof Lapidary Works from semi-precious stones: a gray-green Altai jasper tomb for Alexander II and a pink Ural rhodonite tomb for his wife Maria Alexandrovna.

Identifier: storyofenglishli00lill

Title: The story of English literature for young readers

Year: 1879 (1870s)

Authors: Lillie, Lucy C. (Lucy Cecil), b. 1855

Subjects: English literature

Publisher: Boston, D. Lothrop and company

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

  

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t the portrait he painted of himself and I thinkI would like to have had his friendship, to have heldhis hand, and listened to the tones of his sweet, affec-tionate voice. Sir Joshua was one of the prosperous men of theday. Dukes and duchesses sought his acquaintance ;but he was always simple in himself, quite free fromaffectation, and generous and kindly to all whom hemet. His portraits have come down to us like he-roes and heroines of a romance in his time. Beauti-ful women, noble-looking men, sweet, dimpled chil-dren ; and, in all, we see a touch of that which madethe.people he lived among call him the sweet SirJoshua. And who are the guests at Sir Joshuas dinner ?There are Johnson and Boswell, of course, the for-mer holding forth on some subject of the hour. Nearby are lounging two handsome young men, foppish in For Young Readers. 309 dress, dandified in air, yet they are Johnsons de-voted admirers, Topham Beauclerk and Bennet Lang-ton. The devotion of these two young men to John-

 

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:^t^$^ Sir Joshua Reynolds. son shows how gay and hght a side there must havebeen to the old bears nature. One night Beau and Lanky, as Johnsoncalled them, had been supping together at a tavern,and about three in the morning they started off for 3IO The Story of English Literature Johnsons rooms. They pounded at the door andJohnson appeared in his night-cap and armed with apoker. Beau and Lanky called out to him tojoin them. What! is that you, you dogs 1 cried Dr. John-son, Ill have a frisk with you ! And away he flew,dressed himself in an old suit of clothes, and, pres-ently, behold the three going down Covent Garden,where the fruit and flower venders were just appear-ing with their blooming cart-loads to sell at day-break. They stopped at a tavern and brewed abowl of punch; then took a boat to Billingsgatewhere the morning broke upon them in rich splendor.Langton deserted them to go off to a breakfast-party,but the great man and Beau kept up the frolic tillmid-day. Hell be in The Ch

  

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A Duke and Duchess is the highest rank and title in the British peerage, first introduced by Edward III in 1337 when he created his son, the Black Prince, as the first English duke. A Duke is “Most Noble” and is styled “Your Grace”.

After the Duke (Duchess) at the top rung of the British Orders of Precedence there follow, in order of rank, Marquess/Marquis and Marchioness; Earl; Viscount; Baron; Baronet.

Dukes and Duchesses are called "Your Grace" or "Duke/Duchess." Introduce the duke to someone else as "His Grace the Duke of Norfolk," the duchess as "Her Grace the Duchess of Norfolk".

Baronets and knights, if male, are addressed as "Sir Bryan" (if his name is Bryan Thwaites) and his wife is "Lady Thwaites". You would introduce him using his full name, "Sir Bryan Thwaites," and his wife as "Lady Thwaites."

Dames (the equivalent of knighthood for women - there is no female equivalent of baronetcy) are "Dame Gertrude" in conversation, and you would introduce her as "Dame Gertrude Mellon."

Other forms of nobility (including Marquess/Marchioness, Earl/Countess, Viscount/Viscountess, Baron/Baroness) are generally addressed as, "Lord or Lady Trowbridge" (for the Earl of Trowbridge), and introduced with their appropriate title, such as "Viscount Sweet" or "Baroness Rivendell" .

  

Acknowledge royalty with a bow from the neck (not the waist) if you're a man and a small curtsy (placing your right foot behind your left heel and bending your knees slightly) if you're a woman. The bow or curtsy is not expected if you are not a citizen of the U.K. or the Commonwealth, and even if you are, this traditional gesture is no longer required or expected. In either case, however, it is an acceptable courtesy.

Only shake the queen's hand if she offers it to you first. If you are wearing gloves, do not remove them.

Do not begin a conversation with the queen. Instead, wait until she starts speaking to you.

The famous Duke of Burgundy.

 

Tis the season for orchids and the Duke, and at one site there is a huge crowd of Lady and between them, many Dukes and Duchesses.

 

With the forecast much better this afternoon, I went over and rewarded with at least six, including one female, either on the wing, feeding or basking.

 

Well worth the trip out I believe.

Dukes and Duchesses of Marlborough are buried in a mausoleum in Blenheim Palace. Other family members are buried elsewhere, many of them at St. Martin's Church in Bladon. The grave with the large cross in the back is Lord Randolph Churchill, the father of Winston Churchill. He was the second son of the seventh Duke of Marlborough, and an important politician in the late 19th century.

Title: California agriculturist and live stock journal

Identifier: californiaagricu6182sanjrich

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Agriculture -- California; Livestock -- California; Animal industry -- California

Publisher: San Jose

Contributing Library: The Bancroft Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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The Leading Breeds of Cattle. BEEF BEEED3 THE SHOBT-HOENS. ^T is unnecesary to give any detailed ac- count of the origin and history of these celebrated cattle. Wherever beef is con- sumed—and where is it not?—they have played an important part in supplying the wants of man. They are known from one end of the country to the other as the Koyal Family among cattle; and no breed dares dispute with them their merited posi- tion at the head of the list. The Short-horn has been termed the rich man's breed; and at present prices the "fancy" of his kind could hardly become the property of a poor man without bankrupting him. There is a mania just now for Dukes and Duchesses, and mat- ter-of-fact farmers are disposed to discover something fishy about the immense prices realized, at recent sales for members of this family. There is no reason, however, why we should mark a man a fool because, for reasons best known to himself, he chooses to invest a largo sum of money in a small amouut of beef. He may have Ughts before him which have not shone upon us; and although we may not choose to go and do likewise, we have no special interest in the matter, and can act upon our own instincts. We cannot indulge ourselves in such expensive luxuries as Duch- esses and Dukes; but we can, .at a small out- lay, replace every scrub bull that ranges the prairies with a well-bred yearling or two-year- old Short-horn. That will commence the era of reform from the time he steps among the herd. The natural home of the Short-horn is on the rich grass lands of the West. Here he thrives amazingly. At two years old he has so waxed in strength and fatness that he is prepared for the shambles, when the scrub- stock of the country is lingering between beef and veal. That is what we want—apti- tude to carry flesh and early maturity. With- out these no man can raise beef at a profit. The modern Short-horn is not a milker, al- though descended from the most noted dairy cows of the last century, Bree<lers have so entirely lost sight of the dairy quahties of the animal in the eflbrt to secure symmetry of form and a ijropeusity to fatten, that it is now customary, among many of them, to "nurse" their calves on cows kept for the purpose, the mother not being able to afford suflicient nourishment. These, however, are fancy notions which are not expected to meet with much favor on the prairies; and bulls selected as breeders for the farmers "out West," would seldom have time to brush up for exhibition at the fairs, and the dams of their young ones would have no difficulty in suckling them, being neither of aristocratic lineage or delicate constitutions. The graz- ing portions of the State should be well-sup- plied with good Durh.im b'ood; and if it could be gradually accomplished without too vio- lent an interference with the rights of indi- viduals, we would favor the castration of all the little pestiferous, ill-shapen Texas bulls that dare attempt to repe.at themselves. HBKEFOEDS, As their name indicates, came from Hereford- shire, England, and are the only prominent rivals of the Shorthorns in size ai^d aptitude to carry flesh. They are a large, long-horned cattle of peculiar color, white about the face, belly and legs, the rest of the body being bright red. They have not succeeded in ex- citing much enthusiasm in the United States, though recent sales show that small herds have been carried as far west as Colorado and seem to meet with favor. Their admirers give statistics to show that they have, in many instances, competed successfully in the

 

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Identifier: robertadamhisbro1915swar

Title: Robert Adam & his brothers; their lives, work & influence on English architecture, decoration and furniture

Year: 1915 (1910s)

Authors: Swarbrick, John, b. 1879

Subjects: Adam, Robert, 1728-1792 Adam, James, d. 1794 Architecture Decoration and ornament, Architectural Furniture

Publisher: London, B.T. Batsford, ltd., New York, C. Scribner's Sons

Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

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rtraitswere placed in small circular panels above the bookshelves, con-stituting a series that represents the Dukes and Duchesses ofNorthumberland, since the time of Hugh, the first Duke of thepresent creation (Fig. 105). Among the various pieces of furniturein the room, there are some which seem to have been designed byRobert Adam, as, for example, the segmental side tables (Fig. 121).The woodwork of these tables was covered entirely with gilding,as in the case of the greater part of the furniture in this room.The table top, in one instance, is formed with a slab of white 170 THE ALTERATIONS AT SYON HOUSE marble, carefully inlaid with coloured compositions, in so skilful amanner that it seems probable that the work may have beenexecuted by the Italian, Bossi, a contemporary of the brothers.Among the drawings in the Soane Collection there is a designfor a similar inlaid marble slab, which was prepared for the Dukeof Northumberland in 1774.1 At each end of the library, entered BilUI ~i

 

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Fig. 121.—Gilt Table with Inlaid Marble Top, Long Gallery, Syon House. only by a secret door, is a very small room contrived in the angleturret. In one case the room is circular and covered by a minia-ture cupola; while, in the other, a square form was adopted. Thecircular room originally contained a quantity of china, and thesquare chamber a collection of miniatures. Among the plates in the first volume of the Works there1 Adam Series, vol. xxxix., No. 8. AND OTHER CONTEMPORARY WORK 171

  

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The Grand Ducal Burial Vault is the purpose-built mausoleum of the Grand Dukes and Duchesses of Russia in the Peter and Paul Fortress. The Neo-Baroque domed structure is frequently mistaken for a part of the Peter and Paul Cathedral due to architectural similarities. A covered passageway leads from the mausoleum to the cathedral, where the Russian emperors and empresses lie in state.

 

The Tenth Duke and Duchess were married on May, 5th 1927 they stayed married until, The Duchess Nell Vere Steads Death on September 2nd, 1966 they had Many property's. We have thousands of them now in several folders being uploaded to a website. Many in U.S.A, Italy, London, Kenya, Jamaica, Australia, West Indies.

Google earth!

 

In December 1923, the future tenth Duke of Manchester assigned his trustees, under clause 14, ‘all articles of furniture plate pictures and other chattels’ that he would be entitled to after the ninth Duke’s death, and under clause 14(B) the trustees should make an inventory of the chattels, which would be included in the settlement, and hold the residue for the future tenth duty absolutely. When the ninth Duke died in February 1947 the trustees did not make the inventory, and released them to the tenth Duke. His solicitor knew that this was not following clause 14(B), but said in a letter on 15 November 1948 that he was free to sell the items. The Duke sold some. He died in 1977. The eleventh Duke brought a claim for breach of trust by failing to make any selection or an inventory of the chattels, and release them all to the tenth Duke, who was a constructive trustee when he received them.

This IS A DISGRACE TO ALL OF THE DUKES AND DUCHESS OF MANCHESTER FAMILY! IT'S A FULL OUR LIE THEY DID NOT FORGET THE PROPERTY'S THEY WANTED THE PROPERTY'S! TIME IS OVER!

  

OMG A MUDDLE??? A HONEST MUDDLE?? THATS A BILLION DOLLAR MUDDLE!!!!

 

There is no suggestion that anyone concerned in the matter was dishonest. There was a muddle, but however careless it was, it was an honest muddle. Further, I do not think that the Duke was at any relevant time conscious of the fact that he was not entitled to receive the chattels and deal with them as beneficial owner…

... the doctrines of purchaser without notice and constructive trusts are concerned with matters which differ in important respects. The former is concerned with the question whether a person takes property subject to or free from some equity. The latter is concerned with whether or not a person is to have imposed upon him the personal burdens and obligations of trusteeship. I do not see why one of the touchstones for determining the burdens on property should be the same as that for deciding whether to impose a personal obligation on a man. The cold calculus of constructive and imputed notice does not seem to me to be an appropriate instrument for deciding whether a man’s conscience is sufficiently affected for it to be right to bind him by the obligations of a constructive trustee...

 

(5) Whether knowledge of the Baden types (iv) and (v) suffices for this purpose [ie circumstances that would indicate facts to honest and reasonable person, or put him on inquiry] is at best doubtful; in my view, it does not, for I cannot see that the carelessness involved will normally amount to a want of probity.

 

THIS IS A DISGRACE TO THIS FAMILY WHO FOUGHT WARS FOR ENGLAND, STARTED THE BANK OF ENGLAND AND WIRKED FOR THE FUTURE OF ALL DUKES AND DUCHESS IF MANCHESTER'S TO PASS ON THE GREAT HONORABLE NAME AND GIVE TO OTHERS AND CHARITY. TO BE DOING WHAT DUKES AND DUCHESS ARE BORN TO DO.

Identifier: robertadamhisbr00swar

Title: Robert Adam & his brothers : their lives, work & influence on English architecture, decoration and furniture

Year: 1915 (1910s)

Authors: Swarbrick, John, b. 1879

Subjects: Adam, Robert, 1728-1792 Adam, James, d. 1794 Architecture

Publisher: London : B.T. Batsford

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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. The portraitswere placed in small circular panels above the bookshelves, con-stituting a series that represents the Dukes and Duchesses ofNorthumberland, since the time of Hugh, the first Duke of thepresent creation (Fig. 105). Among the various pieces of furniturein the room, there are some which seem to have been designed byRobert Adam, as, for example, the segmental side tables (Fig. 121).The woodwork of these tables was covered entirely with gilding,as in the case of the greater part of the furniture in this room.The table top, in one instance, is formed with a slab of white I/O THE ALTERATIONS AT SYON HOUSE marble, carefully inlaid with coloured compositions, in so skilful amanner that it seems probable that the work may have beenexecuted hv the Italian, Bossi, a contemporary of the brothers.Amono- the drawinos in the Soane Collection there is a designfor a similar inlaid marble slab, which was prepared for the Dukeof Xorthumberland in 1774.^ At each end of the library, entered

 

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Fig. 121.—Gilt I.Mii.E with Inl.vid Marblk Top, Long Gallery, Syon House. only by a secret door, is a very small room contrived in the angleturret. In one case the room is circular and covered by a minia-ture cupola; while, in the other, a s([uare form was adopted. Thecircular room originally contained a quantity of china, and thesquare chamber a collection of miniatures. Among the plates in the first \olume of the Works there Adam .Series, vol. wxix., No. 8. AND OTHER CONTEMPORARY WORK 171

  

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25th October 2011 at Royal Festival Hall, London SE1.

 

Country: United States - Texas. Style: Americana.

 

Lineup: Steve Earle (v/g/bouzouki/mandolin/banjo/harmonica), Allison Moorer (g/keyboards/piano accordion/v). Chris Masterson (g/pedal steel g/mandolin/v), Eleanor Whitmore (fiddle/g/mandolin/v), Kelly Looney (bass g/g/v), Will Rigby (d).

 

Steve Earle was brought up in San Antonio, TX (although actually born in Hampton, VA). From when he was 19 to 50 he lived in Nashville, and now resides in New York City. His period of greatest success was the 1980s, with a series of albums on MCA. In recent years he has often performed acoustic and solo, but this was a return to a band setting. This version of the Dukes (and Duchesses) included two married couples. Earle and his wife Alison Moorer (raised near Mobile, AL), and Chris Masterson and Eleanor Whitmore (from Houston, TX and Denton, TX respectively). It was completed by Kelly Looney (of Nashville, TN), who has been with Earle since 1988, and Will Rigby (of Winston-Salem, NC).

More information: steveearle.com/, www.steveearle.net/.

 

13th June 2016 at Union Chapel, London N1.

 

Country: United States. Style: Americana.

 

Lineup: Shawn Colvin (v/g), Steve Earle (v/g/octave mandolin/mandolin/harmonica).

 

Shawn Colvin (born in Vermillion, SD) and Steve Earle (born in Fort Monroe, VA and raised in San Antonio, TX) have played a handful of gigs together dating back to 1987. They were now touring to promote a duo album. Mostly songs they wrote together, plus four covers: "Baby’s in Black", "Ruby Tuesday", "Tobacco Road" and Emmylou Harris’ "Raise the Dead". This was the first time I had seen Colvin, but the sixth for Earle. With the Dukes in 96, solo in 97, 05 and 08 and the Dukes and Duchesses in 11. For photos of the last see: www.flickr.com/photos/kmlivemusic/sets/72157628018139372/.

In this photo: Colvin plays a Martin D-28.

More information: steveearle.com/, www.facebook.com/SteveEarleMusic/, www.shawncolvin.com/, www.facebook.com/ShawnColvin/.

 

25th October 2011 at Royal Festival Hall, London SE1.

 

Country: United States - Texas. Style: Americana.

 

Lineup: Steve Earle (v/g/bouzouki/mandolin/banjo/harmonica), Allison Moorer (g/keyboards/piano accordion/v). Chris Masterson (g/pedal steel g/mandolin/v), Eleanor Whitmore (fiddle/g/mandolin/v), Kelly Looney (bass g/g/v), Will Rigby (d).

 

Steve Earle was brought up in San Antonio, TX (although actually born in Hampton, VA). From when he was 19 to 50 he lived in Nashville, and now resides in New York City. His period of greatest success was the 1980s, with a series of albums on MCA. In recent years he has often performed acoustic and solo, but this was a return to a band setting. This version of the Dukes (and Duchesses) included two married couples. Earle and his wife Alison Moorer (raised near Mobile, AL), and Chris Masterson and Eleanor Whitmore (from Houston, TX and Denton, TX respectively). It was completed by Kelly Looney (of Nashville, TN), who has been with Earle since 1988, and Will Rigby (of Winston-Salem, NC).

More information: steveearle.com/, www.steveearle.net/.

 

Jewels, the glitter of the Russian Court - Hermitage Amsterdam

One of the Hermitage’s greatest treasures is the fabulous jewellery collection. Hundreds of them superbly sparkle in Jewels!. Together with many portraits and a profusion of richly decorated gowns and ensembles once worn by the highest echelons at the Russian court in St Petersburg, they represent two centuries in fashion and jewels. Meet the country’s flamboyant empresses – Anna, Elizabeth and Catherine the Great – as well as grand dukes and duchesses, tsarinas and noble fashionistas of the nineteenth and early twentieth century. For balls and parties they wore dazzling costumes, set off by bijoux carefully selected to demonstrate identity, taste, breeding and wealth. Jewellery might also be designed to provoke or convey secret messages. Pieces were ordered from leading houses like Cartier and Fabergé. Many pieces were lost following the Russian Revolution. Jewels! presents a glittering array of surviving masterpieces, situated in ballrooms and boudoirs like those of the tsars’ Winter Palace.

 

Title: The Civil engineer and architect's journal, scientific and railway gazette

Identifier: civilengineerarc13lond

Year: 1839-1850 (1830s)

Authors:

Subjects: Architecture; Civil engineering; Science

Publisher: London : [William Laxton]

Contributing Library: Northeastern University, Snell Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Northeastern University, Snell Library

  

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1850.] THE CIVIL ENGINEER AND ARCHITECT'S JOURNAL. 281

 

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TOWN HALL, BRUNSWICK. The portion here given forms part of the left wing of a consi- derable building, which is a good specimen of the fine halls of the middle ages, of which we have several examples in our own country. In the north of Europe the Rathhaus, or Hotel de Ville, is always among the chief structures in any town of moderate pre- tensions. The building now under consideration dates from the fourteenth century, and exhibits the peculiarities of an open-worked screen of the Decorated style, carried along the whole of the principal front of the building. This is of a particularly pleasing character, and shows considerable ingenuity in design, and freedom in execution. The tracery in the head of each compartment is carried on a semi- circular arch, and the heads of the windows are liliewise circular. The details are executed in much the same manner as those of the corresponding period in England; and the statues in the niches are those of the reigning dukes and duchesses of Brunswick. A similar arrangement is sometimes found in the cloisters of cathedrals and conventual buildings. The centre piece of the tracery is a pleasing combination. It is a cinquefoil clustered round a circle, and contained within a circle. The lower part is divided into semicircular-headed arches, and these again are divided by trefoil heads. The whole is treated so as to produce an effect of great richness. SANITARY MEASURES. In another column will be found the report of the Sewers Com- mission on the amended plan of drainage they now propose for the metropolis. This speaks for itself, and we need not describe it; but we are glad to find that the Commissioners have attended to the voice of the press, and that one important object is secured— the non-pollution of the Thames in its course through the metro- polis. The nuisance of the sewers has become so great that it can 'i no longer be borne, had Sir John Burgoyne or any other of the 38

  

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Jewels, the glitter of the Russian Court - Hermitage Amsterdam

One of the Hermitage’s greatest treasures is the fabulous jewellery collection. Hundreds of them superbly sparkle in Jewels!. Together with many portraits and a profusion of richly decorated gowns and ensembles once worn by the highest echelons at the Russian court in St Petersburg, they represent two centuries in fashion and jewels. Meet the country’s flamboyant empresses – Anna, Elizabeth and Catherine the Great – as well as grand dukes and duchesses, tsarinas and noble fashionistas of the nineteenth and early twentieth century. For balls and parties they wore dazzling costumes, set off by bijoux carefully selected to demonstrate identity, taste, breeding and wealth. Jewellery might also be designed to provoke or convey secret messages. Pieces were ordered from leading houses like Cartier and Fabergé. Many pieces were lost following the Russian Revolution. Jewels! presents a glittering array of surviving masterpieces, situated in ballrooms and boudoirs like those of the tsars’ Winter Palace.

 

13th June 2016 at Union Chapel, London N1.

 

Country: United States - Texas. Style: Americana.

 

Lineup: Shawn Colvin (v/g), Steve Earle (v/g/octave mandolin/mandolin/harmonica).

 

Shawn Colvin (born in Vermillion, SD) and Steve Earle (born in Fort Monroe, VA and raised in San Antonio, TX) have played a handful of gigs together dating back to 1987. They were now touring to promote a duo album. Mostly songs they wrote together, plus four covers: "Baby’s in Black", "Ruby Tuesday", "Tobacco Road" and Emmylou Harris’ "Raise the Dead". This was the first time I had seen Colvin, but the sixth for Earle. With the Dukes in 96, solo in 97, 05 and 08 and the Dukes and Duchesses in 11. For photos of the last see: www.flickr.com/photos/kmlivemusic/sets/72157628018139372/.

In this photo: Earle plays a Gilchrist octave mandolin.

More information: steveearle.com/, www.facebook.com/SteveEarleMusic/, www.shawncolvin.com/, www.facebook.com/ShawnColvin/.

 

13th June 2016 at Union Chapel, London N1.

 

Country: United States (including Texas). Style: Americana.

 

Lineup: Shawn Colvin (v/g), Steve Earle (v/g/octave mandolin/mandolin/harmonica).

 

Shawn Colvin (born in Vermillion, SD) and Steve Earle (born in Fort Monroe, VA and raised in San Antonio, TX) have played a handful of gigs together dating back to 1987. They were now touring to promote a duo album. Mostly songs they wrote together, plus four covers: "Baby’s in Black", "Ruby Tuesday", "Tobacco Road" and Emmylou Harris’ "Raise the Dead". This was the first time I had seen Colvin, but the sixth for Earle. With the Dukes in 96, solo in 97, 05 and 08 and the Dukes and Duchesses in 11. For photos of the last see: www.flickr.com/photos/kmlivemusic/sets/72157628018139372/.

More information: steveearle.com/, www.facebook.com/SteveEarleMusic/, www.shawncolvin.com/, www.facebook.com/ShawnColvin/.

 

25th October 2011 at Royal Festival Hall, London SE1.

 

Country: United States - Texas. Style: Americana.

 

Lineup: Steve Earle (v/g/bouzouki/mandolin/banjo/harmonica), Allison Moorer (g/keyboards/piano accordion/v). Chris Masterson (g/pedal steel g/mandolin/v), Eleanor Whitmore (fiddle/g/mandolin/v), Kelly Looney (bass g/g/v), Will Rigby (d).

 

Steve Earle was brought up in San Antonio, TX (although actually born in Hampton, VA). From when he was 19 to 50 he lived in Nashville, and now resides in New York City. His period of greatest success was the 1980s, with a series of albums on MCA. In recent years he has often performed acoustic and solo, but this was a return to a band setting. This version of the Dukes (and Duchesses) included two married couples. Earle and his wife Alison Moorer (raised near Mobile, AL), and Chris Masterson and Eleanor Whitmore (from Houston, TX and Denton, TX respectively). It was completed by Kelly Looney (of Nashville, TN), who has been with Earle since 1988, and Will Rigby (of Winston-Salem, NC).

More information: steveearle.com/, www.steveearle.net/.

 

Fitzalan and Howard tombs in the chapel include Eleanor, Countess of Arundel; John, Earl of Arundel; several other Williams, Henrys, Johns and various Howard Dukes and Duchesses

For six word story.

13th June 2016 at Union Chapel, London N1.

 

Country: United States - Texas. Style: Americana.

 

Lineup: Shawn Colvin (v/g), Steve Earle (v/g/octave mandolin/mandolin/harmonica).

 

Shawn Colvin (born in Vermillion, SD) and Steve Earle (born in Fort Monroe, VA and raised in San Antonio, TX) have played a handful of gigs together dating back to 1987. They were now touring to promote a duo album. Mostly songs they wrote together, plus four covers: "Baby’s in Black", "Ruby Tuesday", "Tobacco Road" and Emmylou Harris’ "Raise the Dead". This was the first time I had seen Colvin, but the sixth for Earle. With the Dukes in 96, solo in 97, 05 and 08 and the Dukes and Duchesses in 11. For photos of the last see: www.flickr.com/photos/kmlivemusic/sets/72157628018139372/.

In this photo: Earle plays a Gilchrist A style mandolin.

More information: steveearle.com/, www.facebook.com/SteveEarleMusic/, www.shawncolvin.com/, www.facebook.com/ShawnColvin/.

 

25th October 2011 at Royal Festival Hall, London SE1.

 

Country: United States - Texas. Style: Americana.

 

Lineup: Steve Earle (v/g/bouzouki/mandolin/banjo/harmonica), Allison Moorer (g/keyboards/piano accordion/v). Chris Masterson (g/pedal steel g/mandolin/v), Eleanor Whitmore (fiddle/g/mandolin/v), Kelly Looney (bass g/g/v), Will Rigby (d).

 

Steve Earle was brought up in San Antonio, TX (although actually born in Hampton, VA). From when he was 19 to 50 he lived in Nashville, and now resides in New York City. His period of greatest success was the 1980s, with a series of albums on MCA. In recent years he has often performed acoustic and solo, but this was a return to a band setting. This version of the Dukes (and Duchesses) included two married couples. Earle and his wife Alison Moorer (raised near Mobile, AL), and Chris Masterson and Eleanor Whitmore (from Houston, TX and Denton, TX respectively). It was completed by Kelly Looney (of Nashville, TN), who has been with Earle since 1988, and Will Rigby (of Winston-Salem, NC).

More information: steveearle.com/, www.steveearle.net/.

 

13th June 2016 at Union Chapel, London N1.

 

Country: United States. Style: Americana.

 

Lineup: Shawn Colvin (v/g), Steve Earle (v/g/octave mandolin/mandolin/harmonica).

 

Shawn Colvin (born in Vermillion, SD) and Steve Earle (born in Fort Monroe, VA and raised in San Antonio, TX) have played a handful of gigs together dating back to 1987. They were now touring to promote a duo album. Mostly songs they wrote together, plus four covers: "Baby’s in Black", "Ruby Tuesday", "Tobacco Road" and Emmylou Harris’ "Raise the Dead". This was the first time I had seen Colvin, but the sixth for Earle. With the Dukes in 96, solo in 97, 05 and 08 and the Dukes and Duchesses in 11. For photos of the last see: www.flickr.com/photos/kmlivemusic/sets/72157628018139372/.

In this photo: Colvin plays a Martin D-28.

More information: steveearle.com/, www.facebook.com/SteveEarleMusic/, www.shawncolvin.com/, www.facebook.com/ShawnColvin/.

 

Probably the most beautiful edifice in Brussels, the Town Hall or Hôtel de Ville or Stradhuis (yes, it has a number of names!) stands prominently in the Grand Place Square with its 315 feet tall tower. It is the official seat of the Mayor of Brussels though the administration is located on the Anspach Blvd. Its importance however is not due this. It is a historic structure which had its inception in 1402 when the construction began. On this site there were some wooden structures – shops and inns – which were demolished to make way for the Town Hall.

 

JThe original new building was just the left half or the current structure with a small tower. The architect Jacob van Thienen is credited with this work. In 1444 this building was extended with a right wing which was smaller though to that on the left (the authorities did not want to over run the existing street on the right). Thus the tower is not in the middle. This construction and the current tower were complete in 1449. Jan Van Ruysbroeck is the architect of the tower. In 1455 the statue of St. Michael (shown as triumphant after slaying the Devil) was installed on the top of the Tower. This statue was only removed in 1996 to be replaced by a new one.

 

The original structure has undergone a number of restoration works. In 1695 after the French attack (by troops of De ville roy) the building suffered immense damage. It was immediately thereafter restored. By the early 19th century the structure required restoration due to wear and tear – mainly on the statues adorning the building. In the 1840s another restoration work entailed the beautification of the façade with over 200 little statues of the Dukes and Duchesses of Brabant from 6th century A.D. to the 16th century. The Duchy of Brabant consisted of the Flemish Brabant, Walloon Brabant, Antwerp, Brussels and the Dutch province of North Brabant during the Roman times. It has numerous sculptures on its sides. Ornate and beautiful, the tower has a overpowering presence in the square.

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