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Villa Pisani Dossi ( Como )

Dosso Dossi (1486-1541) Ferrare.

L'archange Saint Michel.

Dresde. Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister.

El castell de Sant'Angelo (en italià Castel Sant'Angelo), conegut també com el mausoleu d'Adrià, és un monument romà situat al marge dret del riu Tíber, davant l'antic Pons Aelius (l'actual pont de Sant'Angelo), a no gaire distància de la Ciutat del Vaticà.

 

Iniciat per l'emperador Adrià l'any 135 amb la finalitat de fer-ne el seu mausoleu personal i familiar, fou acabat per Antoní Pius el 139. El monument, bastit amb pedra de travertí, estava coronat per una quadriga de bronze guiada per l'emperador Adrià. Ben aviat l'edifici canviaria d'ús i es convertiria en una fortificació militar. Es va integrar a la muralla d'Aurelià l'any 403.

 

El nom actual del castell prové de l'any 590, durant una gran epidèmia de pesta que va assolar la ciutat de Roma. El papa de l'època, Gregori I, va veure l'arcàngel Sant Miquel al capdamunt del castell embeinant l'espasa, cosa que significava l'acabament de l'epidèmia. Per commemorar aquesta aparició, es va coronar l'edifici amb l'estàtua d'un àngel: primer va ser una escultura de marbre de Raffaello da Montelupo i, des del 1753, n'és una de bronze de Pierre van Verschaffelt sobre un dibuix de Bernini.

 

Des del 1277, el castell està connectat amb la Ciutat del Vaticà mitjançant un corredor fortificat, anomenat el Passetto, d'uns 800 metres de llargària.

 

La fortalesa fou el refugi del papa Climent VII durant el setge i saqueig de Roma de l'any 1527, dut a terme per les tropes de l'emperador Carles I.

 

Fins al segle XIX, el castell servirà de presó política del papat. El 21 de juliol del 1871 s'arria la bandera pontifícia i l'exèrcit italià pren possessió de l'edifici.

 

Restaurat al començament del segle XX, el castell de Sant'Angelo va restar aïllat de les construccions dels voltants fins fins al 1934. Des del 1925 és un museu nacional que allotja una col·lecció de pintura (amb frescos de Perino del Vaga, Antonio da Sangallo el Jove, Dosso Dossi i Lorenzo Lotto, entre d'altres) i armadures.

 

Dosso Dossi (1486-1541) Ferrare.

L'archange Saint Michel.

Dresde. Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister.

Dosso Dossi (1486-1541) Ferrare.

L'archange Saint Michel.

Dresde. Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister.

Цифровая репродукция находится в интернет-музее Gallerix.ru

Dosso Dossi (1486-1541) Battista Dossi (1500-1548) Ferrare.

Saint George. 1540.

Dresde. Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister.

i have this one taken on a day when i was lucky that i had clouds in the sky, most of the time we had only blue sky.

for photos i the details of clouds in the sky that make the different in a photo.

 

The history:

 

Ferrara listen is a city and comune in Emilia-Romagna, northern Italy, capital city of the Province of Ferrara. It is situated 50 km north-northeast of Bologna, on the Po di Volano, a branch channel of the main stream of the Po River, located 5 km north. The town has broad streets and numerous palaces dating from the 14th century and 15th century, when it hosted the court of the House of Este. For its beauty and cultural importance it has been qualified by UNESCO as World Heritage Site. Modern times have brought a renewal of industrial activity. Ferrara is on the main rail line from Bologna to Padua and Venice, and has branches to Ravenna, Poggio Rusco (for Suzzara) and Codigoro. In 2006, due to its important historical significance, Ferrara became the headquarters of the Italian Hermitage Museum. It is the fifth city in the world to have been linked with the Russian museum. From this union was born the Hermitage-Italy

 

The origin of Ferrara is uncertain, it was probably settled by the inhabitants of the lagoons at the mouth of Po river; there are two early centers of settlement, one round the cathedral,[2] the other, the castrum bizantino, being the San Pietro district, on the opposite shore, where the Primaro empties into the Volano channel. Ferrara appears first in a document of the Lombard king Desiderius of 753 AD,[3] as a city forming part of the Exarchate of Ravenna. Desiderius pledged a Lombard ducatus ferrariae ("Duchy of Ferrara") in 757 to Pope Stephen II. After 984 it was a fief of Tedaldo, count of Modena and Canossa, nephew of the emperor Otto I. It afterwards made itself independent, and in 1101 was taken by siege by the countess Matilda. At this time it was mainly dominated by several great families, among them the prominent Adelardi

In 1146, Guglielmo II of Adelardi, the last of the House of Adelardi, died, and his property passed, as the dowry of his niece the Marchesella, to Obizzo I of Este. There was considerable hostility between the newly entered family and the prominent Salinguerra family, but after considerable struggles Azzo VII of Este was nominated perpetual podestà in 1242; in 1259 he took Ezzelino of Verona prisoner in battle. His grandson, Obizzo II (1264–1293), succeeded him, and he was made perpetual lord of the city by the population. The House of Este was from henceforth settled in Ferrara. In 1289 he was also chosen as lord of Modena, one year later he was made lord of Reggio. Niccolò III (1393–1441) received several popes with great magnificence, especially Eugene IV, who held a council here in 1438. His son Borso received the title of duke for the imperial fiefs of Modena and Reggio from Emperor Frederick III in 1452 (in which year Girolamo Savonarola was born here), and in 1471 was made duke of Ferrara by Pope Paul II. Ercole I (1471–1505) carried on a war with Venice and increased the magnificence of the city.

 

Renaissance :

 

During the reign of Ercole d'Este I, one of the most significant patrons of the arts in late 15th and early 16th century Italy after the Medici, Ferrara grew into a cultural center, renowned for music as well as for visual arts. The painters established links with Flemish artists and their techniques, exchanging influences in the colors and composition choices. Composers came to Ferrara from many parts of Europe, especially France and Flanders; Josquin Des Prez worked for Duke Ercole for a time (producing the Missa Hercules dux Ferrariæ, which he wrote for him); Jacob Obrecht came to Ferrara twice (and died during an outbreak of plague there in 1505); and Antoine Brumel served as principal musician from 1505. Alfonso I, son of Ercole, was also an important patron; his preference for instrumental music resulted in Ferrara becoming an important center of composition for the lute. The architecture of Ferrara benefitted from the genius of Biagio Rossetti, who was asked in 1484 by Ercole I to redesign the plan of the city. The resulting "Addizione Erculea" is one of the most important and beautiful examples of renaissance city planning and contributed to the selection of Ferrara as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

Alfonso married the notorious Lucrezia Borgia, and continued the war with Venice with success. In 1509 he was excommunicated by Pope Julius II, and he overcame the pontifical army in 1512 defending Ravenna. Lucrezia, together with other members of the Este house, is buried in the convent of Corpus Domini.

 

Gaston de Foix fell in the battle, in which he was supporting Alfonso. With the succeeding popes he was able to make peace. He was the patron of Ariosto from 1518 onwards. His son Ercole II married Renée of France, daughter of Louis XII of France; he too embellished Ferrara during his reign (1534–1559).

His son Alfonso II married Lucrezia, daughter of grand-duke Cosimo I of Tuscany, then Barbara, sister of the emperor Maximilian II and finally Margherita Gonzaga, daughter of the duke of Mantua. He raised the glory of Ferrara to its highest point, and was the patron of Tasso, Guarini, and Cremonini – favouring, as the princes of his house had always done, the arts and sciences. During the reign of Alfonso II, Ferrara once again developed an opulent court with an impressive musical establishment, rivaled in Italy only by the adjacent city of Venice, and the traditional musical centers such as Rome, Florence and Milan. Composers such as Luzzasco Luzzaschi, Lodovico Agostini, and later Carlo Gesualdo, represented the avant-garde tendency of the composers there, writing for gifted virtuoso performers, including the famous concerto di donne — the three virtuoso female singers Laura Peverara, Anna Guarini, and Livia d'Arco. Vincenzo Galilei praised the work of Luzzaschi, and Girolamo Frescobaldi studied with him.

 

The city was much affected by the 1570 Ferrara earthquake.

 

Alfonso had no legitimate male heir, and in 1597 Ferrara was claimed as a vacant fief by Pope Clement VIII, as was also Comacchio.

 

Modern history :

 

Ferrara remained a part of the Papal States from 1598 to 1859, when it became part of the Kingdom of Italy. A fortress was constructed by Pope Paul V on the site of the castle called "Castel Tedaldo", at the south-west angle of the town, that was occupied by an Austrian garrison from 1832 until 1859. All of the fortress was dismantled following the birth of the Kingdom of Italy and the bricks used for new constructions all over the town.

 

On August 23, 1944, the Ferrara synthetic rubber plant was a target of Strategic bombing during World War II.

  

Main sights :

 

The town is still surrounded by more than 9 kilometres of ancient walls, mainly built in the 15th and 16th centuries.[4] Together with those of Lucca, they are the best preserved Renaissance walls in Italy.

 

The most iconic building of the town is the imponent Castello Estense: sited in the very centre of the town, it's a brick building surrounded by a moat, with four massive bastions. It was built starting in 1385 and partly restored in 1554; the pavilions on the top of the towers date from the latter year.

 

The ancient City Hall, renovated in the 18th century, was the earlier residence of the Este family. Close by it is the former Cathedral of Saint George, begun in 1135, when the Romanesque lower part of the main façade and the side façades were completed. According to a now lost inscription the church was built in 1135 by Guglielmo I of Adelardi (d. 1146), who is buried in it. The sculpture of the main portal is the signed work of the "artifex" Nicholaus, mentioned in the lost inscription as the "architect" for the church. The upper part of the main façade, with arcades of pointed arches, dates from the 13th century, while the lower part of the protiro or projecting porch and the main portal are by Nicholaus. The recumbent lions guarding the entrance are replacements of the originals, now in the narthex of the church. The elaborate reflief sculptures depicting Last Judgement gracing the second story of the porch above date from the thirteenth century. The interior was restored in the baroque style in 1712. The campanile, in the Renaissance style, dates from 1451–1493, but the last storey was added at the end of the 16th century.

 

A little way off is the university, which has faculties of law, architecture, pharmacy, medicine and natural science; the library has valuable manuscripts, including part of that of the Orlando furioso and letters by Tasso. Its famous graduates include Nicolaus Copernicus (1503) and Paracelsus. Near the main university facilities it raises the University of Ferrara Botanic Garden.

 

Ferrara has many early Renaissance palaces, often retaining terracotta decorations; few towns of Italy as small have so many, though most are comparatively small in size. Among them may be noted those in the north quarter (especially the four at the intersection of its two main streets), which was added by Ercole I in 1492–1505, from the plans of Biagio Rossetti, and hence called the Addizione Erculea.

 

Among the finest palaces is Palazzo dei Diamanti (Diamond Palace), named after the diamond points into which the façade's stone blocks are cut. The palazzo houses the National Picture Gallery, with a large collection of the school of Ferrara, which first rose to prominence in the latter half of the 15th century, with Cosimo Tura, Francesco Cossa and Ercole dei Roberti. Noted masters of the 16th century School of Ferrara (Painting) include Lorenzo Costa and Dosso Dossi, the most eminent of all, Girolamo da Carpi and Benvenuto Tisi (il Garofalo).

 

The Casa Romei is the best preserved Renaissance building in Ferrara. It was the residence of Giovanni Romei, related to Este family by marriage to Polissena d'Este and likely the work of the court architect Pietro Bono Brasavola. It did not fall into decay because it was inherited by the nuns of the Corpus Domini order who lived there without making any changes to its structure. Much of the decoration in the inner rooms has been saved. There are fresco cycles in the Sala delle Sibille (Room of Sibyls), with its original terracotta fireplace bearing the coat of arms of Giovanni Romei, in the adjoining Saletta dei Profeti (Room of the Prophets), depicting allegories from the Bible and in other rooms, some of which were commissioned by cardinal Ippolito d'Este and painted by the school of Camillo and Cesare Filippi (16th century).

 

The Palazzo Schifanoia (sans souci) was built in 1385 for Alberto V d'Este. The palazzo includes frescoes depicting the life of Borso d'Este, the signs of the zodiac and allegorical representations of the months. The vestibule was decorated with stucco mouldings by Domenico di Paris. The building also contains fine choir-books with miniatures and a collection of coins and Renaissance medals.

 

The City Historical Archives contain a relevant amount of historical documents, starting from 15th century. The Diocesan Historical Archive is more ancient, mentioned in documents in A.D. 955, and contains precious documents collected across the centuries by the clergy.

 

The Corpus Domini Monastery contains tombs of the House of Este, including Alfonso I, Alfonso II, Ercole I, Ercole II, as well as Lucrezia Borgia, Eleanor of Aragon, and many more.

 

The Ferrara Synagogue and Jewish Museum are located in the heart of the mediæval centre, close to the cathedral and the Castello Estense. This street was part of the Jewish Quarter in which the Jews were separated from the rest of the population of Ferrara from 1627 to 1859.

 

Giovanni di Niccolò de Lutero dit Dosso Dossi 1497-1548. Ferrare. Saint Jérôme pénitent. Louvre

Ferrara is a city and commune in Emilia Romagna, northern Italy, capital of the province of Ferrara. It is located 50 kilometers (31 miles) north-north-east of Bologna, in the Po di Volano, a channel of the main stream of the River Po, located 5 km (3 miles) to the north. The city has wide streets and numerous palaces dating from the 14th and 15th centuries, when it was the seat of the court of the House of Este. For its beauty and cultural importance it has been qualified by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Modern times have brought a renewal of industrial activity. Ferrara is on the main railway line from Bologna to Padua and Venice, and has branches to Ravenna, Poggio Rusco (by Suzzara) and Codigoro .About this sound

 

Civic and secular monuments

The city is still surrounded by more than 9 kilometers (6 miles) of old, mainly built in the 16th to the 15th and. Along with those of Lucca, that are the best preserved Renaissance walls of Italy.

 

The imposing brick Castle of the East located in the center of the city is an icon of Ferrara. The castle, erected in 1385, is surrounded by a moat, with four massive bastions. The pavilions at the top of the towers date back to the 16th century refurbishment.

 

The town hall, renovated in the 18th century, was the former residence of the family. Nearby is the ancient cathedral of San Giorgio, the Romanesque lower part of the main facade and side facades were completed for the first time in 1135. According to a now lost inscription the church had been commissioned by Guglielmo I of Adelardi (d. 1146). The sculpture of the main portal was signed by a Nicholaus, mentioned in the lost inscription as Romanesque architect of the church. The upper part of the main facade, with arcades of semicircular arches, dates from the 13th century. The lions guarding the entrance reclined are copies of the originals, now in the atrium of the church. An elaborate relief of the 13th century representing the final judgment is found on the second floor of the porch. The interior was restored in the Baroque style in 1712. The bell tower, in the Renaissance style, dates from 1451 to 1493, but was added the highest floor at the end of the 16th century. The bell tower is still incomplete, missing an additional floor and a Tapered cap, as can be seen from numerous historical prints and paintings on the subject.

 

Nearby is the University of Ferrara; The university library starts from the furious Orlando manuscript and Tasso's letters. His famous graduates include Nicolaus Copernicus (1503) and Paracelsus. The campus also houses the Botanic Garden of the University of Ferrara.

 

Unlike other cities, Ferrara retains many of the early Quattrocento palaces, often retaining terracotta decorations, although most are of relatively small size. Among them are those from the north (especially the four at the intersection of the two main streets), which was added by Ercole I in 1492-1505, from the plans of Biagio Rossetti, and is therefore called Addizione Erculea.

 

Among the most distinguished places is the Palazzo dei Diamanti (Diamond Palace), the name of the diamonds of the points where stone blocks of the facade are cut. The palace houses the National Pinacoteca, with a large collection of the school of Ferrara, which first rose to prominence in the latter half of the 15th century, with Cosimo Tura, Francesco Cossa and Ercole dei Roberti. Amos known from the 16th century School of Ferrara include Lorenzo Costa and Dosso Dossi, the most eminent of all, Girolamo da Carpi and Benvenuto Tisi (Garofalo IL).

 

La Casa Romei is perhaps the best preserved Renaissance building in Ferrara. It was the residence of Giovanni Romei, related by marriage to the Este family, and is likely the work of court architect Pietro Bono Brasavola. The occupation of the palace by the nuns of the Order of Corpus Christi prevented its destruction. Much of the decoration of the interior rooms has been saved. There are cycles of frescoes in the Sala de las Sibille (Room of the Sibyls), with its original terracotta fireplace with the coat of arms of Giovanni Romei, in the adjoining Saletta dei Profeti (Hall of the Prophets), representing allegories of the Bible and In the other rooms, some of which were commissioned by Cardinal Ippolito d'Este and painted by the school of Camillo and Cesare Filippi (16th century).

 

Palazzo Schifanoia (Sans Souci) was built in 1385 by Alberto V d'Este. The palace includes frescoes depicting the life of Borso d'Este, the signs of the zodiac and allegorical representations of the months. The lobby was decorated with stucco molded by Domenico di Paris.

  

Ferrara es una ciudad y comuna en Emilia Romagna , norte de Italia, capital de la provincia de Ferrara . Está situado a 50 kilómetros (31 millas) al norte-noreste de Bolonia , en el Po di Volano, un canal de derivación de la corriente principal del río Po , situado a 5 km (3 millas) al norte. La ciudad cuenta con amplias calles y numerosos palacios que datan de los siglos 14 y 15, cuando fue sede de la corte de la Casa de Este . Por su belleza e importancia cultural que ha sido calificado por la UNESCO como patrimonio de la humanidad . Los tiempos modernos han traído una renovación de la actividad industrial. Ferrara está en la línea ferroviaria principal de Bolonia a Padua y Venecia , y tiene sucursales a Rávena , Poggio Rusco (por Suzzara ) y Codigoro .Acerca de este sonido

 

Cívica y monumentos seculares

La ciudad todavía está rodeado por más de 9 kilómetros (6 millas) de las antiguas, construidas principalmente en el 16 al siglos 15 y. [3] Junto con los de Lucca , que son las murallas renacentistas mejor conservados de Italia.

 

El ladrillo imponente Castillo de los Este situada en el centro de la ciudad es un icono de Ferrara. El castillo, erigido en 1385, está rodeado por un foso , con cuatro bastiones masivos. Los pabellones en la parte superior de las torres datan de la remodelación del siglo 16.

 

El ayuntamiento, reformado en el siglo 18, fue la residencia anterior del Este familiar. Muy cerca está la antigua catedral de San Giorgio , El románico parte inferior de la principal fachada y las fachadas laterales se completó por primera vez en 1135. De acuerdo con una inscripción ahora perdida la iglesia había sido encargado por Guglielmo I de Adelardi (m. 1146) . La escultura del portal principal fue firmado por un Nicholaus, mencionado en la inscripción perdida como arquitecto románico de la iglesia. La parte superior de la fachada principal, con arcadas de arcos de medio punto, data del siglo 13. Los leones que guardan la entrada reclinadas son copias de los originales, ahora en el atrio de la iglesia. Un alivio elaborada del siglo 13 que representa el juicio final se encuentra en el segundo piso del porche. El interior fue restaurado en el barroco estilo en 1712. El campanario , en el Renaissance estilo, data de 1451 hasta 1493, pero se añadió el piso más alto al final del siglo 16. El campanario es aún incompleta, falta un piso adicional y una tapa cónica, como se puede observar a partir de numerosas impresiones históricas y pinturas sobre el tema.

 

Muy cerca se encuentra la Universidad de Ferrara ; La biblioteca universitaria parte del manuscrito del Orlando furioso y cartas de Tasso . Sus famosos graduados incluyen Nicolaus Copernicus (1503) y Paracelso . El campus también alberga el Jardín Botánico de la Universidad de Ferrara .

 

A diferencia de otras ciudades, Ferrara conserva muchos de los primeros Quattrocento palacios, a menudo reteniendo terracota decoraciones, aunque la mayoría son de tamaño relativamente pequeño. Entre ellos se encuentran los de la parte del norte (especialmente los cuatro en la intersección de las dos calles principales), que se añadió por Ercole I en 1492-1505, a partir de los planes de Biagio Rossetti , y por ello se llama Addizione Erculea .

 

Entre los lugares más distinguidos es el Palazzo dei Diamanti ( Diamond Palace ), el nombre de los diamantes de los puntos en los que se cortan bloques de piedra de la fachada. El palacio alberga la Pinacoteca Nacional, con una gran colección de la escuela de Ferrara, que primero se levantó a la prominencia en la última mitad del siglo 15, con Cosimo Tura , Francesco Cossa y Ercole dei Roberti . Amos conocidos del siglo 16 Escuela de Ferrara incluyen Lorenzo Costa y Dosso Dossi , el más eminente de todo, Girolamo da Carpi y Benvenuto Tisi (Garofalo IL) .

 

La Casa Romei es quizás el edificio renacentista mejor conservado en Ferrara. Fue la residencia de Giovanni Romei, relacionado por matrimonio con la familia Este, y es probable que el trabajo del arquitecto de la corte Pietro Bono Brasavola . La ocupación del palacio por las monjas de la orden de Corpus Christi impidió su destrucción. Gran parte de la decoración de las habitaciones interiores se ha guardado. Hay ciclos de frescos en la Sala de las Sibille (Sala de Sibilas), con su original de terracota chimenea con el escudo de armas de Giovanni Romei, en el colindante Saletta dei Profeti (Sala de los Profetas), representando alegorías de la Biblia y en la otra habitaciones, algunas de las cuales fueron encargados por el cardenal Ippolito d'Este y pintado por la escuela de Camillo y Cesare Filippi (siglo 16).

 

El Palazzo Schifanoia ( Sans Souci ) fue construido en 1385 por Alberto V d'Este . El palacio incluye frescos que representan la vida de Borso d'Este , los signos del zodiaco y alegóricas representaciones de los meses. El vestíbulo estaba decorado con estuco moldeados por Domenico di Paris .

 

An array of enticing visual clues has given rise to many theories about Dosso Dossi's Mythological Scene, but no one has determined the painting's precise meaning. The cupids in the sky, the lush setting, and the sensuous nude lying on a bed of flowers indicate that the subject is love. The male figure on the right is the Greek god Pan, a satyr. In Renaissance allegories he personifies lust, since he seduced the nymphs with the music of the pipes held in his left hand. The sleeping nude in the foreground may be the nymph Echo, who spurned Pan for Narcissus. The old woman at the center of the group could be Echo's protector Terra, who sits above her and shields her from harm. Next to the old woman and dressed in a green gown, billowing red cape, and armor is a mysterious and yet to be identified woman. Her costume indicates that she is likely a goddess. Dossi painted this figure and then changed his mind and covered her up with a landscape. She was uncovered again during a restoration in the 1800s.

 

Additional clues also tell scholars that the painting was cut down by about six inches on the left side at some point. The arm of another cupid can be seen at the painting's upper left edge, and a x-radiograph reveals the partially cut-off figure of a man under the lower part of the landscape. X-ray photographs also display various pentimenti, or alterations made by the artist. Initially, Dossi included a suit of armour and a sword hanging from the lemon tree, a cello held by the woman in the red cape, and a downward gaze for the old woman.

 

[Oil on canvas, 64.5 x 57.25 inches]

 

gandalfsgallery.blogspot.co.uk/2012/07/dosso-dossi-mythol...

The nymph and the satyr, by Dosso Dossi | | August 9, 2014 | Canon EOS 5D Mark III | ¹⁄₂₅ sec at f/4.0 2000

Title: Orlando furioso. /

Identifier: orlandofurios00ario

Year: 1556 (1550s)

Authors: Ariosto, Lodovico, 1474-1533 Ruscelli, Girolamo, d. ca. 1565 Pigna, Giovan Battista, 1529-1575 Rota, Giovanni Battista, fl. 1556 Dossi, Dosso, d. 1542 Valgrisius, Vincentius, fl. 1543-1575

Subjects:

Publisher: In Venetia, // Appresso Vicenzo Valgrisi, nella bottega d'Erasmo. /

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

Ne la buca infintale ^f, tolf> intendeDi Liàu il mal ; ma via aia fi confluitoDal fumo jurtiejce ,e al-volatorjiiofcende, iJoj^jJ?.- E nel terreflre paradtfò è pianto ì ^WT^i>VtJ\ Nel ael poi con Gioitami ilfentier prende , //^Sp?̧0 y&Et infornato (To<rmcoft à punto [ [ *^ >>./ : 2%WJ Prende il fenno d Orlando. e del fuo parte F fi^-Ffcfe , e c/?/^/.! r ;«)/?>•» Tf III _, e parte. VV.

 

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IN CLVESTO CANTO TRENTESIMO CLVARTO SH A LESSEMPIO cfvnpptentilìiiitoci: sfrenato amore nella per(ònadAlceIie,cV per Iadure7zadi Lidia in non piegar(ì mai per alcun tuo merito ad amarlo, ti vede, non diremo noi lingratitudine, comeila della poi ladichi-ira, mapìùtoflola lèrmeZ70,cV la (ìabilità dellanimo dvna valorofà donna ,la quale vedendoche colui per la rifpolta del padre di lei,in non volergliela dai per moglie,!! volc;c furiolamcnte à v-(cir della fedeltà debita a lui,col fuoSi ;nore ,& à far cole, che tornino in tanto danno, & inquiera-niento della donna a mata, lì ufo lue valorofamentc a non indurli ad amai lo mai. Et (è lAutor quifìnge chella di ciò fiaicueiifsiinamente e litigata nellaltro mondo, cdadire,cheauenifle per laltrecircoflanie che in quella (uà vendetta ella aggiunfe, per condurlo à morte. Diche sha altroue di-fcoriò à pieno, per ellèr caio degno di molta confidci ationc più per aramae(lramento,che per difefade gli amanti. C^fNTO TREN

  

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Title: Orlando furioso. /

Identifier: orlandofurios00ario

Year: 1556 (1550s)

Authors: Ariosto, Lodovico, 1474-1533 Ruscelli, Girolamo, d. ca. 1565 Pigna, Giovan Battista, 1529-1575 Rota, Giovanni Battista, fl. 1556 Dossi, Dosso, d. 1542 Valgrisius, Vincentius, fl. 1543-1575

Subjects:

Publisher: In Venetia, // Appresso Vicenzo Valgrisi, nella bottega d'Erasmo. /

  

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About This Book: Catalog Entry

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Circe and her Lovers in a Landscape

 

oil on canvas, c. 1525

DOSSO DOSSI

 

Dosso Dossi. 1490- 1542. Mantoue et Ferrare. Portrait d'homme dit Portrait de César Borgia. Louvre. Le modèle n'a pas été identifié.

 

Dosso Dossi. From 1490 to 1542. Mantua and Ferrara. Portrait of a Man Portrait of Cesare Borgia said. Louvre. The model has not been identified.

Title: Orlando furioso. /

Identifier: orlandofurios00ario

Year: 1556 (1550s)

Authors: Ariosto, Lodovico, 1474-1533 Ruscelli, Girolamo, d. ca. 1565 Pigna, Giovan Battista, 1529-1575 Rota, Giovanni Battista, fl. 1556 Dossi, Dosso, d. 1542 Valgrisius, Vincentius, fl. 1543-1575

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Publisher: In Venetia, // Appresso Vicenzo Valgrisi, nella bottega d'Erasmo. /

  

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Gr.vi cofe fa perfìrada ilpazgg Orlando.^f Mandrie ardo dà Rupvier la morte ;Sta/Si /.t belli moglie in affettando,Chei Tenga 3 e pena [ente acerba e forte ,Ma à lui, chè fh ito, a la gir quandoPromcffo hauetta, aliar yietb la forte.Va co fratelli intanto ardito e baldoPer darfoccorfo aljuo Signor, Rinaldo.

  

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Title: Orlando furioso. /

Identifier: orlandofurios00ario

Year: 1556 (1550s)

Authors: Ariosto, Lodovico, 1474-1533 Ruscelli, Girolamo, d. ca. 1565 Pigna, Giovan Battista, 1529-1575 Rota, Giovanni Battista, fl. 1556 Dossi, Dosso, d. 1542 Valgrisius, Vincentius, fl. 1543-1575

Subjects:

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Ne la buca infintale ^f, tolf> intendeDi Liàu il mal ; ma via aia fi confluitoDal fumo jurtiejce ,e al-volatorjiiofcende, iJoj^jJ?.- E nel terreflre paradtfò è pianto ì ^WT^i>VtJ\ Nel ael poi con Gioitami ilfentier prende , //^Sp?̧0 y&Et infornato (To<rmcoft à punto [ [ *^ >>./ : 2%WJ Prende il fenno d Orlando. e del fuo parte F fi^-Ffcfe , e c/?/^/.! r ;«)/?>•» Tf III _, e parte. VV.

  

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London, National Gallery

high resolution photo

 

Bacchus, god of wine, emerges with his followers from the landscape to the right. Falling in love with Ariadne on sight, he leaps from his chariot, drawn by two cheetahs, towards her. Ariadne had been abandoned on the Greek island of Naxos by Theseus, whose ship is shown in the distance. The picture shows her initial fear of Bacchus, but he raised her to heaven and turned her into a constellation, represented by the stars above her head.

 

The programme for the series was probably devised by a humanist scholar in the service of Alfonso d'Este. The subject of Bacchus and Ariadne is derived from the classical authors Ovid and Catullus.

 

The painting is one of a famous series by Bellini, Titian and the Ferrarese artist Dosso Dossi, commissioned for the Camerino d'Alabastro, (Alabaster Room) in the Ducal Palace, Ferrara, by Alfonso d'Este, Duke of Ferrara, who in around 1510 tried to include Michelangelo and Raphael among the contributors. Titian's painting was in fact a substitute for one with a similar subject which the Duke had commissioned from Raphael. Bellini's 'Feast of the Gods' for this room is dated 1514, and the three works by Titian were painted 1518-25.

  

Edited By Angelica~ " HOLY DAUGHTER "

 

Lucrezia Borgia (Italian pronunciation: [luˈkrɛtsja ˈbɔrdʒa]; Catalan: Lucrècia; Catalan pronunciation: [luˈkrɛsiə]; 18 April 1480 – 24 June 1519) was the daughter of Pope Alexander VI and Vannozza dei Cattanei. Her brothers included Cesare Borgia, Giovanni Borgia, and Gioffre Borgia.

 

Lucrezia's family later came to epitomize the ruthless Machiavellian politics and sexual corruption alleged to be characteristic of the Renaissance Papacy. Lucrezia was cast as a femme fatale, a role she has been portrayed as in many artworks, novels, and films.

 

Very little is known of Lucrezia, and the extent of her complicity in the political machinations of her father and brothers is unclear. They certainly arranged several marriages for her to important or powerful men in order to advance their own political ambitions. Lucrezia was married to Giovanni Sforza (Lord of Pesaro), Alfonso of Aragon (Duke of Bisceglie), and Alfonso I d'Este (Duke of Ferrara). Tradition has it that Alfonso of Aragon was an illegitimate son of the King of Naples and that her brother Cesare may have had him murdered after his political value waned.

     

Possible portrait of Lucrezia Borgia assumed to be by Dosso Dossi circa 1518

Several rumours have persisted throughout the years, primarily speculating as to the nature of the extravagant parties thrown by the Borgia family. Many of these concern allegations of incest, poisoning, and murder on her part; however, no historical basis for these rumours has ever been brought forward beyond allegations made by rival parties.

It is rumoured that Lucrezia was in possession of a hollow ring that she used frequently to poison drinks.

An early 20th-century painting by Frank Cadogan Cowper that hangs in the London art gallery, Tate Britain, portrays Lucrezia taking the place of her father, Pope Alexander VI, at an official Vatican meeting. This apparently documents an actual event, although the precise moment depicted (a Franciscan friar kissing Lucrezia's feet) was invented by the artist

  

The Borgia Family lyrics

   

Lucrezia, Giovanni,

Gioffre and Cesare

Italian barmy army,

The Borgia Family

 

Our daddy was Rodrigo

I had a monstrous ego

Where he makes trouble we go

The Borgia Family

 

Our tale begins Renaissance Spain,

It's leaders were a shower

So I run out of patience

So began in my quest for power

 

I splashed my cash to all the papal cardinals in hope

That they'd be bought,

They were in short

And I became the Pope

 

More power than I oughta

Blood's thicker than water

Appoint my sons and daughter

To run a dynasty

 

With daddy as the Pope I could do as I pleased was ace,

I'd kill a man who dared

Like invade my personal space

I found a husband for Lucrezia

Rich Giovanni Sforza, do you love him?

Yes of course but love is power and money more so

 

Now married to the Sforza's

This opens up new doorsas

They world bows down before us

The Borgia/Sforza family

 

Yes, and while we're at it we will marry son Gioffre

Aged twelve but so what soon will be

The Borgia/Sforza and the Naples family

 

When the Sforza family

Eventually bores ya

With just annul the marriage

If he refuses to divorce ya

 

Don't I get a say?

Don't fret, for you another man I'll get

Alfonzo of Aragon

I like him this could go on and on!

 

You like him I've gone off him

His pretty face makes me wince

You killed him!

Yeah I'm the model for

Machiavelli's Prince

 

Giovanni run the army but Cesare said

No way! I'll kill you if you cross me

I might kill you anyway

I am the mostest powerfulest, evilest of all

As long as dad's alive

There's not a single chance I'll fall

 

Huh aaaaah!

Awww nooo

 

We suddenly lost status

It seemes the whole world hate us

They excommunicate us

The Borgia Family

 

R.I.P.

  

Full title: The Adoration of the Kings

Artist: Dosso Dossi

Date made: probably 1530-42

Source: www.nationalgalleryimages.co.uk/

Contact: picture.library@nationalgallery.co.uk

 

Copyright © The National Gallery, London

Ferrara is a city and commune in Emilia Romagna, northern Italy, capital of the province of Ferrara. It is located 50 kilometers (31 miles) north-north-east of Bologna, in the Po di Volano, a channel of the main stream of the River Po, located 5 km (3 miles) to the north. The city has wide streets and numerous palaces dating from the 14th and 15th centuries, when it was the seat of the court of the House of Este. For its beauty and cultural importance it has been qualified by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Modern times have brought a renewal of industrial activity. Ferrara is on the main railway line from Bologna to Padua and Venice, and has branches to Ravenna, Poggio Rusco (by Suzzara) and Codigoro .About this sound

 

Civic and secular monuments

The city is still surrounded by more than 9 kilometers (6 miles) of old, mainly built in the 16th to the 15th and. Along with those of Lucca, that are the best preserved Renaissance walls of Italy.

 

The imposing brick Castle of the East located in the center of the city is an icon of Ferrara. The castle, erected in 1385, is surrounded by a moat, with four massive bastions. The pavilions at the top of the towers date back to the 16th century refurbishment.

 

The town hall, renovated in the 18th century, was the former residence of the family. Nearby is the ancient cathedral of San Giorgio, the Romanesque lower part of the main facade and side facades were completed for the first time in 1135. According to a now lost inscription the church had been commissioned by Guglielmo I of Adelardi (d. 1146). The sculpture of the main portal was signed by a Nicholaus, mentioned in the lost inscription as Romanesque architect of the church. The upper part of the main facade, with arcades of semicircular arches, dates from the 13th century. The lions guarding the entrance reclined are copies of the originals, now in the atrium of the church. An elaborate relief of the 13th century representing the final judgment is found on the second floor of the porch. The interior was restored in the Baroque style in 1712. The bell tower, in the Renaissance style, dates from 1451 to 1493, but was added the highest floor at the end of the 16th century. The bell tower is still incomplete, missing an additional floor and a Tapered cap, as can be seen from numerous historical prints and paintings on the subject.

 

Nearby is the University of Ferrara; The university library starts from the furious Orlando manuscript and Tasso's letters. His famous graduates include Nicolaus Copernicus (1503) and Paracelsus. The campus also houses the Botanic Garden of the University of Ferrara.

 

Unlike other cities, Ferrara retains many of the early Quattrocento palaces, often retaining terracotta decorations, although most are of relatively small size. Among them are those from the north (especially the four at the intersection of the two main streets), which was added by Ercole I in 1492-1505, from the plans of Biagio Rossetti, and is therefore called Addizione Erculea.

 

Among the most distinguished places is the Palazzo dei Diamanti (Diamond Palace), the name of the diamonds of the points where stone blocks of the facade are cut. The palace houses the National Pinacoteca, with a large collection of the school of Ferrara, which first rose to prominence in the latter half of the 15th century, with Cosimo Tura, Francesco Cossa and Ercole dei Roberti. Amos known from the 16th century School of Ferrara include Lorenzo Costa and Dosso Dossi, the most eminent of all, Girolamo da Carpi and Benvenuto Tisi (Garofalo IL).

 

La Casa Romei is perhaps the best preserved Renaissance building in Ferrara. It was the residence of Giovanni Romei, related by marriage to the Este family, and is likely the work of court architect Pietro Bono Brasavola. The occupation of the palace by the nuns of the Order of Corpus Christi prevented its destruction. Much of the decoration of the interior rooms has been saved. There are cycles of frescoes in the Sala de las Sibille (Room of the Sibyls), with its original terracotta fireplace with the coat of arms of Giovanni Romei, in the adjoining Saletta dei Profeti (Hall of the Prophets), representing allegories of the Bible and In the other rooms, some of which were commissioned by Cardinal Ippolito d'Este and painted by the school of Camillo and Cesare Filippi (16th century).

 

Palazzo Schifanoia (Sans Souci) was built in 1385 by Alberto V d'Este. The palace includes frescoes depicting the life of Borso d'Este, the signs of the zodiac and allegorical representations of the months. The lobby was decorated with stucco molded by Domenico di Paris.

  

Ferrara es una ciudad y comuna en Emilia Romagna , norte de Italia, capital de la provincia de Ferrara . Está situado a 50 kilómetros (31 millas) al norte-noreste de Bolonia , en el Po di Volano, un canal de derivación de la corriente principal del río Po , situado a 5 km (3 millas) al norte. La ciudad cuenta con amplias calles y numerosos palacios que datan de los siglos 14 y 15, cuando fue sede de la corte de la Casa de Este . Por su belleza e importancia cultural que ha sido calificado por la UNESCO como patrimonio de la humanidad . Los tiempos modernos han traído una renovación de la actividad industrial. Ferrara está en la línea ferroviaria principal de Bolonia a Padua y Venecia , y tiene sucursales a Rávena , Poggio Rusco (por Suzzara ) y Codigoro .Acerca de este sonido

 

Cívica y monumentos seculares

La ciudad todavía está rodeado por más de 9 kilómetros (6 millas) de las antiguas, construidas principalmente en el 16 al siglos 15 y. [3] Junto con los de Lucca , que son las murallas renacentistas mejor conservados de Italia.

 

El ladrillo imponente Castillo de los Este situada en el centro de la ciudad es un icono de Ferrara. El castillo, erigido en 1385, está rodeado por un foso , con cuatro bastiones masivos. Los pabellones en la parte superior de las torres datan de la remodelación del siglo 16.

 

El ayuntamiento, reformado en el siglo 18, fue la residencia anterior del Este familiar. Muy cerca está la antigua catedral de San Giorgio , El románico parte inferior de la principal fachada y las fachadas laterales se completó por primera vez en 1135. De acuerdo con una inscripción ahora perdida la iglesia había sido encargado por Guglielmo I de Adelardi (m. 1146) . La escultura del portal principal fue firmado por un Nicholaus, mencionado en la inscripción perdida como arquitecto románico de la iglesia. La parte superior de la fachada principal, con arcadas de arcos de medio punto, data del siglo 13. Los leones que guardan la entrada reclinadas son copias de los originales, ahora en el atrio de la iglesia. Un alivio elaborada del siglo 13 que representa el juicio final se encuentra en el segundo piso del porche. El interior fue restaurado en el barroco estilo en 1712. El campanario , en el Renaissance estilo, data de 1451 hasta 1493, pero se añadió el piso más alto al final del siglo 16. El campanario es aún incompleta, falta un piso adicional y una tapa cónica, como se puede observar a partir de numerosas impresiones históricas y pinturas sobre el tema.

 

Muy cerca se encuentra la Universidad de Ferrara ; La biblioteca universitaria parte del manuscrito del Orlando furioso y cartas de Tasso . Sus famosos graduados incluyen Nicolaus Copernicus (1503) y Paracelso . El campus también alberga el Jardín Botánico de la Universidad de Ferrara .

 

A diferencia de otras ciudades, Ferrara conserva muchos de los primeros Quattrocento palacios, a menudo reteniendo terracota decoraciones, aunque la mayoría son de tamaño relativamente pequeño. Entre ellos se encuentran los de la parte del norte (especialmente los cuatro en la intersección de las dos calles principales), que se añadió por Ercole I en 1492-1505, a partir de los planes de Biagio Rossetti , y por ello se llama Addizione Erculea .

 

Entre los lugares más distinguidos es el Palazzo dei Diamanti ( Diamond Palace ), el nombre de los diamantes de los puntos en los que se cortan bloques de piedra de la fachada. El palacio alberga la Pinacoteca Nacional, con una gran colección de la escuela de Ferrara, que primero se levantó a la prominencia en la última mitad del siglo 15, con Cosimo Tura , Francesco Cossa y Ercole dei Roberti . Amos conocidos del siglo 16 Escuela de Ferrara incluyen Lorenzo Costa y Dosso Dossi , el más eminente de todo, Girolamo da Carpi y Benvenuto Tisi (Garofalo IL) .

 

La Casa Romei es quizás el edificio renacentista mejor conservado en Ferrara. Fue la residencia de Giovanni Romei, relacionado por matrimonio con la familia Este, y es probable que el trabajo del arquitecto de la corte Pietro Bono Brasavola . La ocupación del palacio por las monjas de la orden de Corpus Christi impidió su destrucción. Gran parte de la decoración de las habitaciones interiores se ha guardado. Hay ciclos de frescos en la Sala de las Sibille (Sala de Sibilas), con su original de terracota chimenea con el escudo de armas de Giovanni Romei, en el colindante Saletta dei Profeti (Sala de los Profetas), representando alegorías de la Biblia y en la otra habitaciones, algunas de las cuales fueron encargados por el cardenal Ippolito d'Este y pintado por la escuela de Camillo y Cesare Filippi (siglo 16).

 

El Palazzo Schifanoia ( Sans Souci ) fue construido en 1385 por Alberto V d'Este . El palacio incluye frescos que representan la vida de Borso d'Este , los signos del zodiaco y alegóricas representaciones de los meses. El vestíbulo estaba decorado con estuco moldeados por Domenico di Paris .

 

Title: Orlando furioso. /

Identifier: orlandofurios00ario

Year: 1556 (1550s)

Authors: Ariosto, Lodovico, 1474-1533 Ruscelli, Girolamo, d. ca. 1565 Pigna, Giovan Battista, 1529-1575 Rota, Giovanni Battista, fl. 1556 Dossi, Dosso, d. 1542 Valgrisius, Vincentius, fl. 1543-1575

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Publisher: In Venetia, // Appresso Vicenzo Valgrisi, nella bottega d'Erasmo. /

  

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il Re ^A^ram.iute e (iifu^girjor^ato ,E Bijcì-tà .mìei- di lontano Tede ;Ma tocco tara , ha ti Sericoli troitato\Che darli ej penai-^a di juàfede ;Orlando con duo altri han disfidato,Cui per fermo (^radafjò incider credtPer difcior fette Re da la catenaFieri colpi Auggier con Dudon mena.

 

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The Three Ages of Man, ca. 1515

Dosso Dossi (Giovanni de Lutero) (Italian, Ferrarese, 1486?–1542)

Oil on canvas; 30 1/2 x 44 in. (77.5 x 111.8 cm)

Maria DeWitt Jesup Fund, 1926 (26.83)

 

This painting is one of Dosso Dossi's finest surviving landscapes. The subject of the painting has been a matter of some debate, and its current title derives from the three pairs of figures—two children, two young adults, and two older men—which may be symbolic of the three stages of life. This interpretation is questionable on two counts. First, that the boys seem to be spying on the amorous couple (who also must contend with the goats pressing in against them) implies a narrative unified in time, rather than completely separate vignettes. Then, technical evidence shows that the old men were painted over the already completed vegetation and thus may have been afterthoughts.

 

The historian Paolo Giovio, a contemporary of the artist, made a distinction between Dosso's "proper works" (justis operibus)—that is, those with serious subjects—and his landscapes, which he called parerga, embellishments meant to delight and refresh, without any deeper purpose. As Giovio knew, such an approach had a direct precedent in the work of the ancient Roman artist Studius, as described by Pliny, which added to its cachet. Dosso and his patrons, Duke Alfonso I d'Este above all, would have been aware of, and appreciated, this classical parallel.

Dosso Dossi. (Giovanni Luteri) 1489-1542 Ferrare. Nymphe et Satyre. Vers 1510. Florence. Palazzo Pitti. Galleria Palatina.

 

Dosso Dossi. (Giovanni Luteri) 1489-1542. Ferrara. Nymph and Satyr. Around 1510. Florence. Palazzo Pitti. Palatine Gallery.

Dosso Dossi (active 1512; died 1542) - Adoration of the Magi, probably 1530-42 : detail

Identifier: americaneducator05fost

Title: The American educator; completely remodelled and rewritten from original text of the New practical reference library, with new plans and additional material

Year: 1919 (1910s)

Authors: Foster, Ellsworth D., ed Hughes, James L. (James Laughlin), 1846-1935

Subjects: Encyclopedias and dictionaries

Publisher: Chicago, Ralph Durham Co.

Contributing Library: Internet Archive

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

  

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bly only the CongressionalLibrary at Washington excels it. The cityhas sixteen parks, aggregating 500 acres.The Federal government has appropriated$550,000 for a new postoflfice building. There is considerable manufacturing; theproducts of greatest note are carriages, farmimplements, dynamos, gas engines, machinetools and art glass. Population, 1910, 25,-531; in 1917, 31,315 (Federal estimate). ADONNA, a tenn nowcommonly used in all lan-guages to refer to theVirgin in works of art.It was not until after a. d.431, when the Councilof Ephesus declared theVirgin Mary to be theMother of God, that shewas frequently represent-ed in art, but after thattime the number of paint-ings increased rapidly. Inearly art she was painted with a robe ofblue, starred or marked with gold and usu-ally draped over her head. Bjzantine modelswere followed up to the thirteenth century,when the revival of painting in Italy broughtmore natural and beautiful forms. FraFilippo Lippi was the first to portray the in-

 

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MADONNA 2215 MADRAS carnation of maternal love and childish inno-cence. Botticellis two best productions rep-resent the Virgin crowned and adored bydreamy angels. Only two of Leonardo daVincis Madonnas remain, both of which arecharming representations. The Umbrianpainters left striking and beautiful picturesof the Madonna, one of the best of which isthe Madonna Enthroned, by Dosso Dossi,now in the Cathedral at Ferrara. Of Vene-tian i^ainters, Giovanni Bellini and Titianstand out most prominently, and TitiansPesaro Madanna in the Church of Frari,Venice, is the most celebrated. Of all theItalian painters of Madonnas, Raphael wasthe greatest. In his early period his themewas Mary the mother, while later he repre-sented her as queen of heaven. Of his fiftyor more excellent Madonnas, the most cele-brated are the Madonna of the Chair and theSistine Mado-nna (see below). The artists of Xortheni Europe did notproduce manj^ famous Madonnas, and ofthese, few remain. The first in rank of theGerm

  

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Title: Orlando furioso. /

Identifier: orlandofurios00ario

Year: 1556 (1550s)

Authors: Ariosto, Lodovico, 1474-1533 Ruscelli, Girolamo, d. ca. 1565 Pigna, Giovan Battista, 1529-1575 Rota, Giovanni Battista, fl. 1556 Dossi, Dosso, d. 1542 Valgrisius, Vincentius, fl. 1543-1575

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ARGOMENTO. Ha Fami battaglia in ogni parteDa lejjercito Moro, e da liffano,Da Logijlillt ^fjìolfofi diparte ;E premici ria Calgorante wfvw.ad Orni dal bujlo il capo parte _,cui Grifone & ^AljmUnte in i<anobattutohan .PoiSanfonetto troua.a Donna ha Grijvn non grata nona . m

 

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Wdz&zà*^ IN QUESTO QV INTODECIMO, PER CALIGORANTE, CHE Fi-nalmente prende fc Hello nella (u.i ice, lì vede come quali tempre le fcelerae7fce ,& glingannialtrui ritornano in vltimoàdanno,& routna di chi ladopra. PER Oiulo,che tagliato in pezzili rilaldaua di le dello &. teneua viuo, (i dimo(lra,che la malignità per qualche tempo lì foftiene,ma clic pural rJne,chi fa conofecre le cagioni che la mantiene, & tagliai la vìa, come fece Allottoij ci i n fatale, onJhauca uita Ornlo, viene ad vccidctlu, cV à farla cadere a riatto. C^fNTO QJS I N T O DEC I MO.

  

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Title: Orlando furioso. /

Identifier: orlandofurios00ario

Year: 1556 (1550s)

Authors: Ariosto, Lodovico, 1474-1533 Ruscelli, Girolamo, d. ca. 1565 Pigna, Giovan Battista, 1529-1575 Rota, Giovanni Battista, fl. 1556 Dossi, Dosso, d. 1542 Valgrisius, Vincentius, fl. 1543-1575

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Publisher: In Venetia, // Appresso Vicenzo Valgrisi, nella bottega d'Erasmo. /

  

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Rtivo-ier dal foco Ricciardetto fomite,A l qttal dal Re Marfilw era dannato.Queipofcia la cantone à lungo fcwglie ,iA Ruo-o-ier,perche à morte era menate.Indi quegli ^fldigier non lieto accoglie ,E la mattina V* aajamo armato,Per far che Malami, e il buon Vintano,Non vadan prefi a Bertolagi in mano.

  

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i have this one taken on a day when i was lucky that i had clouds in the sky, most of the time we had only blue sky.

for photos i the details of clouds in the sky that make the different in a photo.

 

The history:

 

Ferrara listen is a city and comune in Emilia-Romagna, northern Italy, capital city of the Province of Ferrara. It is situated 50 km north-northeast of Bologna, on the Po di Volano, a branch channel of the main stream of the Po River, located 5 km north. The town has broad streets and numerous palaces dating from the 14th century and 15th century, when it hosted the court of the House of Este. For its beauty and cultural importance it has been qualified by UNESCO as World Heritage Site. Modern times have brought a renewal of industrial activity. Ferrara is on the main rail line from Bologna to Padua and Venice, and has branches to Ravenna, Poggio Rusco (for Suzzara) and Codigoro. In 2006, due to its important historical significance, Ferrara became the headquarters of the Italian Hermitage Museum. It is the fifth city in the world to have been linked with the Russian museum. From this union was born the Hermitage-Italy

 

The origin of Ferrara is uncertain, it was probably settled by the inhabitants of the lagoons at the mouth of Po river; there are two early centers of settlement, one round the cathedral,[2] the other, the castrum bizantino, being the San Pietro district, on the opposite shore, where the Primaro empties into the Volano channel. Ferrara appears first in a document of the Lombard king Desiderius of 753 AD,[3] as a city forming part of the Exarchate of Ravenna. Desiderius pledged a Lombard ducatus ferrariae ("Duchy of Ferrara") in 757 to Pope Stephen II. After 984 it was a fief of Tedaldo, count of Modena and Canossa, nephew of the emperor Otto I. It afterwards made itself independent, and in 1101 was taken by siege by the countess Matilda. At this time it was mainly dominated by several great families, among them the prominent Adelardi

In 1146, Guglielmo II of Adelardi, the last of the House of Adelardi, died, and his property passed, as the dowry of his niece the Marchesella, to Obizzo I of Este. There was considerable hostility between the newly entered family and the prominent Salinguerra family, but after considerable struggles Azzo VII of Este was nominated perpetual podestà in 1242; in 1259 he took Ezzelino of Verona prisoner in battle. His grandson, Obizzo II (1264–1293), succeeded him, and he was made perpetual lord of the city by the population. The House of Este was from henceforth settled in Ferrara. In 1289 he was also chosen as lord of Modena, one year later he was made lord of Reggio. Niccolò III (1393–1441) received several popes with great magnificence, especially Eugene IV, who held a council here in 1438. His son Borso received the title of duke for the imperial fiefs of Modena and Reggio from Emperor Frederick III in 1452 (in which year Girolamo Savonarola was born here), and in 1471 was made duke of Ferrara by Pope Paul II. Ercole I (1471–1505) carried on a war with Venice and increased the magnificence of the city.

 

Renaissance :

 

During the reign of Ercole d'Este I, one of the most significant patrons of the arts in late 15th and early 16th century Italy after the Medici, Ferrara grew into a cultural center, renowned for music as well as for visual arts. The painters established links with Flemish artists and their techniques, exchanging influences in the colors and composition choices. Composers came to Ferrara from many parts of Europe, especially France and Flanders; Josquin Des Prez worked for Duke Ercole for a time (producing the Missa Hercules dux Ferrariæ, which he wrote for him); Jacob Obrecht came to Ferrara twice (and died during an outbreak of plague there in 1505); and Antoine Brumel served as principal musician from 1505. Alfonso I, son of Ercole, was also an important patron; his preference for instrumental music resulted in Ferrara becoming an important center of composition for the lute. The architecture of Ferrara benefitted from the genius of Biagio Rossetti, who was asked in 1484 by Ercole I to redesign the plan of the city. The resulting "Addizione Erculea" is one of the most important and beautiful examples of renaissance city planning and contributed to the selection of Ferrara as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

Alfonso married the notorious Lucrezia Borgia, and continued the war with Venice with success. In 1509 he was excommunicated by Pope Julius II, and he overcame the pontifical army in 1512 defending Ravenna. Lucrezia, together with other members of the Este house, is buried in the convent of Corpus Domini.

 

Gaston de Foix fell in the battle, in which he was supporting Alfonso. With the succeeding popes he was able to make peace. He was the patron of Ariosto from 1518 onwards. His son Ercole II married Renée of France, daughter of Louis XII of France; he too embellished Ferrara during his reign (1534–1559).

His son Alfonso II married Lucrezia, daughter of grand-duke Cosimo I of Tuscany, then Barbara, sister of the emperor Maximilian II and finally Margherita Gonzaga, daughter of the duke of Mantua. He raised the glory of Ferrara to its highest point, and was the patron of Tasso, Guarini, and Cremonini – favouring, as the princes of his house had always done, the arts and sciences. During the reign of Alfonso II, Ferrara once again developed an opulent court with an impressive musical establishment, rivaled in Italy only by the adjacent city of Venice, and the traditional musical centers such as Rome, Florence and Milan. Composers such as Luzzasco Luzzaschi, Lodovico Agostini, and later Carlo Gesualdo, represented the avant-garde tendency of the composers there, writing for gifted virtuoso performers, including the famous concerto di donne — the three virtuoso female singers Laura Peverara, Anna Guarini, and Livia d'Arco. Vincenzo Galilei praised the work of Luzzaschi, and Girolamo Frescobaldi studied with him.

 

The city was much affected by the 1570 Ferrara earthquake.

 

Alfonso had no legitimate male heir, and in 1597 Ferrara was claimed as a vacant fief by Pope Clement VIII, as was also Comacchio.

 

Modern history :

 

Ferrara remained a part of the Papal States from 1598 to 1859, when it became part of the Kingdom of Italy. A fortress was constructed by Pope Paul V on the site of the castle called "Castel Tedaldo", at the south-west angle of the town, that was occupied by an Austrian garrison from 1832 until 1859. All of the fortress was dismantled following the birth of the Kingdom of Italy and the bricks used for new constructions all over the town.

 

On August 23, 1944, the Ferrara synthetic rubber plant was a target of Strategic bombing during World War II.

  

Main sights :

 

The town is still surrounded by more than 9 kilometres of ancient walls, mainly built in the 15th and 16th centuries.[4] Together with those of Lucca, they are the best preserved Renaissance walls in Italy.

 

The most iconic building of the town is the imponent Castello Estense: sited in the very centre of the town, it's a brick building surrounded by a moat, with four massive bastions. It was built starting in 1385 and partly restored in 1554; the pavilions on the top of the towers date from the latter year.

 

The ancient City Hall, renovated in the 18th century, was the earlier residence of the Este family. Close by it is the former Cathedral of Saint George, begun in 1135, when the Romanesque lower part of the main façade and the side façades were completed. According to a now lost inscription the church was built in 1135 by Guglielmo I of Adelardi (d. 1146), who is buried in it. The sculpture of the main portal is the signed work of the "artifex" Nicholaus, mentioned in the lost inscription as the "architect" for the church. The upper part of the main façade, with arcades of pointed arches, dates from the 13th century, while the lower part of the protiro or projecting porch and the main portal are by Nicholaus. The recumbent lions guarding the entrance are replacements of the originals, now in the narthex of the church. The elaborate reflief sculptures depicting Last Judgement gracing the second story of the porch above date from the thirteenth century. The interior was restored in the baroque style in 1712. The campanile, in the Renaissance style, dates from 1451–1493, but the last storey was added at the end of the 16th century.

 

A little way off is the university, which has faculties of law, architecture, pharmacy, medicine and natural science; the library has valuable manuscripts, including part of that of the Orlando furioso and letters by Tasso. Its famous graduates include Nicolaus Copernicus (1503) and Paracelsus. Near the main university facilities it raises the University of Ferrara Botanic Garden.

 

Ferrara has many early Renaissance palaces, often retaining terracotta decorations; few towns of Italy as small have so many, though most are comparatively small in size. Among them may be noted those in the north quarter (especially the four at the intersection of its two main streets), which was added by Ercole I in 1492–1505, from the plans of Biagio Rossetti, and hence called the Addizione Erculea.

 

Among the finest palaces is Palazzo dei Diamanti (Diamond Palace), named after the diamond points into which the façade's stone blocks are cut. The palazzo houses the National Picture Gallery, with a large collection of the school of Ferrara, which first rose to prominence in the latter half of the 15th century, with Cosimo Tura, Francesco Cossa and Ercole dei Roberti. Noted masters of the 16th century School of Ferrara (Painting) include Lorenzo Costa and Dosso Dossi, the most eminent of all, Girolamo da Carpi and Benvenuto Tisi (il Garofalo).

 

The Casa Romei is the best preserved Renaissance building in Ferrara. It was the residence of Giovanni Romei, related to Este family by marriage to Polissena d'Este and likely the work of the court architect Pietro Bono Brasavola. It did not fall into decay because it was inherited by the nuns of the Corpus Domini order who lived there without making any changes to its structure. Much of the decoration in the inner rooms has been saved. There are fresco cycles in the Sala delle Sibille (Room of Sibyls), with its original terracotta fireplace bearing the coat of arms of Giovanni Romei, in the adjoining Saletta dei Profeti (Room of the Prophets), depicting allegories from the Bible and in other rooms, some of which were commissioned by cardinal Ippolito d'Este and painted by the school of Camillo and Cesare Filippi (16th century).

 

The Palazzo Schifanoia (sans souci) was built in 1385 for Alberto V d'Este. The palazzo includes frescoes depicting the life of Borso d'Este, the signs of the zodiac and allegorical representations of the months. The vestibule was decorated with stucco mouldings by Domenico di Paris. The building also contains fine choir-books with miniatures and a collection of coins and Renaissance medals.

 

The City Historical Archives contain a relevant amount of historical documents, starting from 15th century. The Diocesan Historical Archive is more ancient, mentioned in documents in A.D. 955, and contains precious documents collected across the centuries by the clergy.

 

The Corpus Domini Monastery contains tombs of the House of Este, including Alfonso I, Alfonso II, Ercole I, Ercole II, as well as Lucrezia Borgia, Eleanor of Aragon, and many more.

 

The Ferrara Synagogue and Jewish Museum are located in the heart of the mediæval centre, close to the cathedral and the Castello Estense. This street was part of the Jewish Quarter in which the Jews were separated from the rest of the population of Ferrara from 1627 to 1859.

 

Dosso Dossi (active 1512; died 1542) - Lamentation over the Body of Christ (Pieta), 1510-20 : detail

Girolamo Romanino (1484/7-1562) - Salome with the Head of John the Baptist.

Detail.

Around 1516-1517.

Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen, Berlin.

 

Wikipedia:

Girolamo Romani (Romanino) (c. 1485 – c. 1566) was an Italian High Renaissance painter active in the Veneto and Lombardy, near Brescia. His long career brought forth different styles.

 

Romani was born in Brescia. His early training and life are not well documented.

 

He took up residence in Venice in his twenties, at the latest by 1513. He was commissioned to complete a Madonna enthroned with four saints for the church of Santa Giustina in Padua in 1513. The coloration of the painting is of Venetian style, but the duller visages in bejeweled setting recalls styles of previous generations.

 

Romanino completed four frescoes in the nave of the cathedral of Cremona in 1519-1520 depicting stories of the Passion of Christ. His paintings have eclectic influences using Venetian coloration with Florentine-Lombard modeling. In the Cremona frescoes, the Lombard influence of Altobello Melone is strong, in the narrative and decorative elements of the fresco. By 1521, Romanino was replaced by Il Pordenone in the decoration of the church.

 

He then returned to Brescia to work (1521–1524) with Alessandro Bonvicino in the decoration of the "Cappella del Sacramento" in San Giovanni Evangelista. His St. Matthew and the Angel depicts the apostle at work under candlelight, and represents one of the first such nocturnes in Italian painting, a device which Correggio and Cambiaso would soon pursue. He also helped decorate the Palazzo Averoldi. A series of frescoes in the Castle of Malpaga, near Bergamo (1520-1530s), celebrating the life of Bartolomeo Colleoni, is attributed to him.

 

In 1531 to 1532, he worked with Dosso Dossi in fresco decoration of Castello del Buoncosiglio in Trento. He completed organ shutters for the church of Asola on Augustus and the sibyl, and Sacrifice of Isaac. He died between 1559-1561. His main pupils were his son-in-law Lattanzio Gambara, Girolamo Muziano, and Stefano Rosa. He is also known to have influenced artists such as Giulio Campi

 

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www.smb.museum/smb/standorte/index.php?lang=de&p=2&am....

See also my list of best and worst museums in the world:

www.flickr.com/photos/menesje/4059308291/

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Ferrara is a city and commune in Emilia Romagna, northern Italy, capital of the province of Ferrara. It is located 50 kilometers (31 miles) north-north-east of Bologna, in the Po di Volano, a channel of the main stream of the River Po, located 5 km (3 miles) to the north. The city has wide streets and numerous palaces dating from the 14th and 15th centuries, when it was the seat of the court of the House of Este. For its beauty and cultural importance it has been qualified by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Modern times have brought a renewal of industrial activity. Ferrara is on the main railway line from Bologna to Padua and Venice, and has branches to Ravenna, Poggio Rusco (by Suzzara) and Codigoro .About this sound

 

Civic and secular monuments

The city is still surrounded by more than 9 kilometers (6 miles) of old, mainly built in the 16th to the 15th and. Along with those of Lucca, that are the best preserved Renaissance walls of Italy.

 

The imposing brick Castle of the East located in the center of the city is an icon of Ferrara. The castle, erected in 1385, is surrounded by a moat, with four massive bastions. The pavilions at the top of the towers date back to the 16th century refurbishment.

 

The town hall, renovated in the 18th century, was the former residence of the family. Nearby is the ancient cathedral of San Giorgio, the Romanesque lower part of the main facade and side facades were completed for the first time in 1135. According to a now lost inscription the church had been commissioned by Guglielmo I of Adelardi (d. 1146). The sculpture of the main portal was signed by a Nicholaus, mentioned in the lost inscription as Romanesque architect of the church. The upper part of the main facade, with arcades of semicircular arches, dates from the 13th century. The lions guarding the entrance reclined are copies of the originals, now in the atrium of the church. An elaborate relief of the 13th century representing the final judgment is found on the second floor of the porch. The interior was restored in the Baroque style in 1712. The bell tower, in the Renaissance style, dates from 1451 to 1493, but was added the highest floor at the end of the 16th century. The bell tower is still incomplete, missing an additional floor and a Tapered cap, as can be seen from numerous historical prints and paintings on the subject.

 

Nearby is the University of Ferrara; The university library starts from the furious Orlando manuscript and Tasso's letters. His famous graduates include Nicolaus Copernicus (1503) and Paracelsus. The campus also houses the Botanic Garden of the University of Ferrara.

 

Unlike other cities, Ferrara retains many of the early Quattrocento palaces, often retaining terracotta decorations, although most are of relatively small size. Among them are those from the north (especially the four at the intersection of the two main streets), which was added by Ercole I in 1492-1505, from the plans of Biagio Rossetti, and is therefore called Addizione Erculea.

 

Among the most distinguished places is the Palazzo dei Diamanti (Diamond Palace), the name of the diamonds of the points where stone blocks of the facade are cut. The palace houses the National Pinacoteca, with a large collection of the school of Ferrara, which first rose to prominence in the latter half of the 15th century, with Cosimo Tura, Francesco Cossa and Ercole dei Roberti. Amos known from the 16th century School of Ferrara include Lorenzo Costa and Dosso Dossi, the most eminent of all, Girolamo da Carpi and Benvenuto Tisi (Garofalo IL).

 

La Casa Romei is perhaps the best preserved Renaissance building in Ferrara. It was the residence of Giovanni Romei, related by marriage to the Este family, and is likely the work of court architect Pietro Bono Brasavola. The occupation of the palace by the nuns of the Order of Corpus Christi prevented its destruction. Much of the decoration of the interior rooms has been saved. There are cycles of frescoes in the Sala de las Sibille (Room of the Sibyls), with its original terracotta fireplace with the coat of arms of Giovanni Romei, in the adjoining Saletta dei Profeti (Hall of the Prophets), representing allegories of the Bible and In the other rooms, some of which were commissioned by Cardinal Ippolito d'Este and painted by the school of Camillo and Cesare Filippi (16th century).

 

Palazzo Schifanoia (Sans Souci) was built in 1385 by Alberto V d'Este. The palace includes frescoes depicting the life of Borso d'Este, the signs of the zodiac and allegorical representations of the months. The lobby was decorated with stucco molded by Domenico di Paris.

  

Ferrara es una ciudad y comuna en Emilia Romagna , norte de Italia, capital de la provincia de Ferrara . Está situado a 50 kilómetros (31 millas) al norte-noreste de Bolonia , en el Po di Volano, un canal de derivación de la corriente principal del río Po , situado a 5 km (3 millas) al norte. La ciudad cuenta con amplias calles y numerosos palacios que datan de los siglos 14 y 15, cuando fue sede de la corte de la Casa de Este . Por su belleza e importancia cultural que ha sido calificado por la UNESCO como patrimonio de la humanidad . Los tiempos modernos han traído una renovación de la actividad industrial. Ferrara está en la línea ferroviaria principal de Bolonia a Padua y Venecia , y tiene sucursales a Rávena , Poggio Rusco (por Suzzara ) y Codigoro .Acerca de este sonido

 

Cívica y monumentos seculares

La ciudad todavía está rodeado por más de 9 kilómetros (6 millas) de las antiguas, construidas principalmente en el 16 al siglos 15 y. [3] Junto con los de Lucca , que son las murallas renacentistas mejor conservados de Italia.

 

El ladrillo imponente Castillo de los Este situada en el centro de la ciudad es un icono de Ferrara. El castillo, erigido en 1385, está rodeado por un foso , con cuatro bastiones masivos. Los pabellones en la parte superior de las torres datan de la remodelación del siglo 16.

 

El ayuntamiento, reformado en el siglo 18, fue la residencia anterior del Este familiar. Muy cerca está la antigua catedral de San Giorgio , El románico parte inferior de la principal fachada y las fachadas laterales se completó por primera vez en 1135. De acuerdo con una inscripción ahora perdida la iglesia había sido encargado por Guglielmo I de Adelardi (m. 1146) . La escultura del portal principal fue firmado por un Nicholaus, mencionado en la inscripción perdida como arquitecto románico de la iglesia. La parte superior de la fachada principal, con arcadas de arcos de medio punto, data del siglo 13. Los leones que guardan la entrada reclinadas son copias de los originales, ahora en el atrio de la iglesia. Un alivio elaborada del siglo 13 que representa el juicio final se encuentra en el segundo piso del porche. El interior fue restaurado en el barroco estilo en 1712. El campanario , en el Renaissance estilo, data de 1451 hasta 1493, pero se añadió el piso más alto al final del siglo 16. El campanario es aún incompleta, falta un piso adicional y una tapa cónica, como se puede observar a partir de numerosas impresiones históricas y pinturas sobre el tema.

 

Muy cerca se encuentra la Universidad de Ferrara ; La biblioteca universitaria parte del manuscrito del Orlando furioso y cartas de Tasso . Sus famosos graduados incluyen Nicolaus Copernicus (1503) y Paracelso . El campus también alberga el Jardín Botánico de la Universidad de Ferrara .

 

A diferencia de otras ciudades, Ferrara conserva muchos de los primeros Quattrocento palacios, a menudo reteniendo terracota decoraciones, aunque la mayoría son de tamaño relativamente pequeño. Entre ellos se encuentran los de la parte del norte (especialmente los cuatro en la intersección de las dos calles principales), que se añadió por Ercole I en 1492-1505, a partir de los planes de Biagio Rossetti , y por ello se llama Addizione Erculea .

 

Entre los lugares más distinguidos es el Palazzo dei Diamanti ( Diamond Palace ), el nombre de los diamantes de los puntos en los que se cortan bloques de piedra de la fachada. El palacio alberga la Pinacoteca Nacional, con una gran colección de la escuela de Ferrara, que primero se levantó a la prominencia en la última mitad del siglo 15, con Cosimo Tura , Francesco Cossa y Ercole dei Roberti . Amos conocidos del siglo 16 Escuela de Ferrara incluyen Lorenzo Costa y Dosso Dossi , el más eminente de todo, Girolamo da Carpi y Benvenuto Tisi (Garofalo IL) .

 

La Casa Romei es quizás el edificio renacentista mejor conservado en Ferrara. Fue la residencia de Giovanni Romei, relacionado por matrimonio con la familia Este, y es probable que el trabajo del arquitecto de la corte Pietro Bono Brasavola . La ocupación del palacio por las monjas de la orden de Corpus Christi impidió su destrucción. Gran parte de la decoración de las habitaciones interiores se ha guardado. Hay ciclos de frescos en la Sala de las Sibille (Sala de Sibilas), con su original de terracota chimenea con el escudo de armas de Giovanni Romei, en el colindante Saletta dei Profeti (Sala de los Profetas), representando alegorías de la Biblia y en la otra habitaciones, algunas de las cuales fueron encargados por el cardenal Ippolito d'Este y pintado por la escuela de Camillo y Cesare Filippi (siglo 16).

 

El Palazzo Schifanoia ( Sans Souci ) fue construido en 1385 por Alberto V d'Este . El palacio incluye frescos que representan la vida de Borso d'Este , los signos del zodiaco y alegóricas representaciones de los meses. El vestíbulo estaba decorado con estuco moldeados por Domenico di Paris .

 

1525

oil on canvas

 

National Gallery of Art

Washington, D.C.

USA

 

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Identifier: paintersofschool00gardrich

Title: The painters of the school of Ferrara

Year: 1911 (1910s)

Authors: Gardner, Edmund Garratt, 1869-1935

Subjects: Painters -- Italy Ferrara Painters -- Italy Bologna Painting -- Italy Ferrara Painting -- Italy Bologna Ferrara (Italy) -- History Bologna (Italy) -- History

Publisher: London : Duckworth New York : Charles Scribner's Sons

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

rately copying from Raphael. Moreplausible is the almost contemporary statement ofLodovico Dolce, in his Dialogo della Pittura, whichis said to have been inspired by Titian himself, andin which he represents Pietro Aretino saying of thetwo Dossi: One of them stayed here at Venice forsome time to learn to paint with Titian, and the otherin Rome with Raphael; though he adds that in-stead they adopted such a clumsy manner that theyare unworthy of the pen of so great a poet asAriosto.^ It is possible, however, that, in the caseof Battista, this refers to a later epoch, as there isdocumentary evidence that he was in Rome, apparentlyworking under Raphael, in 1520, and he was there,most likely, from 1517 to 1524. Traces of Costas influence may be discerned inthe work of Dosso Dossi. In the formers admirableportrait of Battista Fiera in the National Gallery, weseem to find Dossos whimsical but powerful style of 1 I. p. 251. 2 Dialogo della Pittura intitolato VAretino (Venice, 1557), p. 9v. i:

 

Text Appearing After Image:

T.■tl o Ci o mO ^* DOSSO AND BATTISTA DOSSI 147 portraiture in germ, and the figure of St. John inCosta^s altarpiece, in the same collection, distinctlyanticipates the pose and character of Dosso*s similarpresentment of the Evangelist in the great picture fromSanf Andrea now in the pinacoteca at Ferrara. We have no documentary evidence of Dosso**? pre-sence in his native city until 1517, when both he andBattista first appear in the ducal service.^ He maywell have gone to Venice before 1506, when Costasschool was broken up. But, when the League ofCambrai bore fruit in war, and Duke Alfonso him-self, in 1510, took the field against the armies of therepublic, Venice became an intolerable place of resi-dence for a subject of the House of Este, and Dossojoined his former master at Mantua. There is docu-mentary evidence of his presence there in 1511 and1512. No traces remain of the work that heexecuted for the Gonzaga; but his stay at Mantuahas left its mark upon the history of art, for i

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

ANTALYA, TURKEY - JANUARY 9: American Model Lindsay Ellingson poses to media after walked on the runway during the 19th Dosso Dossi Fashion Show on January 09, 2015 in Antalya, Turkey. (Photo by Suleyman Elcin/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Dosso Dossi (1486-1542) - The Archangel Michael.

Detail.

Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden..

 

Wikipedia Encyclopedia:

Dosso Dossi (c. 1490 – 1542), real name Giovanni di Niccolò de Luteri, was an Italian Renaissance painter who belonged to the Ferrara School of Painting.

 

Dossi was born in San Giovanni del Dosso, a village in the province of Mantua. His early training and life is not well documented; his father, originally of Trento, was a bursar (spenditore or fattore) for the Dukes of Ferrara. He may have had training locally with Lorenzo Costa or in Mantua, where he is known to have been in 1512. By 1514, he would begin three decades of service for dukes Alfonso I and Ercole II d'Este, becoming principal court artist. Dosso worked frequently with his brother Battista Dossi, who had trained in the Roman workshop of Raphael. The works he produced for the dukes included the ephemeral decorations of furniture and theater sets. He is known to have worked alongside il Garofalo in the Costabili polyptych. One of his pupils was Giovanni Francesco Surchi (il Dielai).

 

Dosso Dossi is known less for his naturalism or attention to design, and more for cryptic allegorical conceits in paintings around mythological themes, a favored subject for the humanist Ferrarese court (see also Cosimo Tura and the decoration of the Palazzo Schifanoia). Freedburg uses the term sprezzatura to refer to Dossi's caricature-like, primitivist, and eccentric distortions of proportion. Dossi is also known for the atypical choices of bright pigment for his cabinet pieces. Some of his works, such as the Deposition have lambent qualities that suggest some of Correggio's works. Most of his works feature Christian and Ancient Greek themes and use oil painting as a medium.

 

Here you find a link to the Museum:

www.skd.museum/

 

See also my list of best and worst museums in the world:

www.flickr.com/photos/menesje/4059308291/

And here you find my list of best and worst museums in Holland:

www.flickr.com/photos/menesje/4059604700/

 

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