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Duke Farms Meditation Garden

 

Duke Farms is the estate of James Buchanan Duke, of Duke Power and American Tobacco Company, and inherited by his daughter Doris Duke.

 

Located on 2,700 acres (11 km²) of farm and wood lands in Hillsborough, New Jersey, the property was opened to the public on May 19, 2012 by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation as "a model of environmental stewardship in the 21st Century and (to) inspire visitors to become informed stewards of the land."

leading up to the old foundation of aborted Duke mansion

 

Duke Farms is the estate of James Buchanan Duke, of Duke Power and American Tobacco Company, and inherited by his daughter Doris Duke.

 

Located on 2,700 acres (11 km²) of farm and wood lands in Hillsborough, New Jersey, the property was opened to the public on May 19, 2012 by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation as "a model of environmental stewardship in the 21st Century and (to) inspire visitors to become informed stewards of the land."

A Better View: B l a c k M a g i c

 

A view of the French Gardens after the 'renovation'

  

You can view the entire Flickr Collection in the Save Duke Gardens group (Flickr Hive Mind)

 

Note: these eleven gardens are now lost, as far as it is possible to know. The trustees have permanently closed Duke Gardens. Saying "renovated gardens will reopen" was deliberately misleading and sloppy language that concealed the truth. Some sort of garden will be at Duke Farms. Doris Duke's indoor display gardens will not.

 

The glorious indoor display gardens of Doris Duke's Estate in NJ will be destroyed unless the Trustees are persuaded to reconsider before May 25th, 2008: see the Flickr group Save Duke Gardens. Please use the Save Duke Gardens web site to easily email your newspaper and the Trustees if you wish these gardens to remain intact.

 

These gardens are a labor of love and a work of art. Doris Duke spent years creating them, and would sometimes spend 16 hours a day working in them. They are being dismembered only 15 years after Doris Duke's death, on the 50th anniversary of their creation, by the Estate's trustees, who do not feel the gardens fit in with a modern Green vision.

 

Really.

 

The Trustees tell us the Gardens will re-open in a couple years. But what this really means is that a different orchid conservatory will reopen. Not this elaborate set of interconnected Display Gardens created personally by Doris Duke in honor of her father. They will be lost.

 

alternate view of my photostream (Flickr Hive Mind)

  

better view: B l a c k M a g i c

 

Fifty people a day are looking at this picture. Please take 2 minutes to send an email from the Save Duke Gardens web site. This page is the 'visitor book' for a flickr group of pictures by people who love Duke Gardens.

 

Doris Duke's glorious indoor display gardens at her Estate in NJ will be closed then destroyed on May 25th, by the order of the Trustees of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

 

The individuals responsible for this destruction are: Joan E. Spero (President), Nannerl O. Keohane (Chair), John J. Mack (Vice Chair), Harry B. Demopoulos, Anthony S. Fauci, James F. Gill, Anne Hawley, Peter A. Nadosy, William H. Schlesinger, John H.T. Wilson and John E. Zuccotti.

 

These Gardens are a labor of love and a work of art. Doris Duke spent years creating them, and would sometimes spend 16 hours a day working in them. She created the Duke Gardens Foundation in 1960 to sustain them. They are being destroyed only 15 years after Doris Duke's death, on the 50th anniversary of their creation, by her Trustees, who say the gardens don't 'represent the best environmental practices'.

 

Really.

 

The Trustees have a PR machine that says the Gardens will re-open in a couple years. But what this really means is that a different garden will reopen in a different Conservatory. Not Doris Duke's elaborate set of interconnected display gardens. They will be destroyed forever.

  

alternate view of my photostream (Flickr Hive Mind)

Duke Farms is the estate of James Buchanan Duke, of Duke Power and American Tobacco Company, and inherited by his daughter Doris Duke.

 

Located on 2,700 acres (11 km²) of farm and wood lands in Hillsborough, New Jersey, the property was opened to the public on May 19, 2012 by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation as "a model of environmental stewardship in the 21st Century and (to) inspire visitors to become informed stewards of the land."

Duke Farms is the estate of James Buchanan Duke, of Duke Power and American Tobacco Company, and inherited by his daughter Doris Duke.

 

Located on 2,700 acres (11 km²) of farm and wood lands in Hillsborough, New Jersey, the property was opened to the public on May 19, 2012 by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation as "a model of environmental stewardship in the 21st Century and (to) inspire visitors to become informed stewards of the land."

The glorious indoor display gardens of Doris Duke's Estate in NJ will destroyed unless the Trustees are persuaded to reconsider before May 25th: See the Save Duke Gardens web site or the Flickr group Save Duke Gardens.

AIN GORDON is a three-time Obie Award-winning writer/director/actor, a two-time NYFA Fellow and the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in Playwriting. His work has been commissioned/produced/presented by New York Theater Workshop, Soho Rep., The Public Theatre, 651 ARTS, Dance Theater Workshop, Performance Space 122, and HERE Arts Center (all NYC); the Mark Taper Forum (CA), the George Street Playhouse (NJ), the Krannert Center (IL), the Baltimore Museum of Art (MD), DiverseWorks (TX), Spirit Square (NC), VSA North Fourth Arts Center (NM), Jacob’s Pillow (MA), LexArts (KY), The Kitchen Theatre (NYS), and Dance Space (DC), etc. Gordon twice collaborated with choreographer Bebe Miller on works presented at the Wexner Center (OH), Myrna Loy Center/Helena Presents (MT), and the Bates Dance Festival (ME), etc. Collaborations with David Gordon were commissioned and produced by American Repertory Theatre (MA), American Conservatory Theater (CA) and American Music Theatre Festival (PA). As a performer, Gordon was in the original Off-Broadway cast of Spalding Gray: Stories Left To Tell and continues to tour the production to venues including UCLA Live, Guild Hall (LI), TBA Festival at the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (OR), The ICA Boston (Elliot Norton Award nom), Vineyard Playhouse (MA), the Walker Art Center (MN), and Painted Bride Art Center (PA), etc. Gordon also wrote for NBC’s “Will & Grace.” Gordon has received support from the Multi-Arts Production Fund (MAP), the Jerome Foundation, the Greenwall Foundation, the Peg Santvoord Foundation, the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Art, the Department of Cultural Affairs, the National Performance Network, the New York State Council on the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, AT&T OnStage, and the Arts Presenters Ensemble Theatre Collaborations Program funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Trust etc. Gordon’s 2003 work; Art Life & Show-Biz; A Non-Fiction Play, is published in Palgrave Macmillan’s new collection “Dramaturgy Of The Real On The World Stage.” Gordon has been a guest speaker/facilitator/teacher for the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (NY), the Surdna Foundation (NY), the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MD), the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation (NY), the Kentucky Writer’s Conference, Dance USA (DC), the University of Minnesota, Wesleyan University (CT), the University of Limerick & the Dublin Dance Festival (Ireland), Chicago Dancemakers Forum and Columbia College (IL), Ohio State University, and Dartmouth College (NH), etc. Currently, Gordon is a Core Writer of the Playwrights’ Center in Minneapolis, Artist-in-Residence at the Center for Creative Research, a member of the Board of Directors of Performance Space 122, and Chair of the Danspace Project Artist Advisory Board. Gordon is Co-Founder of the Urban Memory Project and has been Co-Director of the Pick Up Performance Co(S) since 1992.

Duke Farms is the estate of James Buchanan Duke, of Duke Power and American Tobacco Company, and inherited by his daughter Doris Duke.

 

Located on 2,700 acres (11 km²) of farm and wood lands in Hillsborough, New Jersey, the property was opened to the public on May 19, 2012 by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation as "a model of environmental stewardship in the 21st Century and (to) inspire visitors to become informed stewards of the land."

Duke Farms is the estate of James Buchanan Duke, of Duke Power and American Tobacco Company, and inherited by his daughter Doris Duke.

 

Located on 2,700 acres (11 km²) of farm and wood lands in Hillsborough, New Jersey, the property was opened to the public on May 19, 2012 by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation as "a model of environmental stewardship in the 21st Century and (to) inspire visitors to become informed stewards of the land."

蝴蝶蘭

 

Duke Farms is the estate of James Buchanan Duke, of Duke Power and American Tobacco Company, and inherited by his daughter Doris Duke.

 

Located on 2,700 acres (11 km²) of farm and wood lands in Hillsborough, New Jersey, the property was opened to the public on May 19, 2012 by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation as "a model of environmental stewardship in the 21st Century and (to) inspire visitors to become informed stewards of the land."

better view: B l a c k M a g i c

 

28 May 2008 update: A Wall Street Journal article (by Jane Garmey) on these gardens appeared this morning:

online.wsj.com/article/SB121192910041724297.html

 

This was one of the most common snapshots ( the French call them clichés ) that people took at Doris Duke's 11 interconnected Indoor Display Gardens. But it is a great spot, and this may be the last photo of the French Garden we'll see on Flickr. The gardens are closing tomorrow, to be dismantled later in the summer by Doris Duke's Trustees. This shot was taken today (Saturday, May 24th, 2008).

 

There is still time to try and stop this - go to savedukegardens and write a letter.

Years back, these gardens were lit at night and there were spectacular night tours.

 

Years ahead, we believe the destruction of these gardens will be seen as a tragic loss to the state of New Jersey and to the memory and history of Doris Duke.

 

No processing of this shot. I did take nine exposures, but have yet to come up with a tone mapping or HDR composite that can beat a proper exposure of this amazing Garden. It's probably just my ineptness with Photomatix.

 

alternate view of my photostream (Flickr Hive Mind)

 

This bonsai will be looking for another home soon: The Japanese Garden and all the linked set of international indoor display gardens at Duke Farms are being permanently closed. See savedukegardens.org and the Save Duke Gardens Flickr group.

   

I'm starting to appreciate that the right light is everything. This is

natural light through the greenhouse glass of Doris Duke's Indoor

Display Gardens. Closed to the public forever last Sunday.

  

No editing except for a crop. Still absolutely terrified of flashes.

The glorious indoor display gardens of Doris Duke's Estate in NJ will destroyed unless the Trustees are persuaded to reconsider before May 25th: See the Save Duke Gardens web site or the Flickr group Save Duke Gardens.

 

The glorious indoor display gardens of Doris Duke's Estate in NJ will be destroyed unless the Trustees are persuaded to reconsider before May 25th: See the Save Duke Gardens web site or the Flickr group Save Duke Gardens.

 

These gardens are a labor of love and a work of art. Doris Duke spent years creating them, and would sometimes spend 16 hours a day working in them. They are being dismembered only 15 years after Doris Duke's death, on the 50th anniversary of their creation, by the Estate's trustees, who do not feel the gardens fit in with a modern Green vision.

 

Really.

 

The Trustees tell us the Gardens will re-open in a couple years. But what this really means is that some type of garden (most likely orchid) will reopen. Not this elaborate set of interconnected display gardens. They will be lost.

 

When I think of these gardens going away, I think of the destruction of the original Penn Station in NY, or the more recent destruction of the ancient Buddhas in Afghanistan. These gardens are not on the same scale, but they are equally precious. These kinds of acts are irreversible, and there is no doubt in my mind that future generations will question our stewardship of these treasures.

 

What a terrible shame.

 

Apparently Doris Duke's will was quite vague about her desire to retain and maintain these gardens after her death. Perhaps she considered these gardens so much a part of her personal and environmental legacy that she didn't think stating the obvious was necessary. If so, she made a terrible mistake.

 

Nathan

French Garden, Duke Farms Indoor Display Gardens.

  

The glorious indoor display gardens of Doris Duke's Estate in NJ will destroyed unless the Trustees are persuaded to reconsider before May 25th: See the Save Duke Gardens web site or the Flickr group Save Duke Gardens.

 

28 May update: A Wall Street Journal article (by Jane Garmey) on these gardens appeared this morning:

online.wsj.com/article/SB121192910041724297.html

Digg it (link at bottom of article)

  

This is the entrance to Doris Duke's Indoor Display Gardens, a set of 11 interconnected greenhouses on the Doris Duke Estate in New Jersey.

 

Oddly enough, the title above is the response we've encountered when discussing

the destruction of Doris Duke's Indoor Display Gardens by her

Trustees. "They will close and reopen in 2010" . This shot was taken May 24th, 2008, one day before closure.

 

What are they thinking? The gardens are not the structures.

 

savedukegardens.org

Fifty years ago, wealthy Chinese families often created private gardens in this style (a Chinese visitor told us that).

 

Fifty years later, the Gardens that Doris Duke created and opened to the public in 1964 are being closed on May 25th, 2008 by their Trustees. This scene will be destroyed.

 

Please visit the Save Duke Gardens Pool and www.SaveDukeGardens.org

This window is in the Chinese Garden at Doris Duke's Display Gardens; a very authentic representation of the private gardens built by wealthy Chinese families in the mid 20th century, Chinese friends tell us.

 

All the glorious International Display Gardens of Doris Duke's Estate in NJ will be destroyed unless the Trustees are persuaded to reconsider before May 25th: see the Flickr group Save Duke Gardens. Please use the Save Duke Gardens web site to easily email your newspaper and the Trustees if you wish these gardens to remain intact.

 

These gardens are a labor of love and a work of art. Doris Duke spent years creating them, and would sometimes spend 16 hours a day working in them. They are being dismembered only 15 years after Doris Duke's death, on the 50th anniversary of their creation, by the Estate's trustees, who do not feel the gardens fit in with a modern Green vision.

 

Really.

 

The Trustees tell us the Gardens will re-open in a couple years. But what this really means is that a different orchid conservatory will reopen. Not the International Display Gardens. They will be lost.

28 May update: A Wall Street Journal article (by Jane Garmey) on these gardens appeared this morning:

online.wsj.com/article/SB121192910041724297.html

Digg it (link at bottom of article)

  

www.savedukegardens.org

Closing forever on May 25th.

 

Evil is done without effort, naturally, it is the working of fate; good is always the product of an art. Charles Baudelaire

 

By order of The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Trustees: Joan Spero, (President), Nannerl Keohane (Chair), John Mack (Vice Chair), Harry Demopoulos, Anthony Fauci, James Gill, Anne Hawley, Peter Nadosy, William Schlesinger, John H.T. Wilson and John Zuccotti.

 

Compare to same blossom on May 24th

Duke Farms is the estate of James Buchanan Duke, of Duke Power and American Tobacco Company, and inherited by his daughter Doris Duke.

 

Located on 2,700 acres (11 km²) of farm and wood lands in Hillsborough, New Jersey, the property was opened to the public on May 19, 2012 by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation as "a model of environmental stewardship in the 21st Century and (to) inspire visitors to become informed stewards of the land."

The glorious indoor display gardens of Doris Duke's Estate in NJ will destroyed unless the Trustees are persuaded to reconsider before May 25th: See the Save Duke Gardens web site or the Flickr group Save Duke Gardens.

 

porcelain with enamel decoration.

gift of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

HPIM9591

... in less than month.

 

The glorious indoor display gardens of Doris Duke's Estate in NJ will destroyed unless the Trustees are persuaded to reconsider before May 25th: Please go to the Save Duke Gardens web site and write a letter!

 

For more photos, see the Flickr group Save Duke Gardens.

23 days until this garden is lost.

Indoor Display Gardens, Duke Farms

 

www.savedukegardens.org

(closed forever in under a month)

28 May update: A Wall Street Journal article (by Jane Garmey) on these gardens appeared this morning:

online.wsj.com/article/SB121192910041724297.html

Digg it (link at bottom of article)

 

We are stardust

Billion year old carbon

We are golden

Caught in the devils bargain

And weve got to get ourselves

Back to the garden

 

Stardust (Joni Mitchell)

 

Compare to same blossom on May 20th

 

www.savedukegardens.org

Thailand

Lacquered and gilt bronze

Gift from Doris Duke Charitable Foundation's Southeast Asian Art Collection

 

"In the nineteenth century, kings of Thailand commissioned large standing crowned and bejeweled Buddha images of the same type as, and with the hands in the same position as, the two in this gallery. The royally commissioned images were set up surrounding the famous Emerald buddha in the royal chapel in Bangkok, where they can still be seen. Their function was to commemorate specific deceased royal parents and other relatives, both male and female. Thus images like the ones in this gallery, which were made in large quantities in all sizes were associated with honoring ancestors, especially royal ancestors. The crown of this image can be removed to reveal a small open space in the top of the head. Perhaps this space was used to hold a relic of the deceased person being honored.

 

This image is missing the elaborate flame-like decorations that would have extended from the crown down behind the ears. The holes were these decorations would have been attached can be seen..."

 

- Asian Art Museum

These Mutant Bunnies will die unless the Trustees of Doris Duke's estate change their decision - see:

flickr.com/groups/savedukegardens/pool/

  

American philanthropist and tobacco heiress Doris Duke ( 1912 - 1993 )

inherited a large family fortune that enabled her to pursue a variety of interests in a lifetime rife with controversy and rumor. Although she lived

a lavish lifestyle and was sometimes self - indulgent and eccentric, she

was also an astute businesswoman and supported a number of public

causes. when she was 21, she established the Independent aid foundation which later became the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

It is estimated that she gave away more than $ 400 million during her lifetime, often as anonymous contributions. The Doris Duke Charitable

Foundation continues to provide grants in programs supporting the arts,

environment, medical research, and child welfare.

This fish in the Chinese Garden will be looking for another home soon: the indoor display gardens at Duke Farms are being permanently closed. See savedukegardens.org and the Save Duke Gardens Flickr group.

This is the letter that the first 130 protesters to the Trustees of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation suddenly got on May 8th, when each Trustees received a bound copy of their emails.

 

The letter is mailed by a Ms Aspero and signed by a Ms Kessler. Which is strange since we all wrote to the Trustees: Joan Spero, (President), Nannerl Keohane (Chair), John Mack (Vice Chair), Harry Demopoulos, Anthony Fauci, James Gill, Anne Hawley, Peter Nadosy, William Schlesinger, John H.T. Wilson and John Zuccotti.

Above the entrance to her Display Gardens.

 

Burma (Myanmar). Lacquered and gilt wood and metal with mirror inlay. Gift from Doris Duke Charitable Foundation’s Southeast Asian Art Collection.

 

"Such an elaborate throne and Buddha image would have been an important fixture of a nineteenth-century Burmese Buddhist temple, and similar ones can still be seen in temples today.

 

The significance of the crowned and bejeweled Buddha image varied in different places and periods. According to a tradition known in Thailand and Burma for the past several centuries (and perhaps considerably longer), an arrogant king named Jambupati once attempted to awe the Buddha with his grandeur. In response, the Buddha manifested himself in the most magnificent crown and royal finery to teach that the grandeur of buddhahood vastly outshines that of earthly kingship.

 

The original crown of this Buddha image disappeared long ago. The one the image now wears was made using traditional techniques and in the traditional style in 2002 by U Win Maung, an expert artisan in Mandalay, Burma. It is a gift in memory of M. R. Vadhanathorn Chirapravati. The rest of the Buddha image's royal decorations appear to be original."

 

- Asian Art Museum

Burma (Myanmar). Lacquered and gilt wood and metal with mirror inlay. Gift from Doris Duke Charitable Foundation’s Southeast Asian Art Collection.

 

"Such an elaborate throne and Buddha image would have been an important fixture of a nineteenth-century Burmese Buddhist temple, and similar ones can still be seen in temples today.

 

The significance of the crowned and bejeweled Buddha image varied in different places and periods. According to a tradition known in Thailand and Burma for the past several centuries (and perhaps considerably longer), an arrogant king named Jambupati once attempted to awe the Buddha with his grandeur. In response, the Buddha manifested himself in the most magnificent crown and royal finery to teach that the grandeur of buddhahood vastly outshines that of earthly kingship.

 

The original crown of this Buddha image disappeared long ago. The one the image now wears was made using traditional techniques and in the traditional style in 2002 by U Win Maung, an expert artisan in Mandalay, Burma. It is a gift in memory of M. R. Vadhanathorn Chirapravati. The rest of the Buddha image's royal decorations appear to be original."

 

- Asian Art Museum

From Thailand. In the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

"Panel with crowned and bejweled Buddha. Lacquered and gilded wood. Such panels with large figured are rare. No other example with a large Buddha image is known.

Gift from Doris Duke Charitable Foundation"

American philanthropist and tobacco heiress Doris Duke (1912 - 1993) inherited a large family fortune that enabled her to pursue a variety of interests in a lifetime rife with controversy and rumor. Although she lived a lavish lifestyle and was sometimes self-indulgent and eccentric, she was also an astute businesswoman and supported a number of public causes. When she was 21, she established the Independent Aid foundation, which later became the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. It is estimated that she gave away more than $400 million during her lifetime, often as anonymous contributions. The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation continues to provide grants in programs supporting the arts, environment, medical research, and child welfare.

www.answers.com

Maurine Knighton, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, and Ta-Nehisi Coates

Jessica Fanzo is a Senior Scientist at Bioversity International, in Rome Italy, where she leads the Nutrition program in the Diversity for Livelihoods division. Bioversity is one of the Centres of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research, a global partnership that unites organisations engaged in research for sustainable development.

 

From 2007 to 2010, Jessica served as the Nutrition Director for the Center for Global Health and Economic Development (CGHED) at the Earth Institute, Columbia University in New York City. While at CGHED, Jessica oversaw the Global Food Systems Initiative that brought together innovative individuals to address food and agriculture system challenges. She was also the Nutrition Coordinator for the Millennium Villages Project where she led a large-scale multi-sectoral nutrition program in 10 sub-Saharan African countries.

 

From 2008 to 2009, Jessica served as the Nutrition Regional Advisor for East and Southern Africa at the Millennium Development Goal Centre at the World Agroforestry Centre leading nutrition policy reform and lived in Kenya. Prior to joining the Earth Institute, she was a Program Officer for the Medical Research Program at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation focusing on HIV/AIDS initiatives in Uganda and South Africa as well as clinical research programs in the United States.

 

In 2000, Jessica received her PhD degree from the University of Arizona in nutrition before completing a four-year Stephen I. Morse postdoctoral fellowship in Immunology at Columbia University. Jessica serves on Columbia University’s Institute of Human Nutrition Food and Nutrition Council, the United Nations Standing Committee on Nutrition Working Group on Household Food Security, the Advisory Group for Agriculture and Nutrition to the Special Advisor to the UNSG, and the IASC Global Nutrition Cluster.

 

She is an editor on several journals, has been commissioned by IDS, WFP and UNDP for global policy reports on nutrition and food security, and has authored a range of peer-reviewed scientific publications.

This project will create a conservation easement on 2,571 acres of extremely valuable wildlife habitat in the upper Green River Valley which is at high risk for development. This property includes portions of the pronghorn migratory bottleneck (the Funnel Bottleneck) at the head of the Upper Green River, sage-grouse nesting and brood rearing habitat, approximately one mile of Green River frontage, elk winter range, moose crucial winter range, and other numerous wildlife habitat values.

 

The project meets wildlife mitigation goals for preserving and enhancing wildlife habitats.

 

Project Status: Conservation easement completed; Conservation plan implementation in progress.

JIO Funded: $2,093,800

Total Project Acres: 2,411

Partners/Cooperators

 

Carney Family - Landowner

Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

The Conservation Fund

Wyoming Wildlife & Natural Resources Trust

Wyoming Stock Growers Agricultural Land Trust

Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative

National Fish & Wildlife Foundation

Carney Ranch. pronhorns. Carney Ranch.

 

www.blm.gov/office/high-desert-district-office/jio-projects

BELIEF is the first in a series of five videos documenting the creation of red, black and GREEN: a blues. The work’s central collaboration—between Marc Bamuthi Joseph and Theaster Gates—exemplifies new directions in socially engaged, hybrid arts practice and presentation.

 

BELIEF is made possible by the Contemporary Art Centers (CAC) network, administered by the New England Foundation for the Arts (NEFA), with major support from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. CAC is comprised of leading art centers and brings together performing arts curators to support collaboration and work across disciplines, and is an initiative of NEFA's National Dance Project.

 

Video footage by Eli Jacobs-Fantauzzi

Photos by Bethanie Hines

Editing by Mike Taylor

  

*****

 

red, black and GREEN: a blues

 

by Marc Bamuthi Joseph for The Living Word Project

 

Produced by MAPP International Productions

 

Directed by Michael John Garcés

 

Performed by

Theaster Gates

Marc Bamuthi Joseph

Tommy Shepherd aka Soulati

Traci Tolmaire

 

Set/Installation Design by Theaster Gates

Choreography by Stacey Printz

Media Design by David Szlaza

Lighting Design by James Clotfelter

Films created by Eli Jacobs-Fantauzzi

Production Management by Pam Traynor

 

World Premiere: Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco, CA), October 13-15 and 20-22, 2011.

 

red, black, and GREEN: a blues is co-commissioned by Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Cynthia Woods Mitchell Center for the Arts at University of Houston, Walker Art Center and Lehigh University. It is also commissioned by The America Project, with support from the Ford Foundation and the Nathan Cummings Foundation.

 

Developmental residencies have been provided by Carolina Performing Arts at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Critical production support for rbGb is being provided by the Technical Residency Program at Z Space.

 

red, black, and GREEN: a blues has received generous support from The National Endowment for the Arts; The New England Foundation for the Arts' National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and additional funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Boeing Company Charitable Trust; The MAP Fund, a program of Creative Capital supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation; East Bay Community Foundation, with matching support from United States Artists; Panta Rhea Foundation; and Zellerbach Family Foundation.

 

Watch this video on Vimeo. Video created by MAPP International.

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