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Ctenucha virginica on Gooseneck Loosestrife

I found this moth over these beautiful pink flowers.

 

Ctenucha virginica is a moth of the family Erebidae. The wingspan ranges from 40–50 millimetres. The wing color varies from black to olive-brown. The body is a metallic blue-green. The head is yellow-orange, with feathery antennae. The caterpillar has multiple tufts of white and yellow hair. It undergoes metamorphosis in May–August.

Why hide that beautiful blue abdomen, Ctenucha virginica?

 

(Caught a Virginia Ctenucha mid-flight at a bioblitz last July)

I'm positive what moth this is but It could be ...

Black Wings and Orange Head - Ctenucha virginica

– Virginia Ctenucha moth.

Virginia ctenucha (Ctenucha virginica); northern Indiana

If you scroll down my photostream you'll see that I posted a couple pix of this rather colorful moth earlier this week.

Here it is again, on one of our pine trees in black & white for the Monochrome Bokeh Thursday Group.

HMBT!

 

SOOC, other than the conversion to black and white.

 

You can read about this cool moth here:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ctenucha_virginica

 

Posting 3 pix today. :)

I've been messing around with a few pics. I'm not sure if this one is a little over-cooked.

 

View On Black

Virginia Ctenucha (Ctenucha virginica) is a large, common day-flying wasp moth in the Subfamily Ctenuchinae (Wasp Moths) in the family Arctiidae (Tiger Moths). The body is metallic blue and the head and sides of the collar are orange.

   

Virginia ctenucha moths fly around during the daylight just like butterflies do instead of after dark and they count on those bold blackish-blue and orange colors to protect them from predators since that striking color combination makes them look very similar to a dangerous wasp.

Virginia Ctenucha (Ctenucha virginica) is a large, common day-flying wasp moth in the Subfamily Ctenuchinae (Wasp Moths) in the family Arctiidae (Tiger Moths).

  

My sister was able to i.d. it for me. Ctenucha virginica.

Explored number 434 on June 29, 2016

Aire écologique Maskimo, Trois-Rivières, Québec - Canada

This is the Ctenucha virginica moth....or so a friend assures me. I did not know that diurnal means it flies during the day.

A rather handsome day-flying moth nectaring on Apocynum.

Pentax K-30, SMC Pentax-M 35/2.8, Raynox 150

 

For the Pentax Forums Single in July Challenge

Red Mill, Trois-Rivières, Mauricie, Québec, Canada.

I spotted this rather large insect, a moth of some kind, I think, on some wildflowers in one of our local forest preserves recently. I didn’t have my macro lens with me, so I grabbed a couple of shots with a long zoom lens.

 

Maybe I haven’t been paying attention, but I don’t recall seeing a moth like this before. With its orange head, blue upper body markings and large fuzzy antennae, I thought it was interesting enough to post. Maybe someone knows what it is. I added some texture to pretty things up a bit.

 

Addendum: Thanks to all who helped with the ID on this Virginia Ctenucha (Ctenucha virginica) moth!

Moth and ant feeding on milkweed flowers. Where I live milkweed is one of the best sources for insect photos.

Virginia Ctenuchid Moth (Ctenucha virginica)

 

I quit shooting grasshoppers a few years ago because they creep me out too much. They give me nightmares.

 

So along comes this creepy-looking Virginia Ctenuchid Moth. It is extremely fast and constantly waves its feathery antennae. This moth is both beautiful and scary-looking. Morbid fascination is what kept me taking images of the moth which was nectaring on wild asters. I kept the crop large so I wouldn't creep myself out too much.

 

Thanks for viewing and have a marvelous day!

 

© Nancy Clark - All Rights Reserved

 

Member of the Flickr Bird Brigade

Activists for birds and wildlife

  

Posting 2 pix of this colorful moth I discovered in the front yard yesterday morning while out looking at the flowers and cleaning out the nest boxes. I love its iridescent blue body.

It's a Ctenucha Virginica moth and you can read about it here:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ctenucha_virginica

and here:

www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Ctenucha-virginica

SOOC.

 

Posting 3 pix today. :)

Virginia ctenucha moths are also appearing on flowers like these daisy fleabanes in grassy habitats now. Even though they're a moth, they fly during the day since those orange, blue and black colors make them look just like a wasp, and we certainly wouldn't want to mess with them.

Ctenucha virginica

Upper Peninsula of Michigan

  

Virginia_Ctenuchid-0046-sc02

Posting 2 pix of this colorful moth I discovered in the front yard yesterday morning while out looking at the flowers and cleaning out the nest boxes. I love its iridescent blue body.

It's a Ctenucha Virginica moth and you can read about it here:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ctenucha_virginica

and here:

www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Ctenucha-virginica

SOOC.

 

Posting 3 pix today. :)

Virginia Ctenucha (Ctenucha virginica) is a large, common day-flying wasp moth in the Subfamily Ctenuchinae (Wasp Moths) in the family Arctiidae (Tiger Moths). The body is metallic blue and the head and sides of the collar are orange.

     

Male Virginia Ctenucha moth. The largest wasp moth in North America. Taken at Flat Island, Newfoundland.

Ctenucha virginica

 

19 June 2016

 

© Bruce Bolin K1__0625ce

... dining on Conoclinum coelestinum

Some caterpillars are just born ready to handle winter in style... I found this Ctenucha virginica caterpillar last January stranded on the snow.

 

No worries though, with a lovely fur coat and a body that can literally handle freezing, it was capable of waiting for the temperature to warm up a little so it could continue with its midwinter journey. But a frozen caterpillar? That's begging to be brought indoors under a high magnification setup, and photographed quickly before it thaws and starts to run away.

 

Technical Info:

 

-SB-80dx flashes left and right, diffused through sections of ping pong balls up close to the subject.

-Triggered with rf-602's.

-Caterpillar on its back and I was shooting down.

-Lens was a Mitakon Zhongyi 20mm with 4x magnification, so the frame represents about 4mm by 6mm.

-This is 8 shots, stacked in Zerene for more Depth of Field.

-Caterpillar was kept cold overwinter, fed when it warmed up, and eventually released as a moth later in the spring.

I believe this is a Ctenucha Virginica Moth (not easy to say). I found it on my hike today hanging off a grass in a field. Pretty cool looking moth.

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