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U.S. Army Human Resources Command Soldiers salute during the change of command ceremony at Fort Knox, Ky., April 28, 2017.

 

Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Brian Hamilton, U.S. Army Human Resources Command Public Affairs Office

 

Maj. Gen. Jason T. Evans assumed command of U.S. Army Human Resources Command from Maj. Gen. Thomas C. Seamands at a ceremony conducted at the Lt. Gen. Timothy J. Maude Complex on Fort Knox, Ky., April 28. U.S. Army Deputy Chief of Staff/G-1, Lt. Gen. James C. McConville, officiated. Evans returns to HRC from the Pentagon, where he served as Director of Military Personnel Management. He previously served as The Adjutant General of the Army, U.S. Army Human Resources Command, from 2011 to 2013. Seamands departed for new duties in Washington, D.C.

 

For the full story, go to Evans takes command of U.S. Army Human Resources Command

 

Follow Army HRC on Twitter at : twitter.com/ArmyHRC, and join the conversations online at Army HRC www.facebook.com/ArmyHRC

  

U.S. Army Deputy Chief of Staff/G-1, Lt. Gen. James C. McConville (left), looks on as Ms. Melinda Seamands and her husband, outgoing HRC commander, Maj. Gen. Thomas C. Seamands, kiss during an award presentation at the HRC change of command ceremony at Fort Knox, Ky., April 28, 2017.

 

Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Brian Hamilton, U.S. Army Human Resources Command Public Affairs Office

 

Maj. Gen. Jason T. Evans assumed command of U.S. Army Human Resources Command from Maj. Gen. Thomas C. Seamands at a ceremony conducted at the Lt. Gen. Timothy J. Maude Complex on Fort Knox, Ky., April 28. U.S. Army Deputy Chief of Staff/G-1, Lt. Gen. James C. McConville, officiated. Evans returns to HRC from the Pentagon, where he served as Director of Military Personnel Management. He previously served as The Adjutant General of the Army, U.S. Army Human Resources Command, from 2011 to 2013. Seamands departed for new duties in Washington, D.C.

 

For the full story, go to Evans takes command of U.S. Army Human Resources Command

 

Follow Army HRC on Twitter at : twitter.com/ArmyHRC, and join the conversations online at Army HRC www.facebook.com/ArmyHRC

  

Unnamed Falls

Pounder Branch

Cane Creek Wildlife Area

Kentucky

 

5 Image HDR

 

You know, half the fun of hiking to Van Hook Falls really is the hike. Usually for me it's mostly about the payoff, but the section of the Sheltowee Tracel National Trail as it passes through the Cane Creek Wildlife Management Area from Kentucky 192 to Van Hook is one of the prettiest in Kentucky! When you start out on the trail you have no clue about what's ahead. It's drab and boring, but after you descend into the watershed things change quickly and you find yourself among a second growth hemlock forest as the trail follows and crosses, several times I might add, a tributary of Pounder Branch. You pass two falls along the tributary, both fairly small, but when it meets the main branch things change quickly as the creek begins to drop and drop and drop. Small creeks flow across the trail and then descend into Pounder Branch as the creek is now 100 ft. below to your right. Below you hear falling water. We counted at least 11 waterfalls along the trail. My good friend Chris Morris had been here before and spotted a place he had ascended from the gorge to the trail so down we went. For me it was a little dicey, I'm not a fan of heights but I pushed on anyway and made the scramble down to creek level. Goodness, what a payoff as this was the waterfall at the bottom. Although I'm sure there have been some, it was nice to know I was visiting a waterfall many had never been to and to make it even better with this much water on it. It was so peaceful there, with the sound of rushing water all around, towering hemlocks high above my head, and rhododendrons dancing across the high water, it was truly paradise.

 

Check out my website www.fultzfotos.com for more photos!

www.holyspiritspeaks.org

“Ever since God created them, based on the laws that He determined, all things have been operating and have been continuing to develop regularly. Under His gaze, under His rule, all things have been developing regularly alongside the survival of humans. Not a single thing is able to change these laws, and not a single thing can destroy these laws. It is because of God’s rule that all beings can multiply, and because of His rule and management that all beings can survive. This is to say that under God’s rule, all beings come into existence, thrive, disappear, and reincarnate in an orderly fashion. When spring arrives, drizzling rain brings that feeling of spring and moistens the earth. The ground begins to thaw, grass germinates and pushes its way up through the soil and the trees gradually turn green. All these living things bring fresh vitality to the earth. This is the sight of all beings coming into existence and thriving. All sorts of animals also come out of their burrows to feel the warmth of spring and start a new year. All beings bask in the heat during the summer and enjoy the warmth brought by the season. They grow rapidly; trees, grass, and all types of plants are growing very quickly, then they bloom and bear fruit. All beings are very busy during the summer, including humans. In the fall, rains bring autumn’s coolness, and all types of living beings start to experience the harvest season. All beings bear fruit, and humans also begin to harvest all kinds of things because of the fall production of these beings, in order to prepare food for the winter. In the winter all beings gradually begin to rest in the coldness, to become quiet, and people also take a break during this season. These transitions from spring to summer to fall and to winter—these changes all occur according to the laws established by God. He leads all beings and humans using these laws and has established for mankind a rich and colorful way of life, preparing an environment for survival that has different temperatures and different seasons. Under these orderly environments for survival, humans can also survive and multiply in an orderly way. Humans cannot change these laws and not a single person or being can break them. No matter what radical changes occur in the world, these laws continue to exist and they exist because God does. It is because of God’s rule and His management. With this type of orderly, larger environment, people’s lives go forward within these laws and rules. These laws cultivated generation after generation of people and generation after generation of people have survived within these laws. People have enjoyed the beings and this orderly environment for survival created by God for generation after generation of humans. Even though people feel that these types of laws are innate, even though they are entirely dismissive of them, and even though they cannot feel that God is orchestrating these laws, that God is ruling over these laws, no matter what, God is always engaged in this unchanging work. His purpose in this unchanging work is for the survival of mankind, and so that humans may continue on.”

(Continuation of The Word Appears in the Flesh)

www.holyspiritspeaks.org

“Ever since God created them, based on the laws that He determined, all things have been operating and have been continuing to develop regularly. Under His gaze, under His rule, all things have been developing regularly alongside the survival of humans. Not a single thing is able to change these laws, and not a single thing can destroy these laws. It is because of God’s rule that all beings can multiply, and because of His rule and management that all beings can survive. This is to say that under God’s rule, all beings come into existence, thrive, disappear, and reincarnate in an orderly fashion. When spring arrives, drizzling rain brings that feeling of spring and moistens the earth. The ground begins to thaw, grass germinates and pushes its way up through the soil and the trees gradually turn green. All these living things bring fresh vitality to the earth. This is the sight of all beings coming into existence and thriving. All sorts of animals also come out of their burrows to feel the warmth of spring and start a new year. All beings bask in the heat during the summer and enjoy the warmth brought by the season. They grow rapidly; trees, grass, and all types of plants are growing very quickly, then they bloom and bear fruit. All beings are very busy during the summer, including humans. In the fall, rains bring autumn’s coolness, and all types of living beings start to experience the harvest season. All beings bear fruit, and humans also begin to harvest all kinds of things because of the fall production of these beings, in order to prepare food for the winter. In the winter all beings gradually begin to rest in the coldness, to become quiet, and people also take a break during this season. These transitions from spring to summer to fall and to winter—these changes all occur according to the laws established by God. He leads all beings and humans using these laws and has established for mankind a rich and colorful way of life, preparing an environment for survival that has different temperatures and different seasons. Under these orderly environments for survival, humans can also survive and multiply in an orderly way. Humans cannot change these laws and not a single person or being can break them. No matter what radical changes occur in the world, these laws continue to exist and they exist because God does. It is because of God’s rule and His management. With this type of orderly, larger environment, people’s lives go forward within these laws and rules. These laws cultivated generation after generation of people and generation after generation of people have survived within these laws. People have enjoyed the beings and this orderly environment for survival created by God for generation after generation of humans. Even though people feel that these types of laws are innate, even though they are entirely dismissive of them, and even though they cannot feel that God is orchestrating these laws, that God is ruling over these laws, no matter what, God is always engaged in this unchanging work. His purpose in this unchanging work is for the survival of mankind, and so that humans may continue on.”

(Continuation of The Word Appears in the Flesh)

Change of scene for the next series, to the Pajares pass line in northern Spain. It was originally planned to have been bypassed in 2012 by a base tunnel, but financial and geological difficulties mean that everything for the time being still has to be hauled over the 1270 metres high pass. Here, a southbound train loaded with rails is descending towards La Robla (and possibly onwards) behind ADIF 319 243, ADIF being the company charged with the management of most of Spain's railway infrastructure. Golpejar de la Tercia, 05-08-2014.

This remarkable structure in the Rijn Harbour in Rotterdam will become the showcase and centre of expertise for the National Water Centre that is currently in the process of formation. The floating pavilion is the reference centre for the innovative and inspiring approach to water management, climate change and energy issues

 

I noticed the plastic balls look quite interesting at dusk, so I went back there to take this picture.

 

www.manhattanofeurope.com

At Allies for Change, we look at pain differently. We assess every aspect of life that might contribute to chronic pain. We develop a collaborative, individualized treatment plan that addresses each of the contributing factors. We provide short and long-term support to help develop and implement the needed life style changes that result in true healing.

The lighting here changes incessantly..........film simulation with Nik

 

The coming death of Nikon 11

Nikon FX D-SLR vs Sony FF MILC. Should Nikon keep the venerable F mount for their future serious mirrorless system(even with a lot of technical restrictions)?

First of all, there are a few very erratic but interesting Nikon related rumors we've heard at CP+ show and at Kyobashi Tokyo camera museum, which I sometimes call Nikon graveyard.

But I think it is just a bit too early for us to write about these rumors here or anywhere else now.

We have to analyze these rumors a bit deeper to see which ones might become close to the real things or all are a bit too far-fetched stupid typical internet lies, and at this point, I think all Nikon related rumors we see at NR and many Japanese camera forums are all fakes.....or exaggerated version of the real ones.. or some Nikon fanatic's dreams or requests sent to Nikon via Internet forums.

Mr.Hogan recently said there were a few new Nikon FX rumors floating around internet and one of which actually stimulated his interest was: that the D810 update would not come at the last CP+ show and probably until the next CP+ show in 2018 because instead that camera would be replaced by a mirrorless model. That way Nikon would have a Sony A7R2 competitor instantly.

Well this one was spread across almost all Japanese camera forums and I think some Western guy or girl Google translated the Japanese original rumor erroneously and some very important info was lost in Google translation.....

Anyway, the original Japanese rumor in which Thom seems to have got interested said Nikon would come out with a similarly specified FX mirrorless body to the Sony A7R2 but with a new 46.4mp or 54.7mp sensor sensor designed by Nikon and fabricated by a new sensor manufacturing fab that Nikon, Olympus and Pentax have been trying to set up with some serious help from Tower Jazz and Panasonic. And this new FX mirrorless comes in F mount and a new mount and Nikon would evaluate which version would be selling better for them(like they did with the D800 and the E version of it).

I think this rumor might be true since we dealers always hear this kind of things every where, from third-party lens manufacture guys, from third-party LCD cover sells guys, some third-party speedlite sells guys,etc.

Well this rumor may be true, but the real problem here in this rumor is that Nikon seems to be choosing the F mount for their future mirrorless system and there is no benefit for them with that technically very restricted mount.

Thom commented below on this issue.

"Well, they already have a considerable A7r2 competitor: the D810. I own and shoot both, and I consider the D810 the better choice most of the time. I’d expect a D810 replacement to retain that distinction. So exactly what would we gain with a switch to mirrorless? I’m not sure we'd gain anything that excites me, especially if this means yet another new lens mount".

Well what can I say? I'm not sure if Mr.Hogan is really serious or just joking here? but I think there is no way Nikon will choose the F mount for their upcoming SERIOUS mirrorless system and succeed with it. True the D810 is a good camera already and it may compete well with the A7R2, especially considering its bargain price compared to the Sony.

But I guess Mr.Hogan is not a big fan of EVF and therefore he does not see many advantages of the Sony over the Nikon unlike us who love the EVF and video features of the Sony.

As a pure stills camera the Nikon is still a great body, but it cannot be as versatile hybrid camera as the Sony A7R2, in fact even the cheap Fuji X-T2 beats the Nikon hands down for video and any sort of hybrid use.

Here are some of main advantages of the Sony over the Nikon and Nikon should seriously study about these.

1 incredible video ability for a cheap stills camera.

2 incredibly smooth LV and fast LV AF.

3 effective live exposure compensation.

4 IBIS and effective electronic IS in video mode(although I am not a fan of IBIS thing, I can see it is very useful for handheld lowlight work).

5 I think the Sony system provides better event shooting experience for many of us(who were growing up with digital not film) due to the better LV implementation with the better more accurate tilty LCD screen compared to the D810 based kit with very low resolution fixed LCD.

In addition to all the above Sony or mirrorless specific benefits, Sony already has the more complete newer design better lens line up, especially the manual focus prime selection for the Sony system is a huge advantage of the Sony system over Nikon or Canon. IMHO, the Sony system has the best lens line up for most of normal shooters who are mostly in the range of 10-200 mm FF equivalent focal range, and this is because Sony has got all newly designed digital-optimized Zeiss Loxia, Batis, Voiklander CV-E line primes and Sony's own GM series zooms. IMHO, Nikon has nothing really as strong as the Sony GM line zooms in performance in their current lens line up to compete with Sony E mount system. I mean too many Nikon lenses are already too old and very restricted in use and not really compatible to most of the latest Nikon bodies.....and the latest E series lenses are only compatible to the latest and greatest line of Nikon D series bodies and these E series lenses are all more expensive than Sony and Canon counterparts........so where is never changing F mount lens compatibility that always Nikon fanatics brag about ?

Just a couple of years ago, Sony E mount haters always made fun of the E mount system for its(then) very poor lens lineup. But now ironically enough, with some serious help from Coshina, Zeiss, Samyang, Tokina, etc, Sony seems to have got one of the very best lens line in the FF class in just a matter of a year or so and I think we have to give some serious credit to Sony for keeping it an open mount system unlike Canon and Nikon trying hard to shut out all the third-parties out of their respective FF system. Nikon has sued Sigma for a several times already and they have lost a lot of money and customers over that stupid lawsuits.

Sony E mount has the widest range of digital-optimized MF(manual focus) lenses and many people who find precise MF-ability more important to them than super fast C-AF will always choose the Sony FE system. I mean it is almost impossible to really precisely MF on your Nikon with their poor soft LV image quality..no peaking,etc. The Canon D-SLRs at least have very good LV and LV exposure simulation mode, but the Nikons including the latest D5600, the D500, the D5 do not have that. The LV speed of the latest Nikon is basically the same as the 7year old D7000, in fact, Nikon has made no progress in this area since the D600.

It is really pity and the Nikon D-SLRs-even the best ones are not comparable to any of the Sony A7X series cameras in this regard.

In last week, I just tried the CV40mm f1.2 in Osaka, and I must say it is incredible, extremely sharp and extremely compact,I think this new Coshina Voiktlander E mount prime series is instantly becoming really an indispensable prime line to many E mount shooters.......

The CV-E 40mm f1.2 is incredible, the CV 12mm f5.6 and 10mm f5.6 are both indispensable and I am sure the upcoming 65mm f2 APO-Lanther will be incredible too, but it is a bit too bulky for me and I might not buy it but still it is a great lens for sure.. And most importantly they are only really practical on a EVF camera with focus peaking.

I do really appreciate the new Voiklander primes and Zeiss Loxia series, and they are one of the main reasons I have been using the A7R and A7R2 for most of things now....

 

Anyway Mr.Hogan wrote below:

"But let’s assume for a moment that the Mirrorless D810 update rumor is true and Nikon will not update the D810 but put out a high megapixel full frame mirrorless camera instead. What would that say about Nikon’s product line management?

To me, such a switcheroo would be just another sign of Nikon product panic.

Let's see, the F3, F4, D1h/D1x, D3/D3x all worked, and the D5 seems to be working while the F6 worked for the few remaining film-shooting pros. Great products that the pros and high end enthusiasts loved. The F5, D2h/D2x, and D4 didn't quite rise to the same level, but I know plenty of pros that (mostly) love those cameras, too. What I can't understand is why establish the h/s combo and then abandon it? Until the D4 came out we all had h/s twins in our gear closets. Now our gear closet is a bit of a mess. A mirrorless replacement for the D810 would just increase that mess."

I do not know he is actually honest or just writing the above because he has hugely invested into the Nikon eco-system and writing the books on the D series Nikon bodies, after all Nikon is his client and probably the most important one, so he can not be brutally honest about it, maybe? I mean no Nikon cameras even come close to the A7R2 or the A7M2 in terms of LV and video shooting experience or in terms of sheer IQ..........even the ancient A7R ORIGINAL was already a bit better than the D810 with respect to the base ISO noise, color accuracy and most importantly resolving power...and more importantly these high resolution bodies are usually used on a tripod and so they do not need any kind of extra shock generating mecha like the mirror-box or completely mechanical shutter...Almost all the Sony E mount cameras now shoot without shutter mirror slap and therefore they can better utilize the high resolution sensor with the latest high-grade lens combo.....I have compared a couple of the D810 bodies with a couple of the A7R(not the 2) many times and the A7R produces better sharper images most of times as long as it is set on a solid tripod.....so if the D810 cannot get as sharp as the A7R most of times, then how can it compete with the even better almost mechanical internal shock-free A7R2 body? On top of that, the D810 has less durable shutter unit than the one used in the A7MK2 and any Sony released after that. The A7R2 has about 3 times longer rated shutter life with much more quiet electronic shutter.

And why he still wants to have a so-called pro body with a super high resolution sensor is beyond me. He seems to want a D5 with the D810 or A7R2 sensor, but is that really needed in the current Nikon line up? I mean all these high resolution cameras are normally used on a tripod or in a studio or like that, so the ultimate speed of pro body is not that important for that kind of camera market. In fact, I think most of people who buy or consider high resolution FF prefer a mirroless over a D-SLR body.

MR.Hogan also said below:

"The D500 is one of Nikon's big successes recently—told you so, Nikon—despite the rushed and slightly unfinished feel. There really should be a D500s soon to polish it up, but we don't hear rumors about that, do we? Meanwhile, the D7200 has been a workhorse for everyone that bought it. It'll give a D500 a run for the money in terms of image quality, though not in build or a few critical performance aspects. "

Well this is a common forum myth or almost an urban legend.....the D500 is not selling well in real world, it was actually a bit too late since most of Nikon shooters that really needed that kind of sports body already dumped their once beloved Nikon kit for the Canon 7DMK2 kit.

We have had many customers complaining about how slow Nikon was and if they had known it coming, then they would have kept their Nikon lenses altogether, but too late.......

Yeah in this sense Hogan is right, Nikon should have talked to the most important user base of theirs about the D500 coming way before ahead.

And how much is the Canon 7DMK2 these days , how much is the Sony A77MK2 or A6500?

Well they are all much cheaper than the D500, and one thing I agree with Mr.Hogan is the D7200 is the biggest enemy of the D500.......the D7200 is cheaper, produces sharper file, with a bit more DR and color range to play with in Capture One pro 10 or DXO Pro 11.

Yeah I agree it is the best Nikon body for our bucks. It is really cheap and really reliable, probably one of these most cost effective camera body solutions. The D7200 and the D750 are really hard to beat for the modest price they carry.

Well, as Thom rightly said, the D500 might have a bit tougher body, but would you really feel it in real life use? I think no. I've abused my puny dinky A7R for almost 4 years but it does not even develop a line of scratch on it, it may be a cheap plastic body but it will definitely take any kind of abuse, even a few drops on to a concrete sidewalk. And still it will work well without any issue. My cheap dinky NEX5n is even more durable, I really abuse it and I do not even care if or when it breaks , so I always use it in the worst possible conditions I can conceive of, but it never breaks. My Nikon D7200 is the same-it is really cheap and easy to replace when it breaks so I use it in the worst possible condition I can conceive of, but it too never breaks.

So the so-called pro build quality is really overrated.......I mean hey try to drop your D5 or D4s or 1DX2 onto a sidewalk, they'd immediately die, I am sure about it but if you drop a Panasonic G85, a Sony A6300, or a Canon EOS-M5, they all would survive. These plastic cameras are more durable than these heavy pro metal bodies and if you doubt it try to drop your so-called pro D-SLRs from some rocky slope onto rocky ground to see how weak fragile they actually are.

Why do we have to worship the usual the more metal contain the better body religion? Why do they all think metal is so much better than plastic ? And why do they all seem to love the loud Nikon shutter so much? Do they never shoot any concert? or piano recital, etc? I am a big fan of Mozart so I do really need silent shutter.........

 

Hogan also said:

"Many of you think that horse should be FX mirrorless. But I don't see how that helps Nikon at all. Note what I wrote about the FX DSLR line above: those are all good cameras, and it's a strong lineup. Probably the strongest part of Nikon's current camera lineup. Do you really think they're going to risk that? I don't. Moreover, it doesn't solve Nikon's biggest problem: negative growth."

Yeah exactly, this is what these annoying Nikon fanatics or forum denizens cannot get, they chant FF, FX, FF and belittle everything else...........but in real life the so-called FF sales makes up for only about 8 percent of the entire ILC market sales and it is not getting much better...

And even before that Nikon's financial crisis is nothing to do with their camera business but the bean counters from Mitsubishi bank stipulate them to stick forever with the silly money losing stepper business.....But even so,Nikon really needs to rectify their consumer camera business as soon as they can, too, since most of their income is now coming from that ever contracting camera business...and the majority of camera buyers never care about FX or DX, or they do not even understand the difference between these two formats. I think one thing Thom has got right-spot-on was Nikon needs more programmable camera (open mount system) and definitely needs to get the SnapBridge thing right. All cameras should have more thorough sophisticated connectivity. After all, the majority of consumers want to upload their images(mostly selfies) right up to their FaceBook pages instantly. Most of my normal friends have already ditched their serious cameras and got something more casual because they hated post-processing or RAW processing, they simply prefer to shoot everything Jpeg and up these directly to their facebook pages.

"By now, as everybody already knows,Nikon has two extremely weak sectors right now: (1) serious compact or One sensor camera; and (2) big sensor mirrorless product that effectively covers from below the D3400 space up to the D7200 range.."

Mr.Hogan continued:

"I've heard absolutely nothing about what happens after the DL fiasco. If Nikon is really not going to play in the 1" compact game, the only choice they really have now is to build Coolpix A replacements. But Nikon proved they didn't know how to market the Coolpix A. Great camera, bit of a price stretch, terrible name and marketing."

Do I agree? No, the Coolpix A was a terrible camera, IMHO.......it needed to have some sort of real EVF and fast static AF, and at least a bit brighter lens than the lame 28mm f2.8 equivalent lens on it. Well the marketing campaign and the software part were really terrible too, but the camera itself was already a terrible camera to start from, so how could any amount of marketing help it moving?

Meanwhile, for DX mirrorless, I haven't heard a lot. I know Nikon has designed prototypes of such cameras and lenses, but I don't know what their target was or whether they decided to move forward with them. I think Nikon has produced a several prototypes already but they decided not to mass-produce these since they all designed to cover the Thom-called- a bit below D3400 market, and I guess they thought it would not be good enough to fight with the Fuji XT2 and similar products. In fact, there is a long lasting rumor that Nikon will join in the Fuji X system camp, but I do not think this rumor is correct since Nikon is not very close to Fuji any more they basically fought and decided to go against each other 7 years ago after Nikon stupidly tried to restrict Fuji to design a F mount body with Fuji's own sensor and electronics inside.

Realistically, I think the only two remaining options Nikon should and still can do now are:

1 to join the m43 or the E mount system, but I do not think Sony will allow Nikon to sell E mount body in the existing E mount eco-system. This means if Nikon wants to join in some already popular mirrorless mount system, that would have to be the m43 club.

2 to start new mirrorless that takes all the advantage(or disadvantage of)existing F mount eco-system. This means Nikon will have to use non optimized mount for FF and video, real electronic aperture control, etc. Or they simply design a new mount like Sony E or Canon M and take the F mount legacy lenses with a sophisticated fully compatible mount adapter like Canon did with their EOS-M mount.

But in this case Nikon can only use the P type and E type lenses for their new mirrorless systems since the older G and D series lenses are not fully compatible to fully electronic aperture control system. Too many Nikon lenses are already too old and very restricted in use and not really compatible to most of new Nikon bodies.....But if the only really fully compatible lenses to their new mirrorless system are the E and P series lenses, then there will be no advantage of choosing the optically very restricted venerable F mount. After all, how many E and P series lenses does the F mount have? I think 13? And is it enough to start a new system from scratch?

Thom and many of his followers seem to prefer Nikon to choose the F mount for their future serious FX mirrorless system, but do they think just having P and E series lenses in the catalogue for that is fine? I think Nikon initially needs at least two very different mount systems:

A: a big FF mirrorless with the F mount for event/ sports /wildlife kind of camera market, they need this type of silly but important F mount mirrorless to just shut up the old whiners in the forums that demand the F mount mirrorless forever...

B: a small FF or APS-C mirrorless system with short flange back design just like the A7 series but with a fully F mount compatible mount adapter(maybe it also needs a kind of focal reducer in case they make it with the DX sized sensor).

So I think it is not too late for Nikon since Sony is the only one player in the FF mirrorless market. But it must be great and fully compatible to the F mount lenses at least the E series lenses, hopefully also compatible to the G series(but I doubt it possible).

Many people in forums asking Nikon to keep the F mount, but in the long run keeping the F mount has no advantages over moving to a new mount system with a fully compatible F mount adapter.

1, the F mount makes camera unnecessarily thick and awkward to hold.

2, the F mount never allows Nikon or any third-party lens maker to develop a set of primes like the Voiklander CV-E series and Zeiss Loxia.......and also the F mount forces Nikon to use super long registration distance for every lens they will make.

3, there are a very few F mount lenses work well without the mirror. Actually only the E series and maybe the P too work well even without the mirror.

The G, the D, etc, never work well since they do not have electronically controlled aperture design.

4, The F mount really restricts Nikon to design a real hybrid camera like the GH5 or the A6500, if not the F mount makes it impossible. The terrible mechanically controlled aperture design really restricts smooth AF and aperture control in video mode and even in LV mode, we already experienced that in any of Nikon LV capable cameras if you ever tried shooting it LV. It is literally useless.

However Nikon should not discard the F mount system just yet since there are simply too many old men asking Nikon to keep using the venerable F mount for their future mirrorless system, and I think this is the biggest long term problem for Nikon.......

The F mount has become a big burden on Nikon's aged back and it will really really limit their camera design options in the future.

However, for a temporal very short time success, it may be better to just continue using the F mount for their action/sports bodies since using short mount registration distance design does not make FX zooms and long primes smaller or cheaper as Sony FE lenses have already shown it...

So they may just want to keep the F mount for their new FF mirrorless system designed for sports/PJ/wildlife market that mostly use a trio of the f2.8 zooms and long super tele primes.

A tiny body like the A7R2 does not hold the heavy lenses well, even the 24-70mm f2.8 feels too big on that body. So Sony will need a big body mirrorless in addition to the A7 line and it should come with the A mount not the puny E mount. I think the A99Mk3 will be that kind of camera covers the PJ/ Wildlife and sports market.

Now for the type B kind of a small bodied mirrorless system, Nikon needs a new mount design with short flange distance with a bit wider than the E mount mount design. If it is compact and actually fine-tuned for the FF sensor from the very start(unlike the E mount , which was originally designed for the APS-C system), I think it will be interesting, but they must have a full line of lenses from the very first day.

And Nikon needs better 21st century camera user interface and program-ability, I think the Leica SL has the best UI and it is definitely a very intuitive camera.

The A7R2 has no touch screen, no proper touch interface, not open to third-party App developers, so if Nikon or any one gets that all right in one body at the Sony price (not the Leica price) , I think they might have a serious chance.

For me touch screen and better more intuitive U.I is more than enough to try the new Nikon system, especially if it gets wider mount diameter than the E mount. Also Nikon(Sony too) must consider developing really effective sensor dust reduction system, for me the most important feature in any new mirrorless system is effective supersonic dust reduction system like the one in the Olympus EM1MK2 and the Panasonic GH5. The effective Dust Reduction system in any m43 body really eliminates the fear of changing lenses in the field. And it is a big plus for me.

Finally, if Nikon wants to really succeed it, then they must persuade Zeiss, Coshina, Sigma, Tamron, Samyang, etc, to enter into their new mount system.

But I doubt they will do it since Nikon always loves proprietary closed system , the Nikon-Sigma court case really shows us how close-mined Nikon is.

If Nikon stupidly closes their new MILC system and shuts out all the third-party lens makers , it will definitely kill the new system immediately. Also they need to persuade Phase One to make Capture One pro for Nikon for around 50 bucks just like Sony does for us.

So while it is not too late, I think, considering the all negative facts such as how they treat the third-parties, etc, it is really really difficult for them....but it is definitely not impossible.

PS. At the last CP+ show Nikon was rumored to have revealed they have already produced a small number of FX mirrorless prototypes a few times in the past, but decided not release these.

Actually, many of us who have closely followed Nikon Japan for at least 6 years or so all have heard about that Nikon has already developed a several or more FX mirrorless prototypes, and a very few of those people have actually tried some of these prototype cameras.

But for some very obscure reasons Nikon just dropped all of them off before the actual planned announcement dates.

I recalled the very first Nikon FX mirrorless prototype design rumor came out in 2015 just before the actual A7R2 announcement, and I think because of that camera, Nikon decided to drop it off. I guess Nikon was embarrassed of their very primitive /crude FX mirrorless camera compared to the already very sophisticated Sony camera at the time.

It was still a rumor but I actually believed it was the case.

  

UPDATE : now, Canon has just announced its new sensor development policy. Canon seems to have built a new sensor plant in Mie prefecture of Japan. It seems like Canon is going on new 65nm process rule and all upcoming Canon sensors will be produced at there.

I think the 1DX2 and the 80D sensors are processed at the new plant.

Sony is still leading the CMOS imaging industry, but giants like Samsung are in close pursuit. Also big players like Panasonic are forming joint ventures with the likes of TowerJazz to offer 12-inch wafer fabrication with state-of-the-art quantum efficiency and dark current performance at 65 nano meters, and additional 45nm digital technology, and added available capacity of approximately 800,000 8-inch wafers per year in three manufacturing plants in Japan, according to TowerJazz.

 

The stakes are huge. The CMOS image sensor market will reached the historic $10 billion milestone in 2015, according to Yale, and with new applications popping up in automotive, medical and surveillance, while smartphones begin adopting high-definition front facing cameras, the industry is likely to hit the $16 billion mark by 2020. So nobody is just sleeping and Sony has to consolidate its position ASAP, or probably Sony will lose it again just like its short-lived TV business.

Now Canon's main customer is Honda, who buys a billion of small high

ISO capable 4k sensors for their cars.

  

UPDATE2: I interviewed many NORMAL camera buyers in my area at our camera shop and asked them to tell us about what was the main reason they did not buy so-called mirrorless any more, and why they think the market share of these mirrorless decreasing at least in the Western world and the already developed part of Asia such as Japan, Taiwan, South Korea , Singapore and HK.

They answered to these questions carefully as we paid some $$ and I think we found out a few interesting things about the NORMAL camera buyers' perception/opinion about ILC cameras and the culture surrounding the camera business:

 

1 to them, if it requires a bag even a tiny one, it's really not important what kind of camera system it is; a mirrorless or a D-SLR, a m43 or a FF, it is just too big and simply too annoying to carry around. So they use their cellphone more even though many of them already have some sort of One cameras or cheap ILCs.

2 To most of NORMAL camera buying people here it really does not matter FF or m43 or APS-C or MF because they are all too difficult to operate and actually really not much different to each other in real life use(at least to them).

This means maybe the small sensor camera systems like the m43 and the Nikon One will all fail since there is no market for them. Not many average camera buyers are interested in ILC systems but fixed lens all around cameras with good one button wireless connection to their phones. And not many the fanatics get interested in these cause most of them are obsessed with the best IQ possible they can get out of a camera system. Thus Olympus, Nikon and Panasonic will definitely need a bigger sensor system to entice them.

3 they do not want a lens like Zeiss Otus or Sigma Art even if it is selling for $50 or less. In fact, any kind of lens interchangeability is not important to them, in fact it is really annoying, and if it is an all around just fixed lens camera like the Sony RX10MK3 , it is actually a better camera system than any type of ILC with a set of primes that most of camera forum denizens want. They should realize they are not the majority of camera buyers and making and selling exactly what they want does not actually help any of these camera makers........

To them a set of great dedicated APS-C primes may be an important part of a good camera system, but to most of NORMAL people it is just not an important or an alluring feature at all.

So as opposed to what Tony , Thom, and many other self-proclaimed experts in many camera forums think, a great set of APS-C dedicated primes will NOT help Nikon or Sony. In fact, outside of the forums most of people actually prefer ZOOMS.

4 To NORMAL people all interchangeable lens cameras are big and quite intimidating.

This means that the very common camera forum trend to get mirrorless for being less conspicuous in the public reason is a silly idea , no one actually cares about if it is a mirroless or a D-SLR, to them all interchangeable lens cameras are annoying and intimidating to most of non-photographers.......so if they really want to be less conspicuous they should try one of the One inch sensor fixed lens cameras.

 

So as I already pointed out, the camera makers should focus on developing fixed multi lenses multi sensored computational cameras with easy one-button wireless connectivity to the phones. The software must be intuitive and 21st century design rather than the current 1980 design, I think it should be user programmable and as Thom points out open the source code to the smart kids and then some of them will develop some good apps for them for free.

Remember why the 5DMK2 and the Panasonic GH2 became such huge hits? Because of the hacked firmwares, I think it is the key.

  

UPDATE3: Now Nikon rumors and the others are getting really paranoid about the new Sony sensor marketing strategy that Nikon rumors and IR widely reported as a kind of fact a few days back.

I know and I have read the original Japanese text and I know their translation is totally wrong. Sony has never said they won't sell the best sensors they have to Nikon or hold back every latest techs they have in house. But they said they will not sell the best FF sensor for hybrid use and the A7R2 sensor is one of that kind....This means if it is not hybrid or video (high speed read-out) sensors Sony will more than willing to sell it to Nikon, so the stills focused 36, 46, and 54 mp sensors are all available to Nikon and the APS-C or so-called MF sensors are also widely available to whoever want to buy one of these.

Remember Sony Semi is not a part of Sony corporation but an independent company and so is the imaging group of Sony...........this means Sony imaging is just one of many many customers of the Semiconductor company of Sony, and the 42.4mp chip was designed for the standards of Sony imaging corp.

Therefore, they will sell any ordinary sensors to Nikon , especially the stills focused ones and smaller than 35mm FF sensors.

However in the long run, it is a big problem for Nikon since Sony Semi's main business is selling automobile sensors, cellphone sensor units and industrial sensors, so Nikon may become a very unimportant customer to their future business plan....

I have heard that the A9 sensors are kept for in-house use only and Nikon will have no access to it.

For now it is not a very serious issue, but Nikon will have to find the real long term solution for their long term sensor plan.

I think they will have to start sensor fabricating themselves with help from Ricoh, Fuji, TowerJazz , and I know many actually think it has already started working in this direction.

 

UPDATE 4: now IR posted the corrected version of the Sony interview with some corroboration from the Sony officials from Sony corporation (not the people originally interviewed from Sony DI).

 

www.imaging-resource.com/news/2017/03/26/sony-thailand-fa...

 

Now IR again proved itself a very sincere and respectable source of info, as opposed to Photorumors and other junk sites.

And this new IR article proved that I was correct on this one and the all PhotoRumors and Nikon Rumors are all wrong on this issue.

 

UPDATE5:Sony Semiconductor Solutions Corporation designs some sensors "on spec" for sale to all comers, like the ones listed at www.sony-semicon.co.jp/products_en/IS/sensor2/products/in... However it also collaborates with some large customers to design and produce sensors that are exclusive to that customer, either permanently or for a period of exclusivity. Nikon and Sony have partnered like this a number of times going back to the CCD era; more recently this has been done with Sony Imaging, Phase One, and Fujifilm (the last only customizing CFAs and micro-lenses, not the electronic part).

So all the paranoid rumors sites are wrong on this issue and they all proved that they've got no clue at all.

 

UPDATE6: Now the rumored A9 is announced and I was wrong on the name, I said it Alpha One, but everything else I predicted about it was right.

It was, after all, a very highspeed FF camera that designed to kill the D5 and 1DX2. It is incredibly fast and very good hybrid shooter and for 4500USD, it is a big bargain.

However, it was kind of a big disappointment to me since I do prefer the 42.4mp sensor or the 36.7 mp sensor and I am too used to it.........the 24.3mp resolution feels like old now, and being 24mp means it cannot be updated to shoot 8k when it finally gets available for consumer cameras.

So while it is an incredibly versatile FF camera, I prefer my A7R2 any day to this highend A9 camera even if it is cheaper than my 2 year old A7R2.

Low tide, a forever changing sky, an upheaval of sand

mixes with surf, foam whipped to a frenzy washes

ashore, and a audacious spectator with his point and

shoot as Sandy advances upon Florida's coast. I stood

in watched and got a sense of proportion of the surf

against the size of this man daring to photograph.

 

"The earth is art, the photographer is only a witness"

..........Yann Arthus- Bertrand

 

More dramatic on black....press L.

 

iso 100

focal length 200mm

aperture f/22

exposure 1sec.

 

b+w 6 stop

Nik silver efex pro2

the light changes incessantly here and it is very difficult to nail the WB right here.

 

The coming death of Nikon 12

Now the D7500 is announced........we have tried it a few weeks ago at a dealers trade show.

www.imaging-resource.com/news/2017/04/12/nikon-introduces...

What can I say? It is a huge disappointment for many, a serious downgrade from its predecessor-the D7500 in many ways.

1 it has terrible low resolution outdated D500 sensor with slower read out speed.

2 it has no dual card slots that all Nikon fanatics raved about and used it to effectively degrade Sony A6500 and a several others in that class.

3 it has a downgraded cheaper grade body with lesser quality sealing materials.

4 the AF system is basically the same as the 2007 d3 tech.

5 the LV speed while it recorded Nikon's best time in my personal test of it at a trade show, it is still much slower than the Canon, Sony D-SLR rivals, let alone the same class mirrorless rivals such as the Sony A6500, the Fuji XT20, XT2, and Canon EOSM5.

6 the view finder spec is nothing fancy, much smaller than the size of the EVF in this class of camera.

7 it has shorter battery life on a charge than the predecessor.

8 while the video feature set of it is a bit better than the D7200, it is still not as good as the 2 year old Fuji XT2 or Olympus EM1MK2, let alone the Sony A6500 or the Panasonic GH5.

Everybody thought that Olympus and Fuji cannot do video right because of their non-electronics company heritage, but now they are slowly but getting it right at least on the latest highend models..........but Nikon? Getting worse and now seems to be they are the only one can not get the video thing right........so in this sense and also with respect to the slow sluggish LV, they are competing for the bottom position with Ricoh Pentax.

 

Anyway, here's some basic info of the new D7500:

Native ISO range of 100-51,200, expandable to 50-1,640,000(this sensor is horrible compared to the current APS-C best sensor used in the A6500 and some Fuji models, in fact, it is even worse than the old D7200 Toshiba sensor).

EXPEED 5 processor(so what? it is just a numbering change)

Continuous shooting up to 8 frames per second (fps) (well but at the big cost of image quality and AF reliability).

Auto Picture Control (only beginners need this kind of marketing gimmick)

In-camera batch RAW processing (just incorporate LR or C1 in camera by licensing via Adobe or Phase or anyone better than your own junk-ware). But hey who's in his or her right mind tries to edit heavy RAW files in-camera with such a tiny LCD?

4K UHD video recording up to 30p (but at what bitrates ? and how come no 60P yet?)

Built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth (so what? now everybody else already has it).

SnapBridge functionality (as Thom pointed out many times it does not work well).

No Optional battery grip available for this model(a huge drawback for serious birders or sports shooters with a heavy lens).

US$1,250 body-only price( hugely overpriced considering the fact the better and more reliable D7200 and A6500 currently sold for about 1K US or less).

 

So this camera might be the final nail on the Nikon coffin, I was really really disappointed with this one, and now I do not know how to move this one at our shop with a lot of unsold D7200 stocks remained here............Nikon has started cash back promotion deal for the D7200, the D500, but now nobody wants to get that even at the 82500 yen including VAT and after cash back it becomes like 72500 yen...but after this lame D7500 launch, the 72500 yen D7200 deal would suddenly become like a true bargain.......and most opt for that instead( if they still prefer D-SLR.)

Now Nikon really needs to wake up to work on improving their poor- if not poorest quality LV mode. The young or majority of this type of camera buyers never shoot anything through the finder. They all use LCD for framing and judge the speed of cameras by the LV speed..........so they all think the Nikons the slowest focusing cameras.......

Oh Nikon also needs silent shutter mode since many of pet shooters and concert shooters need that, and those are actually the people always buying dedicated cameras since they need a dedicated camera to shoot concerts or serious piano recitals of their daughters or sons. But they all use mirroelss or Sony SLT since they have actually working silent shooting mode, even some of Canon D-SLRs have that now....again Nikon is really way behind the time and losing a lot of potential customers mainly to Canon but also to Fuji, Sony, Olympus and Panasonic.

Also Nikon Jpeg color is one of the worst if not the very worst, so I think Nikon should license the Jpeg engine from Apple iPhone 7, whose Jpeg engine seems to be rated one of the best, and they may want also consult with DXO for that issue.

Nikon needs a serious wake up call, and seriously needs better marketing and better management team who will listen to the majority of the market not the old self-proclaimed experts like PhotoRumors, Photographylife, OnlinePhotography, etc...

They do not get how important the actual speed of LV is or decent quality video with good bitrates and stabilization.

They think keep improving sensor DR just sell cameras and ultimately outsell Canon or Sony......but did D800 outsell the 5DMK3?

No................many people value overall camera functionality practicality over just a tiny bit better sensor tech. There is DR freak market, of course, but those DR freaks now choose the Sony A7R2 or Fuji GFX50s since that the DR fanatic market do not need fast shooting speed or ultimate Nikon action AF........definitely not the clunky OVF.

Like Thom Hogan kindly pointed out a few times in this year alone, Nikon's main problem is they are not trying to communicate with their user base and the young.

So how they can improve the F mount system or more broader camera business:

1 discontinue the Key Mission immediately, no one will buy it. It is a horrible product, PERIOD.

2 merge the D5XXX series with the D3XXX series and redesign it with EVF.

3 re-launch the DL series at least the one with mega zoom lens.

4 merge the D750 series with D610 series..........to keep it at the current D750 level of price point...the current D610 is too cheap to earn any profit for Nikon, so just discontinue that model. In Japan the D610 is sold for just 89800 yen brand new, while the Canon EOS6D keeps the value much higher (123000 yen). And I am sure the D610 is more expensive to build than the Canon 6D.

5 redesign the D750 successor mirrorless to improve the poor LV and video functionality.

6 redesign the D810 series without the mirror and OVF. As I said many times high resolution FF cameras do not need the mirror box or the super powerful action AF since they are mostly used on a tripod. In fact, many actually prefer the D8xx body to be a mirrorless- even AF-less. I personally seldom use AF when I shoot my A7R or A7R2 and actually prefer it to be AF-less.

7 for those needs fast AF and high resolution in one same body, they may want to make a super highend pro body with high resolution sensor, e.g., the d5X that Thom Hogan and some other experts seem to want.

I think the DL is not too late if it gets decent video feature set and a bit better improved continuous AF and released at US$700 or so.

The Sony RX100V is priced simply beyond many people's comfortable zone.

The Canon G7X2 has no view finder and it has a bit laggy AF for action.

The Panasonic LX10 has no EVF and the lens is a bit too dark from 35mm and up(35mm equivalent term).

So nothing is perfect, and therefore Nikon has a serious chance winning over all of these with the relaunched DL series. In fact, I personally want to see a Tough water proofed version of One sensor CFL camera just like the Olympus Tough but with a big sensor, I think that would be a very interesting option for many of us.

 

2nd October. In the Ashurst centre on the edge of the New Forest. I used to work here a long time ago and one of my mates still does. It's a very odd place, full of converted buildings; a hotchpotch of NHS and management services. This lovely little church has been turned into meeting rooms. If you look through the proper leaded windows you see plasterboard walls. A shame.

Really sorry to post and run but off to see another of my oldest friends tonight and late already

Forest land management is providing environmental assessments, surveys and monitoring for fish and wildlife habitat, watersheds, vegetation, access and terrain, as well as environmental monitoring and change detection. www.Silvatech.ca

Kenya, like the rest of the world, is experiencing climate change and variability and the associated adverse impacts. This photo series looks at the Olkiramatian area, a group ranch area in southern Kenya’s Kajiado district at the south of the Rift Valley. Olkiramatian implements a successful system of communal open rangeland management which is based on traditional Masai techniques but which divides the valley for three different uses: grazing, cultivation and conservation. Grazing accounts for around 75 per cent with each registered member raising their own herd of livestock. A second zone where fresh water flows down from the Nguruman hills behind, is dedicated to crops - each member is allocated five to ten hectares which they cultivate themselves or lease to others to grow maize, tomatoes or the leafy vegetable Sukuma wiki (kale). The third zone - one-eighth of the total area - is a shared resource designated as a conservation area for wildlife which brings in tourism and acts as a dry season grazing bank which, with group consensus, can be opened to livestock in times of severe feed shortage.

  

The photo series was taken during the areas dry season and shows the issues that are surfacing due to the gradual climate change of less rainfall, with failed rains becoming increasingly likely. The changes are gradual but are noticeable.

The level of the Ewaso Nyiro river, the areas lifeline, in some areas fell by 12ft. The crop-growing zone suffered very little water in all of the rivers and streams with generators being used to pump water from the Ewaso Nyiro river into the drying soil of the crops. In the grazing zones, the wildlife or livestock grass literally vanished leaving pastures of thick fine dust. Masai children are taken out of school in order to take care of the livestock that are now needing to travel greater distances from the homesteads to find any form of pasture. These greater distances mean the livestock return later to the boma or homestead, often after sunset.

 

Even an organized successful rangeland system such as this suffers loss of its wildlife and livestock with less rainfall. As pressure on resources increases, our need to implement protection and mitigation strategies becomes even greater.

the light changes incessantly here and it is very difficult to nail the WB right here.

 

The coming death of Nikon 12

Now the D7500 is announced........we have tried it a few weeks ago at a dealers trade show.

www.imaging-resource.com/news/2017/04/12/nikon-introduces...

What can I say? It is a huge disappointment for many, a serious downgrade from its predecessor-the D7500 in many ways.

1 it has terrible low resolution outdated D500 sensor with slower read out speed.

2 it has no dual card slots that all Nikon fanatics raved about and used it to effectively degrade Sony A6500 and a several others in that class.

3 it has a downgraded cheaper grade body with lesser quality sealing materials.

4 the AF system is basically the same as the 2007 d3 tech.

5 the LV speed while it recorded Nikon's best time in my personal test of it at a trade show, it is still much slower than the Canon, Sony D-SLR rivals, let alone the same class mirrorless rivals such as the Sony A6500, the Fuji XT20, XT2, and Canon EOSM5.

6 the view finder spec is nothing fancy, much smaller than the size of the EVF in this class of camera.

7 it has shorter battery life on a charge than the predecessor.

8 while the video feature set of it is a bit better than the D7200, it is still not as good as the 2 year old Fuji XT2 or Olympus EM1MK2, let alone the Sony A6500 or the Panasonic GH5.

Everybody thought that Olympus and Fuji cannot do video right because of their non-electronics company heritage, but now they are slowly but getting it right at least on the latest highend models..........but Nikon? Getting worse and now seems to be they are the only one can not get the video thing right........so in this sense and also with respect to the slow sluggish LV, they are competing for the bottom position with Ricoh Pentax.

 

Anyway, here's some basic info of the new D7500:

Native ISO range of 100-51,200, expandable to 50-1,640,000(this sensor is horrible compared to the current APS-C best sensor used in the A6500 and some Fuji models, in fact, it is even worse than the old D7200 Toshiba sensor).

EXPEED 5 processor(so what? it is just a numbering change)

Continuous shooting up to 8 frames per second (fps) (well but at the big cost of image quality and AF reliability).

Auto Picture Control (only beginners need this kind of marketing gimmick)

In-camera batch RAW processing (just incorporate LR or C1 in camera by licensing via Adobe or Phase or anyone better than your own junk-ware). But hey who's in his or her right mind tries to edit heavy RAW files in-camera with such a tiny LCD?

4K UHD video recording up to 30p (but at what bitrates ? and how come no 60P yet?)

Built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth (so what? now everybody else already has it).

SnapBridge functionality (as Thom pointed out many times it does not work well).

No Optional battery grip available for this model(a huge drawback for serious birders or sports shooters with a heavy lens).

US$1,250 body-only price( hugely overpriced considering the fact the better and more reliable D7200 and A6500 currently sold for about 1K US or less).

 

So this camera might be the final nail on the Nikon coffin, I was really really disappointed with this one, and now I do not know how to move this one at our shop with a lot of unsold D7200 stocks remained here............Nikon has started cash back promotion deal for the D7200, the D500, but now nobody wants to get that even at the 82500 yen including VAT and after cash back it becomes like 72500 yen...but after this lame D7500 launch, the 72500 yen D7200 deal would suddenly become like a true bargain.......and most opt for that instead( if they still prefer D-SLR.)

Now Nikon really needs to wake up to work on improving their poor- if not poorest quality LV mode. The young or majority of this type of camera buyers never shoot anything through the finder. They all use LCD for framing and judge the speed of cameras by the LV speed..........so they all think the Nikons the slowest focusing cameras.......

Oh Nikon also needs silent shutter mode since many of pet shooters and concert shooters need that, and those are actually the people always buying dedicated cameras since they need a dedicated camera to shoot concerts or serious piano recitals of their daughters or sons. But they all use mirroelss or Sony SLT since they have actually working silent shooting mode, even some of Canon D-SLRs have that now....again Nikon is really way behind the time and losing a lot of potential customers mainly to Canon but also to Fuji, Sony, Olympus and Panasonic.

Also Nikon Jpeg color is one of the worst if not the very worst, so I think Nikon should license the Jpeg engine from Apple iPhone 7, whose Jpeg engine seems to be rated one of the best, and they may want also consult with DXO for that issue.

Nikon needs a serious wake up call, and seriously needs better marketing and better management team who will listen to the majority of the market not the old self-proclaimed experts like PhotoRumors, Photographylife, OnlinePhotography, etc...

They do not get how important the actual speed of LV is or decent quality video with good bitrates and stabilization.

They think keep improving sensor DR just sell cameras and ultimately outsell Canon or Sony......but did D800 outsell the 5DMK3?

No................many people value overall camera functionality practicality over just a tiny bit better sensor tech. There is DR freak market, of course, but those DR freaks now choose the Sony A7R2 or Fuji GFX50s since that the DR fanatic market do not need fast shooting speed or ultimate Nikon action AF........definitely not the clunky OVF.

Like Thom Hogan kindly pointed out a few times in this year alone, Nikon's main problem is they are not trying to communicate with their user base and the young.

So how they can improve the F mount system or more broader camera business:

1 discontinue the Key Mission immediately, no one will buy it. It is a horrible product, PERIOD.

2 merge the D5XXX series with the D3XXX series and redesign it with EVF.

3 re-launch the DL series at least the one with mega zoom lens.

4 merge the D750 series with D610 series..........to keep it at the current D750 level of price point...the current D610 is too cheap to earn any profit for Nikon, so just discontinue that model. In Japan the D610 is sold for just 89800 yen brand new, while the Canon EOS6D keeps the value much higher (123000 yen). And I am sure the D610 is more expensive to build than the Canon 6D.

5 redesign the D750 successor mirrorless to improve the poor LV and video functionality.

6 redesign the D810 series without the mirror and OVF. As I said many times high resolution FF cameras do not need the mirror box or the super powerful action AF since they are mostly used on a tripod. In fact, many actually prefer the D8xx body to be a mirrorless- even AF-less. I personally seldom use AF when I shoot my A7R or A7R2 and actually prefer it to be AF-less.

7 for those needs fast AF and high resolution in one same body, they may want to make a super highend pro body with high resolution sensor, e.g., the d5X that Thom Hogan and some other experts seem to want.

I think the DL is not too late if it gets decent video feature set and a bit better improved continuous AF and released at US$700 or so.

The Sony RX100V is priced simply beyond many people's comfortable zone.

The Canon G7X2 has no view finder and it has a bit laggy AF for action.

The Panasonic LX10 has no EVF and the lens is a bit too dark from 35mm and up(35mm equivalent term).

So nothing is perfect, and therefore Nikon has a serious chance winning over all of these with the relaunched DL series. In fact, I personally want to see a Tough water proofed version of One sensor CFL camera just like the Olympus Tough but with a big sensor, I think that would be a very interesting option for many of us.

 

The lighting here changes incessantly..........

 

The coming death of Nikon 11

Nikon FX D-SLR vs Sony FF MILC. Should Nikon keep the venerable F mount for their future serious mirrorless system(even with a lot of technical restrictions)?

First of all, there are a few very erratic but interesting Nikon related rumors we've heard at CP+ show and at Kyobashi Tokyo camera museum, which I sometimes call Nikon graveyard.

But I think it is just a bit too early for us to write about these rumors here or anywhere else now.

We have to analyze these rumors a bit deeper to see which ones might become close to the real things or all are a bit too far-fetched stupid typical internet lies, and at this point, I think all Nikon related rumors we see at NR and many Japanese camera forums are all fakes.....or exaggerated version of the real ones.. or some Nikon fanatic's dreams or requests sent to Nikon via Internet forums.

Mr.Hogan recently said there were a few new Nikon FX rumors floating around internet and one of which actually stimulated his interest was: that the D810 update would not come at the last CP+ show and probably until the next CP+ show in 2018 because instead that camera would be replaced by a mirrorless model. That way Nikon would have a Sony A7R2 competitor instantly.

Well this one was spread across almost all Japanese camera forums and I think some Western guy or girl Google translated the Japanese original rumor erroneously and some very important info was lost in Google translation.....

Anyway, the original Japanese rumor in which Thom seems to have got interested said Nikon would come out with a similarly specified FX mirrorless body to the Sony A7R2 but with a new 46.4mp or 54.7mp sensor sensor designed by Nikon and fabricated by a new sensor manufacturing fab that Nikon, Olympus and Pentax have been trying to set up with some serious help from Tower Jazz and Panasonic. And this new FX mirrorless comes in F mount and a new mount and Nikon would evaluate which version would be selling better for them(like they did with the D800 and the E version of it).

I think this rumor might be true since we dealers always hear this kind of things every where, from third-party lens manufacture guys, from third-party LCD cover sells guys, some third-party speedlite sells guys,etc.

Well this rumor may be true, but the real problem here in this rumor is that Nikon seems to be choosing the F mount for their future mirrorless system and there is no benefit for them with that technically very restricted mount.

Thom commented below on this issue.

"Well, they already have a considerable A7r2 competitor: the D810. I own and shoot both, and I consider the D810 the better choice most of the time. I’d expect a D810 replacement to retain that distinction. So exactly what would we gain with a switch to mirrorless? I’m not sure we'd gain anything that excites me, especially if this means yet another new lens mount".

Well what can I say? I'm not sure if Mr.Hogan is really serious or just joking here? but I think there is no way Nikon will choose the F mount for their upcoming SERIOUS mirrorless system and succeed with it. True the D810 is a good camera already and it may compete well with the A7R2, especially considering its bargain price compared to the Sony.

But I guess Mr.Hogan is not a big fan of EVF and therefore he does not see many advantages of the Sony over the Nikon unlike us who love the EVF and video features of the Sony.

As a pure stills camera the Nikon is still a great body, but it cannot be as versatile hybrid camera as the Sony A7R2, in fact even the cheap Fuji X-T2 beats the Nikon hands down for video and any sort of hybrid use.

Here are some of main advantages of the Sony over the Nikon and Nikon should seriously study about these.

1 incredible video ability for a cheap stills camera.

2 incredibly smooth LV and fast LV AF.

3 effective live exposure compensation.

4 IBIS and effective electronic IS in video mode(although I am not a fan of IBIS thing, I can see it is very useful for handheld lowlight work).

5 I think the Sony system provides better event shooting experience for many of us(who were growing up with digital not film) due to the better LV implementation with the better more accurate tilty LCD screen compared to the D810 based kit with very low resolution fixed LCD.

In addition to all the above Sony or mirrorless specific benefits, Sony already has the more complete newer design better lens line up, especially the manual focus prime selection for the Sony system is a huge advantage of the Sony system over Nikon or Canon. IMHO, the Sony system has the best lens line up for most of normal shooters who are mostly in the range of 10-200 mm FF equivalent focal range, and this is because Sony has got all newly designed digital-optimized Zeiss Loxia, Batis, Voiklander CV-E line primes and Sony's own GM series zooms. IMHO, Nikon has nothing really as strong as the Sony GM line zooms in performance in their current lens line up to compete with Sony E mount system. I mean too many Nikon lenses are already too old and very restricted in use and not really compatible to most of the latest Nikon bodies.....and the latest E series lenses are only compatible to the latest and greatest line of Nikon D series bodies and these E series lenses are all more expensive than Sony and Canon counterparts........so where is never changing F mount lens compatibility that always Nikon fanatics brag about ?

Just a couple of years ago, Sony E mount haters always made fun of the E mount system for its(then) very poor lens lineup. But now ironically enough, with some serious help from Coshina, Zeiss, Samyang, Tokina, etc, Sony seems to have got one of the very best lens line in the FF class in just a matter of a year or so and I think we have to give some serious credit to Sony for keeping it an open mount system unlike Canon and Nikon trying hard to shut out all the third-parties out of their respective FF system. Nikon has sued Sigma for a several times already and they have lost a lot of money and customers over that stupid lawsuits.

Sony E mount has the widest range of digital-optimized MF(manual focus) lenses and many people who find precise MF-ability more important to them than super fast C-AF will always choose the Sony FE system. I mean it is almost impossible to really precisely MF on your Nikon with their poor soft LV image quality..no peaking,etc. The Canon D-SLRs at least have very good LV and LV exposure simulation mode, but the Nikons including the latest D5600, the D500, the D5 do not have that. The LV speed of the latest Nikon is basically the same as the 7year old D7000, in fact, Nikon has made no progress in this area since the D600.

It is really pity and the Nikon D-SLRs-even the best ones are not comparable to any of the Sony A7X series cameras in this regard.

In last week, I just tried the CV40mm f1.2 in Osaka, and I must say it is incredible, extremely sharp and extremely compact,I think this new Coshina Voiktlander E mount prime series is instantly becoming really an indispensable prime line to many E mount shooters.......

The CV-E 40mm f1.2 is incredible, the CV 12mm f5.6 and 10mm f5.6 are both indispensable and I am sure the upcoming 65mm f2 APO-Lanther will be incredible too, but it is a bit too bulky for me and I might not buy it but still it is a great lens for sure.. And most importantly they are only really practical on a EVF camera with focus peaking.

I do really appreciate the new Voiklander primes and Zeiss Loxia series, and they are one of the main reasons I have been using the A7R and A7R2 for most of things now....

 

Anyway Mr.Hogan wrote below:

"But let’s assume for a moment that the Mirrorless D810 update rumor is true and Nikon will not update the D810 but put out a high megapixel full frame mirrorless camera instead. What would that say about Nikon’s product line management?

To me, such a switcheroo would be just another sign of Nikon product panic.

Let's see, the F3, F4, D1h/D1x, D3/D3x all worked, and the D5 seems to be working while the F6 worked for the few remaining film-shooting pros. Great products that the pros and high end enthusiasts loved. The F5, D2h/D2x, and D4 didn't quite rise to the same level, but I know plenty of pros that (mostly) love those cameras, too. What I can't understand is why establish the h/s combo and then abandon it? Until the D4 came out we all had h/s twins in our gear closets. Now our gear closet is a bit of a mess. A mirrorless replacement for the D810 would just increase that mess."

I do not know he is actually honest or just writing the above because he has hugely invested into the Nikon eco-system and writing the books on the D series Nikon bodies, after all Nikon is his client and probably the most important one, so he can not be brutally honest about it, maybe? I mean no Nikon cameras even come close to the A7R2 or the A7M2 in terms of LV and video shooting experience or in terms of sheer IQ..........even the ancient A7R ORIGINAL was already a bit better than the D810 with respect to the base ISO noise, color accuracy and most importantly resolving power...and more importantly these high resolution bodies are usually used on a tripod and so they do not need any kind of extra shock generating mecha like the mirror-box or completely mechanical shutter...Almost all the Sony E mount cameras now shoot without shutter mirror slap and therefore they can better utilize the high resolution sensor with the latest high-grade lens combo.....I have compared a couple of the D810 bodies with a couple of the A7R(not the 2) many times and the A7R produces better sharper images most of times as long as it is set on a solid tripod.....so if the D810 cannot get as sharp as the A7R most of times, then how can it compete with the even better almost mechanical internal shock-free A7R2 body? On top of that, the D810 has less durable shutter unit than the one used in the A7MK2 and any Sony released after that. The A7R2 has about 3 times longer rated shutter life with much more quiet electronic shutter.

And why he still wants to have a so-called pro body with a super high resolution sensor is beyond me. He seems to want a D5 with the D810 or A7R2 sensor, but is that really needed in the current Nikon line up? I mean all these high resolution cameras are normally used on a tripod or in a studio or like that, so the ultimate speed of pro body is not that important for that kind of camera market. In fact, I think most of people who buy or consider high resolution FF prefer a mirroless over a D-SLR body.

MR.Hogan also said below:

"The D500 is one of Nikon's big successes recently—told you so, Nikon—despite the rushed and slightly unfinished feel. There really should be a D500s soon to polish it up, but we don't hear rumors about that, do we? Meanwhile, the D7200 has been a workhorse for everyone that bought it. It'll give a D500 a run for the money in terms of image quality, though not in build or a few critical performance aspects. "

Well this is a common forum myth or almost an urban legend.....the D500 is not selling well in real world, it was actually a bit too late since most of Nikon shooters that really needed that kind of sports body already dumped their once beloved Nikon kit for the Canon 7DMK2 kit.

We have had many customers complaining about how slow Nikon was and if they had known it coming, then they would have kept their Nikon lenses altogether, but too late.......

Yeah in this sense Hogan is right, Nikon should have talked to the most important user base of theirs about the D500 coming way before ahead.

And how much is the Canon 7DMK2 these days , how much is the Sony A77MK2 or A6500?

Well they are all much cheaper than the D500, and one thing I agree with Mr.Hogan is the D7200 is the biggest enemy of the D500.......the D7200 is cheaper, produces sharper file, with a bit more DR and color range to play with in Capture One pro 10 or DXO Pro 11.

Yeah I agree it is the best Nikon body for our bucks. It is really cheap and really reliable, probably one of these most cost effective camera body solutions. The D7200 and the D750 are really hard to beat for the modest price they carry.

Well, as Thom rightly said, the D500 might have a bit tougher body, but would you really feel it in real life use? I think no. I've abused my puny dinky A7R for almost 4 years but it does not even develop a line of scratch on it, it may be a cheap plastic body but it will definitely take any kind of abuse, even a few drops on to a concrete sidewalk. And still it will work well without any issue. My cheap dinky NEX5n is even more durable, I really abuse it and I do not even care if or when it breaks , so I always use it in the worst possible conditions I can conceive of, but it never breaks. My Nikon D7200 is the same-it is really cheap and easy to replace when it breaks so I use it in the worst possible condition I can conceive of, but it too never breaks.

So the so-called pro build quality is really overrated.......I mean hey try to drop your D5 or D4s or 1DX2 onto a sidewalk, they'd immediately die, I am sure about it but if you drop a Panasonic G85, a Sony A6300, or a Canon EOS-M5, they all would survive. These plastic cameras are more durable than these heavy pro metal bodies and if you doubt it try to drop your so-called pro D-SLRs from some rocky slope onto rocky ground to see how weak fragile they actually are.

Why do we have to worship the usual the more metal contain the better body religion? Why do they all think metal is so much better than plastic ? And why do they all seem to love the loud Nikon shutter so much? Do they never shoot any concert? or piano recital, etc? I am a big fan of Mozart so I do really need silent shutter.........

 

Hogan also said:

"Many of you think that horse should be FX mirrorless. But I don't see how that helps Nikon at all. Note what I wrote about the FX DSLR line above: those are all good cameras, and it's a strong lineup. Probably the strongest part of Nikon's current camera lineup. Do you really think they're going to risk that? I don't. Moreover, it doesn't solve Nikon's biggest problem: negative growth."

Yeah exactly, this is what these annoying Nikon fanatics or forum denizens cannot get, they chant FF, FX, FF and belittle everything else...........but in real life the so-called FF sales makes up for only about 8 percent of the entire ILC market sales and it is not getting much better...

And even before that Nikon's financial crisis is nothing to do with their camera business but the bean counters from Mitsubishi bank stipulate them to stick forever with the silly money losing stepper business.....But even so,Nikon really needs to rectify their consumer camera business as soon as they can, too, since most of their income is now coming from that ever contracting camera business...and the majority of camera buyers never care about FX or DX, or they do not even understand the difference between these two formats. I think one thing Thom has got right-spot-on was Nikon needs more programmable camera (open mount system) and definitely needs to get the SnapBridge thing right. All cameras should have more thorough sophisticated connectivity. After all, the majority of consumers want to upload their images(mostly selfies) right up to their FaceBook pages instantly. Most of my normal friends have already ditched their serious cameras and got something more casual because they hated post-processing or RAW processing, they simply prefer to shoot everything Jpeg and up these directly to their facebook pages.

"By now, as everybody already knows,Nikon has two extremely weak sectors right now: (1) serious compact or One sensor camera; and (2) big sensor mirrorless product that effectively covers from below the D3400 space up to the D7200 range.."

Mr.Hogan continued:

"I've heard absolutely nothing about what happens after the DL fiasco. If Nikon is really not going to play in the 1" compact game, the only choice they really have now is to build Coolpix A replacements. But Nikon proved they didn't know how to market the Coolpix A. Great camera, bit of a price stretch, terrible name and marketing."

Do I agree? No, the Coolpix A was a terrible camera, IMHO.......it needed to have some sort of real EVF and fast static AF, and at least a bit brighter lens than the lame 28mm f2.8 equivalent lens on it. Well the marketing campaign and the software part were really terrible too, but the camera itself was already a terrible camera to start from, so how could any amount of marketing help it moving?

Meanwhile, for DX mirrorless, I haven't heard a lot. I know Nikon has designed prototypes of such cameras and lenses, but I don't know what their target was or whether they decided to move forward with them. I think Nikon has produced a several prototypes already but they decided not to mass-produce these since they all designed to cover the Thom-called- a bit below D3400 market, and I guess they thought it would not be good enough to fight with the Fuji XT2 and similar products. In fact, there is a long lasting rumor that Nikon will join in the Fuji X system camp, but I do not think this rumor is correct since Nikon is not very close to Fuji any more they basically fought and decided to go against each other 7 years ago after Nikon stupidly tried to restrict Fuji to design a F mount body with Fuji's own sensor and electronics inside.

Realistically, I think the only two remaining options Nikon should and still can do now are:

1 to join the m43 or the E mount system, but I do not think Sony will allow Nikon to sell E mount body in the existing E mount eco-system. This means if Nikon wants to join in some already popular mirrorless mount system, that would have to be the m43 club.

2 to start new mirrorless that takes all the advantage(or disadvantage of)existing F mount eco-system. This means Nikon will have to use non optimized mount for FF and video, real electronic aperture control, etc. Or they simply design a new mount like Sony E or Canon M and take the F mount legacy lenses with a sophisticated fully compatible mount adapter like Canon did with their EOS-M mount.

But in this case Nikon can only use the P type and E type lenses for their new mirrorless systems since the older G and D series lenses are not fully compatible to fully electronic aperture control system. Too many Nikon lenses are already too old and very restricted in use and not really compatible to most of new Nikon bodies.....But if the only really fully compatible lenses to their new mirrorless system are the E and P series lenses, then there will be no advantage of choosing the optically very restricted venerable F mount. After all, how many E and P series lenses does the F mount have? I think 13? And is it enough to start a new system from scratch?

Thom and many of his followers seem to prefer Nikon to choose the F mount for their future serious FX mirrorless system, but do they think just having P and E series lenses in the catalogue for that is fine? I think Nikon initially needs at least two very different mount systems:

A: a big FF mirrorless with the F mount for event/ sports /wildlife kind of camera market, they need this type of silly but important F mount mirrorless to just shut up the old whiners in the forums that demand the F mount mirrorless forever...

B: a small FF or APS-C mirrorless system with short flange back design just like the A7 series but with a fully F mount compatible mount adapter(maybe it also needs a kind of focal reducer in case they make it with the DX sized sensor).

So I think it is not too late for Nikon since Sony is the only one player in the FF mirrorless market. But it must be great and fully compatible to the F mount lenses at least the E series lenses, hopefully also compatible to the G series(but I doubt it possible).

Many people in forums asking Nikon to keep the F mount, but in the long run keeping the F mount has no advantages over moving to a new mount system with a fully compatible F mount adapter.

1, the F mount makes camera unnecessarily thick and awkward to hold.

2, the F mount never allows Nikon or any third-party lens maker to develop a set of primes like the Voiklander CV-E series and Zeiss Loxia.......and also the F mount forces Nikon to use super long registration distance for every lens they will make.

3, there are a very few F mount lenses work well without the mirror. Actually only the E series and maybe the P too work well even without the mirror.

The G, the D, etc, never work well since they do not have electronically controlled aperture design.

4, The F mount really restricts Nikon to design a real hybrid camera like the GH5 or the A6500, if not the F mount makes it impossible. The terrible mechanically controlled aperture design really restricts smooth AF and aperture control in video mode and even in LV mode, we already experienced that in any of Nikon LV capable cameras if you ever tried shooting it LV. It is literally useless.

However Nikon should not discard the F mount system just yet since there are simply too many old men asking Nikon to keep using the venerable F mount for their future mirrorless system, and I think this is the biggest long term problem for Nikon.......

The F mount has become a big burden on Nikon's aged back and it will really really limit their camera design options in the future.

However, for a temporal very short time success, it may be better to just continue using the F mount for their action/sports bodies since using short mount registration distance design does not make FX zooms and long primes smaller or cheaper as Sony FE lenses have already shown it...

So they may just want to keep the F mount for their new FF mirrorless system designed for sports/PJ/wildlife market that mostly use a trio of the f2.8 zooms and long super tele primes.

A tiny body like the A7R2 does not hold the heavy lenses well, even the 24-70mm f2.8 feels too big on that body. So Sony will need a big body mirrorless in addition to the A7 line and it should come with the A mount not the puny E mount. I think the A99Mk3 will be that kind of camera covers the PJ/ Wildlife and sports market.

Now for the type B kind of a small bodied mirrorless system, Nikon needs a new mount design with short flange distance with a bit wider than the E mount mount design. If it is compact and actually fine-tuned for the FF sensor from the very start(unlike the E mount , which was originally designed for the APS-C system), I think it will be interesting, but they must have a full line of lenses from the very first day.

And Nikon needs better 21st century camera user interface and program-ability, I think the Leica SL has the best UI and it is definitely a very intuitive camera.

The A7R2 has no touch screen, no proper touch interface, not open to third-party App developers, so if Nikon or any one gets that all right in one body at the Sony price (not the Leica price) , I think they might have a serious chance.

For me touch screen and better more intuitive U.I is more than enough to try the new Nikon system, especially if it gets wider mount diameter than the E mount. Also Nikon(Sony too) must consider developing really effective sensor dust reduction system, for me the most important feature in any new mirrorless system is effective supersonic dust reduction system like the one in the Olympus EM1MK2 and the Panasonic GH5. The effective Dust Reduction system in any m43 body really eliminates the fear of changing lenses in the field. And it is a big plus for me.

Finally, if Nikon wants to really succeed it, then they must persuade Zeiss, Coshina, Sigma, Tamron, Samyang, etc, to enter into their new mount system.

But I doubt they will do it since Nikon always loves proprietary closed system , the Nikon-Sigma court case really shows us how close-mined Nikon is.

If Nikon stupidly closes their new MILC system and shuts out all the third-party lens makers , it will definitely kill the new system immediately. Also they need to persuade Phase One to make Capture One pro for Nikon for around 50 bucks just like Sony does for us.

So while it is not too late, I think, considering the all negative facts such as how they treat the third-parties, etc, it is really really difficult for them....but it is definitely not impossible.

PS. At the last CP+ show Nikon was rumored to have revealed they have already produced a small number of FX mirrorless prototypes a few times in the past, but decided not release these.

Actually, many of us who have closely followed Nikon Japan for at least 6 years or so all have heard about that Nikon has already developed a several or more FX mirrorless prototypes, and a very few of those people have actually tried some of these prototype cameras.

But for some very obscure reasons Nikon just dropped all of them off before the actual planned announcement dates.

I recalled the very first Nikon FX mirrorless prototype design rumor came out in 2015 just before the actual A7R2 announcement, and I think because of that camera, Nikon decided to drop it off. I guess Nikon was embarrassed of their very primitive /crude FX mirrorless camera compared to the already very sophisticated Sony camera at the time.

It was still a rumor but I actually believed it was the case.

  

UPDATE : now, Canon has just announced its new sensor development policy. Canon seems to have built a new sensor plant in Mie prefecture of Japan. It seems like Canon is going on new 65nm process rule and all upcoming Canon sensors will be produced at there.

I think the 1DX2 and the 80D sensors are processed at the new plant.

Sony is still leading the CMOS imaging industry, but giants like Samsung are in close pursuit. Also big players like Panasonic are forming joint ventures with the likes of TowerJazz to offer 12-inch wafer fabrication with state-of-the-art quantum efficiency and dark current performance at 65 nano meters, and additional 45nm digital technology, and added available capacity of approximately 800,000 8-inch wafers per year in three manufacturing plants in Japan, according to TowerJazz.

 

The stakes are huge. The CMOS image sensor market will reached the historic $10 billion milestone in 2015, according to Yale, and with new applications popping up in automotive, medical and surveillance, while smartphones begin adopting high-definition front facing cameras, the industry is likely to hit the $16 billion mark by 2020. So nobody is just sleeping and Sony has to consolidate its position ASAP, or probably Sony will lose it again just like its short-lived TV business.

Now Canon's main customer is Honda, who buys a billion of small high

ISO capable 4k sensors for their cars.

  

UPDATE2: I interviewed many NORMAL camera buyers in my area at our camera shop and asked them to tell us about what was the main reason they did not buy so-called mirrorless any more, and why they think the market share of these mirrorless decreasing at least in the Western world and the already developed part of Asia such as Japan, Taiwan, South Korea , Singapore and HK.

They answered to these questions carefully as we paid some $$ and I think we found out a few interesting things about the NORMAL camera buyers' perception/opinion about ILC cameras and the culture surrounding the camera business:

 

1 to them, if it requires a bag even a tiny one, it's really not important what kind of camera system it is; a mirrorless or a D-SLR, a m43 or a FF, it is just too big and simply too annoying to carry around. So they use their cellphone more even though many of them already have some sort of One cameras or cheap ILCs.

2 To most of NORMAL camera buying people here it really does not matter FF or m43 or APS-C or MF because they are all too difficult to operate and actually really not much different to each other in real life use(at least to them).

This means maybe the small sensor camera systems like the m43 and the Nikon One will all fail since there is no market for them. Not many average camera buyers are interested in ILC systems but fixed lens all around cameras with good one button wireless connection to their phones. And not many the fanatics get interested in these cause most of them are obsessed with the best IQ possible they can get out of a camera system. Thus Olympus, Nikon and Panasonic will definitely need a bigger sensor system to entice them.

3 they do not want a lens like Zeiss Otus or Sigma Art even if it is selling for $50 or less. In fact, any kind of lens interchangeability is not important to them, in fact it is really annoying, and if it is an all around just fixed lens camera like the Sony RX10MK3 , it is actually a better camera system than any type of ILC with a set of primes that most of camera forum denizens want. They should realize they are not the majority of camera buyers and making and selling exactly what they want does not actually help any of these camera makers........

To them a set of great dedicated APS-C primes may be an important part of a good camera system, but to most of NORMAL people it is just not an important or an alluring feature at all.

So as opposed to what Tony , Thom, and many other self-proclaimed experts in many camera forums think, a great set of APS-C dedicated primes will NOT help Nikon or Sony. In fact, outside of the forums most of people actually prefer ZOOMS.

4 To NORMAL people all interchangeable lens cameras are big and quite intimidating.

This means that the very common camera forum trend to get mirrorless for being less conspicuous in the public reason is a silly idea , no one actually cares about if it is a mirroless or a D-SLR, to them all interchangeable lens cameras are annoying and intimidating to most of non-photographers.......so if they really want to be less conspicuous they should try one of the One inch sensor fixed lens cameras.

 

So as I already pointed out, the camera makers should focus on developing fixed multi lenses multi sensored computational cameras with easy one-button wireless connectivity to the phones. The software must be intuitive and 21st century design rather than the current 1980 design, I think it should be user programmable and as Thom points out open the source code to the smart kids and then some of them will develop some good apps for them for free.

Remember why the 5DMK2 and the Panasonic GH2 became such huge hits? Because of the hacked firmwares, I think it is the key.

  

UPDATE3: Now Nikon rumors and the others are getting really paranoid about the new Sony sensor marketing strategy that Nikon rumors and IR widely reported as a kind of fact a few days back.

I know and I have read the original Japanese text and I know their translation is totally wrong. Sony has never said they won't sell the best sensors they have to Nikon or hold back every latest techs they have in house. But they said they will not sell the best FF sensor for hybrid use and the A7R2 sensor is one of that kind....This means if it is not hybrid or video (high speed read-out) sensors Sony will more than willing to sell it to Nikon, so the stills focused 36, 46, and 54 mp sensors are all available to Nikon and the APS-C or so-called MF sensors are also widely available to whoever want to buy one of these.

Remember Sony Semi is not a part of Sony corporation but an independent company and so is the imaging group of Sony...........this means Sony imaging is just one of many many customers of the Semiconductor company of Sony, and the 42.4mp chip was designed for the standards of Sony imaging corp.

Therefore, they will sell any ordinary sensors to Nikon , especially the stills focused ones and smaller than 35mm FF sensors.

However in the long run, it is a big problem for Nikon since Sony Semi's main business is selling automobile sensors, cellphone sensor units and industrial sensors, so Nikon may become a very unimportant customer to their future business plan....

I have heard that the A9 sensors are kept for in-house use only and Nikon will have no access to it.

For now it is not a very serious issue, but Nikon will have to find the real long term solution for their long term sensor plan.

I think they will have to start sensor fabricating themselves with help from Ricoh, Fuji, TowerJazz , and I know many actually think it has already started working in this direction.

 

UPDATE 4: now IR posted the corrected version of the Sony interview with some corroboration from the Sony officials from Sony corporation (not the people originally interviewed from Sony DI).

 

www.imaging-resource.com/news/2017/03/26/sony-thailand-fa...

 

Now IR again proved itself a very sincere and respectable source of info, as opposed to Photorumors and other junk sites.

And this new IR article proved that I was correct on this one and the all PhotoRumors and Nikon Rumors are all wrong on this issue.

 

UPDATE5:Sony Semiconductor Solutions Corporation designs some sensors "on spec" for sale to all comers, like the ones listed at www.sony-semicon.co.jp/products_en/IS/sensor2/products/in... However it also collaborates with some large customers to design and produce sensors that are exclusive to that customer, either permanently or for a period of exclusivity. Nikon and Sony have partnered like this a number of times going back to the CCD era; more recently this has been done with Sony Imaging, Phase One, and Fujifilm (the last only customizing CFAs and micro-lenses, not the electronic part).

So all the paranoid rumors sites are wrong on this issue and they all proved that they've got no clue at all.

   

Now for a change of subject...

 

We were almost home early Sunday afternoon when a bright headlamp and flashing ditch lights were spotted in the rear-view mirror; something big was coming round the curve behind us! Did we have time to get to Trentham and the good photo site right beside the track? There were two problems: one was that the road zigged and zagged and zigged again away from the track for the next two kilometres – and the track was (of course!)) dead straight, and the other was the slow-moving car in front of us...

 

“The Wife” was asked (very nicely of course!) to get the camera out of it’s bag as we crawled along, but as it turned out, the train had to stop at a “Red” just before the double track became single track, and by the time it got its “Green”, we were ready to ‘shoot’!

 

It seemed to take an age to start moving again as the Engineer notched the power upwards; it was clearly a heavy Unit (by N.Z. standards anyway!), yet by the time it reached us 300 metres north of where it had stopped, it was moving surprisingly quickly and still accelerating with two 1979-built General Motors (Canada) Class Df on the front – one a DfT (to acknowledge the Turbo fitted to the Class in the 1990s), and the second a DfB (to acknowledge the Brightstar engine management system installed in the 1980s). Both now generate 2400 horsepower and both were using that horsepower to the max as they passed by!

   

Incoming HRC commander, Maj. Gen. Jason T. Evans (left), accepts the command guidon from U.S. Army Deputy Chief of Staff/G-1, Lt. Gen. James C. McConville, during the change of command ceremony at Fort Knox, Ky., April 28, 2017.

 

Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Brian Hamilton, U.S. Army Human Resources Command Public Affairs Office

 

Maj. Gen. Jason T. Evans assumed command of U.S. Army Human Resources Command from Maj. Gen. Thomas C. Seamands at a ceremony conducted at the Lt. Gen. Timothy J. Maude Complex on Fort Knox, Ky., April 28. U.S. Army Deputy Chief of Staff/G-1, Lt. Gen. James C. McConville, officiated. Evans returns to HRC from the Pentagon, where he served as Director of Military Personnel Management. He previously served as The Adjutant General of the Army, U.S. Army Human Resources Command, from 2011 to 2013. Seamands departed for new duties in Washington, D.C.

 

For the full story, go to Evans takes command of U.S. Army Human Resources Command

 

Follow Army HRC on Twitter at : twitter.com/ArmyHRC, and join the conversations online at Army HRC www.facebook.com/ArmyHRC

  

The lighting here changes incessantly.....

 

The coming death of Nikon 11

Nikon FX D-SLR vs Sony FF MILC. Should Nikon keep the venerable F mount for their future serious mirrorless system(even with a lot of technical restrictions)?

First of all, there are a few very erratic but interesting Nikon related rumors we've heard at CP+ show and at Kyobashi Tokyo camera museum, which I sometimes call Nikon graveyard.

But I think it is just a bit too early for us to write about these rumors here or anywhere else now.

We have to analyze these rumors a bit deeper to see which ones might become close to the real things or all are a bit too far-fetched stupid typical internet lies, and at this point, I think all Nikon related rumors we see at NR and many Japanese camera forums are all fakes.....or exaggerated version of the real ones.. or some Nikon fanatic's dreams or requests sent to Nikon via Internet forums.

Mr.Hogan recently said there were a few new Nikon FX rumors floating around internet and one of which actually stimulated his interest was: that the D810 update would not come at the last CP+ show and probably until the next CP+ show in 2018 because instead that camera would be replaced by a mirrorless model. That way Nikon would have a Sony A7R2 competitor instantly.

Well this one was spread across almost all Japanese camera forums and I think some Western guy or girl Google translated the Japanese original rumor erroneously and some very important info was lost in Google translation.....

Anyway, the original Japanese rumor in which Thom seems to have got interested said Nikon would come out with a similarly specified FX mirrorless body to the Sony A7R2 but with a new 46.4mp or 54.7mp sensor sensor designed by Nikon and fabricated by a new sensor manufacturing fab that Nikon, Olympus and Pentax have been trying to set up with some serious help from Tower Jazz and Panasonic. And this new FX mirrorless comes in F mount and a new mount and Nikon would evaluate which version would be selling better for them(like they did with the D800 and the E version of it).

I think this rumor might be true since we dealers always hear this kind of things every where, from third-party lens manufacture guys, from third-party LCD cover sells guys, some third-party speedlite sells guys,etc.

Well this rumor may be true, but the real problem here in this rumor is that Nikon seems to be choosing the F mount for their future mirrorless system and there is no benefit for them with that technically very restricted mount.

Thom commented below on this issue.

"Well, they already have a considerable A7r2 competitor: the D810. I own and shoot both, and I consider the D810 the better choice most of the time. I’d expect a D810 replacement to retain that distinction. So exactly what would we gain with a switch to mirrorless? I’m not sure we'd gain anything that excites me, especially if this means yet another new lens mount".

Well what can I say? I'm not sure if Mr.Hogan is really serious or just joking here? but I think there is no way Nikon will choose the F mount for their upcoming SERIOUS mirrorless system and succeed with it. True the D810 is a good camera already and it may compete well with the A7R2, especially considering its bargain price compared to the Sony.

But I guess Mr.Hogan is not a big fan of EVF and therefore he does not see many advantages of the Sony over the Nikon unlike us who love the EVF and video features of the Sony.

As a pure stills camera the Nikon is still a great body, but it cannot be as versatile hybrid camera as the Sony A7R2, in fact even the cheap Fuji X-T2 beats the Nikon hands down for video and any sort of hybrid use.

Here are some of main advantages of the Sony over the Nikon and Nikon should seriously study about these.

1 incredible video ability for a cheap stills camera.

2 incredibly smooth LV and fast LV AF.

3 effective live exposure compensation.

4 IBIS and effective electronic IS in video mode(although I am not a fan of IBIS thing, I can see it is very useful for handheld lowlight work).

5 I think the Sony system provides better event shooting experience for many of us(who were growing up with digital not film) due to the better LV implementation with the better more accurate tilty LCD screen compared to the D810 based kit with very low resolution fixed LCD.

In addition to all the above Sony or mirrorless specific benefits, Sony already has the more complete newer design better lens line up, especially the manual focus prime selection for the Sony system is a huge advantage of the Sony system over Nikon or Canon. IMHO, the Sony system has the best lens line up for most of normal shooters who are mostly in the range of 10-200 mm FF equivalent focal range, and this is because Sony has got all newly designed digital-optimized Zeiss Loxia, Batis, Voiklander CV-E line primes and Sony's own GM series zooms. IMHO, Nikon has nothing really as strong as the Sony GM line zooms in performance in their current lens line up to compete with Sony E mount system. I mean too many Nikon lenses are already too old and very restricted in use and not really compatible to most of the latest Nikon bodies.....and the latest E series lenses are only compatible to the latest and greatest line of Nikon D series bodies and these E series lenses are all more expensive than Sony and Canon counterparts........so where is never changing F mount lens compatibility that always Nikon fanatics brag about ?

Just a couple of years ago, Sony E mount haters always made fun of the E mount system for its(then) very poor lens lineup. But now ironically enough, with some serious help from Coshina, Zeiss, Samyang, Tokina, etc, Sony seems to have got one of the very best lens line in the FF class in just a matter of a year or so and I think we have to give some serious credit to Sony for keeping it an open mount system unlike Canon and Nikon trying hard to shut out all the third-parties out of their respective FF system. Nikon has sued Sigma for a several times already and they have lost a lot of money and customers over that stupid lawsuits.

Sony E mount has the widest range of digital-optimized MF(manual focus) lenses and many people who find precise MF-ability more important to them than super fast C-AF will always choose the Sony FE system. I mean it is almost impossible to really precisely MF on your Nikon with their poor soft LV image quality..no peaking,etc. The Canon D-SLRs at least have very good LV and LV exposure simulation mode, but the Nikons including the latest D5600, the D500, the D5 do not have that. The LV speed of the latest Nikon is basically the same as the 7year old D7000, in fact, Nikon has made no progress in this area since the D600.

It is really pity and the Nikon D-SLRs-even the best ones are not comparable to any of the Sony A7X series cameras in this regard.

In last week, I just tried the CV40mm f1.2 in Osaka, and I must say it is incredible, extremely sharp and extremely compact,I think this new Coshina Voiktlander E mount prime series is instantly becoming really an indispensable prime line to many E mount shooters.......

The CV-E 40mm f1.2 is incredible, the CV 12mm f5.6 and 10mm f5.6 are both indispensable and I am sure the upcoming 65mm f2 APO-Lanther will be incredible too, but it is a bit too bulky for me and I might not buy it but still it is a great lens for sure.. And most importantly they are only really practical on a EVF camera with focus peaking.

I do really appreciate the new Voiklander primes and Zeiss Loxia series, and they are one of the main reasons I have been using the A7R and A7R2 for most of things now....

 

Anyway Mr.Hogan wrote below:

"But let’s assume for a moment that the Mirrorless D810 update rumor is true and Nikon will not update the D810 but put out a high megapixel full frame mirrorless camera instead. What would that say about Nikon’s product line management?

To me, such a switcheroo would be just another sign of Nikon product panic.

Let's see, the F3, F4, D1h/D1x, D3/D3x all worked, and the D5 seems to be working while the F6 worked for the few remaining film-shooting pros. Great products that the pros and high end enthusiasts loved. The F5, D2h/D2x, and D4 didn't quite rise to the same level, but I know plenty of pros that (mostly) love those cameras, too. What I can't understand is why establish the h/s combo and then abandon it? Until the D4 came out we all had h/s twins in our gear closets. Now our gear closet is a bit of a mess. A mirrorless replacement for the D810 would just increase that mess."

I do not know he is actually honest or just writing the above because he has hugely invested into the Nikon eco-system and writing the books on the D series Nikon bodies, after all Nikon is his client and probably the most important one, so he can not be brutally honest about it, maybe? I mean no Nikon cameras even come close to the A7R2 or the A7M2 in terms of LV and video shooting experience or in terms of sheer IQ..........even the ancient A7R ORIGINAL was already a bit better than the D810 with respect to the base ISO noise, color accuracy and most importantly resolving power...and more importantly these high resolution bodies are usually used on a tripod and so they do not need any kind of extra shock generating mecha like the mirror-box or completely mechanical shutter...Almost all the Sony E mount cameras now shoot without shutter mirror slap and therefore they can better utilize the high resolution sensor with the latest high-grade lens combo.....I have compared a couple of the D810 bodies with a couple of the A7R(not the 2) many times and the A7R produces better sharper images most of times as long as it is set on a solid tripod.....so if the D810 cannot get as sharp as the A7R most of times, then how can it compete with the even better almost mechanical internal shock-free A7R2 body? On top of that, the D810 has less durable shutter unit than the one used in the A7MK2 and any Sony released after that. The A7R2 has about 3 times longer rated shutter life with much more quiet electronic shutter.

And why he still wants to have a so-called pro body with a super high resolution sensor is beyond me. He seems to want a D5 with the D810 or A7R2 sensor, but is that really needed in the current Nikon line up? I mean all these high resolution cameras are normally used on a tripod or in a studio or like that, so the ultimate speed of pro body is not that important for that kind of camera market. In fact, I think most of people who buy or consider high resolution FF prefer a mirroless over a D-SLR body.

MR.Hogan also said below:

"The D500 is one of Nikon's big successes recently—told you so, Nikon—despite the rushed and slightly unfinished feel. There really should be a D500s soon to polish it up, but we don't hear rumors about that, do we? Meanwhile, the D7200 has been a workhorse for everyone that bought it. It'll give a D500 a run for the money in terms of image quality, though not in build or a few critical performance aspects. "

Well this is a common forum myth or almost an urban legend.....the D500 is not selling well in real world, it was actually a bit too late since most of Nikon shooters that really needed that kind of sports body already dumped their once beloved Nikon kit for the Canon 7DMK2 kit.

We have had many customers complaining about how slow Nikon was and if they had known it coming, then they would have kept their Nikon lenses altogether, but too late.......

Yeah in this sense Hogan is right, Nikon should have talked to the most important user base of theirs about the D500 coming way before ahead.

And how much is the Canon 7DMK2 these days , how much is the Sony A77MK2 or A6500?

Well they are all much cheaper than the D500, and one thing I agree with Mr.Hogan is the D7200 is the biggest enemy of the D500.......the D7200 is cheaper, produces sharper file, with a bit more DR and color range to play with in Capture One pro 10 or DXO Pro 11.

Yeah I agree it is the best Nikon body for our bucks. It is really cheap and really reliable, probably one of these most cost effective camera body solutions. The D7200 and the D750 are really hard to beat for the modest price they carry.

Well, as Thom rightly said, the D500 might have a bit tougher body, but would you really feel it in real life use? I think no. I've abused my puny dinky A7R for almost 4 years but it does not even develop a line of scratch on it, it may be a cheap plastic body but it will definitely take any kind of abuse, even a few drops on to a concrete sidewalk. And still it will work well without any issue. My cheap dinky NEX5n is even more durable, I really abuse it and I do not even care if or when it breaks , so I always use it in the worst possible conditions I can conceive of, but it never breaks. My Nikon D7200 is the same-it is really cheap and easy to replace when it breaks so I use it in the worst possible condition I can conceive of, but it too never breaks.

So the so-called pro build quality is really overrated.......I mean hey try to drop your D5 or D4s or 1DX2 onto a sidewalk, they'd immediately die, I am sure about it but if you drop a Panasonic G85, a Sony A6300, or a Canon EOS-M5, they all would survive. These plastic cameras are more durable than these heavy pro metal bodies and if you doubt it try to drop your so-called pro D-SLRs from some rocky slope onto rocky ground to see how weak fragile they actually are.

Why do we have to worship the usual the more metal contain the better body religion? Why do they all think metal is so much better than plastic ? And why do they all seem to love the loud Nikon shutter so much? Do they never shoot any concert? or piano recital, etc? I am a big fan of Mozart so I do really need silent shutter.........

 

Hogan also said:

"Many of you think that horse should be FX mirrorless. But I don't see how that helps Nikon at all. Note what I wrote about the FX DSLR line above: those are all good cameras, and it's a strong lineup. Probably the strongest part of Nikon's current camera lineup. Do you really think they're going to risk that? I don't. Moreover, it doesn't solve Nikon's biggest problem: negative growth."

Yeah exactly, this is what these annoying Nikon fanatics or forum denizens cannot get, they chant FF, FX, FF and belittle everything else...........but in real life the so-called FF sales makes up for only about 8 percent of the entire ILC market sales and it is not getting much better...

And even before that Nikon's financial crisis is nothing to do with their camera business but the bean counters from Mitsubishi bank stipulate them to stick forever with the silly money losing stepper business.....But even so,Nikon really needs to rectify their consumer camera business as soon as they can, too, since most of their income is now coming from that ever contracting camera business...and the majority of camera buyers never care about FX or DX, or they do not even understand the difference between these two formats. I think one thing Thom has got right-spot-on was Nikon needs more programmable camera (open mount system) and definitely needs to get the SnapBridge thing right. All cameras should have more thorough sophisticated connectivity. After all, the majority of consumers want to upload their images(mostly selfies) right up to their FaceBook pages instantly. Most of my normal friends have already ditched their serious cameras and got something more casual because they hated post-processing or RAW processing, they simply prefer to shoot everything Jpeg and up these directly to their facebook pages.

"By now, as everybody already knows,Nikon has two extremely weak sectors right now: (1) serious compact or One sensor camera; and (2) big sensor mirrorless product that effectively covers from below the D3400 space up to the D7200 range.."

Mr.Hogan continued:

"I've heard absolutely nothing about what happens after the DL fiasco. If Nikon is really not going to play in the 1" compact game, the only choice they really have now is to build Coolpix A replacements. But Nikon proved they didn't know how to market the Coolpix A. Great camera, bit of a price stretch, terrible name and marketing."

Do I agree? No, the Coolpix A was a terrible camera, IMHO.......it needed to have some sort of real EVF and fast static AF, and at least a bit brighter lens than the lame 28mm f2.8 equivalent lens on it. Well the marketing campaign and the software part were really terrible too, but the camera itself was already a terrible camera to start from, so how could any amount of marketing help it moving?

Meanwhile, for DX mirrorless, I haven't heard a lot. I know Nikon has designed prototypes of such cameras and lenses, but I don't know what their target was or whether they decided to move forward with them. I think Nikon has produced a several prototypes already but they decided not to mass-produce these since they all designed to cover the Thom-called- a bit below D3400 market, and I guess they thought it would not be good enough to fight with the Fuji XT2 and similar products. In fact, there is a long lasting rumor that Nikon will join in the Fuji X system camp, but I do not think this rumor is correct since Nikon is not very close to Fuji any more they basically fought and decided to go against each other 7 years ago after Nikon stupidly tried to restrict Fuji to design a F mount body with Fuji's own sensor and electronics inside.

Realistically, I think the only two remaining options Nikon should and still can do now are:

1 to join the m43 or the E mount system, but I do not think Sony will allow Nikon to sell E mount body in the existing E mount eco-system. This means if Nikon wants to join in some already popular mirrorless mount system, that would have to be the m43 club.

2 to start new mirrorless that takes all the advantage(or disadvantage of)existing F mount eco-system. This means Nikon will have to use non optimized mount for FF and video, real electronic aperture control, etc. Or they simply design a new mount like Sony E or Canon M and take the F mount legacy lenses with a sophisticated fully compatible mount adapter like Canon did with their EOS-M mount.

But in this case Nikon can only use the P type and E type lenses for their new mirrorless systems since the older G and D series lenses are not fully compatible to fully electronic aperture control system. Too many Nikon lenses are already too old and very restricted in use and not really compatible to most of new Nikon bodies.....But if the only really fully compatible lenses to their new mirrorless system are the E and P series lenses, then there will be no advantage of choosing the optically very restricted venerable F mount. After all, how many E and P series lenses does the F mount have? I think 13? And is it enough to start a new system from scratch?

Thom and many of his followers seem to prefer Nikon to choose the F mount for their future serious FX mirrorless system, but do they think just having P and E series lenses in the catalogue for that is fine? I think Nikon initially needs at least two very different mount systems:

A: a big FF mirrorless with the F mount for event/ sports /wildlife kind of camera market, they need this type of silly but important F mount mirrorless to just shut up the old whiners in the forums that demand the F mount mirrorless forever...

B: a small FF or APS-C mirrorless system with short flange back design just like the A7 series but with a fully F mount compatible mount adapter(maybe it also needs a kind of focal reducer in case they make it with the DX sized sensor).

So I think it is not too late for Nikon since Sony is the only one player in the FF mirrorless market. But it must be great and fully compatible to the F mount lenses at least the E series lenses, hopefully also compatible to the G series(but I doubt it possible).

Many people in forums asking Nikon to keep the F mount, but in the long run keeping the F mount has no advantages over moving to a new mount system with a fully compatible F mount adapter.

1, the F mount makes camera unnecessarily thick and awkward to hold.

2, the F mount never allows Nikon or any third-party lens maker to develop a set of primes like the Voiklander CV-E series and Zeiss Loxia.......and also the F mount forces Nikon to use super long registration distance for every lens they will make.

3, there are a very few F mount lenses work well without the mirror. Actually only the E series and maybe the P too work well even without the mirror.

The G, the D, etc, never work well since they do not have electronically controlled aperture design.

4, The F mount really restricts Nikon to design a real hybrid camera like the GH5 or the A6500, if not the F mount makes it impossible. The terrible mechanically controlled aperture design really restricts smooth AF and aperture control in video mode and even in LV mode, we already experienced that in any of Nikon LV capable cameras if you ever tried shooting it LV. It is literally useless.

However Nikon should not discard the F mount system just yet since there are simply too many old men asking Nikon to keep using the venerable F mount for their future mirrorless system, and I think this is the biggest long term problem for Nikon.......

The F mount has become a big burden on Nikon's aged back and it will really really limit their camera design options in the future.

However, for a temporal very short time success, it may be better to just continue using the F mount for their action/sports bodies since using short mount registration distance design does not make FX zooms and long primes smaller or cheaper as Sony FE lenses have already shown it...

So they may just want to keep the F mount for their new FF mirrorless system designed for sports/PJ/wildlife market that mostly use a trio of the f2.8 zooms and long super tele primes.

A tiny body like the A7R2 does not hold the heavy lenses well, even the 24-70mm f2.8 feels too big on that body. So Sony will need a big body mirrorless in addition to the A7 line and it should come with the A mount not the puny E mount. I think the A99Mk3 will be that kind of camera covers the PJ/ Wildlife and sports market.

Now for the type B kind of a small bodied mirrorless system, Nikon needs a new mount design with short flange distance with a bit wider than the E mount mount design. If it is compact and actually fine-tuned for the FF sensor from the very start(unlike the E mount , which was originally designed for the APS-C system), I think it will be interesting, but they must have a full line of lenses from the very first day.

And Nikon needs better 21st century camera user interface and program-ability, I think the Leica SL has the best UI and it is definitely a very intuitive camera.

The A7R2 has no touch screen, no proper touch interface, not open to third-party App developers, so if Nikon or any one gets that all right in one body at the Sony price (not the Leica price) , I think they might have a serious chance.

For me touch screen and better more intuitive U.I is more than enough to try the new Nikon system, especially if it gets wider mount diameter than the E mount. Also Nikon(Sony too) must consider developing really effective sensor dust reduction system, for me the most important feature in any new mirrorless system is effective supersonic dust reduction system like the one in the Olympus EM1MK2 and the Panasonic GH5. The effective Dust Reduction system in any m43 body really eliminates the fear of changing lenses in the field. And it is a big plus for me.

Finally, if Nikon wants to really succeed it, then they must persuade Zeiss, Coshina, Sigma, Tamron, Samyang, etc, to enter into their new mount system.

But I doubt they will do it since Nikon always loves proprietary closed system , the Nikon-Sigma court case really shows us how close-mined Nikon is.

If Nikon stupidly closes their new MILC system and shuts out all the third-party lens makers , it will definitely kill the new system immediately. Also they need to persuade Phase One to make Capture One pro for Nikon for around 50 bucks just like Sony does for us.

So while it is not too late, I think, considering the all negative facts such as how they treat the third-parties, etc, it is really really difficult for them....but it is definitely not impossible.

PS. At the last CP+ show Nikon was rumored to have revealed they have already produced a small number of FX mirrorless prototypes a few times in the past, but decided not release these.

Actually, many of us who have closely followed Nikon Japan for at least 6 years or so all have heard about that Nikon has already developed a several or more FX mirrorless prototypes, and a very few of those people have actually tried some of these prototype cameras.

But for some very obscure reasons Nikon just dropped all of them off before the actual planned announcement dates.

I recalled the very first Nikon FX mirrorless prototype design rumor came out in 2015 just before the actual A7R2 announcement, and I think because of that camera, Nikon decided to drop it off. I guess Nikon was embarrassed of their very primitive /crude FX mirrorless camera compared to the already very sophisticated Sony camera at the time.

It was still a rumor but I actually believed it was the case.

  

UPDATE : now, Canon has just announced its new sensor development policy. Canon seems to have built a new sensor plant in Mie prefecture of Japan. It seems like Canon is going on new 65nm process rule and all upcoming Canon sensors will be produced at there.

I think the 1DX2 and the 80D sensors are processed at the new plant.

Sony is still leading the CMOS imaging industry, but giants like Samsung are in close pursuit. Also big players like Panasonic are forming joint ventures with the likes of TowerJazz to offer 12-inch wafer fabrication with state-of-the-art quantum efficiency and dark current performance at 65 nano meters, and additional 45nm digital technology, and added available capacity of approximately 800,000 8-inch wafers per year in three manufacturing plants in Japan, according to TowerJazz.

 

The stakes are huge. The CMOS image sensor market will reached the historic $10 billion milestone in 2015, according to Yale, and with new applications popping up in automotive, medical and surveillance, while smartphones begin adopting high-definition front facing cameras, the industry is likely to hit the $16 billion mark by 2020. So nobody is just sleeping and Sony has to consolidate its position ASAP, or probably Sony will lose it again just like its short-lived TV business.

Now Canon's main customer is Honda, who buys a billion of small high

ISO capable 4k sensors for their cars.

  

UPDATE2: I interviewed many NORMAL camera buyers in my area at our camera shop and asked them to tell us about what was the main reason they did not buy so-called mirrorless any more, and why they think the market share of these mirrorless decreasing at least in the Western world and the already developed part of Asia such as Japan, Taiwan, South Korea , Singapore and HK.

They answered to these questions carefully as we paid some $$ and I think we found out a few interesting things about the NORMAL camera buyers' perception/opinion about ILC cameras and the culture surrounding the camera business:

 

1 to them, if it requires a bag even a tiny one, it's really not important what kind of camera system it is; a mirrorless or a D-SLR, a m43 or a FF, it is just too big and simply too annoying to carry around. So they use their cellphone more even though many of them already have some sort of One cameras or cheap ILCs.

2 To most of NORMAL camera buying people here it really does not matter FF or m43 or APS-C or MF because they are all too difficult to operate and actually really not much different to each other in real life use(at least to them).

This means maybe the small sensor camera systems like the m43 and the Nikon One will all fail since there is no market for them. Not many average camera buyers are interested in ILC systems but fixed lens all around cameras with good one button wireless connection to their phones. And not many the fanatics get interested in these cause most of them are obsessed with the best IQ possible they can get out of a camera system. Thus Olympus, Nikon and Panasonic will definitely need a bigger sensor system to entice them.

3 they do not want a lens like Zeiss Otus or Sigma Art even if it is selling for $50 or less. In fact, any kind of lens interchangeability is not important to them, in fact it is really annoying, and if it is an all around just fixed lens camera like the Sony RX10MK3 , it is actually a better camera system than any type of ILC with a set of primes that most of camera forum denizens want. They should realize they are not the majority of camera buyers and making and selling exactly what they want does not actually help any of these camera makers........

To them a set of great dedicated APS-C primes may be an important part of a good camera system, but to most of NORMAL people it is just not an important or an alluring feature at all.

So as opposed to what Tony , Thom, and many other self-proclaimed experts in many camera forums think, a great set of APS-C dedicated primes will NOT help Nikon or Sony. In fact, outside of the forums most of people actually prefer ZOOMS.

4 To NORMAL people all interchangeable lens cameras are big and quite intimidating.

This means that the very common camera forum trend to get mirrorless for being less conspicuous in the public reason is a silly idea , no one actually cares about if it is a mirroless or a D-SLR, to them all interchangeable lens cameras are annoying and intimidating to most of non-photographers.......so if they really want to be less conspicuous they should try one of the One inch sensor fixed lens cameras.

 

So as I already pointed out, the camera makers should focus on developing fixed multi lenses multi sensored computational cameras with easy one-button wireless connectivity to the phones. The software must be intuitive and 21st century design rather than the current 1980 design, I think it should be user programmable and as Thom points out open the source code to the smart kids and then some of them will develop some good apps for them for free.

Remember why the 5DMK2 and the Panasonic GH2 became such huge hits? Because of the hacked firmwares, I think it is the key.

  

UPDATE3: Now Nikon rumors and the others are getting really paranoid about the new Sony sensor marketing strategy that Nikon rumors and IR widely reported as a kind of fact a few days back.

I know and I have read the original Japanese text and I know their translation is totally wrong. Sony has never said they won't sell the best sensors they have to Nikon or hold back every latest techs they have in house. But they said they will not sell the best FF sensor for hybrid use and the A7R2 sensor is one of that kind....This means if it is not hybrid or video (high speed read-out) sensors Sony will more than willing to sell it to Nikon, so the stills focused 36, 46, and 54 mp sensors are all available to Nikon and the APS-C or so-called MF sensors are also widely available to whoever want to buy one of these.

Remember Sony Semi is not a part of Sony corporation but an independent company and so is the imaging group of Sony...........this means Sony imaging is just one of many many customers of the Semiconductor company of Sony, and the 42.4mp chip was designed for the standards of Sony imaging corp.

Therefore, they will sell any ordinary sensors to Nikon , especially the stills focused ones and smaller than 35mm FF sensors.

However in the long run, it is a big problem for Nikon since Sony Semi's main business is selling automobile sensors, cellphone sensor units and industrial sensors, so Nikon may become a very unimportant customer to their future business plan....

I have heard that the A9 sensors are kept for in-house use only and Nikon will have no access to it.

For now it is not a very serious issue, but Nikon will have to find the real long term solution for their long term sensor plan.

I think they will have to start sensor fabricating themselves with help from Ricoh, Fuji, TowerJazz , and I know many actually think it has already started working in this direction.

 

UPDATE 4: now IR posted the corrected version of the Sony interview with some corroboration from the Sony officials from Sony corporation (not the people originally interviewed from Sony DI).

 

www.imaging-resource.com/news/2017/03/26/sony-thailand-fa...

 

Now IR again proved itself a very sincere and respectable source of info, as opposed to Photorumors and other junk sites.

And this new IR article proved that I was correct on this one and the all PhotoRumors and Nikon Rumors are all wrong on this issue.

 

UPDATE5:Sony Semiconductor Solutions Corporation designs some sensors "on spec" for sale to all comers, like the ones listed at www.sony-semicon.co.jp/products_en/IS/sensor2/products/in... However it also collaborates with some large customers to design and produce sensors that are exclusive to that customer, either permanently or for a period of exclusivity. Nikon and Sony have partnered like this a number of times going back to the CCD era; more recently this has been done with Sony Imaging, Phase One, and Fujifilm (the last only customizing CFAs and micro-lenses, not the electronic part).

So all the paranoid rumors sites are wrong on this issue and they all proved that they've got no clue at all.

 

UPDATE6: Now the rumored A9 is announced and I was wrong on the name, I said it Alpha One, but everything else I predicted about it was right.

It was, after all, a very highspeed FF camera that designed to kill the D5 and 1DX2. It is incredibly fast and very good hybrid shooter and for 4500USD, it is a big bargain.

However, it was kind of a big disappointment to me since I do prefer the 42.4mp sensor or the 36.7 mp sensor and I am too used to it.........the 24.3mp resolution feels like old now, and being 24mp means it cannot be updated to shoot 8k when it finally gets available for consumer cameras.

So while it is an incredibly versatile FF camera, I prefer my A7R2 any day to this highend A9 camera even if it is cheaper than my 2 year old A7R2.

The world would never be the same again

 

It was a year of seismic social and political change across the globe. From the burgeoning anti-Vietnam war and civil rights movements in the United States, protests and revolutions in Europe and the first comprehensive coverage of war and resultant famine in Africa.

 

To some, 1968 was the year of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. Yet it was also the year of the Martin Luther King, Jr., and Bobby Kennedy assassinations; the riots at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago; Prague Spring; the antiwar movement and the Tet Offensive; Black Power; the generation gap; avant-garde theater; the upsurge of the women’s movement; and the beginning of the end for the Soviet Union.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ehCU3oUtVY

 

1968 In both Europe and America Japanese imported cars and other goods were continuing to rise and trouble the governments of UK and USA as they worried about industries in their own countries being effected and jobs lost. In the spring of 1968 on 4th April The Rev Martin Luther King was assassinated and Robert Kennedy was mortally wounded when he is shot by Sirhan Sirhan.

 

The peace movement had continued to grow and more and more Americans were against the war in Vietnam, and once again more riots occurred throughout cities in America. The music scene was once again set by the "Beatles" and the "Rolling Stones" , and fashion flirted with see through blouses and midis and maxis skirts joined the Mini Skirt as part of the fashion trends. There is a Flu Pandemic in Hong Kong and the first Black power salute is seen on Television worldwide during an Olympics medal ceremony.

 

Another 96 Indians and Pakistanis from Kenya had arrived in Britain, the latest in a growing exodus of Kenyan Asians fleeing from laws which prevent them making a living. The party included nine children under two, and all flew in on cut-price one-way tickets costing about £60 - less than half the normal single fare. Omar Sharmar, an Indian who was forced to close his haulage business in Mombasa when the government refused to grant him a licence, estimates he has lost £2,000.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMamOIdcS9A

 

Enoch Powell's Rivers Of Blood Speech

 

The Conservative right-winger Enoch Powell has made a hard-hitting speech attacking the government's immigration policy. Addressing a Conservative association meeting in Birmingham, Mr Powell said Britain had to be mad to allow in 50,000 dependents of immigrants each year.

 

He compared it to watching a nation busily engaged in heaping up its own funeral pyre.

 

The MP for Wolverhampton South West called for an immediate reduction in immigration and the implementation of a Conservative policy of "urgent" encouragement of those already in the UK to return home.

 

"It can be no part of any policy that existing families should be kept divided. But there are two directions on which families can be reunited," he said.

 

Mr Powell compared enacting legislation such as the Race Relations Bill to "throwing a match on to gunpowder".

 

He said that as he looked to the future he was filled with a sense of foreboding.

 

"Like the Roman, I seem to see the river Tiber foaming with much blood," he said.

 

He estimated that by the year 2000 up to seven million people - or one in ten of the population - would be of immigrant descent.

 

Mr Powell, the shadow defence spokesman, was applauded during and after his 45-mintue speech.

 

However, it is likely his comments will be less warmly received by the Conservative party leader, Edward Heath.

 

Several opinion polls were stating that the majority of the public shares Mr Powell's fears.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gkBr-qvo-4

 

Top Of The Pops from 15th February 1968 introduced by Jimmy Savile & Dave Cash and featuring: Manfred Mann - Mighty Quinn, The Foundations - Back On My Feet Again, Status Quo - Pictures Of Matchstick Men, Alan Price Set - Don't Stop The Carnival, Brenton Wood - Gimme Little Sign, The Move - Fire Brigade, Hermans Hermits - I Can Take Or Leave Your Loving, Amen Corner - Bend Me Shape Me, Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich - Legend Of Xanadu.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrBwPfcJpfI

 

1968 Timeline

 

January – The Ford Escort car is introduced to replace the Anglia.

 

Dutch Elm Disease continues to increase with tens of thousands of trees now destroyed.

 

British Post office introduces First Class Post.

 

London Bridge sold for 1 million. and later re-erected in Arizona.

 

The popular rock band the Beatles released the “White Album,” an untitled double album that featured some of the legendary band’s most experimental music. Many of the songs were written when the band was in Rishikesh, India while they were attending a meditation camp. While the album received mixed reviews at the time, it still reached the number one spot on the music charts in both the United Kingdom and United States. Modern critics mark the album as on of the best albums ever created and it remains popular today.

 

The first public demonstration of the computer mouse, video conferencing, teleconferencing, email, and hypertext.

 

1 January – The Colour television licence is introduced when a £5 "colour supplement" is added to the £5 monochrome licence fee, therefore making the cost of a colour licence £10.

 

1 January – Cecil Day-Lewis is announced as the new Poet Laureate.

 

5 January – Gardeners' World debuts on BBC1 television, featuring Percy Thrower.

 

8 January – The Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, endorses the 'I'm Backing Britain' campaign, encouraging workers to work extra time without pay or take other actions to help competitiveness, which is spreading across Britain.

 

16 January – The Prime Minister announces that the Civil Defence Corps is being stood down.

 

4 February – 96 Indians and Pakistanis arrive in Britain from Kenya. Some 1,500 Asians have now arrived in Britain from Kenya, where they were forced out by increasingly draconian immigration laws.

 

4 February – The cult series The Prisoner finishes its first run on British television.

 

16 February – The Beatles, Mike Love, Mia Farrow, Donovan and others travel to India to visit Maharishi Mahesh Yogi at Rishikesh.

 

6 – 18 February – Great Britain and Northern Ireland compete at the Winter Olympics in Grenoble, France, but do not win any medals.

 

18 February – David Gilmour joins Pink Floyd, replacing founder Syd Barrett, who had checked himself into a psychiatric hospital.

 

14 February – Northampton, the county town of Northamptonshire, is designated as a New town, with the Wilson government hoping to double its size and population by 1980.

 

24 February – Announcement of the first discovery (last year) of a pulsar by astronomer Jocelyn Bell Burnell working with Antony Hewish at the University of Cambridge.

 

1 March – First performance of an Andrew Lloyd Webber–Tim Rice musical, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat in its original form as a "pop cantata", by pupils of Colet Court preparatory school in Hammersmith.

 

2 March – Coal mining in the Black Country, which played a big part in the Industrial Revolution, ends after some 300 years with the closure of Baggeridge Colliery near Sedgley.

 

12 March – Mauritius achieves independence from British Rule.

 

15 March – George Brown, British Foreign Secretary, resigns.

 

17 March – A demonstration in London's Grosvenor Square against U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War leads to violence – 91 police injured, 200 demonstrators arrested.

 

30 March – The Yardbirds record their live album Live Yardbirds at the Anderson Theater.

 

1 April – Thames Valley Police is formed by the amalgamation of Berkshire Constabulary, Buckinghamshire Constabulary, Oxford City Police, Oxfordshire Constabulary and Reading Borough Police.

 

6 April – The 13th Eurovision Song Contest is held in the Royal Albert Hall, London. The winning song, Spain's "La, la, la" is sung by Massiel, after Spanish authorities refused to allow Joan Manuel Serrat to perform it in Catalan. The UK finish in second place, just one point behind, with the song "Congratulations" sung by Cliff Richard, which goes on to outsell the winning Spanish entry throughout Europe.

 

7 April – Motor racing world champion Jim Clark, 32, is killed when his car leaves the track at 170 mph and smashes into a tree during a Formula 2 race at Hockenheim.

 

11 April – Popularity of Harold Wilson's Labour government is shown to be slumping as opinion polls show the Conservatives, led by Edward Heath, with a lead of more than 20 points.

 

18 April – London Bridge sold to American entrepreneur Robert P. McCulloch who rebuilds it at Lake Havasu City, Arizona.

 

20 April – Enoch Powell makes his controversial Rivers of Blood Speech on immigration. The speech is made at the Midland Hotel in Birmingham to a meeting of the Conservative Political Centre at 2:30 pm. The Birmingham-based television company ATV saw an advance copy of the speech that morning, and its news editor ordered a television crew to go to the venue, where they filmed sections of the speech.

 

The speech provokes great outcry among the British public, making Powell one of the most popular and loathed politicians in the country, and leading to his dismissal from the Shadow Cabinet by Conservative party leader Edward Heath.

 

21 April – Enoch Powell is dismissed from the Shadow Cabinet by Opposition leader Edward Heath due to the Rivers of Blood Speech, despite several opinion polls stating that the majority of the public shares Mr Powell's fears.

 

23 April – Five and ten pence coins are introduced in the run-up to Decimalisation, which will be complete within the next three years.

 

27 April – The Abortion Act 1967 comes into effect, legalising abortion on a number of grounds, with free provision through the National Health Service.

 

3 May – Mr Frederick West (aged 45) becomes Britain's first heart transplant patient.

 

4 May – Mary Hopkin performs on the British TV show Opportunity Knocks. Hopkin catches the attention of model Twiggy, who recommends her to Paul McCartney. McCartney would soon sign Hopkin to Apple Records.

 

8 May – The Kray Twins, 34-year-old Ronnie and Reggie, are among 18 men arrested in dawn raids across London. They stand accused of a series of crimes including murder, fraud, blackmail and assault. Their 41-year-old brother Charlie Kray is one of the other men under arrest.

 

11 May – Manchester City win the Football League First Division title.

 

14 May – At a press conference, John Lennon and Paul McCartney introduce the Beatles' new business concept, Apple Corps, Ltd., a disastrously mismanaged entertainment company that included a recording studio, a record label, and clothing store.

 

16 May – Ronan Point tower block at Newham in east London collapses after a gas explosion, killing four occupants.

 

18 May – West Bromwich Albion win the FA Cup for the fifth time, with Jeff Astle scoring the only goal of the game against Everton at the Wembley Stadium.

 

20 May – Harlech (which became HTV in 1970) starts its dual service for Wales and the West Country, replacing the interim ITSWW, which had replaced TWW on 4 March.

 

22 May – The General Assembly of the Church of Scotland permits the ordination of women as ministers.

 

29 May – Manchester United become the first English winners of the European Cup after beating Benfica 4-1 in extra-time at Wembley Stadium.

 

30 May – The Beatles begin recording The White Album (officially titled, simply, The Beatles). Sessions would span over 4 months, ending on 14 October.

 

7 June – Start of Ford sewing machinists strike at the Dagenham assembly plant: women workers strike for pay comparable to that of men.

 

8 June – Martin Luther King, Jr.'s killer, James Earl Ray, arrested in London.

 

8 June - premiere of Harrison Birtwistle's opera Punch and Judy in the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh during the Aldeburgh Festival.

 

10 June – National Health Service reintroduces prescription charges.

 

14 June - Manfred Mann appear in the first edition of the BBC2 series Colour Me Pop.

 

18 June – Frederick West, Britain's first heart transplant, dies 46 days after his operation.

 

20 June – Austin Currie, Member of Parliament at Stormont in Northern Ireland, along with others, squats a house in Caledon to protest discrimination in housing allocations.

 

4 July – Alec Rose returns from a 354-day single-handed round-the-world trip for which he receives a knighthood the following day.

 

7 July – The Yardbirds perform for the last time before disbanding.

 

10 July – Floods in South West England.

 

Flooding had been occurring throughout the South West from mid-day but the full fury of the flood was felt during the hours of darkness. By 5.am almost every stream, brook and river in the area had burst its banks causing death, devastation and despair on a scale greater than any in living memory.

 

That night, seven people lost their lives, hundreds more suffered a terrifying ordeal of hardship and loss, bridges that had stood for centuries were washed away or severely damaged and countless houses, shops, factories and other properties were engulfed. It was a night that re-kindled the ‘spirit of the blitz’, a night when numerous selfless acts of heroism and community spirit prevailed.

 

As night gave way to day and the full extent of the disaster was revealed, it became obvious that for a great many people life would not return to normal for a number of days yet to come.. . for same it never did.

 

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/sets/72157603190...

 

17 July – The Beatles animated film Yellow Submarine debuts in London.

 

28 July – Final day on air for ABC which had broadcast to the North and Midlands regions during weekends.

 

The 1968 Contract Round sees the end of weekend franchises in these regions. From the following day, Granada and ATV broadcast seven days a week. The North is split into two regions with Granada broadcasting to the North West and Yorkshire Television broadcasting to the Yorkshire region. It is also the last day on air for ATV London which lost its weekend franchise to the newly formed London Weekend Television.

 

29 July – ATV begins broadcasting seven days a week in the Midlands, while Granada begins broadcasting seven days a week to the North West and Yorkshire Television does likewise in its newly created region.

 

30 July – Thames Television goes on air, having taken over the ITV London weekday franchise from Rediffusion, London. Thames is a result of a merger between ABC and Rediffusion, ABC having been awarded the London weekday franchise.

 

30 July – Magpie premieres on ITV.

 

31 July – Popular sitcom Dad's Army begins its nine-year run on BBC1.

 

August - John McVie marries Christine Perfect.

 

2 August – London Weekend Television takes over the ITV London weekend franchise from ATV London. They went on air initially using the name London Weekend Television but then adopted the name London Weekend before reverting to London Weekend Television (often abbreviated to LWT) in 1978.

 

August – Independent Television technicians strike immediately after the 1968 franchise changes, causing a national stoppage. The individual companies are off the air for several weeks and an emergency service is established.

 

The ITV Emergency National Service is presented by management personnel with no regional variations. This was the first time that a uniform presentation practice was adopted across all regions.

 

4 August – Yes performs for the first time, at a summer camp.

 

8 August – Royal Navy Leander-class frigate HMS Scylla is launched at Devonport, the last ship to be built in a Royal Dockyard.

 

11 August – British Rail's last steam train service runs on the standard gauge: steam locomotives make the 314-mile return passenger journey from Liverpool to Carlisle before being dispatched to the scrapyard or preservation.

 

31 August – First Isle of Wight Festival. Headline Acts – Jefferson Airplane. Other Acts – Arthur Brown, The Move, Smile, Tyrannosaurus Rex, Plastic Penny, Fairport Convention and The Pretty Things.

 

September - The new school year in England sees the first local authorities adopt three tier education, where 5-7 infant, 7-11 junior schools are replaced by 5-8 or 5-9 first schools and 8-12 or 9-13 middle schools, with the transfer age to grammar and secondary modern schools being increased to 12 or 13.

 

Japanese car maker Nissan began importing its range of Datsun badged family cars to Britain.

 

7 September – Led Zeppelin performs for the first time, billed as The New Yardbirds (the Yardbirds had disbanded two months earlier, and guitarist Jimmy Page subsequently formed this new group).

 

8 September – Tennis player Virginia Wade wins the 1968 U.S. Open Women's Singles event.

 

15 September – Floods in South East England.

 

15 September - Song of Summer, Ken Russell's noted TV documentary about Frederick Delius, is shown for the first time as part of the BBC's Omnibus series.

 

16 September – General Post Office divides post into first-class and second-class services.

 

19 September – The Who begin recording Tommy, a rock opera that tells the story about a deaf, dumb and blind boy, including his experiences with life and the relationship with his family.

 

26 September – Theatres Act 1968 ends censorship of the theatre.

 

27 September – The US musical Hair opens in London following the removal of theatre censorship.

 

October – The M1 motorway is completed when the final 35-mile section opens between Rotherham and Leeds.

 

2 October – A woman from Birmingham gives birth to the first recorded instance of live Sextuplets in the UK.

 

5 October – A civil rights march in Derry, Northern Ireland, which includes several Stormont and British MPs, is batoned off the streets by the Royal Ulster Constabulary.

 

6 October – British racing drivers Jackie Stewart, Graham Hill and John Surtees take the first three places at the United States Grand Prix.

 

8 October – Enoch Powell warns that immigrants "may change the character" of England.

 

12 – 27 October – Great Britain and Northern Ireland compete at the Olympics in Mexico City and win 5 gold, 5 silver and 3 bronze medals.

 

13 October – The rebuilt Euston railway station opens.

 

18 October – National Giro opens for business through the General Post Office, with administrative headquarters at Bootle.

 

27 October – Police and protestors clash at an anti-Vietnam War protest outside the Embassy of the United States in London.

 

31 October – Alan Bennett's play Forty Years On premiered at the Apollo Theatre in the West End.

 

8 November – John Lennon and his wife Cynthia are divorced.

 

18 November – James Watt Street fire: A warehouse fire in Glasgow kills 22.

 

21 November – The Cyril Lord carpet business goes into receivership.

 

22 November – The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society released.

 

22 November – The Beatles (also known as "The White Album") by The Beatles is released.

 

26 November – The Race Relations Act is passed, making it illegal to refuse housing, employment or public services to people in Britain because of their ethnic background.

 

26 November – Cream plays their farewell concert at the Royal Albert Hall. It will be the last time Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce, and Ginger Baker play together until their 1993 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

 

29 November – The Dawley New Town (Designation) Amendment (Telford) Order extends the boundaries of Dawley New Town in Shropshire and renames it Telford.

 

30 November – The Trade Descriptions Act comes into force, preventing shops and traders from describing goods in a misleading way.

 

2 December - Jimi Hendrix's manager Chas Chandler quits over differences with Hendrix during the recording of Electric Ladyland.

 

17 December - Mary Bell, an 11-year-old girl from Newcastle upon Tyne, is sentenced to life detention for the manslaughter of two small boys.

 

Official opening of first phase of the Royal Mint's new Llantrisant plant in South Wales.

 

22 December – The Animals reunite for one benefit concert at the Newcastle City Hall while Eric Burdon & The Animals are disbanding.

 

Obituarie: Chas Chandler

 

When Jimi Hendrix set fire to his guitar, Chas Chandler was ready with the lighter fuel. When Slade were desperate for a new image, Chandler dressed the band up as skinheads. The tough, outspoken Geordie was the perfect manager for both these diverse talents. A fouder member of The Animals, he could sympathise with musicians and understand their problems. As a canny businessman he also understood the power of publicity and the importance of image.

Few Sixties stars were able to make the jump from pop to business. They lacked the discipline and know-how. But when Chandler quit The Animals and swapped his caftan for a suit, he swiftly became one of the most respected and successful managers and producers of the rock age.

 

He discovered Jimi Hendrix, but it was his energy and commitment that helped turn a shy young American backing guitarist into a dynamic performer and a rock legend. Their mutual regard was based on trust and friendship. When their partnership eventually broke down, Chandler found it a bitter blow. But just before Hendrix died in September 1970, he called upon his old manager once more for help and guidance. Chas Chandler was a man that anxious artists knew they could trust.

 

He was born Bryan Chandler in Heaton, near Newcastle in 1938. After leaving school his first job was as a turner in the Tyneside shipyards. The first brush with with music came when he took up playing a homemade guitar. He later switched to bass and was in the Alan Price Trio when singer Eric Burdon joined the band in 1962.

 

Renamed The Animals, they quickly became one of Britain's most dynamic R&B groups. From Newcastle's Club A Go Go, they came to London in 1964, when they had a massive hit with "House of the Rising Sun". Many more followed, among them "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" (1964) and "We've Got To Get Out Of This Place" (1965), but disillusioned by their lack of financial reward and exhausted by touring,

 

The Animals broke up in late 1966. Said Chandler: "We toured non-stop for three years, doing 300 gigs a year and we hardly got a penny. But our manager Mike Jeffery did all right. 25 per cent of the gross of 300 gigs a year, that was good money."

 

During the Animals' last US tour Chandler was advised by Keith Richards' girlfriend, Linda Keith, to see an up-coming guitarist, Jimmy James, who was playing with the Blue Flames at the Cafe Wha in New York's Greenwich Village.

 

Chandler was especially impressed by Jimmy James's performance of the Tim Rose song "Hey Joe", offered to be his manager and invited him to London. James asked Chandler if he could introduce him to Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck, and that clinched the deal.

 

Chandler had already decided to stop playing himself. "I was never that good on bass guitar," he confessed. He brought his new find, now renamed Jimi Hendrix, to London in September 1966, and recruited Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding to form Hendrix's new group The Experience. He also formed a partnership with The Animals' manager Mike Jeffery to look after Hendrix's business affairs for the next two years.

 

Chandler eventually produced all Hendrix's hit singles including "Hey Joe", "Purple Haze", and "The Wind Cries Mary" and his first two albums, Are You Experienced and Axis: bold as love.

 

He first presented The Experience at a series of London showcase gigs where Mick Jagger and Paul McCartney were among the stars who flocked to see Hendrix kitted out in Afro hairstyle and military uniform.

 

When The Experience played with The Walker Brothers at the Finsbury Park Astoria in London, Hendrix and Chandler debated how they could liven up their act.

 

The journalist Keith Altham said that as Pete Townshend smashed up his guitar, it was a pity Hendrix couldn't set his on fire: "Chas immediately ordered his roadie Gerry Stickells to get some lighter fuel. Jimi only ever set fire to his guitar three times but it made history."

 

In 1968 Chandler quit as Hendrix's manager half way through the Electric Ladyland album sessions, fed up with endless re-recording and the surfeit of hangers-on in the studio. He fell out with Jeffery over the way Hendrix's career was being handled, and in 1969 returned to London to his Swedish wife Lotta, who was expecting their first child. Shortly afterwards he set up Montgrow Productions with Robert Stigwood.

 

Their aim was to find and develop new talent but Stigwood didn't share Chandler's enthusiasm for his next discovery, the Wolverhampton band Slade, and pulled out, leaving Chas Chandler as their sole manager. He paid off their previous management with pounds 100 and encouraged the adoption of a skinhead look, with cropped hair and bovver boots. Slade's lead singer Noddy Holder said that the band "worshipped" Chandler for the way he had transformed their fortunes.

 

Under his guidance they became of the most prolific hit makers of the 1970s - their singles included "Coz I Luv You" (1971) and "We've Got to Get Out of this Place" (1972) - though they failed to gain American success. In 1979 he withdrew from management and formed his own record label Barn Productions. At the same time he separated from his first wife, and left London to retire to Newcastle, where he married his second wife, Madeleine Stringer, a former Newcastle beauty queen.

 

In 1983 he became part of the re-formed Animals, and had to relearn the bass guitar. It was not a happy experience. The group spent most of the time arguing and at one point Chandler was seen grabbing Eric Burdon by the scruff of the neck.

 

In recent years he helped local bands in the North East to record their own music, and he also set up in business with architect and saxophonist Nigel Stranger. They established Park Arena Ltd, which developed the 10,500- seater Newcastle Arena, the largest sports and entertainment venue in the north-east. It opened last year after nine years work, and has already featured artists such as Neil Diamond, David Bowie and Pulp.

 

A big-built man who liked to drink and smoke, he had, said Keith Altham "enormous drive and self-belief. It was that enthusiasm that helped both Jimi Hendrix and Slade become stars. He'd just tell everyone: 'They are the best in the world!'"

 

Bryan "Chas" Chandler, bass player, manager and record producer: born Newcastle upon Tyne 18 December 1938; married twice (two sons, two daughters); died Newcastle 17 July 1996.

 

ITV

 

4 April – Freewheelers (1968–1973)

30 July – Magpie (1968–1980)

15 August – Nearest and Dearest (1968–1973)

21 September – Strange Report (1968–1969)

24 September – How We Used To Live (1968–2002)

25 September – The Champions (1968–1969)

5 November – Father, Dear Father (1968–1973)

8 November – Please Sir! (1968–1972)

16 November – Journey to the Unknown (1968–1969)

Unknown – The Big Match (1968–1992)

 

1967-1968 Football

 

First Division - Manchester City

Second Division - Ipswich Town

Third Division - Oxford United

Fourth Division - Luton Town

FA Cup - West Bromwich Albion

League Cup - Leeds United

Charity Shield - Manchester United and Tottenham Hotspur (shared)

Home Championship - England

the light changes incessantly here and it is very difficult to nail the WB right here.

 

The coming death of Nikon 12

Now the D7500 is announced........we have tried it a few weeks ago at a dealers trade show.

www.imaging-resource.com/news/2017/04/12/nikon-introduces...

What can I say? It is a huge disappointment for many, a serious downgrade from its predecessor-the D7500 in many ways.

1 it has terrible low resolution outdated D500 sensor with slower read out speed.

2 it has no dual card slots that all Nikon fanatics raved about and used it to effectively degrade Sony A6500 and a several others in that class.

3 it has a downgraded cheaper grade body with lesser quality sealing materials.

4 the AF system is basically the same as the 2007 d3 tech.

5 the LV speed while it recorded Nikon's best time in my personal test of it at a trade show, it is still much slower than the Canon, Sony D-SLR rivals, let alone the same class mirrorless rivals such as the Sony A6500, the Fuji XT20, XT2, and Canon EOSM5.

6 the view finder spec is nothing fancy, much smaller than the size of the EVF in this class of camera.

7 it has shorter battery life on a charge than the predecessor.

8 while the video feature set of it is a bit better than the D7200, it is still not as good as the 2 year old Fuji XT2 or Olympus EM1MK2, let alone the Sony A6500 or the Panasonic GH5.

Everybody thought that Olympus and Fuji cannot do video right because of their non-electronics company heritage, but now they are slowly but getting it right at least on the latest highend models..........but Nikon? Getting worse and now seems to be they are the only one can not get the video thing right........so in this sense and also with respect to the slow sluggish LV, they are competing for the bottom position with Ricoh Pentax.

 

Anyway, here's some basic info of the new D7500:

Native ISO range of 100-51,200, expandable to 50-1,640,000(this sensor is horrible compared to the current APS-C best sensor used in the A6500 and some Fuji models, in fact, it is even worse than the old D7200 Toshiba sensor).

EXPEED 5 processor(so what? it is just a numbering change)

Continuous shooting up to 8 frames per second (fps) (well but at the big cost of image quality and AF reliability).

Auto Picture Control (only beginners need this kind of marketing gimmick)

In-camera batch RAW processing (just incorporate LR or C1 in camera by licensing via Adobe or Phase or anyone better than your own junk-ware). But hey who's in his or her right mind tries to edit heavy RAW files in-camera with such a tiny LCD?

4K UHD video recording up to 30p (but at what bitrates ? and how come no 60P yet?)

Built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth (so what? now everybody else already has it).

SnapBridge functionality (as Thom pointed out many times it does not work well).

No Optional battery grip available for this model(a huge drawback for serious birders or sports shooters with a heavy lens).

US$1,250 body-only price( hugely overpriced considering the fact the better and more reliable D7200 and A6500 currently sold for about 1K US or less).

 

So this camera might be the final nail on the Nikon coffin, I was really really disappointed with this one, and now I do not know how to move this one at our shop with a lot of unsold D7200 stocks remained here............Nikon has started cash back promotion deal for the D7200, the D500, but now nobody wants to get that even at the 82500 yen including VAT and after cash back it becomes like 72500 yen...but after this lame D7500 launch, the 72500 yen D7200 deal would suddenly become like a true bargain.......and most opt for that instead( if they still prefer D-SLR.)

Now Nikon really needs to wake up to work on improving their poor- if not poorest quality LV mode. The young or majority of this type of camera buyers never shoot anything through the finder. They all use LCD for framing and judge the speed of cameras by the LV speed..........so they all think the Nikons the slowest focusing cameras.......

Oh Nikon also needs silent shutter mode since many of pet shooters and concert shooters need that, and those are actually the people always buying dedicated cameras since they need a dedicated camera to shoot concerts or serious piano recitals of their daughters or sons. But they all use mirroelss or Sony SLT since they have actually working silent shooting mode, even some of Canon D-SLRs have that now....again Nikon is really way behind the time and losing a lot of potential customers mainly to Canon but also to Fuji, Sony, Olympus and Panasonic.

Also Nikon Jpeg color is one of the worst if not the very worst, so I think Nikon should license the Jpeg engine from Apple iPhone 7, whose Jpeg engine seems to be rated one of the best, and they may want also consult with DXO for that issue.

Nikon needs a serious wake up call, and seriously needs better marketing and better management team who will listen to the majority of the market not the old self-proclaimed experts like PhotoRumors, Photographylife, OnlinePhotography, etc...

They do not get how important the actual speed of LV is or decent quality video with good bitrates and stabilization.

They think keep improving sensor DR just sell cameras and ultimately outsell Canon or Sony......but did D800 outsell the 5DMK3?

No................many people value overall camera functionality practicality over just a tiny bit better sensor tech. There is DR freak market, of course, but those DR freaks now choose the Sony A7R2 or Fuji GFX50s since that the DR fanatic market do not need fast shooting speed or ultimate Nikon action AF........definitely not the clunky OVF.

Like Thom Hogan kindly pointed out a few times in this year alone, Nikon's main problem is they are not trying to communicate with their user base and the young.

So how they can improve the F mount system or more broader camera business:

1 discontinue the Key Mission immediately, no one will buy it. It is a horrible product, PERIOD.

2 merge the D5XXX series with the D3XXX series and redesign it with EVF.

3 re-launch the DL series at least the one with mega zoom lens.

4 merge the D750 series with D610 series..........to keep it at the current D750 level of price point...the current D610 is too cheap to earn any profit for Nikon, so just discontinue that model. In Japan the D610 is sold for just 89800 yen brand new, while the Canon EOS6D keeps the value much higher (123000 yen). And I am sure the D610 is more expensive to build than the Canon 6D.

5 redesign the D750 successor mirrorless to improve the poor LV and video functionality.

6 redesign the D810 series without the mirror and OVF. As I said many times high resolution FF cameras do not need the mirror box or the super powerful action AF since they are mostly used on a tripod. In fact, many actually prefer the D8xx body to be a mirrorless- even AF-less. I personally seldom use AF when I shoot my A7R or A7R2 and actually prefer it to be AF-less.

7 for those needs fast AF and high resolution in one same body, they may want to make a super highend pro body with high resolution sensor, e.g., the d5X that Thom Hogan and some other experts seem to want.

I think the DL is not too late if it gets decent video feature set and a bit better improved continuous AF and released at US$700 or so.

The Sony RX100V is priced simply beyond many people's comfortable zone.

The Canon G7X2 has no view finder and it has a bit laggy AF for action.

The Panasonic LX10 has no EVF and the lens is a bit too dark from 35mm and up(35mm equivalent term).

So nothing is perfect, and therefore Nikon has a serious chance winning over all of these with the relaunched DL series. In fact, I personally want to see a Tough water proofed version of One sensor CFL camera just like the Olympus Tough but with a big sensor, I think that would be a very interesting option for many of us.

 

A management train makes their way towards Transload on Annacis Island, as they approach the Alex Fraser Bridge. Usually a night job switches Transload, but after Southern Railway of BC locked out their employees, the schedule has changed dramatically.

The lighting here changes incessantly.....

 

The coming death of Nikon 11

Nikon FX D-SLR vs Sony FF MILC. Should Nikon keep the venerable F mount for their future serious mirrorless system(even with a lot of technical restrictions)?

First of all, there are a few very erratic but interesting Nikon related rumors we've heard at CP+ show and at Kyobashi Tokyo camera museum, which I sometimes call Nikon graveyard.

But I think it is just a bit too early for us to write about these rumors here or anywhere else now.

We have to analyze these rumors a bit deeper to see which ones might become close to the real things or all are a bit too far-fetched stupid typical internet lies, and at this point, I think all Nikon related rumors we see at NR and many Japanese camera forums are all fakes.....or exaggerated version of the real ones.. or some Nikon fanatic's dreams or requests sent to Nikon via Internet forums.

Mr.Hogan recently said there were a few new Nikon FX rumors floating around internet and one of which actually stimulated his interest was: that the D810 update would not come at the last CP+ show and probably until the next CP+ show in 2018 because instead that camera would be replaced by a mirrorless model. That way Nikon would have a Sony A7R2 competitor instantly.

Well this one was spread across almost all Japanese camera forums and I think some Western guy or girl Google translated the Japanese original rumor erroneously and some very important info was lost in Google translation.....

Anyway, the original Japanese rumor in which Thom seems to have got interested said Nikon would come out with a similarly specified FX mirrorless body to the Sony A7R2 but with a new 46.4mp or 54.7mp sensor sensor designed by Nikon and fabricated by a new sensor manufacturing fab that Nikon, Olympus and Pentax have been trying to set up with some serious help from Tower Jazz and Panasonic. And this new FX mirrorless comes in F mount and a new mount and Nikon would evaluate which version would be selling better for them(like they did with the D800 and the E version of it).

I think this rumor might be true since we dealers always hear this kind of things every where, from third-party lens manufacture guys, from third-party LCD cover sells guys, some third-party speedlite sells guys,etc.

Well this rumor may be true, but the real problem here in this rumor is that Nikon seems to be choosing the F mount for their future mirrorless system and there is no benefit for them with that technically very restricted mount.

Thom commented below on this issue.

"Well, they already have a considerable A7r2 competitor: the D810. I own and shoot both, and I consider the D810 the better choice most of the time. I’d expect a D810 replacement to retain that distinction. So exactly what would we gain with a switch to mirrorless? I’m not sure we'd gain anything that excites me, especially if this means yet another new lens mount".

Well what can I say? I'm not sure if Mr.Hogan is really serious or just joking here? but I think there is no way Nikon will choose the F mount for their upcoming SERIOUS mirrorless system and succeed with it. True the D810 is a good camera already and it may compete well with the A7R2, especially considering its bargain price compared to the Sony.

But I guess Mr.Hogan is not a big fan of EVF and therefore he does not see many advantages of the Sony over the Nikon unlike us who love the EVF and video features of the Sony.

As a pure stills camera the Nikon is still a great body, but it cannot be as versatile hybrid camera as the Sony A7R2, in fact even the cheap Fuji X-T2 beats the Nikon hands down for video and any sort of hybrid use.

Here are some of main advantages of the Sony over the Nikon and Nikon should seriously study about these.

1 incredible video ability for a cheap stills camera.

2 incredibly smooth LV and fast LV AF.

3 effective live exposure compensation.

4 IBIS and effective electronic IS in video mode(although I am not a fan of IBIS thing, I can see it is very useful for handheld lowlight work).

5 I think the Sony system provides better event shooting experience for many of us(who were growing up with digital not film) due to the better LV implementation with the better more accurate tilty LCD screen compared to the D810 based kit with very low resolution fixed LCD.

In addition to all the above Sony or mirrorless specific benefits, Sony already has the more complete newer design better lens line up, especially the manual focus prime selection for the Sony system is a huge advantage of the Sony system over Nikon or Canon. IMHO, the Sony system has the best lens line up for most of normal shooters who are mostly in the range of 10-200 mm FF equivalent focal range, and this is because Sony has got all newly designed digital-optimized Zeiss Loxia, Batis, Voiklander CV-E line primes and Sony's own GM series zooms. IMHO, Nikon has nothing really as strong as the Sony GM line zooms in performance in their current lens line up to compete with Sony E mount system. I mean too many Nikon lenses are already too old and very restricted in use and not really compatible to most of the latest Nikon bodies.....and the latest E series lenses are only compatible to the latest and greatest line of Nikon D series bodies and these E series lenses are all more expensive than Sony and Canon counterparts........so where is never changing F mount lens compatibility that always Nikon fanatics brag about ?

Just a couple of years ago, Sony E mount haters always made fun of the E mount system for its(then) very poor lens lineup. But now ironically enough, with some serious help from Coshina, Zeiss, Samyang, Tokina, etc, Sony seems to have got one of the very best lens line in the FF class in just a matter of a year or so and I think we have to give some serious credit to Sony for keeping it an open mount system unlike Canon and Nikon trying hard to shut out all the third-parties out of their respective FF system. Nikon has sued Sigma for a several times already and they have lost a lot of money and customers over that stupid lawsuits.

Sony E mount has the widest range of digital-optimized MF(manual focus) lenses and many people who find precise MF-ability more important to them than super fast C-AF will always choose the Sony FE system. I mean it is almost impossible to really precisely MF on your Nikon with their poor soft LV image quality..no peaking,etc. The Canon D-SLRs at least have very good LV and LV exposure simulation mode, but the Nikons including the latest D5600, the D500, the D5 do not have that. The LV speed of the latest Nikon is basically the same as the 7year old D7000, in fact, Nikon has made no progress in this area since the D600.

It is really pity and the Nikon D-SLRs-even the best ones are not comparable to any of the Sony A7X series cameras in this regard.

In last week, I just tried the CV40mm f1.2 in Osaka, and I must say it is incredible, extremely sharp and extremely compact,I think this new Coshina Voiktlander E mount prime series is instantly becoming really an indispensable prime line to many E mount shooters.......

The CV-E 40mm f1.2 is incredible, the CV 12mm f5.6 and 10mm f5.6 are both indispensable and I am sure the upcoming 65mm f2 APO-Lanther will be incredible too, but it is a bit too bulky for me and I might not buy it but still it is a great lens for sure.. And most importantly they are only really practical on a EVF camera with focus peaking.

I do really appreciate the new Voiklander primes and Zeiss Loxia series, and they are one of the main reasons I have been using the A7R and A7R2 for most of things now....

 

Anyway Mr.Hogan wrote below:

"But let’s assume for a moment that the Mirrorless D810 update rumor is true and Nikon will not update the D810 but put out a high megapixel full frame mirrorless camera instead. What would that say about Nikon’s product line management?

To me, such a switcheroo would be just another sign of Nikon product panic.

Let's see, the F3, F4, D1h/D1x, D3/D3x all worked, and the D5 seems to be working while the F6 worked for the few remaining film-shooting pros. Great products that the pros and high end enthusiasts loved. The F5, D2h/D2x, and D4 didn't quite rise to the same level, but I know plenty of pros that (mostly) love those cameras, too. What I can't understand is why establish the h/s combo and then abandon it? Until the D4 came out we all had h/s twins in our gear closets. Now our gear closet is a bit of a mess. A mirrorless replacement for the D810 would just increase that mess."

I do not know he is actually honest or just writing the above because he has hugely invested into the Nikon eco-system and writing the books on the D series Nikon bodies, after all Nikon is his client and probably the most important one, so he can not be brutally honest about it, maybe? I mean no Nikon cameras even come close to the A7R2 or the A7M2 in terms of LV and video shooting experience or in terms of sheer IQ..........even the ancient A7R ORIGINAL was already a bit better than the D810 with respect to the base ISO noise, color accuracy and most importantly resolving power...and more importantly these high resolution bodies are usually used on a tripod and so they do not need any kind of extra shock generating mecha like the mirror-box or completely mechanical shutter...Almost all the Sony E mount cameras now shoot without shutter mirror slap and therefore they can better utilize the high resolution sensor with the latest high-grade lens combo.....I have compared a couple of the D810 bodies with a couple of the A7R(not the 2) many times and the A7R produces better sharper images most of times as long as it is set on a solid tripod.....so if the D810 cannot get as sharp as the A7R most of times, then how can it compete with the even better almost mechanical internal shock-free A7R2 body? On top of that, the D810 has less durable shutter unit than the one used in the A7MK2 and any Sony released after that. The A7R2 has about 3 times longer rated shutter life with much more quiet electronic shutter.

And why he still wants to have a so-called pro body with a super high resolution sensor is beyond me. He seems to want a D5 with the D810 or A7R2 sensor, but is that really needed in the current Nikon line up? I mean all these high resolution cameras are normally used on a tripod or in a studio or like that, so the ultimate speed of pro body is not that important for that kind of camera market. In fact, I think most of people who buy or consider high resolution FF prefer a mirroless over a D-SLR body.

MR.Hogan also said below:

"The D500 is one of Nikon's big successes recently—told you so, Nikon—despite the rushed and slightly unfinished feel. There really should be a D500s soon to polish it up, but we don't hear rumors about that, do we? Meanwhile, the D7200 has been a workhorse for everyone that bought it. It'll give a D500 a run for the money in terms of image quality, though not in build or a few critical performance aspects. "

Well this is a common forum myth or almost an urban legend.....the D500 is not selling well in real world, it was actually a bit too late since most of Nikon shooters that really needed that kind of sports body already dumped their once beloved Nikon kit for the Canon 7DMK2 kit.

We have had many customers complaining about how slow Nikon was and if they had known it coming, then they would have kept their Nikon lenses altogether, but too late.......

Yeah in this sense Hogan is right, Nikon should have talked to the most important user base of theirs about the D500 coming way before ahead.

And how much is the Canon 7DMK2 these days , how much is the Sony A77MK2 or A6500?

Well they are all much cheaper than the D500, and one thing I agree with Mr.Hogan is the D7200 is the biggest enemy of the D500.......the D7200 is cheaper, produces sharper file, with a bit more DR and color range to play with in Capture One pro 10 or DXO Pro 11.

Yeah I agree it is the best Nikon body for our bucks. It is really cheap and really reliable, probably one of these most cost effective camera body solutions. The D7200 and the D750 are really hard to beat for the modest price they carry.

Well, as Thom rightly said, the D500 might have a bit tougher body, but would you really feel it in real life use? I think no. I've abused my puny dinky A7R for almost 4 years but it does not even develop a line of scratch on it, it may be a cheap plastic body but it will definitely take any kind of abuse, even a few drops on to a concrete sidewalk. And still it will work well without any issue. My cheap dinky NEX5n is even more durable, I really abuse it and I do not even care if or when it breaks , so I always use it in the worst possible conditions I can conceive of, but it never breaks. My Nikon D7200 is the same-it is really cheap and easy to replace when it breaks so I use it in the worst possible condition I can conceive of, but it too never breaks.

So the so-called pro build quality is really overrated.......I mean hey try to drop your D5 or D4s or 1DX2 onto a sidewalk, they'd immediately die, I am sure about it but if you drop a Panasonic G85, a Sony A6300, or a Canon EOS-M5, they all would survive. These plastic cameras are more durable than these heavy pro metal bodies and if you doubt it try to drop your so-called pro D-SLRs from some rocky slope onto rocky ground to see how weak fragile they actually are.

Why do we have to worship the usual the more metal contain the better body religion? Why do they all think metal is so much better than plastic ? And why do they all seem to love the loud Nikon shutter so much? Do they never shoot any concert? or piano recital, etc? I am a big fan of Mozart so I do really need silent shutter.........

 

Hogan also said:

"Many of you think that horse should be FX mirrorless. But I don't see how that helps Nikon at all. Note what I wrote about the FX DSLR line above: those are all good cameras, and it's a strong lineup. Probably the strongest part of Nikon's current camera lineup. Do you really think they're going to risk that? I don't. Moreover, it doesn't solve Nikon's biggest problem: negative growth."

Yeah exactly, this is what these annoying Nikon fanatics or forum denizens cannot get, they chant FF, FX, FF and belittle everything else...........but in real life the so-called FF sales makes up for only about 8 percent of the entire ILC market sales and it is not getting much better...

And even before that Nikon's financial crisis is nothing to do with their camera business but the bean counters from Mitsubishi bank stipulate them to stick forever with the silly money losing stepper business.....But even so,Nikon really needs to rectify their consumer camera business as soon as they can, too, since most of their income is now coming from that ever contracting camera business...and the majority of camera buyers never care about FX or DX, or they do not even understand the difference between these two formats. I think one thing Thom has got right-spot-on was Nikon needs more programmable camera (open mount system) and definitely needs to get the SnapBridge thing right. All cameras should have more thorough sophisticated connectivity. After all, the majority of consumers want to upload their images(mostly selfies) right up to their FaceBook pages instantly. Most of my normal friends have already ditched their serious cameras and got something more casual because they hated post-processing or RAW processing, they simply prefer to shoot everything Jpeg and up these directly to their facebook pages.

"By now, as everybody already knows,Nikon has two extremely weak sectors right now: (1) serious compact or One sensor camera; and (2) big sensor mirrorless product that effectively covers from below the D3400 space up to the D7200 range.."

Mr.Hogan continued:

"I've heard absolutely nothing about what happens after the DL fiasco. If Nikon is really not going to play in the 1" compact game, the only choice they really have now is to build Coolpix A replacements. But Nikon proved they didn't know how to market the Coolpix A. Great camera, bit of a price stretch, terrible name and marketing."

Do I agree? No, the Coolpix A was a terrible camera, IMHO.......it needed to have some sort of real EVF and fast static AF, and at least a bit brighter lens than the lame 28mm f2.8 equivalent lens on it. Well the marketing campaign and the software part were really terrible too, but the camera itself was already a terrible camera to start from, so how could any amount of marketing help it moving?

Meanwhile, for DX mirrorless, I haven't heard a lot. I know Nikon has designed prototypes of such cameras and lenses, but I don't know what their target was or whether they decided to move forward with them. I think Nikon has produced a several prototypes already but they decided not to mass-produce these since they all designed to cover the Thom-called- a bit below D3400 market, and I guess they thought it would not be good enough to fight with the Fuji XT2 and similar products. In fact, there is a long lasting rumor that Nikon will join in the Fuji X system camp, but I do not think this rumor is correct since Nikon is not very close to Fuji any more they basically fought and decided to go against each other 7 years ago after Nikon stupidly tried to restrict Fuji to design a F mount body with Fuji's own sensor and electronics inside.

Realistically, I think the only two remaining options Nikon should and still can do now are:

1 to join the m43 or the E mount system, but I do not think Sony will allow Nikon to sell E mount body in the existing E mount eco-system. This means if Nikon wants to join in some already popular mirrorless mount system, that would have to be the m43 club.

2 to start new mirrorless that takes all the advantage(or disadvantage of)existing F mount eco-system. This means Nikon will have to use non optimized mount for FF and video, real electronic aperture control, etc. Or they simply design a new mount like Sony E or Canon M and take the F mount legacy lenses with a sophisticated fully compatible mount adapter like Canon did with their EOS-M mount.

But in this case Nikon can only use the P type and E type lenses for their new mirrorless systems since the older G and D series lenses are not fully compatible to fully electronic aperture control system. Too many Nikon lenses are already too old and very restricted in use and not really compatible to most of new Nikon bodies.....But if the only really fully compatible lenses to their new mirrorless system are the E and P series lenses, then there will be no advantage of choosing the optically very restricted venerable F mount. After all, how many E and P series lenses does the F mount have? I think 13? And is it enough to start a new system from scratch?

Thom and many of his followers seem to prefer Nikon to choose the F mount for their future serious FX mirrorless system, but do they think just having P and E series lenses in the catalogue for that is fine? I think Nikon initially needs at least two very different mount systems:

A: a big FF mirrorless with the F mount for event/ sports /wildlife kind of camera market, they need this type of silly but important F mount mirrorless to just shut up the old whiners in the forums that demand the F mount mirrorless forever...

B: a small FF or APS-C mirrorless system with short flange back design just like the A7 series but with a fully F mount compatible mount adapter(maybe it also needs a kind of focal reducer in case they make it with the DX sized sensor).

So I think it is not too late for Nikon since Sony is the only one player in the FF mirrorless market. But it must be great and fully compatible to the F mount lenses at least the E series lenses, hopefully also compatible to the G series(but I doubt it possible).

Many people in forums asking Nikon to keep the F mount, but in the long run keeping the F mount has no advantages over moving to a new mount system with a fully compatible F mount adapter.

1, the F mount makes camera unnecessarily thick and awkward to hold.

2, the F mount never allows Nikon or any third-party lens maker to develop a set of primes like the Voiklander CV-E series and Zeiss Loxia.......and also the F mount forces Nikon to use super long registration distance for every lens they will make.

3, there are a very few F mount lenses work well without the mirror. Actually only the E series and maybe the P too work well even without the mirror.

The G, the D, etc, never work well since they do not have electronically controlled aperture design.

4, The F mount really restricts Nikon to design a real hybrid camera like the GH5 or the A6500, if not the F mount makes it impossible. The terrible mechanically controlled aperture design really restricts smooth AF and aperture control in video mode and even in LV mode, we already experienced that in any of Nikon LV capable cameras if you ever tried shooting it LV. It is literally useless.

However Nikon should not discard the F mount system just yet since there are simply too many old men asking Nikon to keep using the venerable F mount for their future mirrorless system, and I think this is the biggest long term problem for Nikon.......

The F mount has become a big burden on Nikon's aged back and it will really really limit their camera design options in the future.

However, for a temporal very short time success, it may be better to just continue using the F mount for their action/sports bodies since using short mount registration distance design does not make FX zooms and long primes smaller or cheaper as Sony FE lenses have already shown it...

So they may just want to keep the F mount for their new FF mirrorless system designed for sports/PJ/wildlife market that mostly use a trio of the f2.8 zooms and long super tele primes.

A tiny body like the A7R2 does not hold the heavy lenses well, even the 24-70mm f2.8 feels too big on that body. So Sony will need a big body mirrorless in addition to the A7 line and it should come with the A mount not the puny E mount. I think the A99Mk3 will be that kind of camera covers the PJ/ Wildlife and sports market.

Now for the type B kind of a small bodied mirrorless system, Nikon needs a new mount design with short flange distance with a bit wider than the E mount mount design. If it is compact and actually fine-tuned for the FF sensor from the very start(unlike the E mount , which was originally designed for the APS-C system), I think it will be interesting, but they must have a full line of lenses from the very first day.

And Nikon needs better 21st century camera user interface and program-ability, I think the Leica SL has the best UI and it is definitely a very intuitive camera.

The A7R2 has no touch screen, no proper touch interface, not open to third-party App developers, so if Nikon or any one gets that all right in one body at the Sony price (not the Leica price) , I think they might have a serious chance.

For me touch screen and better more intuitive U.I is more than enough to try the new Nikon system, especially if it gets wider mount diameter than the E mount. Also Nikon(Sony too) must consider developing really effective sensor dust reduction system, for me the most important feature in any new mirrorless system is effective supersonic dust reduction system like the one in the Olympus EM1MK2 and the Panasonic GH5. The effective Dust Reduction system in any m43 body really eliminates the fear of changing lenses in the field. And it is a big plus for me.

Finally, if Nikon wants to really succeed it, then they must persuade Zeiss, Coshina, Sigma, Tamron, Samyang, etc, to enter into their new mount system.

But I doubt they will do it since Nikon always loves proprietary closed system , the Nikon-Sigma court case really shows us how close-mined Nikon is.

If Nikon stupidly closes their new MILC system and shuts out all the third-party lens makers , it will definitely kill the new system immediately. Also they need to persuade Phase One to make Capture One pro for Nikon for around 50 bucks just like Sony does for us.

So while it is not too late, I think, considering the all negative facts such as how they treat the third-parties, etc, it is really really difficult for them....but it is definitely not impossible.

PS. At the last CP+ show Nikon was rumored to have revealed they have already produced a small number of FX mirrorless prototypes a few times in the past, but decided not release these.

Actually, many of us who have closely followed Nikon Japan for at least 6 years or so all have heard about that Nikon has already developed a several or more FX mirrorless prototypes, and a very few of those people have actually tried some of these prototype cameras.

But for some very obscure reasons Nikon just dropped all of them off before the actual planned announcement dates.

I recalled the very first Nikon FX mirrorless prototype design rumor came out in 2015 just before the actual A7R2 announcement, and I think because of that camera, Nikon decided to drop it off. I guess Nikon was embarrassed of their very primitive /crude FX mirrorless camera compared to the already very sophisticated Sony camera at the time.

It was still a rumor but I actually believed it was the case.

  

UPDATE : now, Canon has just announced its new sensor development policy. Canon seems to have built a new sensor plant in Mie prefecture of Japan. It seems like Canon is going on new 65nm process rule and all upcoming Canon sensors will be produced at there.

I think the 1DX2 and the 80D sensors are processed at the new plant.

Sony is still leading the CMOS imaging industry, but giants like Samsung are in close pursuit. Also big players like Panasonic are forming joint ventures with the likes of TowerJazz to offer 12-inch wafer fabrication with state-of-the-art quantum efficiency and dark current performance at 65 nano meters, and additional 45nm digital technology, and added available capacity of approximately 800,000 8-inch wafers per year in three manufacturing plants in Japan, according to TowerJazz.

 

The stakes are huge. The CMOS image sensor market will reached the historic $10 billion milestone in 2015, according to Yale, and with new applications popping up in automotive, medical and surveillance, while smartphones begin adopting high-definition front facing cameras, the industry is likely to hit the $16 billion mark by 2020. So nobody is just sleeping and Sony has to consolidate its position ASAP, or probably Sony will lose it again just like its short-lived TV business.

Now Canon's main customer is Honda, who buys a billion of small high

ISO capable 4k sensors for their cars.

  

UPDATE2: I interviewed many NORMAL camera buyers in my area at our camera shop and asked them to tell us about what was the main reason they did not buy so-called mirrorless any more, and why they think the market share of these mirrorless decreasing at least in the Western world and the already developed part of Asia such as Japan, Taiwan, South Korea , Singapore and HK.

They answered to these questions carefully as we paid some $$ and I think we found out a few interesting things about the NORMAL camera buyers' perception/opinion about ILC cameras and the culture surrounding the camera business:

 

1 to them, if it requires a bag even a tiny one, it's really not important what kind of camera system it is; a mirrorless or a D-SLR, a m43 or a FF, it is just too big and simply too annoying to carry around. So they use their cellphone more even though many of them already have some sort of One cameras or cheap ILCs.

2 To most of NORMAL camera buying people here it really does not matter FF or m43 or APS-C or MF because they are all too difficult to operate and actually really not much different to each other in real life use(at least to them).

This means maybe the small sensor camera systems like the m43 and the Nikon One will all fail since there is no market for them. Not many average camera buyers are interested in ILC systems but fixed lens all around cameras with good one button wireless connection to their phones. And not many the fanatics get interested in these cause most of them are obsessed with the best IQ possible they can get out of a camera system. Thus Olympus, Nikon and Panasonic will definitely need a bigger sensor system to entice them.

3 they do not want a lens like Zeiss Otus or Sigma Art even if it is selling for $50 or less. In fact, any kind of lens interchangeability is not important to them, in fact it is really annoying, and if it is an all around just fixed lens camera like the Sony RX10MK3 , it is actually a better camera system than any type of ILC with a set of primes that most of camera forum denizens want. They should realize they are not the majority of camera buyers and making and selling exactly what they want does not actually help any of these camera makers........

To them a set of great dedicated APS-C primes may be an important part of a good camera system, but to most of NORMAL people it is just not an important or an alluring feature at all.

So as opposed to what Tony , Thom, and many other self-proclaimed experts in many camera forums think, a great set of APS-C dedicated primes will NOT help Nikon or Sony. In fact, outside of the forums most of people actually prefer ZOOMS.

4 To NORMAL people all interchangeable lens cameras are big and quite intimidating.

This means that the very common camera forum trend to get mirrorless for being less conspicuous in the public reason is a silly idea , no one actually cares about if it is a mirroless or a D-SLR, to them all interchangeable lens cameras are annoying and intimidating to most of non-photographers.......so if they really want to be less conspicuous they should try one of the One inch sensor fixed lens cameras.

 

So as I already pointed out, the camera makers should focus on developing fixed multi lenses multi sensored computational cameras with easy one-button wireless connectivity to the phones. The software must be intuitive and 21st century design rather than the current 1980 design, I think it should be user programmable and as Thom points out open the source code to the smart kids and then some of them will develop some good apps for them for free.

Remember why the 5DMK2 and the Panasonic GH2 became such huge hits? Because of the hacked firmwares, I think it is the key.

  

UPDATE3: Now Nikon rumors and the others are getting really paranoid about the new Sony sensor marketing strategy that Nikon rumors and IR widely reported as a kind of fact a few days back.

I know and I have read the original Japanese text and I know their translation is totally wrong. Sony has never said they won't sell the best sensors they have to Nikon or hold back every latest techs they have in house. But they said they will not sell the best FF sensor for hybrid use and the A7R2 sensor is one of that kind....This means if it is not hybrid or video (high speed read-out) sensors Sony will more than willing to sell it to Nikon, so the stills focused 36, 46, and 54 mp sensors are all available to Nikon and the APS-C or so-called MF sensors are also widely available to whoever want to buy one of these.

Remember Sony Semi is not a part of Sony corporation but an independent company and so is the imaging group of Sony...........this means Sony imaging is just one of many many customers of the Semiconductor company of Sony, and the 42.4mp chip was designed for the standards of Sony imaging corp.

Therefore, they will sell any ordinary sensors to Nikon , especially the stills focused ones and smaller than 35mm FF sensors.

However in the long run, it is a big problem for Nikon since Sony Semi's main business is selling automobile sensors, cellphone sensor units and industrial sensors, so Nikon may become a very unimportant customer to their future business plan....

I have heard that the A9 sensors are kept for in-house use only and Nikon will have no access to it.

For now it is not a very serious issue, but Nikon will have to find the real long term solution for their long term sensor plan.

I think they will have to start sensor fabricating themselves with help from Ricoh, Fuji, TowerJazz , and I know many actually think it has already started working in this direction.

 

UPDATE 4: now IR posted the corrected version of the Sony interview with some corroboration from the Sony officials from Sony corporation (not the people originally interviewed from Sony DI).

 

www.imaging-resource.com/news/2017/03/26/sony-thailand-fa...

 

Now IR again proved itself a very sincere and respectable source of info, as opposed to Photorumors and other junk sites.

And this new IR article proved that I was correct on this one and the all PhotoRumors and Nikon Rumors are all wrong on this issue.

 

UPDATE5:Sony Semiconductor Solutions Corporation designs some sensors "on spec" for sale to all comers, like the ones listed at www.sony-semicon.co.jp/products_en/IS/sensor2/products/in... However it also collaborates with some large customers to design and produce sensors that are exclusive to that customer, either permanently or for a period of exclusivity. Nikon and Sony have partnered like this a number of times going back to the CCD era; more recently this has been done with Sony Imaging, Phase One, and Fujifilm (the last only customizing CFAs and micro-lenses, not the electronic part).

So all the paranoid rumors sites are wrong on this issue and they all proved that they've got no clue at all.

 

UPDATE6: Now the rumored A9 is announced and I was wrong on the name, I said it Alpha One, but everything else I predicted about it was right.

It was, after all, a very highspeed FF camera that designed to kill the D5 and 1DX2. It is incredibly fast and very good hybrid shooter and for 4500USD, it is a big bargain.

However, it was kind of a big disappointment to me since I do prefer the 42.4mp sensor or the 36.7 mp sensor and I am too used to it.........the 24.3mp resolution feels like old now, and being 24mp means it cannot be updated to shoot 8k when it finally gets available for consumer cameras.

So while it is an incredibly versatile FF camera, I prefer my A7R2 any day to this highend A9 camera even if it is cheaper than my 2 year old A7R2.

Key #Elements of an Effective #Regulatory_Change_ManagementProgram

Due to the increasing number of #regulations and the constant #changes to those #regulations, the cost and #complexity of doing #business is increasing. In order to

this article which you can read by clicking here

www.360factors.com/blog/key-elements-of-an-effective-regu...

A change of pace...

 

The Wairarapa Line runs north-east out of New Zealand’s capitol through suburban Hutt Valley, under the Rimutaka mountain range via the 8 kilometre-long tunnel of the same name, and into the lush farming region of the Wairarapa. Passenger trains, consisting of carriages (or coaches) rebuilt from British Rail Mark II rolling stock, run between Wellington and the Wairarapa town of Masterton – a journey of approximately two hours.

 

On a recent sunny Wednesday afternoon, Mrs Lance joined me for the trip through the 8.5km tunnel beneath the Rimutaka mountain range and across the rich farming lands of the Wairarapa region to Masterton.

 

With a little over an hour to fill in before the return Journey, we just had time to walk into town for a quick Coffee before returning to the station for a "photo shoot"! Be assured however: the above photo was not taken from the middle of the tracks; I was sitting on the edge of the Platform, and right at the very end of it...! (I have a long arm...!!!).

 

For those interested in technical matters, the locomotive started out as a DF class Diesel-Electric built by General Motors Diesel of Canada between 1979 and 1981. Between 1992 and 1997, the Class was turbo-charged and re-classified as DFT, enabling the Class to generate 2400hp. In 2006, the Brightstar engine management system was installed in some of the locomotives, and they were duly reclassified “DFB”...

  

[ From en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand_DF_class_locomotive_(1979) ]

  

Ryogoku pier

  

In my original plan I walked from the Imperial palace area of Tokyo to Tokyo Budokan area and then go explore in deep inside of the imperial palace park, but it was closed.

So I went to Yotsuya after Hanzomon park, I just walked down Shinjuku-dori street to Yotsuya and then took a bus to Kojimachi. I had a quick dinner at Kojimachi. After that I took a Tokyo metro Yurakucho-line train to Tsukishima, where I changed my train to Tokyo subway Oedo line to finally get Ryogoku. After Ryogoku I walked along Sumidagawa river side to Azumabashi and Asakusa area, I did not plan to go there but by following interesting light from Asahi beer building I got there....

  

The coming death of Nikon 9

 

A few weeks back, when the miserable Nikon financial result (although it was nothing to do with their camera business as I reported a month ago) was reported over the usual internet camera related sites, many many Nikon fanatics usually gathering at the trashy sites like Nikon Rumors and Photo Rumors requested Nikon to keep the venerable F mount even for the their future upcoming MILC system.

 

I was really shocked to see that and I thought the real problem of companies like Nikon is that they are too sincere(more like naive?) to listen to the old (usually over 50) fanatics who are only interested in discussing about cameras and debating over it at these camera fora but actually still holding on to their beloved ancient D800.

 

These fanatics are usually stingy and not buying many new cameras(definitely not something uses non-F mount lenses) but just whine whatever the camera their favored maker comes up with. So Nikon or any one else should ignore them.

Instead, Nikon should listen to the Young who actually know why the dedicated cameras are no longer appealing to the majority of buyers.

The F mount will severely restrict Nikon in lens design and also in hybrid camera design, and they should not go with it.....

Oh well but it seems to be what the core Nikon fans want or prefer it over any kind of new mount.....

 

"Whats the point of a Nikon FF camera without Nikon legacy mount? Why anybody should prefer that new born with uncertain future thing to the well received A7 series? "

"the 24-70 Sony GM is bigger and heavier than the Nikon's and Canon's. In this case, the small size body is actually a disadvantage."

"The small size is required only by casual photographers. It reminds me when it was cool to have a small phone (Nokia vs Ericsson ). Then the Samsung Phablet came and people were making fun of the iPhone because it was "too small"l!! And look what we have now!"

 

Hearing this kind of ignorant comments all the time at shops and camera fora, I really wonder if they are really thinking about the smaller size is the only one advantage of the Sony, the Fuji and the other mirrorless systems, or they just pretending not to see the other merits of the Sony system over the Nikon venerable mechanical mount?

"Size advantage is not the only reason for mirroless.In fact, it is the least important one. One day SLRs will pretty much go to the Nikon Tokyo camera museum and all cameras will be mirroless. But working professionals(PJ, Event and Wild life guys) with large glass are not going to want dinky cameras, they will want large grips and good ergonomics. So personally I think Nikon should keep f mount for those. That also means they don't have to catch up on lenses. Plus, they could use the space that is left by the mirror for lens design. The trouble with small mirrorless like the Sony E and the Fuji X is the very small flange has left no room for inverting back into the camera for wide angle lens design as rangefinders used to do. Nikon could potentially create ultra compact wide angle lenses for a F mount mirrorless, and include a small notch so it won't mount on SLRs similar to their non Ai /Ai-S lens issue. They should jump into the mirrorless market with a huge selection of the F lenses rather then just a couple of new mount lenses. Removing their legacy would be dangerous I think."

 

If it was about 6 months ago, I may have agreed with the above comment, but now I think if Nikon chooses the F mount for its new FX or DX mirrorless system, that means Nikon is shooting itself on the foot by killing hybrid functionality and all associated benefits come with that new fully electronic mount design..If they use the ancient mechanical F mount, their new mirrorless system will suffer from very slow LV and very slow and imprecise aperture control system that all their latest D-SLRs just show, and that means it won't sell well.

Actually,the short flange distance let them put the rear lens elements much closer to the image sensor without having to put things deep into the body like in the old days, 50 years ago when seriously wide angle lenses often required mirror lock up and an optical finder on the hot shoe! Thank Sony, Zeiss and Fuji, we don't have to put up with such nonsense any more! All Sony E mount wide angle lenses are superb, sharp across the FF and it is mostly because of the freedom of lens design created by the short flange back design.

With a short flange distance as with most of mirrorless mount, you can then add a converter to use traditional lenses. But you can also use much smaller lenses designed for the short flange distance, such as the Zeiss Loxia 21mm f2.8, compare that amazing Zeiss glass to the typical D-SLR lens of this class, say the Milvus 21mm f2.8 ZF2, you will see my point. The new Coshina Voiklander 10mm f5.6 is even more amazing lens and that kind of design is only possible with the very short flange distance design of the E mount.

If Nikon goes larger format mirrorless and keeps the F mount exactly like it is, they will fade into irrelevance as SLRs fade away into the mirrorless future. That said, they also have to provide full featured mirrorless to F mount adapters for a future serious mirrorless camera. Ideally one that has a screw drive motor in it for all those older AF lenses although I think it is difficult for them to do now. In fact, realistically Nikon can only fully utilize their E series lenses nothing else for the future mirrorless system.

So even if they decided to keep the F mount for the future upcoming mirrorless system that may be announced in this June (in the fastest case), there would be only a few really usable lenses in the current F mount line up, namely the E series and possibly the P series lenses.

Another serious issue for Nikon now is that they might have too little resources to design a completely new lens line in a very short time........as the below customer questions.....

"the dilemma for Nikon should be starting "fresh" means that they are in last place, even behind competitors like Olympus and Panasonic, but is it still better than the venerable F mount for the next coming decade? As you can see in Nikon DX lens line up, Nikon's proclivity to see any non-FX DSLR as something more for convenience means they won't make competitive lenses any time soon for that "fresh" start. And so it will surely fail, and they should keep the F mount."

"As far as I'm concerned, lens adapters like that are like Linus' blanket: it's a security thing. Having it means you can pretend to keep using your lenses.

But frankly, looking around at people shooting with the A7, other than videographers I'm not seeing a lot of folk running adapters all the time on them."

 

Well this is a really difficult question........indeed a very tough one to answer correctly.

I personally dislike the adapter for technical mount precision reason too, but I also know that many many of A7 and Fuji shooters are using that and that is the biggest contributor to their success in the rapidly declining market.

And now video is the most important aspect of any good hybrid camera, and therefore, it is the most important area that Nikon or any new comer in this market should focus all their effort into.

 

So Nikon must go with a wide new mount with very short flange distance design or it will definitely fail, but the real question here is : Can they really afford it ? and even if they can, will they be able to keep up with the speed of Sony and Fuji on lenses?

When some rational people pointing out Nikon really need to react very fast to Fuji and Sony with a completely NEW mount, many avid Nikon fanboys at NR and Photo Rumors belittle Sony and Fuji system all the time like below:

" Sony has no lens or Fuji system is no where near complete. Micro 43 is only just now reaching the point where you can buy almost any piece of glass you need, Fuji and Sony are getting there but its a long road."

 

Well, but then, how many lenses do you really need or able to buy? The reality is Sony and Fuji both have a great lens line up and the quality of their lenses are far better than that of Nikon equivalents. The Zeiss 85mm f1.8 Batis is an incredible lens, sharp across FF even at wide open and relatively cheap for that kind of quality. The Fuji 90 mm f2 is a portrait shooter's dream, a fantastic portrait lens that also does landscape very very well. Honestly, there is no better lens than the Fuji 90mm f2 in under 35mm class. The Sony FE24-70mm f2.8GM is a fantastic lens that comfortably beats the huge Nikon 24-70mm f2.8VR, and in facts the Sony GM zoom beats all Nikon primes in its range. It is that sharp.

The Sony FE 90mm f2.8G is like a Mini Otus, it is the sharpest Sony E mount lens and probably the best corrected AF lens ever made in any mount. The most amazing thing about the FE90 mm f2.8G macro lens is that it has no CA to speak of, I mean literally!

The Zeiss Loxia 21mm f2.8, while I am not a fan of its focal length, is amazingly sharp and it is extremely well made, a Leica-like lens priced like a Tamron or Sigma. The 25mm Batis is also great, the FE16-35mm f4 is also a better lens than the Nikon AF-S16-35mm f4 VR, which I hated for the terrible fish-eye like distortion at 16mm. The FE55mm f1.8 Z is also fantastic a Mini-Otus like lens and it is already a legend, and it is the sharpest AF capable 50-ish lens, only the Otus 55mm f1.4 comes close to its amazing resolving power! Some may say the Sigma art is as good as the Sony FE 55. But,IMHO, there is no contest, the Sony is a much better lens in terms of CA, flare resistance, bokeh, over all look, etc. The Sigma may be just as sharp as the Sony but that does not mean it is just as optically well corrected as the Sony FE 55mm f1.8Z.

Even the cheap FE lenses like FE24-70mm f4, FE 35mm f2.8, FE28mm f2 are not too bad. The 24-70mm f4 is arguably the worst FE lens, and is a bit worse than the similar Canon, but at least as good as the Nikon AF-S24-120mm f4 VR and the Sony is a lot smaller with better built barrel I have owned all of these and tested all myself and I only kept the Sony and sold the Canon and Nikon 24-XXX f4 zooms. The most hard-core Nikon lovers at the Photo Rumors site never admit it but the Sony FE24-70mm f4 Z is actually not as bad as many chart shooting obsessed useless review sites like Photozone tend to make it out to be, really it is a very versatile lens.

The Sony FE28mm f2 is much more compact than the similar Nikon AF-S28mm f1.8G.

The FE35mm f2.8 Z is a bit dim lens but it is an extremely sharp lens with amazing flare resistance, just a bit dim, but most of times, the IBIS compensates that. The Fuji XF16-50 f2.8 is also an amazing lens, if not the very best std zoom ever made by anyone. The Fuji XF23mm f1.4 is also a stellar lens, I could not find any flaw in this lens at all no matter how hard I look for it, it is that good. Nikon has no lens like the amazing Fuji 23mm f1.4 or Zeiss Batis 25mm f2..

Oh I almost forgot to mention,but the Fuji XF50-140mm f2.8 is probably the best portrait zoom ever made by any one, and it is also a great concert event lens, and again, Nikon has nothing like it. The new Coshina Voiklander 10mm f5.6, 12mm f5.6 super wide primes are only possible with the short mount registration distance. The Voiklander 40mm f1.2 is also a quite small lens and it is very very sharp even at f1.2, I am sure it will become an instant hit for Coshina.

So unless you need very specific super tele or fish eye or TS lenses, they both already have almost any lens most of us ever need with generally better IQ than similar Nikon or Canon lenses. And in case of TS or some short macro lens, we can just adapt Canon lenses or Leica glass, so again no issue here.

 

I think their already having almost complete lens line respectively at this stage of this game is a huge advantage over hypothetical Nikon big sensor mirrorless system.

I guess it is very difficult for Nikon to catch up with Fuji or Sony or both, and even before that, they cannot afford to start a completely new mount system as Nikon is a tiny rapidly contracting company. They simply don't have the resources to invent an entirely new range of lenses for mirrorless when they still don't have a convincing DX range and the only CX lenses they ever announce are versions of the ones that already exist. Just think about how many years they actually needed to complete the current FX F mount line up, almost 10 years since 2007 and still missing a set of PC-E lenses that rival the quality of the Canon TS-E lenses. Well there is a new 19mm f4 PC-E but it is super overpriced and not as wide as the Canon TS-E17mm f4L, which was released in 2009.

So, I think, there are only three realistic options left for Nikon now. These area:

1 to Join in the E mount(most realistic option but I am not sure Sony allows Nikon to do so since Nikon has nothing Sony does not have in-house).

2 to Join in the X or EOS M mount if Fuji or Canon allows that.

3 or to become a third party lens maker for Sony, Fuji and Canon.

As video and legacy lens adaptability are the 2 most important aspects of all future mirrorless cameras, Nikon must go fully electronic FX mount for its rumored prosumer mirrorless system something like Nikon's version of the Fuji X-Pro 2, or Nikon will have to join in the E mount or the X mount or become a third party lens company for Sony, Fuji and Canon. I really hope they can afford the new mount option but I do not think they can do it under the current really obtuse management team. I think my dad and his generation of people will cry when they see Nikon finally becomes a third-party lens manufacture like Sigma to Sony, Canon and Fuji.

But I think it is the future only realistic future left for Nikon.

Finally, it is really sad to see too many folk argue solely from a size perspective when it comes to mirrorless vs D-SLR, Mirrorless cameras have several advantages nothing to do with size. I miss my EVF and all its plus points when I use my Nikon D-SLR much more than I miss the OVF when I use my Sony, Fuji and Panasonic. In fact, I would be delighted if Nikon makes an external EVF for my D-SLRs.

IMO, the main advantages of using mirrorless cameras are:

1 better VF with much more usable info display.

2 better Manual focus-ability with focus peaking and zeburra.

3 superb S-AF speeds at least on par with the very best DSLR, with much better focus accuracy.

4 much better utility for video, with excellent EVF. D-SLRs cannot use the finder during video shooting.

5 more simple, more durable body. On average my mirrorless cameras last much longer than my D-SLRs. My ancient NEX5n is still going very strong without any issue. It has been really abused under torrential rain, extremely intense snow,etc but never broke.

6 much faster much usable LV AF with much better keeper rate, this is very usable when shooting some event at very crowded venue.

7 AI based much more accurate metering system directly off the sensor.

So, as opposed to many D-SLR lovers believe, I think once we go mirrorless it is hard to go back to the D-SLR with antique 1950th style OVF.

I mean I did not like Sony, Fuji,etc and tried to go back to Nikon many times, but once re-used the OVF, I was quickly disillusioned and came back to the reality. And I realize why I ditched my D810 at the very first place for the A7R because I hated the thickness of the D810 body plus the terrible anachronistic OVF.............. I have been shooting mirrorless since 2009 and even before that I was using EVF on my video cameras and I prefer even the most primitive EVF I had on my Minolta A2(in 2005) to any of the best D-SLR OVFs. Now, I have collected at least 24 mirrorless cameras and it is really hard for me to go back to Nikon or Pentax, not because I hate them or their cameras IQ, but the terrible LV AF performance and even more terrible video features they offer really scare me away.

And I actually think the slow 2009 LV AF speed of the Nikon 2016 cameras is the main issue why Nikon is dying out, it is quickly becoming an irrelevant player in this game. All our iPhone generation boys expect any camera to do LV better than the best Nikon can do it.

 

Sony and Fuji both admitted that the main advantage of MILC is nothing do with the potential size or weight reduction, but reading out the chip info directly off the sensor chip itself without funny extra AF sensors/processors combo intervening the process of the main processor processing the sensor distance data.

Honestly I found the "real advantage of mirrorless" bullet interesting because it's a complete redirect from the whole notion of a size advantage, which was particularly misleading in the case of full frame. It becomes even less relevant when we realize that manufacturers will be organizing their line-ups to push enthusiast buyers up-market to larger sensor cameras.

This new tact about "direct information," however, is equally misleading because any feature that can be incorporated onto a sensor, can work within a mirrored camera as easily as a mirrorless one. But some of us who are already extremely used to shooting with an EVF camera do not want to go back to the OVF........the real reason why some of us need mirrorless is the EVF and the amount of info that the EVF can show us while shooting through the finder............any OVF even the best one like the A900 or the K1 finder cannot do that.

So I am sure the mirrorless will become bigger and bigger each generation as the GH5, EM1MK2, A7R2,etc already show us that trend.

Finally, the main difference between Nikon 1 and EOS-M is the evolution potential. The 1 can´t go further, there are better 1´ sensors, but not that much better, and all the lenses are constructed for this size of sensor, so you can´t get something much more powerful in there in the future. But by contrast, Canon can get their most potent APS-C sensor inside, all EF/EF-S lenses can be used with the same crop factor as with their DSLR´s via adapter, and it's all about their will to invest into this system. If they choose, they can make a powerful EOS-M - Nikon can´t do anything more with their CX system, they will have to begin from the scratch when they want to offer their own competitive MILC system. The EOS-M has some potential, and it´s only about Canon if they want to take it further. But it´s definitely not dead like the Nikon One...

After the EOS M5 launch, Canon has actually announced that they now own 23.5 percent of world wide MILC market, and they are already no2 in that market.

However, it is still not too late for Nikon, Nikon just should develop a Fully compatible new electronic mount with short registration distance and fully compatible F mount adapter with automated electronic aperture.

  

UPDATE : now, Canon has just announced its new sensor development policy. Canon seems to have built a new sensor plant in Mie prefecture of Japan. It seems like Canon is going on new 65nm process rule and all upcoming Canon sensors will be produced at there.

I think the 1DX2 and the 80D sensors are processed at the new plant.

Sony is still leading the CMOS imaging industry, but giants like Samsung are in close pursuit. Also big players like Panasonic are forming joint ventures with the likes of TowerJazz to offer 12-inch wafer fabrication with state-of-the-art quantum efficiency and dark current performance at 65 nano meters, and additional 45nm digital technology, and added available capacity of approximately 800,000 8-inch wafers per year in three manufacturing plants in Japan, according to TowerJazz.

 

The stakes are huge. The CMOS image sensor market will reached the historic $10 billion milestone in 2015, according to Yale, and with new applications popping up in automotive, medical and surveillance, while smartphones begin adopting high-definition front facing cameras, the industry is likely to hit the $16 billion mark by 2020. So nobody is just sleeping and Sony has to consolidate its position ASAP, or probably Sony will lose it again just like its short-lived TV business.

Now Canon's main customer is Honda, who buys a billion of small high

ISO capable 4k sensors for their cars.

  

UPDATE2: I interviewed many NORMAL camera buyers in my area at our camera shop and asked them to tell us about what was the main reason they did not buy so-called mirrorless any more, and why they think the market share of these mirrorless decreasing at least in the Western world and the already developed part of Asia such as Japan, Taiwan, South Korea , Singapore and HK.

They answered to these questions carefully as we paid some $$ and I think we found out a few interesting things about the NORMAL camera buyers' perception/opinion about ILC cameras and the culture surrounding the camera business:

 

1 to them, if it requires a bag even a tiny one, it's really not important what kind of camera system it is; a mirrorless or a D-SLR, a m43 or a FF, it is just too big and simply too annoying to carry around. So they use their cellphone more even though many of them already have some sort of One cameras or cheap ILCs.

2 To most of NORMAL camera buying people here it really does not matter FF or m43 or APS-C or MF because they are all too difficult to operate and actually really not much different to each other in real life use(at least to them).

This means maybe the small sensor camera systems like the m43 and the Nikon One will all fail since there is no market for them. Not many average camera buyers are interested in ILC systems but fixed lens all around cameras with good one button wireless connection to their phones. And not many the fanatics get interested in these cause most of them are obsessed with the best IQ possible they can get out of a camera system. Thus Olympus, Nikon and Panasonic will definitely need a bigger sensor system to entice them.

3 they do not want a lens like Zeiss Otus or Sigma Art even if it is selling for $50 or less. In fact, any kind of lens interchangeability is not important to them, in fact it is really annoying, and if it is an all around just fixed lens camera like the Sony RX10MK3 , it is actually a better camera system than any type of ILC with a set of primes that most of camera forum denizens want. They should realize they are not the majority of camera buyers and making and selling exactly what they want does not actually help any of these camera makers........

To them a set of great dedicated APS-C primes may be an important part of a good camera system, but to most of NORMAL people it is just not an important or an alluring feature at all.

So as opposed to what Tony , Thom, and many other self-proclaimed experts in many camera forums think, a great set of APS-C dedicated primes will NOT help Nikon or Sony. In fact, outside of the forums most of people actually prefer ZOOMS.

4 To NORMAL people all interchangeable lens cameras are big and quite intimidating.

This means that the very common camera forum trend to get mirrorless for being less conspicuous in the public reason is a silly idea , no one actually cares about if it is a mirroless or a D-SLR, to them all interchangeable lens cameras are annoying and intimidating to most of non-photographers.......so if they really want to be less conspicuous they should try one of the One inch sensor fixed lens cameras.

 

So as I already pointed out, the camera makers should focus on developing fixed multi lenses multi sensored computational cameras with easy one-button wireless connectivity to the phones. The software must be intuitive and 21st century design rather than the current 1980 design, I think it should be user programmable and as Thom points out open the source code to the smart kids and then some of them will develop some good apps for them for free.

Remember why the 5DMK2 and the Panasonic GH2 became such huge hits? Because of the hacked firmwares, I think it is the key.

  

UPDATE3: Now Nikon rumors and the others are getting really paranoid about the new Sony sensor marketing strategy that Nikon rumors and IR widely reported as a kind of fact a few days back.

I know and I have read the original Japanese text and I know their translation is totally wrong. Sony has never said they won't sell the best sensors they have to Nikon or hold back every latest techs they have in house. But they said they will not sell the best FF sensor for hybrid use and the A7R2 sensor is one of that kind....This means if it is not hybrid or video (high speed read-out) sensors Sony will more than willing to sell it to Nikon, so the stills focused 36, 46, and 54 mp sensors are all available to Nikon and the APS-C or so-called MF sensors are also widely available to whoever want to buy one of these.

Remember Sony Semi is not a part of Sony corporation but an independent company and so is the imaging group of Sony...........this means Sony imaging is just one of many many customers of the Semiconductor company of Sony, and the 42.4mp chip was designed for the standards of Sony imaging corp.

Therefore, they will sell any ordinary sensors to Nikon , especially the stills focused ones and smaller than 35mm FF sensors.

However in the long run, it is a big problem for Nikon since Sony Semi's main business is selling automobile sensors, cellphone sensor units and industrial sensors, so Nikon may become a very unimportant customer to their future business plan....

I have heard that the A9 sensors are kept for in-house use only and Nikon will have no access to it.

For now it is not a very serious issue, but Nikon will have to find the real long term solution for their long term sensor plan.

I think they will have to start sensor fabricating themselves with help from Ricoh, Fuji, TowerJazz , and I know many actually think it has already started working in this direction.

 

UPDATE 4: now IR posted the corrected version of the Sony interview with some corroboration from the Sony officials from Sony corporation (not the people originally interviewed from Sony DI).

 

www.imaging-resource.com/news/2017/03/26/sony-thailand-fa...

 

Now IR again proved itself a very sincere and respectable source of info, as opposed to Photorumors and other junk sites.

And this new IR article proved that I was correct on this one and the all PhotoRumors and Nikon Rumors are all wrong on this issue.

 

UPDATE5:Sony Semiconductor Solutions Corporation designs some sensors "on spec" for sale to all comers, like the ones listed at www.sony-semicon.co.jp/products_en/IS/sensor2/products/in... However it also collaborates with some large customers to design and produce sensors that are exclusive to that customer, either permanently or for a period of exclusivity. Nikon and Sony have partnered like this a number of times going back to the CCD era; more recently this has been done with Sony Imaging, Phase One, and Fujifilm (the last only customizing CFAs and micro-lenses, not the electronic part).

So all the paranoid rumors sites are wrong on this issue and they all proved that they've got no clue at all.

 

UPDATE6:Now Sony guys kind of implying that there would never be a E mount camera that carries number 9 as rumored as A9. When we interviewed a high ranked Sony official he said that there would be no E mount cameras that carry no9.

The official said no 9 may make some old A mount fans recall of Minolta legacy and using the number for a E mount body may make some old A mount fans furious. So Sony wants to avoid that, they seem try hard not to agitate or perturb the old A mount guys unnecessarily, and so Sony's high-end models will carry either no 7 as already used or no 1 when Sony feels it is necessary or Sony feels it is good enough to carry the ace number 1.

The official also said he and his team cannot say it officially just yet, but he personally thinks the ultimate E mount body would be called Alpha One, not 9 that hay hurt or agitate some people unnecessarily.

So there will be no Alpha 9 or A9, their ultimate highend body will be called Alpha One.

   

The light changes incessantly here and so nailing the right WB is a difficult task here.

 

The coming death of Nikon 10

 

One of the most strange mysteries of camera-loving-people in internet forums is that they view everything from the camera fanatic's point of view and discuss why one company doing badly or well simply from the crazy camera fanatic point of view.........now many self-proclaimed experts criticizing Nikon for their recent brave decision to cancel the DL series and their reported loss of about 50 billion yen or so without knowing any detail about the actual financial reports from the company, and it is getting really ridiculous.

It is really funny. The fanatics think the D810 is/ has been selling well, the D800 was the last big hit of Nikon , and the reason why Nikon did so badly in the last few years was the lack of the D810 update, etc, etc, but in reality it is nothing to do with camera or even the DL series but mostly to do with the recent write down of their restructuring cost.......and this means they will go back to black profitable state by next fiscal year even in the worst case. So it is not as bad as many self-proclaimed experts like Tony Northrup or a guy commented below believe it is.

"I'm completely flabbergasted. Of all the cameras Nikon has launched recently outside of the D5/D500, these were easily the best/most interesting. And from what I remember their tech wasn't THAT exotic. It was definitely a better bet than KeyMission or whatever.... what a shame. Sad!

Nikon seems to be in a death spiral.... if they couldn't release these I don't see a big new MILC platform. But they keep pumping money into dead products like the D3xxx. What they actually need is a mirrorless D810, and then it will be all right again like in the 2007".

 

Seriously we have to wonder if this guy or girl actually from some middle school or a vocational school?

Seriously disconnected to the reality, the Nikon financial issue is not any related to specific camera or camera business of the company itself at all.

Plus, while all of us know Nikon is struggling, it is far from a real dying company.

And I must wonder why this kind of Olympus, Sony fanatics or Fuji fanatics always believe mirrorless is some kind of real innovation when it is not. Honestly every compact cameras and video cameras before the NEX, the m43, the Fuji X, are all mirrorless, and even film era Leica M, Minolta SLC, etc, were mirrorless.

Last year, 27% of ILCs shipped were mirrorless. Nikon can't afford to continue to be uncompetitive in that sector. Well is that really so? Is mirrorless that innovative or even disruptive ? I seriously doubt that idea now, how long those mirrorless fanboys including I myself saying D-SLR is dead ? and is it really dead? No. D-SLR still owns about 72 percent of ILC market.

The Mirrorless ILC market is already quite fragmented among quite a few manufacturers. And as Canon are starting to prove it's not that hard to achieve a significant market share of that 27% in a relatively short time. Now, arguably, Nikon's 1 Series might have got it wrong by choosing a too small sensor size (in the opinion of enthusiasts on forums such as the above guy or girl, of course) but with that know how I'm not sure that it would take them too long to become competitive in the Mirrorless sector - if they choose to. Like Canon they may have simply been waiting for what they believe is the right time. Plus, the DL series is not a mirrorless or an ILC series but a fixed lens compact camera series and as such Nikon actually does not need that.

Another fanatic in some forum wrote below:

"I agree with Tony, who thinks Nikon will become a lot smaller company. He seems to have lost complete faith in Nikon. I also believe that when your number one focus is cost cutting as evidenced by the d3xxx and d5xxx series, you are on a downward spiral. No doubt, Nikon management is royally screwing up."

But the reality is far from it, and this kind of comment shows how disconnected Northrup has been to the reality. And who cares what he thinks or writes about anything other than his Windows handbooks, he is just a smart but devious YouTube sells man or an over qualified camera expert as with all other so-called reviewers, anyway.

If there is a really trenchant criticism to make of Nikon management over the past 10 years, it's related to the semiconductor lithography business, not camera or LCD lithography business.

Nikon has been investing hundreds of millions of dollars in the semiconductor lithography business over almost 20 years with very erratic results; profits some years, big losses others. I haven't done the math, yet I think they probably have a net loss in that business over that period. Yet, they keep persisting. That's becoming less and less defensible.

The camera business, on the other hand, has been continuously profitable over that time; in some years, extremely profitable. (Which is not to say that it's been perfectly managed; just very profitably managed.)

And this year is a good case in point. The "extraordinary loss" they just announced is mostly a write-down/write-off of semiconductor lithography inventory(and hidden restructuring cost). So when the year finishes, they will probably once again have a profitable (maybe only a little bit) camera division and an unprofitable semiconductor lithography division, which drags the whole company into a small overall loss. It has done that in a handful of years since 1992.

Also important to note many forum fanatics accuse Nikon of being non-diversified company but in reality Nikon is actually quite well diversified with five main divisions:

1 camera related consumer imaging.

2 precision semiconductor Lithography.

3 medical and industrial imaging business(selling CT-Scans, X-rays, MRI ,etc).

4 LCD lithography.

5 consumer foods business, this one is a small division and not well known outside of Japan. They are selling some traditional Japanese(Tokyo style) rice-cracker like stuffs and other red bean paste like thing filled in very crispy rice cracker like stuff and it is very popular here. You can buy it directly from Nikon direct.com

And the no2 is the only one has lost some $$$ this year.

And now the DL line was cancelled so that Nikon can bury all the costs among their 'one off extraordinary restructuring cost' in the annual results. Continuing with the product would have meant they couldn't do this and its costs would have been reflected as losses to future quarters operating incomes.

So while it makes Nikon look really stupid, it actually did the best it could, and this brave decision will probably pay off well enough to help Nikon- it will definitely accelerate the restructuring process.

Maybe it's why Nikon share price in Japan is now going up, not down.

I used to think and respect Tony as an expert but now I find him a bitter-minded soul with his own agenda, and I have to wonder if he knows anything about what he preaches out side of photography and Windows PC...I mean he should stick with his excellent Windows handbook series rather than writing about something he does not actually know anything about(in side of the camera companies or how they manage themselves). And he writes everything with his strong Canon bias......For him anything does not carry Canon or Sony name is a crap, it is that simple..

If he knows something then he does not write about how well selling the D810 is or D500 is in its class, really if they are selling half as well as he often says they are, Nikon hasn't been struggling this much. The D810 and D500 are not doing well in terms of sells, and this tells us something very important listening to people like Northrup , Hogan, or any of those internet self-proclaimed experts actually hurts the companies since they do not know what they are preaching about, seriously! That said I am not saying the D810 is not a great all around body as Tony says, however, it is not selling well and it and D500 are not the cameras will help Nikon dramatically. I am sure the Fullframe mirrorless that is always discussed across the internet camera forums will not help Nikon much, either. Those armchair experts must understand what actually sells well is not what they love or want to see being materialized.

Finally, the modular camera concept Northrup ,Hogan and many other pundits are always suggesting is also a flawed concept/idea.

I already wrote about it a several times here......Also the silly APS-C dedicated prime line does not or will not help Nikon or Sony at all. The majority of consumer or prosumer APS-C camera buyers are not interested in primes as much as Tony, Thom or other fanatics think they are.

At our shops most of people just buy a few zooms and FF primes for their APS-C bodies, even those who have the money to buy the D500 or the A6500 are not very different.

So they must realize what they are asking may be the final nail on the Nikon coffin........not helping or revitalizing it but actually killing it.

Now I must conclude that the biggest enemy of Nikon might be the forum experts, and Nikon should listen to the smartphone generation customers instead of these self-proclaimed experts hanging out at LL or Nikon Rumors site.

I think Nikon or any business should not underestimate the power and influence of those self-proclaimed experts cause people especially the naive ones will believe them and simply conclude Nikon is actually going under or performing much worse than the rest of the camera companies.

  

UPDATE : now, Canon has just announced its new sensor development policy. Canon seems to have built a new sensor plant in Mie prefecture of Japan. It seems like Canon is going on new 65nm process rule and all upcoming Canon sensors will be produced at there.

I think the 1DX2 and the 80D sensors are processed at the new plant.

Sony is still leading the CMOS imaging industry, but giants like Samsung are in close pursuit. Also big players like Panasonic are forming joint ventures with the likes of TowerJazz to offer 12-inch wafer fabrication with state-of-the-art quantum efficiency and dark current performance at 65 nano meters, and additional 45nm digital technology, and added available capacity of approximately 800,000 8-inch wafers per year in three manufacturing plants in Japan, according to TowerJazz.

 

The stakes are huge. The CMOS image sensor market will reached the historic $10 billion milestone in 2015, according to Yale, and with new applications popping up in automotive, medical and surveillance, while smartphones begin adopting high-definition front facing cameras, the industry is likely to hit the $16 billion mark by 2020. So nobody is just sleeping and Sony has to consolidate its position ASAP, or probably Sony will lose it again just like its short-lived TV business.

Now Canon's main customer is Honda, who buys a billion of small high

ISO capable 4k sensors for their cars.

  

UPDATE2: I interviewed many NORMAL camera buyers in my area at our camera shop and asked them to tell us about what was the main reason they did not buy so-called mirrorless any more, and why they think the market share of these mirrorless decreasing at least in the Western world and the already developed part of Asia such as Japan, Taiwan, South Korea , Singapore and HK.

They answered to these questions carefully as we paid some $$ and I think we found out a few interesting things about the NORMAL camera buyers' perception/opinion about ILC cameras and the culture surrounding the camera business:

 

1 to them, if it requires a bag even a tiny one, it's really not important what kind of camera system it is; a mirrorless or a D-SLR, a m43 or a FF, it is just too big and simply too annoying to carry around. So they use their cellphone more even though many of them already have some sort of One cameras or cheap ILCs.

2 To most of NORMAL camera buying people here it really does not matter FF or m43 or APS-C or MF because they are all too difficult to operate and actually really not much different to each other in real life use(at least to them).

This means maybe the small sensor camera systems like the m43 and the Nikon One will all fail since there is no market for them. Not many average camera buyers are interested in ILC systems but fixed lens all around cameras with good one button wireless connection to their phones. And not many the fanatics get interested in these cause most of them are obsessed with the best IQ possible they can get out of a camera system. Thus Olympus, Nikon and Panasonic will definitely need a bigger sensor system to entice them.

3 they do not want a lens like Zeiss Otus or Sigma Art even if it is selling for $50 or less. In fact, any kind of lens interchangeability is not important to them, in fact it is really annoying, and if it is an all around just fixed lens camera like the Sony RX10MK3 , it is actually a better camera system than any type of ILC with a set of primes that most of camera forum denizens want. They should realize they are not the majority of camera buyers and making and selling exactly what they want does not actually help any of these camera makers........

To them a set of great dedicated APS-C primes may be an important part of a good camera system, but to most of NORMAL people it is just not an important or an alluring feature at all.

So as opposed to what Tony , Thom, and many other self-proclaimed experts in many camera forums think, a great set of APS-C dedicated primes will NOT help Nikon or Sony. In fact, outside of the forums most of people actually prefer ZOOMS.

4 To NORMAL people all interchangeable lens cameras are big and quite intimidating.

This means that the very common camera forum trend to get mirrorless for being less conspicuous in the public reason is a silly idea , no one actually cares about if it is a mirroless or a D-SLR, to them all interchangeable lens cameras are annoying and intimidating to most of non-photographers.......so if they really want to be less conspicuous they should try one of the One inch sensor fixed lens cameras.

 

So as I already pointed out, the camera makers should focus on developing fixed multi lenses multi sensored computational cameras with easy one-button wireless connectivity to the phones. The software must be intuitive and 21st century design rather than the current 1980 design, I think it should be user programmable and as Thom points out open the source code to the smart kids and then some of them will develop some good apps for them for free.

Remember why the 5DMK2 and the Panasonic GH2 became such huge hits? Because of the hacked firmwares, I think it is the key.

  

UPDATE3: Now Nikon rumors and the others are getting really paranoid about the new Sony sensor marketing strategy that Nikon rumors and IR widely reported as a kind of fact a few days back.

I know and I have read the original Japanese text and I know their translation is totally wrong. Sony has never said they won't sell the best sensors they have to Nikon or hold back every latest techs they have in house. But they said they will not sell the best FF sensor for hybrid use and the A7R2 sensor is one of that kind....This means if it is not hybrid or video (high speed read-out) sensors Sony will more than willing to sell it to Nikon, so the stills focused 36, 46, and 54 mp sensors are all available to Nikon and the APS-C or so-called MF sensors are also widely available to whoever want to buy one of these.

Remember Sony Semi is not a part of Sony corporation but an independent company and so is the imaging group of Sony...........this means Sony imaging is just one of many many customers of the Semiconductor company of Sony, and the 42.4mp chip was designed for the standards of Sony imaging corp.

Therefore, they will sell any ordinary sensors to Nikon , especially the stills focused ones and smaller than 35mm FF sensors.

However in the long run, it is a big problem for Nikon since Sony Semi's main business is selling automobile sensors, cellphone sensor units and industrial sensors, so Nikon may become a very unimportant customer to their future business plan....

I have heard that the A9 sensors are kept for in-house use only and Nikon will have no access to it.

For now it is not a very serious issue, but Nikon will have to find the real long term solution for their long term sensor plan.

I think they will have to start sensor fabricating themselves with help from Ricoh, Fuji, TowerJazz , and I know many actually think it has already started working in this direction.

 

UPDATE 4: now IR posted the corrected version of the Sony interview with some corroboration from the Sony officials from Sony corporation (not the people originally interviewed from Sony DI).

 

www.imaging-resource.com/news/2017/03/26/sony-thailand-fa...

 

Now IR again proved itself a very sincere and respectable source of info, as opposed to Photorumors and other junk sites.

And this new IR article proved that I was correct on this one and the all PhotoRumors and Nikon Rumors are all wrong on this issue.

 

UPDATE5:Sony Semiconductor Solutions Corporation designs some sensors "on spec" for sale to all comers, like the ones listed at www.sony-semicon.co.jp/products_en/IS/sensor2/products/in... However it also collaborates with some large customers to design and produce sensors that are exclusive to that customer, either permanently or for a period of exclusivity. Nikon and Sony have partnered like this a number of times going back to the CCD era; more recently this has been done with Sony Imaging, Phase One, and Fujifilm (the last only customizing CFAs and micro-lenses, not the electronic part).

So all the paranoid rumors sites are wrong on this issue and they all proved that they've got no clue at all.

 

UPDATE6: Now the rumored A9 is announced and I was wrong on the name, I said it Alpha One, but everything else I predicted about it was right.

It was, after all, a very highspeed FF camera that designed to kill the D5 and 1DX2. It is incredibly fast and very good hybrid shooter and for 4500USD, it is a big bargain.

However, it was kind of a big disappointment to me since I do prefer the 42.4mp sensor or the 36.7 mp sensor and I am too used to it.........the 24.3mp resolution feels like old now, and being 24mp means it cannot be updated to shoot 8k when it finally gets available for consumer cameras.

So while it is an incredibly versatile FF camera, I prefer my A7R2 any day to this highend A9 camera even if it is cheaper than my 2 year old A7R2.

Why many of our customers see m43 has failed 1:

 

The thing that would concern me if I was in management in Canon, or Nikon, or indeed Pentax, Olympus or Fuji is brand recognition among younger generations and in developing markets.

 

Of course to us (middle aged enthusiasts) Canon, Nikon, etc. means something positive. We recognize them as 'photo' brands And although we may be Nikon users (or Canon, Fuji, Olympus or Pentax users) we recognize and accept the others as photo brands because we know that historically they have earned their place in the market. They are familiar to us.

But a child born today is much more likely to be exposed to brands more relevant to him or her. Like the brands that manufacture phones, or tablets, or Apps, or even sportswear.

Similar is true of emerging markets. Some years back Yashica(I do not know what Yashica is, so he must be much older than me) used to be No. 1 in India. Why? Presumably because the Yashica importer / distributor did a better job at the time in establishing that brand in a market that was starting from a very low base and had few if any historical brand preconceptions.

So should, say, Nike suddenly decide to start marketing cameras aimed at younger people they might have a lot more brand recognition in a relatively short time than say the market leader, i.e. Canon. After all what does Canon do that really appeals to a teenager? Cameras? Granddad products. Copiers? Office Valium, and of course, medical equipment such as CT scan and X-Ray machine, but people even know that they make such variety of things? And the same also applies to the other 'established' photo companies maybe except Sony, whose one of main businesses is PlayStation.

 

Of course there are many technological hurdles that a new brand would have to overcome to compete, let alone dominate in the photo market but those are certainly not insurmountable, should of course anyone think it is actually worth doing, and if it is too difficult they can just buy the techs needed to enter into this market.

Remember this.... Olympus, Panasonic, Fujifilm and Samsung did not move to Mirrorless because they wanted to. They moved because they were forced to. They really had no other choice.

All four companies failed in the DSLR market, and had to try something else. They could not compete with Canon, Nikon and to a large extent Pentax in the DSLR market, and had to either retreat to fixed lens cameras, or try something else. So they tried so-called Mirrorless system camera with mixed success. It didn't end well for Samsung, but the other three seem to be doing fairly well, especially for Fuji.

At least they are doing better than when they were selling EVolt DSLRs (Olympus), Lumix DSLRs(Paasonic), re-branded Nikon DSLRs (Fujifilm), or re-branded Pentax DSLRs (Samsung).

And we all know it was a good thing for them even for a very temporal time that they did actually try something different, because the bottom fell out of the P&S market.

Without an ILC to sell when the market is moving to higher ground for survival, you end up becoming Casio, that said though, oddly enough , Casio is actually outdoing the 3 that tried something new. But the real question is why they did not do well in DSLR market?

I think because,like our old customers said it above, Panasonic, Olympus, Pentax and Fuji had no brand recognition and not enough number of fanatic supporters, at the time. At least not enough number to compete Canon, Nikon and Sony in DSLR business.

Sony is another story, and a more actually much more complicated one. They seem to compete in every market, hoping that something sticks. And right now Sony E/FE seems to have pretty good traction, and Sony A Mount is believed to be on the way out. However, Sony denies it firmly at CP Plus and NBA.

At the CP + show in Yokohama, I asked a few A mount related questions to a couple of Sony guys, and I got interesting answers to my questions.

Basically, Sony said the A7RMK2 is the 'the E mount' flagship, but not the real flagship for the Alpha system. The 2 different lines of Alpha systems will be merged but not the E takes over the A kind of merging.

Sony says, it will be very interesting to many and technologically shocking to the public. But it is really difficult to do that right, and Sony needs to improve or waiting for a few key techs for that incredible things to come into the A mount. This is why Sony has had to cancel out the planned announcement of the A99VMK2 or whatever called(Sony guys said at least 2 times they canceled it).

A few new techs not available at the time of the planned announcement for the A mount FF body became available right after that and Sony thought that would surely improve it further. Sony thinks we should wait to see it before making any firm decision on buying into any existing camera system because it will be Sony's first true pro-grade, grand-breaking true game changer. I hope it will be true, but how long will we have to wait? Why not just release a temporal stop gap solution camera with current best technology available? Sony is really odd, they seem to be really obsessed with shocking the public with every camera announcement kind of idea.

But is A mount really doomed ? I 'd say no. Many people think it is really long await, but hey see the reality, the A99 was announced in November 2012, the Canon EOS5DMK3 was announced in Feb,2012 and still not updated, so no need irrational panic just yet.

The D800/E was updated because it was a flawed camera from the start and Nikon could not hide the many many technical design flaws and many usability issues of that camera. The D800 did not do well in the camera market despite of the common forum myth that the D800 killed the 5DMK3 and the A99 in terms of sells,etc.

I think this clearly shows us what sells and no, following the idea proposed by the camera fanatics at many fora does not work. The D800 is a big mistake for Nikon, not many people wanted it, not many people obsessed with the tiny bit better DR at the very base ISO. By comparison, the Sony A7R was a huge success for Sony because it was a more logical choice for many of us who really wanted the tiny bit better DR of the D800 sensor since that tiny Sony took all our existing Canon EF, Nikon F, Leica M, Minolta Sony A, etc, without any issue. And for ultimate IQ work, we do not need the flappy mirror and the associated mirror shock.

I think, despite of the common forum myth that m43 is selling very well and no 1 in Japan,etc, it is the most doomed future-less system out there.

All the current ILC cameras are big to most of NORMAL non-photographer people, and they are very intimidating to most of NORMAL people(I mean regardless of mount type or sensor type).

I never realized it before but while walking around down town Fukuoka with one of my long time friends here forced me to understand it. A friend of mine told me that he thinks all interchangeable lens cameras are huge and intimidating to most of average people regardless of sensor size or format, it's just simply annoying!

I guess a big lens scares or annoys people more than a big body......I never saw it his way but I got his point and I decided to carry my tiny Canon G5X2 when I just walk around the city area with other people. If I am alone shooting something, then I usually carry my big camera, and I think it does not matter it's a m43, or FF, or an APS-C, it is all big to most of NORMAL people anyway.

Then why not just go all way up to FF or MFDB, or at least APS-C?

So maybe the one really doomed is not Nikon or Sony A mount but m43?

Nikon Fand Sony Alpha mount have historically had very enthusiastic and even fanatic core shooters and they are usually too old to adapt themselves fast to new EVF based hybrid-minded gear even if they understand it is the more logical thing for them as they are aged. So D-SLRs may survive as antique cameras, but m43 or Nikon One?

After all, to most of NORMAL people, Panasonic is really nothing but a microwave company as my Thai friend, who has been an assistant prof at Bangkok university.

He hated Panasonic cameras although he loved GH4 when I had him try my GH4 without Panasonic name, I covered the name with blacktape. And sadly enough, Panasonic understands it, so they tend to put Leica name on their lenses, but did not have the guts to change the brand name on their camera.

  

UPDATE : Now once again, it's proven that Sony and its E mount fanboys are all bark but never actually bite kind of dogs. Thanks to DXO for proving this, the over hyped, expensive, almost ridiculously huge Sony FE24-70mm f2.8G-Master is really just as good or a tiny bit better than the infamous so-called Zeiss fisheye zoom FE24-70mm f4Z even at the huge cost of the oversized barrel with the 82mm filter thread design. In fact , the expensive oversized FE24-70mmf2.8 G-Master(WTF is the G master anyway) is optically much worse than the Canon EF24-70mm f2.8L MK2 that all mean, ill-spirited Sony A7 fanboys despised a few months back(when the G master line was announced). And even sadly, the Sony G master is even worse than the equally huge but a bit lighter Nikon AF-S24-70mm f2.8E VR. Yeah Sony has again proved the E mount means overpriced trendy toy for old men, it might be taken as cool fashion item or cool old man's toy for the silly mount adapter game for a while(at least).

But for cost effective real world solution, Sony is not the answer to most of us. I am not anti mirrorless but becoming anti-Sony, and I am tired of all their immature products coming with their extremely condescending marketing.

 

Hope Red or someone like that will challenge the A7X line with better video minded ergonomics design.

  

Update2:now, I think FF mirrorless is, like self-driving car, it is the future, definitely, but not really mature enough to be practical for many real life tasks, and they are both still immensely overpriced just because newer tech relatively to their older more practical rivals.

The Sony a7R2 should be cheaper than the D810 considering it does not have the complex mirror and proper weather sealings on the shutter. The X-T2 should be as cheap as the D7200 or the 80D. The A6300 should be as cheap as its predecessor(about 650US), no more than that, it is a great camera but still not able to shoot from a fast running car or train like the 7DMK2 or the D500, and so if you were a paparazzi or anything like that, you would not choose the A6300 as your main camera.

When I wrote my previous A6300 vs D500 hands-on experience,I was very very impressed with the A6300 AF, especially with the FE55mm f1.8Z. But now I am sure if my work is completely relying on the best AF in the game, I'd definitely choose the D500, not the A6300, which could not focus well on a super fast moving thing from a fast running train or a car unless the light level is perfectly ideal.

In last week,I tried to shoot street snaps from a fast running super express train with my A6300, A7M2 and A7R2, none of my Sonys could focus on anything moving from a 300km/h fast running train, I was really glad I also brought my D750 with me for my last short train trip.

Like Thom Hogan said, the Sony Alpha E mount cameras are too slow for anything moving fast, I mean their single AF speed is very fast, but it cannot track fast, especially when the light level is not really ideal.

Plus, the general operation speed of the Sony is just painfully slow, even the most expensive A7SMK2 is very slow. I mean it takes about 30 seconds to format a card, about 5 seconds or more to wake up from a long sleep, etc, and is too slow for anything unpredictably moving or decisive once a life time kind of shot. Another big issue of the Sony FE system is terribly short battery life. I know if I bring this up, many Sony fans would tell me after adding a couple of extra batteries it is still lighter than any of Nikon Canon FF D-SLRs. Maybe so, but the real issue here is because we need to change the battery almost every couple of hours, we would miss many decisive moments, and it is really annoying.

 

Now, it is obvious this is the most difficult time to spend some serious amount of money into any of these already existing camera system since they all suck in some ways and all the camera companies are too arrogant or stupid to listen to the actual users.

 

The FE50mm f1.4Z is an amazing lens that may change the direction of the entire industry but it is a huge lens, honestly, if I knew where Sony were heading to at very first place in 2013, I would not have spent this much money into Sony FE system......I wanted it to be small, light and simple, but now it is a big, heavy, expensive and very complex system.

Really, why every new lens must be AF and this huge is beyond me. It is just making the system impractical with the terribly oversized lenses. I have never seen any 50 this big(except my Otus 55 and the old Sigma Art I hated both of those huge 50 primes), seriously it is as big as the 85mm f1.4 GM and is an ugly looking lens, too.

Sony should not try a D-SLR replacement system with the A7 system, but a great RangeFinder replacement system.

Hope they wake up soon.

 

The real reason why mirrorless cameras are not already successful replacing supposed to be primitive D-SLRs is they are bad value for our buck. Maybe it is newer better tech, but still very bad value.......almost all current mirrorless cameras are overpriced considering the fact most of them are still playing the catching-up game, every year they are replaced.

The A7MK2 was the first mirrorless camera to have stayed in the market for longer than a year. And the A7R2 seems to follow that trend.

   

A black and white one for a change.

 

Danique Laken from Modelution Model Management

 

Special thanks to Transcontinenta for supplying Carl Zeiss Optics and Lastolite Reflectors I used a Zeiss Sonnar T* 135mm f/2 ZE for these images.

  

For over a decade, CIAT has tested agronomic and soil management practices in Western Kenya. From minimum tillage to integrated soil fertility management, these trials are the most comprehensive picture of tropical soil health that we have in Kenya. They show-case changes in soil fertility and health, which take time to develop, hence the importance of these long-term trails. CIAT’s “Climate-smart soil protection and rehabilitation in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, India and Kenya” project is implemented in collaboration with the Kenya Agriculture and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO); GOPA and implementing partners including PAFID, Welthungerhilfe and WOCAT - University of Bern. It is supported by the German Society for International Cooperation (GIZ) and the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). For more information, visit: blog.ciat.cgiar.org/sink-it-or-lose-it-the-carbon-trade-off/ or contact g.smith (at) cgiar (dot) org. Please credit accordingly: Georgina Smith / CIAT.

For over a decade, CIAT has tested agronomic and soil management practices in Western Kenya. From minimum tillage to integrated soil fertility management, these trials are the most comprehensive picture of tropical soil health that we have in Kenya. They show-case changes in soil fertility and health, which take time to develop, hence the importance of these long-term trails. CIAT’s “Climate-smart soil protection and rehabilitation in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, India and Kenya” project is implemented in collaboration with the Kenya Agriculture and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO); GOPA and implementing partners including PAFID, Welthungerhilfe and WOCAT - University of Bern. It is supported by the German Society for International Cooperation (GIZ) and the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). For more information, visit: blog.ciat.cgiar.org/sink-it-or-lose-it-the-carbon-trade-off/ or contact g.smith (at) cgiar (dot) org. Please credit accordingly: Georgina Smith / CIAT.

Morro Bay CA Pink Sunset over the Pacific Ocean at Morro Rock

 

Eff. 20 Aug. 2013 license changes to "all rights reserved" due to adoption by Getty Images.

 

20 Aug 2013, the original 1024 x 1024 icon version has been replaced with a larger 3648x2736 original here due to a Getty request to represent the image.

 

The original 1024x1024 icon displayed here is now a hidden file www.flickr.com/photos/mikebaird/9555966139/

 

This is a proposed splash screen and icon for an iPhone and Android App I'm building using JamPot's The AppBuilder

Morro Rock at sunset on Morro Strand State Beach, Morro Bay, CA

 

To use this photo...

Eff. 20 Aug. 2013 license changes to "all rights reserved" due to adoption by Getty Images.

Please add comments/notes/tags to add to or correct information, identification, etc. Please, no comments or invites with badges, unrelated images, flashing icons, links to your photos, multiple invites, or invites with award levels and/or award/post rules. Critique is always welcomed.

 

PhotoMorroBay.com Social Network - An App to appear soon in the Apple and Android App stores.

PhotoMorroBay.com Social Network. Author: Mike Baird Created: 9/29/2011 8:10:55 PM Status: Awaiting store submission

Support url: photomorrobay.com

email: app{at] mikebaird d o t com

phone: 805-704-2064

 

Description: PhotoMorroBay.com Social Network, including Yahoo! Group discussions, Flickr photo sharing, Digital Photo Walk Meet-ups, Bay Birding Photo Cruises, and Morro Bay Bird Festival photo events.

 

Keywords: photomorrobay,DPW,digital photo walk,bay birding,photo cruise,morro bay,bird festival,Mike Baird,Michael Baird,Dos Osos,Sub Sea Tours,photomorrobay.com,

 

Details: Morro Bay, CA Central Coast Area (San Luis Obispo County, California, USA) PhotoMorroBay.com Social Network, including Yahoo! Group discussions, Flickr photo sharing, Digital Photo Walk Meet-ups, Bay Birding Photo Cruises, and Morro Bay Bird Festival events led by bairdphotos.com photographer "Mike" Michael L. Baird. Share your photography passion. PhotoMorroBay.com -- Gateway to our local Morro Bay, CA photographers' Yahoo! Group for discussions, events, meet-ups, polls, calendars, etc., and Gateway to our local Morro Bay, CA photographers' Flickr Group for photo sharing and critique.

 

*****

1024x1024 version of www.flickr.com/photos/mikebaird/3048731033/ a JamPot TheAppBuilder icon and splash screen resource photomorropbay.com theappbuilder.com

 

Shown as the lone bird is the Long-billed Curlew Numenius americanus) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long-billed_curlew

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Long-billed_Curlew_eating_sand... (another of mine on the Wiki pages)

 

***

11/24/2011 posted here to preserve some comments I recently made about using Apple's Aperture software.

I want to talk about Apple's Aperture 3, which is only $79 in the Mac App Store

(It is still $199 in the Apple Online Store, Amazon, etc., and, it is the same program, just not delivered on physical media).

You can download and install it as many times as you like to all of your machines using the same Apple ID. That beats searching for a DVD.

All of Apple's newer software is now being delivered/sold only online, even the latest Lion OS X.

 

Normally I use only Lightroom for my image management and processing (with some Photoshop CS5 if needed), but since the introduction of iCloud from Apple recently with the iOS 5 and Lion OS X upgrades, and the iPhone 4S,

I find myself taking a lot of iPhone photos (8MP, HDR, HD Video, GPS geo-tagging), the quality of which has astounded me and many others.

 

The cool thing about iCloud is that as soon as you enter a WiFi zone, all the photos you've taken earlier are automatically uploaded into the cloud (Your Photo Stream in iCloud is a rolling collection of your last 1000 photos), and

then they are automatically downloaded into the "Photo Stream" of every Mac device you own running OS X Lion (iMAc, MacBooks, iMAcs, iPads, etc.), where they are then automatically archived permanently.

 

No longer do I need to remove an SDHC card from a point-and-shoot camera and import the photos into a computer, and then worry about syncing all my photos from my different machines into consistent libraries.

 

For this to work on OSX Lion (iMac, MacBooks...), however, one MUST use either Apple's iPhoto or Aperture program.

Now many of you know I hate iPhoto (it tries as hard as possible not to let you know where your photos are on your hard drive; makes duplicate copies with every edit, etc.).

 

So I was curious and looked at Aperture again even though I was biased against it.

I didn't like the $199 price, but when I found that Apple lowered the download price in the App store to $79,

I bought it and played with it.

 

You can learn about Aperture at

www.apple.com/aperture/what-is.html

www.apple.com/aperture/action/

www.apple.com/aperture/action/frakes/

www.apple.com/aperture/what-is.html#overlay-jarvis

www.apple.com/aperture/iphoto-to-aperture/

store.apple.com/us/product/MB957Z/A#overview

--- you too will be impressed with it's power... many professionals use it for high-end production projects.

 

So, bottom line is that I'm done with iPhoto.

All my iPhone photos are sent to my Aperture Application on my Macs automatically (and I'll also know exactly where they are on the hard drive).

I then have the option to further export/import between Lightroom and Aperture or Photoshop if I want to preserve my usual workflow, and prepare the iPhone photos the same way I do all my RAW Canon SLR images.

I may well not even bother using Lightroom treatment for many of my social iPhone photos, as Aperture cleans them up in seconds... and provides automated Flickr and such uploads.

 

I highly recommend Apple's Aperture as a vehicle for integrating your iPhone iCloud images into your existing Lightroom/Bridge/Photoshop workflow.

And, many professionals find they prefer to use Aperture as their only image management/processing tool (it is nicely integrated into the Apple eco-system, using for example your Apple Contacts to aid in labeling faces in your images).

very impressive. Apple is doing a lot of things right.

 

I wonder when Canon and Nikon will catch up. 11/24/2011

 

08 July 2015 CC use as an unsplash photo

www.dropbox.com/s/snuyrz7v4xwi135/pool_456.jpg?dl=0

www.facebook.com/groups/Glitchcollective/786226681498886/

cornerstoneindiacxosearch.tumblr.com/post/158182603950/em...

 

While it is true that the work environment within organizations has undergone a tremendous change over the past half a century or so, many entrepreneurs are still not able to fully comprehend the meaning of employee engagement. That is why it becomes extremely difficult for them to understand the need of hiring employee engagement consulting firms to develop policies and methods that ensure better engagement of the workforce.

 

Austria Kunsthistorisches Museum

Federal Museum

Logo KHM

Regulatory authority (ies)/organs to the Federal Ministry for Education, Science and Culture

Founded 17 October 1891

Headquartered Castle Ring (Burgring), Vienna 1, Austria

Management Sabine Haag

www.khm.at website

Main building of the Kunsthistorisches Museum at Maria-Theresa-Square

The Kunsthistorisches Museum (KHM abbreviated) is an art museum in Vienna. It is one of the largest and most important museums in the world. It was opened in 1891 and 2012 visited of 1.351.940 million people.

The museum

The Kunsthistorisches Museum is with its opposite sister building, the Natural History Museum (Naturhistorisches Museum), the most important historicist large buildings of the Ringstrasse time. Together they stand around the Maria Theresa square, on which also the Maria Theresa monument stands. This course spans the former glacis between today's ring road and 2-line, and is forming a historical landmark that also belongs to World Heritage Site Historic Centre of Vienna.

History

Archduke Leopold Wilhelm in his Gallery

The Museum came from the collections of the Habsburgs, especially from the portrait and armor collections of Ferdinand of Tyrol, the collection of Emperor Rudolf II (most of which, however scattered) and the art collection of Archduke Leopold Wilhelm into existence. Already In 1833 asked Joseph Arneth, curator (and later director) of the Imperial Coins and Antiquities Cabinet, bringing together all the imperial collections in a single building .

Architectural History

The contract to build the museum in the city had been given in 1858 by Emperor Franz Joseph. Subsequently, many designs were submitted for the ring road zone. Plans by August Sicard von Sicardsburg and Eduard van der Null planned to build two museum buildings in the immediate aftermath of the Imperial Palace on the left and right of the Heroes' Square (Heldenplatz). The architect Ludwig Förster planned museum buildings between the Schwarzenberg Square and the City Park, Martin Ritter von Kink favored buildings at the corner Währingerstraße/ Scots ring (Schottenring), Peter Joseph, the area Bellariastraße, Moritz von Loehr the south side of the opera ring, and Ludwig Zettl the southeast side of the grain market (Getreidemarkt).

From 1867, a competition was announced for the museums, and thereby set their current position - at the request of the Emperor, the museum should not be too close to the Imperial Palace, but arise beyond the ring road. The architect Carl von Hasenauer participated in this competition and was able the at that time in Zürich operating Gottfried Semper to encourage to work together. The two museum buildings should be built here in the sense of the style of the Italian Renaissance. The plans got the benevolence of the imperial family. In April 1869, there was an audience with of Joseph Semper at the Emperor Franz Joseph and an oral contract was concluded, in July 1870 was issued the written order to Semper and Hasenauer.

Crucial for the success of Semper and Hasenauer against the projects of other architects were among others Semper's vision of a large building complex called "Imperial Forum", in which the museums would have been a part of. Not least by the death of Semper in 1879 came the Imperial Forum not as planned for execution, the two museums were built, however.

Construction of the two museums began without ceremony on 27 November 1871 instead. Semper moved to Vienna in the sequence. From the beginning, there were considerable personal differences between him and Hasenauer, who finally in 1877 took over sole construction management. 1874, the scaffolds were placed up to the attic and the first floor completed, built in 1878, the first windows installed in 1879, the Attica and the balustrade from 1880 to 1881 and built the dome and the Tabernacle. The dome is topped with a bronze statue of Pallas Athena by Johannes Benk.

The lighting and air conditioning concept with double glazing of the ceilings made ​​the renunciation of artificial light (especially at that time, as gas light) possible, but this resulted due to seasonal variations depending on daylight to different opening times .

Kuppelhalle

Entrance (by clicking the link at the end of the side you can see all the pictures here indicated!)

Grand staircase

Hall

Empire

The Kunsthistorisches Museum was on 17 October 1891 officially opened by Emperor Franz Joseph I. Since 22 October 1891 , the museum is accessible to the public. Two years earlier, on 3 November 1889, the collection of arms, Arms and Armour today, had their doors open. On 1 January 1890 the library service resumed its operations. The merger and listing of other collections of the Highest Imperial Family from the Upper and Lower Belvedere, the Hofburg Palace and Ambras in Tyrol will need another two years.

189, the farm museum was organized in seven collections with three directorates:

Directorate of coins, medals and antiquities collection

The Egyptian Collection

The Antique Collection

The coins and medals collection

Management of the collection of weapons, art and industrial objects

Weapons collection

Collection of industrial art objects

Directorate of Art Gallery and Restaurieranstalt (Restoration Office)

Collection of watercolors, drawings, sketches, etc.

Restoration Office

Library

Very soon the room the Court Museum (Hofmuseum) for the imperial collections was offering became too narrow. To provide temporary help, an exhibition of ancient artifacts from Ephesus in the Theseus Temple was designed. However, additional space had to be rented in the Lower Belvedere.

1914, after the assassination of Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne, his " Estonian Forensic Collection " passed to the administration of the Court Museum. This collection, which emerged from the art collection of the house of d' Este and world travel collection of Franz Ferdinand, was placed in the New Imperial Palace since 1908. For these stocks, the present collection of old musical instruments and the Museum of Ethnology emerged.

The First World War went by, apart from the oppressive economic situation without loss. The farm museum remained during the five years of war regularly open to the public.

Until 1919 the K.K. Art Historical Court Museum was under the authority of the Oberstkämmereramt (head chamberlain office) and belonged to the House of Habsburg-Lorraine. The officials and employees were part of the royal household.

First Republic

The transition from monarchy to republic, in the museum took place in complete tranquility. On 19 November 1918 the two imperial museums on Maria Theresa Square were placed under the state protection of the young Republic of German Austria. Threatening to the stocks of the museum were the claims raised in the following weeks and months of the "successor states" of the monarchy as well as Italy and Belgium on Austrian art collection. In fact, it came on 12th February 1919 to the violent removal of 62 paintings by armed Italian units. This "art theft" left a long time trauma among curators and art historians.

It was not until the Treaty of Saint-Germain of 10 September 1919, providing in Article 195 and 196 the settlement of rights in the cultural field by negotiations. The claims of Belgium, Czechoslovakia, and Italy again could mostly being averted in this way. Only Hungary, which presented the greatest demands by far, was met by more than ten years of negotiation in 147 cases.

On 3 April 1919 was the expropriation of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine by law and the acquisition of its property, including the "Collections of the Imperial House" , by the Republic. Of 18 June 1920 the then provisional administration of the former imperial museums and collections of Este and the secular and clergy treasury passed to the State Office of Internal Affairs and Education, since 10 November 1920, the Federal Ministry of the Interior and Education. A few days later it was renamed the Art History Court Museum in the "Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna State", 1921 "Kunsthistorisches Museum" . Of 1st January 1921 the employees of the museum staff passed to the state of the Republic.

Through the acquisition of the former imperial collections owned by the state, the museum found itself in a complete new situation. In order to meet the changed circumstances in the museum area, designed Hans Tietze in 1919 the "Vienna Museum program". It provided a close cooperation between the individual museums to focus at different houses on main collections. So dominated exchange, sales and equalizing the acquisition policy in the interwar period. Thus resulting until today still valid collection trends. Also pointing the way was the relocation of the weapons collection from 1934 in its present premises in the New Castle, where since 1916 the collection of ancient musical instruments was placed.

With the change of the imperial collections in the ownership of the Republic the reorganization of the internal organization went hand in hand, too. Thus the museum was divided in 1919 into the

Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection (with the Oriental coins)

Collection of Classical Antiquities

Collection of ancient coins

Collection of modern coins and medals

Weapons collection

Collection of sculptures and crafts with the Collection of Ancient Musical Instruments

Picture Gallery

The Museum 1938-1945

Count Philipp Ludwig Wenzel Sinzendorf according to Rigaud. Clarisse 1948 by Baroness de Rothschildt "dedicated" to the memory of Baron Alphonse de Rothschildt; restituted to the Rothschilds in 1999, and in 1999 donated by Bettina Looram Rothschild, the last Austrian heiress.

With the "Anschluss" of Austria to the German Reich all Jewish art collections such as the Rothschilds were forcibly "Aryanised". Collections were either "paid" or simply distributed by the Gestapo at the museums. This resulted in a significant increase in stocks. But the KHM was not the only museum that benefited from the linearization. Systematically looted Jewish property was sold to museums, collections or in pawnshops throughout the empire.

After the war, the museum struggled to reimburse the "Aryanised" art to the owners or their heirs. They forced the Rothschild family to leave the most important part of their own collection to the museum and called this "dedications", or "donations". As a reason, was the export law stated, which does not allow owners to perform certain works of art out of the country. Similar methods were used with other former owners. Only on the basis of international diplomatic and media pressure, to a large extent from the United States, the Austrian government decided to make a change in the law (Art Restitution Act of 1998, the so-called Lex Rothschild). The art objects were the Rothschild family refunded only in the 1990s.

The Kunsthistorisches Museum operates on the basis of the federal law on the restitution of art objects from the 4th December 1998 (Federal Law Gazette I, 181 /1998) extensive provenance research. Even before this decree was carried out in-house provenance research at the initiative of the then archive director Herbert Haupt. This was submitted in 1998 by him in collaboration with Lydia Grobl a comprehensive presentation of the facts about the changes in the inventory levels of the Kunsthistorisches Museum during the Nazi era and in the years leading up to the State Treaty of 1955, an important basis for further research provenance.

The two historians Susanne Hehenberger and Monika Löscher are since 1st April 2009 as provenance researchers at the Kunsthistorisches Museum on behalf of the Commission for Provenance Research operating and they deal with the investigation period from 1933 to the recent past.

The museum today

Today the museum is as a federal museum, with 1st January 1999 released to the full legal capacity - it was thus the first of the state museums of Austria, implementing the far-reaching self-financing. It is by far the most visited museum in Austria with 1.3 million visitors (2007).

The Kunsthistorisches Museum is under the name Kunsthistorisches Museum and Museum of Ethnology and the Austrian Theatre Museum with company number 182081t since 11 June 1999 as a research institution under public law of the Federal virtue of the Federal Museums Act, Federal Law Gazette I/115/1998 and the Museum of Procedure of the Kunsthistorisches Museum and Museum of Ethnology and the Austrian Theatre Museum, 3 January 2001, BGBl II 2/ 2001, in force since 1 January 2001, registered.

In fiscal 2008, the turnover was 37.185 million EUR and total assets amounted to EUR 22.204 million. In 2008 an average of 410 workers were employed.

Management

1919-1923: Gustav Glück as the first chairman of the College of science officials

1924-1933: Hermann Julius Hermann 1924-1925 as the first chairman of the College of the scientific officers in 1925 as first director

1933: Arpad Weixlgärtner first director

1934-1938: Alfred Stix first director

1938-1945: Fritz Dworschak 1938 as acting head, from 1938 as a chief in 1941 as first director

1945-1949: August von Loehr 1945-1948 as executive director of the State Art Collections in 1949 as general director of the historical collections of the Federation

1945-1949: Alfred Stix 1945-1948 as executive director of the State Art Collections in 1949 as general director of art historical collections of the Federation

1949-1950: Hans Demel as administrative director

1950: Karl Wisoko-Meytsky as general director of art and historical collections of the Federation

1951-1952: Fritz Eichler as administrative director

1953-1954: Ernst H. Buschbeck as administrative director

1955-1966: Vincent Oberhammer 1955-1959 as administrative director, from 1959 as first director

1967: Edward Holzmair as managing director

1968-1972: Erwin Auer first director

1973-1981: Friderike Klauner first director

1982-1990: Hermann Fillitz first director

1990: George Kugler as interim first director

1990-2008: Wilfried Seipel as general director

Since 2009: Sabine Haag as general director

Collections

To the Kunsthistorisches Museum are also belonging the collections of the New Castle, the Austrian Theatre Museum in Palais Lobkowitz, the Museum of Ethnology and the Wagenburg (wagon fortress) in an outbuilding of Schönbrunn Palace. A branch office is also Ambras in Innsbruck.

Kunsthistorisches Museum (main building)

Picture Gallery

Egyptian and Near Eastern Collection

Collection of Classical Antiquities

Vienna Chamber of Art

Numismatic Collection

Library

New Castle

Ephesus Museum

Collection of Ancient Musical Instruments

Arms and Armour

Archive

Hofburg

The imperial crown in the Treasury

Imperial Treasury of Vienna

Insignia of the Austrian Hereditary Homage

Insignia of imperial Austria

Insignia of the Holy Roman Empire

Burgundian Inheritance and the Order of the Golden Fleece

Habsburg-Lorraine Household Treasure

Ecclesiastical Treasury

Schönbrunn Palace

Imperial Carriage Museum Vienna

Armory in Ambras Castle

Ambras Castle

Collections of Ambras Castle

Major exhibits

Among the most important exhibits of the Art Gallery rank inter alia:

Jan van Eyck: Cardinal Niccolò Albergati, 1438

Martin Schongauer: Holy Family, 1475-80

Albrecht Dürer : Trinity Altar, 1509-16

Portrait Johann Kleeberger, 1526

Parmigianino: Self Portrait in Convex Mirror, 1523/24

Giuseppe Arcimboldo: Summer 1563

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio: Madonna of the Rosary 1606/ 07

Caravaggio: Madonna of the Rosary (1606-1607)

Titian: Nymph and Shepherd to 1570-75

Portrait of Jacopo de Strada, 1567/68

Raffaello Santi: Madonna of the Meadow, 1505 /06

Lorenzo Lotto: Portrait of a young man against white curtain, 1508

Peter Paul Rubens: The altar of St. Ildefonso, 1630-32

The Little Fur, about 1638

Jan Vermeer: The Art of Painting, 1665/66

Pieter Bruegel the Elder: Fight between Carnival and Lent, 1559

Kids, 1560

Tower of Babel, 1563

Christ Carrying the Cross, 1564

Gloomy Day (Early Spring), 1565

Return of the Herd (Autumn), 1565

Hunters in the Snow (Winter) 1565

Bauer and bird thief, 1568

Peasant Wedding, 1568/69

Peasant Dance, 1568/69

Paul's conversion (Conversion of St Paul), 1567

Cabinet of Curiosities:

Saliera from Benvenuto Cellini 1539-1543

Egyptian-Oriental Collection:

Mastaba of Ka Ni Nisut

Collection of Classical Antiquities:

Gemma Augustea

Treasure of Nagyszentmiklós

Gallery: Major exhibits

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kunsthistorisches_Museum

Waste management awareness- Upasana Society- Feb 2017

 

Upasna Society NGO in association with Patkar college students ( Duheeta Joshi, Yash Chavan, Chaitali Pawar, Arya Vaidya, Hardik Rane, Trishant Bhatt and Vyanketesh Lutkurthi) is organising an awareness campaign on waste management in United English school at Malad Marve on 13th of Feb 2017 at 3pm . It is a school for under privileged children. Believing in the idea of, “What we sow, so shall we reap”, is the main motto of the campaign.

Students will be taught about waste management and its importance through audio visual aids.

Upasana Society volunteers would be demonstrating them what exactly is dry and wet waste.

"Best out of waste" competition will also be conducted for the kids.

Upasana Society volunteers will be installing two separate dustbins for the segregation of waste at the school so that the students can take this example to their own house.

At Upasana Society NGO, It is important to know how and what affects us and how we can bring out sustainable change. Thus this will be a small step towards bringing about a positive change in the society.

Those who wish to be a part of such events and campaigns can contact Saurabh- 9769727057 or Dipti- 7045127770.

After making a quick, urgent jaunt from the Port of Stockton, CCT 1502 (an EMD SW1500 built for Southern Pacific) cools its heels at the Shops while crew members evaluate their game plan for the hectic day ahead. The engine ran light to the Car Barn by way of BNSF's Stockton Subdivision, and then trundled up the Central Valley Branch.

 

When CCT employees arrived at the Shops to examine work orders, they were surprised to learn that GP18 1790 had been placed out of service due to significant defects linked to its wheels. This induced 1502's expedited run from the Port to the Shops. In addition, with a lengthy northbound train slated for pick up at BNSF's Mormon Yard on this day, CCT management decided to team up Brookville Genset 2101 and SW1500 1502 for duties on the Lodi Job. Just days prior, CCT 2101 was placed back in service following a prolonged absence, owing to a breakdown of two of its three Cummins QSK-19 liter diesel engines. The two locomotives safely reached Mormon Yard, but while retrieving cars, a new problem came to fruition. 2101 wasn't cooperating with 1502. It was discovered that the MU hoses on 2101 were rejecting 1502's electrical system. This quandary was eventually rectified, but the Lodi Flyer was nearly three hours behind schedule. The train departed Stockton much later than normal. In the end, the two units switched Lodi without a hitch, and the men that worked the Lodi Job on this day were able to enjoy the Thanksgiving holiday, which fell on the next day.

petitions.moveon.org/sign/change-flickr-back?source=s.em....

 

_________________________________________________________________________

 

Users of the English version of Flickr may have got the botton " try our new experience Beta"

 

This is an incredible regression .....once again

 

No longer any white space underneath pictures for comments, description, invitations etc....

 

Everything is gathered in a tiny sidebar to the right of the photo in the Lightbox

 

All features that allow interaction and sharing have gone so groups might also disappear ......

 

You may take a look here

  

yahoo.uservoice.com/forums/224533-flickr-photo-page-beta

 

If you want to save the groups from a certain death, Please click this blue link and go to vote

  

yahoo.uservoice.com/forums/224533-flickr-photo-page-beta/...

______________________________________________________________

 

We had got used (more or less) the first changes, but this time, it is a

total scuttling of Flickr and of its spirit of sharing :(

We can't see who faved our pictures

 

We can't see the groups the pictures appear in ( except only 8)

 

Awards images. are not shown

 

Invitations are not visible except for the last ones (only in "Recent Activity").They're lost.

 

For admins group management will become a work more and more difficult or even impossible

 

Groups might close......and groups add visibility to our pictures

 

Our descriptions including quotes or links to YouTube or other sites are hidden

 

NO LONGER ANY CONVIVIALITY.. ANY VISIBILITY . NO SENSE

 

*I specify for those who haven't seen the Beta page;that there is NO

white area under the pictures for descriptions / comments / invitations /

flickr Award Counter

 

Only a narrow sidebar to the right of the image ,showing ONLY the last 4 comments

 

White print on a black and depressive background, that hurts the eyes

Unfortunately everything we can do is absolutely useless ....

Unfortunately it is obvious that Yahoo wants to turn Flickr into another social network for teens and young using only tablets and smartphones and whose only interaction is Hi or Lol

Motivated photographers using computers and large screens are no longer interesting users.... ( nor groups since our invitations are only visible on our "Recent Activity "Page....The oldest are lost ....)

 

How many people know what represents the Beta Page ?? I wonder ?

Only some users of the English version of Flickr ..... but not all of them

 

All this is very discouraging

 

T H A N K Y O U !!!!!!!!!

23

 

Model: Paige @Direct Model Management

Hair/MUA: Liz Blaso

 

flickr sharpening can go die

Today I shot with Paige and it was the first time working with someone my own age that wasn't one of my friends. It was cool to hear about how much she's done in 17 short years.

We wandered around various parts of the park channeling Marc Jacobs.

She fell and skinned her left knee trying to balance on that log behind her :(

 

ps. notice a change in my exif data?!?!?! ;)

For over a decade, CIAT has tested agronomic and soil management practices in Western Kenya. From minimum tillage to integrated soil fertility management, these trials are the most comprehensive picture of tropical soil health that we have in Kenya. They show-case changes in soil fertility and health, which take time to develop, hence the importance of these long-term trails. CIAT’s “Climate-smart soil protection and rehabilitation in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, India and Kenya” project is implemented in collaboration with the Kenya Agriculture and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO); GOPA and implementing partners including PAFID, Welthungerhilfe and WOCAT - University of Bern. It is supported by the German Society for International Cooperation (GIZ) and the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). For more information, visit: blog.ciat.cgiar.org/sink-it-or-lose-it-the-carbon-trade-off/ or contact g.smith (at) cgiar (dot) org. Please credit accordingly: Georgina Smith / CIAT.

Waste management awareness- Upasana Society- Feb 2017

 

Upasna Society NGO in association with Patkar college students ( Duheeta Joshi, Yash Chavan, Chaitali Pawar, Arya Vaidya, Hardik Rane, Trishant Bhatt and Vyanketesh Lutkurthi) is organising an awareness campaign on waste management in United English school at Malad Marve on 13th of Feb 2017 at 3pm . It is a school for under privileged children. Believing in the idea of, “What we sow, so shall we reap”, is the main motto of the campaign.

Students will be taught about waste management and its importance through audio visual aids.

Upasana Society volunteers would be demonstrating them what exactly is dry and wet waste.

"Best out of waste" competition will also be conducted for the kids.

Upasana Society volunteers will be installing two separate dustbins for the segregation of waste at the school so that the students can take this example to their own house.

At Upasana Society NGO, It is important to know how and what affects us and how we can bring out sustainable change. Thus this will be a small step towards bringing about a positive change in the society.

Those who wish to be a part of such events and campaigns can contact Saurabh- 9769727057 or Dipti- 7045127770.

In today's rapidly evolving business environment, under-performing companies and their management teams often require expert advise on how to effectively manage unwanted change and turn the business around. A thorough situational and financial analysis is the key to cost effective and timely results.

 

Caston Corporate advisory provides restructuring advisory services to companies and its stakeholders that is lenders, investors, etc. in under performing companies and companies experiencing liquidity problems, in all sectors and in all markets. We support you in managing work-out or turn-around processes and in allocating capital and investment — evaluating your business plans objectively. Drawing on our deep insights, we devise strategies to address potential covenant breaches, negotiating with stakeholders and complying with insolvency and other requirements.

 

We can assist banks, financial institutions and investors in achieving accelerated and enhanced results through the rehabilitation or recovery of problem loans. We are very keen to work on sell side transactions involving One Time Settlements (OTS) , Financial Restructuring and Securitization of Loans.

We offer Portfolio and Single Credit services for impaired accounts:

 

Portfolio Services

oNPL Portfolio Valuation

oNPL Portfolio / Single Asset Buy and Sell Side Advisory

oPortfolio diagnosis

oLoan recovery strategies.

For more information – check www.castoncorporateadvisory.in or contact on Caston Corporate Advisory Services : 6 / 5, Didar House Building, DLF Industrial Area, Moti Nagar New Delhi-110015 (India) Ph.:+91-11-25161294

 

You will never change your life until you change something you do daily. - Mike Murdock

Change of pace from all those flowers i've posted this week, here's another from last years 'Round the Island Race' on the Isle of Wight as captured on my early morning expedition around the West Wight.

 

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©2013 Jason Swain, All Rights Reserved

This image is not available for use on websites, blogs or other media without the explicit written permission of the photographer.

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my website

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Links to facebook and twitter can be found on my flickr profile

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Fort Drum Wildlife Management Area

Slightly off Main Trail, just before Hog Island

 

Check it out On Black

 

I have been wanting to make a trip back to the Fort Drum WMA since i made my first trip the other day. So today i called up Sarah and i told her that i was planning on heading out that way again and she said she would love to come. So i picked her up and we were on the road by four fifteen, we got to the park at roughly four fifty leaving us about a hour of nice light left.

 

On the drive into the Park we saw several Hawks and the colors to the sky seemed to be really opening up through the rain clouds we just had received. So we were very excited as the night had just begun and things were already looking up.

 

So we drove to the Horseshoe Lake parking lot where we were greeted by some Hunters, they said there was not much game activity that they saw besides one little hog but they said that there had been dozens of Hawks and Eagles up ahead on the trail, on the fence line. So we rushed that way but we didnt come across any birds sadly.

 

We continued forward on the trail and passed another trail continuing to head south. After several minutes of walking we passed by a small body of water with alot of Cypress Tree's and i decided to turn around and head back into there. So we walked through the mucky ground and decided to shoot this great spot, the bugs were not to bad yet but as we started shooting more the bugs became a nightmare but the light had a nice warm tone so i stayed happy. After shooting this spot we continued on our journey forward but decided to turn back about a half mile ahead as it was getting darker and there was a incredible amount of hog trails and little holes all over the place.

 

So almost back to the parking i said to Sarah who was hating life due to the incredible amount of Mosquito's that had finally came out that we should head a little west off this trail and shoot the Sunset, so she agreed because she basically realized she had no choice. Well right as we go around the fence i hear something moving along the taller grass to my right. My heart started to pound because i knew it was a hog and with my past experience with the guys i was not excited.

 

So i place my camera bag on the ground and picked up my spotlight, i shined it his way and he didnt seem to care, so i decided to give these cute little creatures a second chance and i walked his way. As i got closer i could see his tusks that were about a inch or so long, so he was still young i am assuming. Well i got roughly ten or so feet from him and he didnt seem to care one second that i was there shining this light on him, he just went on sniffing the ground for something to eat. So i turned around and we headed our different ways.

 

So now that Sarah has had it with me and me changing the plan slightly she is basically jumping up and down from all the Mosquito's that have decided to eat her so i told her lets just leave. So we head back to the car after another short walk and its about pitch black now. So i decide to go looking for Alligators with the spot light, i came across about three small little guys before i finally got in the car and blasted the ac to get the bugs out.

 

So we made one more quick stop for me to take a few twilight shots of Lake Cara and then we headed back into town.

 

Overall it was a great trip and i cant wait to head out there to spend a longer amount of time and hopefully get some shots of the Hawks i managed to miss today as well as the other Wildlife in the Area.

 

Information on the park can be found here : myfwc.com/RECREATION/WMASites_FortDrum_index.htm

 

Exif

Canon 50D

2.00Sec

F11

ISO200

18MM

 

Not much changed here since the last time I photographed it a few years back. Now the entire building is surrounded by a fence, so you can no longer walk up to it.

 

The Red Apple Rest was a cafeteria-style restaurant on NY State Route 17, in the Southfields section of Tuxedo, NY. It was a noted way station for people travelling to the hotels of the Catskill Mountains of upstate New York.

 

Before the New York State Thruway was built, the travel time from New York City to the Catskill Mountains was often four or five hours, especially during weekends. The Red Apple Rest, located almost halfway, became a major roadside stopping place. The restaurant was opened in May 1931 by Reuben Freed.

 

The Red Apple Rest had much business during the 1940s and 1950s. It was open 365 days a year, 24 hours a day, and was patronized by so-called "Borscht Belt" comedians and professional athletes as well as families travelling to campgrounds and resorts. Although the Thruway (which was built beginning 1953) bypassed the restaurant, and vacationing in the Catskill Mountains became less popular after the 1960s, the restaurant remained very busy until the 1970s. In 1965 the Red Apple Rest served one million customers.

 

The Red Apple Rest went through several changes of management. It closed in September 2006 - purportedly for a "graduation and vacation," according to a sign posted on the door - and was condemned on January 23, 2007 because of roof damage.

Waste management awareness- Upasana Society- Feb 2017

 

Upasna Society NGO in association with Patkar college students ( Duheeta Joshi, Yash Chavan, Chaitali Pawar, Arya Vaidya, Hardik Rane, Trishant Bhatt and Vyanketesh Lutkurthi) is organising an awareness campaign on waste management in United English school at Malad Marve on 13th of Feb 2017 at 3pm . It is a school for under privileged children. Believing in the idea of, “What we sow, so shall we reap”, is the main motto of the campaign.

Students will be taught about waste management and its importance through audio visual aids.

Upasana Society volunteers would be demonstrating them what exactly is dry and wet waste.

"Best out of waste" competition will also be conducted for the kids.

Upasana Society volunteers will be installing two separate dustbins for the segregation of waste at the school so that the students can take this example to their own house.

At Upasana Society NGO, It is important to know how and what affects us and how we can bring out sustainable change. Thus this will be a small step towards bringing about a positive change in the society.

Those who wish to be a part of such events and campaigns can contact Saurabh- 9769727057 or Dipti- 7045127770.

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