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Unnamed Falls

Pounder Branch

Cane Creek Wildlife Area

Kentucky

 

5 Image HDR

 

You know, half the fun of hiking to Van Hook Falls really is the hike. Usually for me it's mostly about the payoff, but the section of the Sheltowee Tracel National Trail as it passes through the Cane Creek Wildlife Management Area from Kentucky 192 to Van Hook is one of the prettiest in Kentucky! When you start out on the trail you have no clue about what's ahead. It's drab and boring, but after you descend into the watershed things change quickly and you find yourself among a second growth hemlock forest as the trail follows and crosses, several times I might add, a tributary of Pounder Branch. You pass two falls along the tributary, both fairly small, but when it meets the main branch things change quickly as the creek begins to drop and drop and drop. Small creeks flow across the trail and then descend into Pounder Branch as the creek is now 100 ft. below to your right. Below you hear falling water. We counted at least 11 waterfalls along the trail. My good friend Chris Morris had been here before and spotted a place he had ascended from the gorge to the trail so down we went. For me it was a little dicey, I'm not a fan of heights but I pushed on anyway and made the scramble down to creek level. Goodness, what a payoff as this was the waterfall at the bottom. Although I'm sure there have been some, it was nice to know I was visiting a waterfall many had never been to and to make it even better with this much water on it. It was so peaceful there, with the sound of rushing water all around, towering hemlocks high above my head, and rhododendrons dancing across the high water, it was truly paradise.

 

Check out my website www.fultzfotos.com for more photos!

www.holyspiritspeaks.org

“Ever since God created them, based on the laws that He determined, all things have been operating and have been continuing to develop regularly. Under His gaze, under His rule, all things have been developing regularly alongside the survival of humans. Not a single thing is able to change these laws, and not a single thing can destroy these laws. It is because of God’s rule that all beings can multiply, and because of His rule and management that all beings can survive. This is to say that under God’s rule, all beings come into existence, thrive, disappear, and reincarnate in an orderly fashion. When spring arrives, drizzling rain brings that feeling of spring and moistens the earth. The ground begins to thaw, grass germinates and pushes its way up through the soil and the trees gradually turn green. All these living things bring fresh vitality to the earth. This is the sight of all beings coming into existence and thriving. All sorts of animals also come out of their burrows to feel the warmth of spring and start a new year. All beings bask in the heat during the summer and enjoy the warmth brought by the season. They grow rapidly; trees, grass, and all types of plants are growing very quickly, then they bloom and bear fruit. All beings are very busy during the summer, including humans. In the fall, rains bring autumn’s coolness, and all types of living beings start to experience the harvest season. All beings bear fruit, and humans also begin to harvest all kinds of things because of the fall production of these beings, in order to prepare food for the winter. In the winter all beings gradually begin to rest in the coldness, to become quiet, and people also take a break during this season. These transitions from spring to summer to fall and to winter—these changes all occur according to the laws established by God. He leads all beings and humans using these laws and has established for mankind a rich and colorful way of life, preparing an environment for survival that has different temperatures and different seasons. Under these orderly environments for survival, humans can also survive and multiply in an orderly way. Humans cannot change these laws and not a single person or being can break them. No matter what radical changes occur in the world, these laws continue to exist and they exist because God does. It is because of God’s rule and His management. With this type of orderly, larger environment, people’s lives go forward within these laws and rules. These laws cultivated generation after generation of people and generation after generation of people have survived within these laws. People have enjoyed the beings and this orderly environment for survival created by God for generation after generation of humans. Even though people feel that these types of laws are innate, even though they are entirely dismissive of them, and even though they cannot feel that God is orchestrating these laws, that God is ruling over these laws, no matter what, God is always engaged in this unchanging work. His purpose in this unchanging work is for the survival of mankind, and so that humans may continue on.”

(Continuation of The Word Appears in the Flesh)

www.holyspiritspeaks.org

“Ever since God created them, based on the laws that He determined, all things have been operating and have been continuing to develop regularly. Under His gaze, under His rule, all things have been developing regularly alongside the survival of humans. Not a single thing is able to change these laws, and not a single thing can destroy these laws. It is because of God’s rule that all beings can multiply, and because of His rule and management that all beings can survive. This is to say that under God’s rule, all beings come into existence, thrive, disappear, and reincarnate in an orderly fashion. When spring arrives, drizzling rain brings that feeling of spring and moistens the earth. The ground begins to thaw, grass germinates and pushes its way up through the soil and the trees gradually turn green. All these living things bring fresh vitality to the earth. This is the sight of all beings coming into existence and thriving. All sorts of animals also come out of their burrows to feel the warmth of spring and start a new year. All beings bask in the heat during the summer and enjoy the warmth brought by the season. They grow rapidly; trees, grass, and all types of plants are growing very quickly, then they bloom and bear fruit. All beings are very busy during the summer, including humans. In the fall, rains bring autumn’s coolness, and all types of living beings start to experience the harvest season. All beings bear fruit, and humans also begin to harvest all kinds of things because of the fall production of these beings, in order to prepare food for the winter. In the winter all beings gradually begin to rest in the coldness, to become quiet, and people also take a break during this season. These transitions from spring to summer to fall and to winter—these changes all occur according to the laws established by God. He leads all beings and humans using these laws and has established for mankind a rich and colorful way of life, preparing an environment for survival that has different temperatures and different seasons. Under these orderly environments for survival, humans can also survive and multiply in an orderly way. Humans cannot change these laws and not a single person or being can break them. No matter what radical changes occur in the world, these laws continue to exist and they exist because God does. It is because of God’s rule and His management. With this type of orderly, larger environment, people’s lives go forward within these laws and rules. These laws cultivated generation after generation of people and generation after generation of people have survived within these laws. People have enjoyed the beings and this orderly environment for survival created by God for generation after generation of humans. Even though people feel that these types of laws are innate, even though they are entirely dismissive of them, and even though they cannot feel that God is orchestrating these laws, that God is ruling over these laws, no matter what, God is always engaged in this unchanging work. His purpose in this unchanging work is for the survival of mankind, and so that humans may continue on.”

(Continuation of The Word Appears in the Flesh)

www.holyspiritspeaks.org

“Ever since God created them, based on the laws that He determined, all things have been operating and have been continuing to develop regularly. Under His gaze, under His rule, all things have been developing regularly alongside the survival of humans. Not a single thing is able to change these laws, and not a single thing can destroy these laws. It is because of God’s rule that all beings can multiply, and because of His rule and management that all beings can survive. This is to say that under God’s rule, all beings come into existence, thrive, disappear, and reincarnate in an orderly fashion. When spring arrives, drizzling rain brings that feeling of spring and moistens the earth. The ground begins to thaw, grass germinates and pushes its way up through the soil and the trees gradually turn green. All these living things bring fresh vitality to the earth. This is the sight of all beings coming into existence and thriving. All sorts of animals also come out of their burrows to feel the warmth of spring and start a new year. All beings bask in the heat during the summer and enjoy the warmth brought by the season. They grow rapidly; trees, grass, and all types of plants are growing very quickly, then they bloom and bear fruit. All beings are very busy during the summer, including humans. In the fall, rains bring autumn’s coolness, and all types of living beings start to experience the harvest season. All beings bear fruit, and humans also begin to harvest all kinds of things because of the fall production of these beings, in order to prepare food for the winter. In the winter all beings gradually begin to rest in the coldness, to become quiet, and people also take a break during this season. These transitions from spring to summer to fall and to winter—these changes all occur according to the laws established by God. He leads all beings and humans using these laws and has established for mankind a rich and colorful way of life, preparing an environment for survival that has different temperatures and different seasons. Under these orderly environments for survival, humans can also survive and multiply in an orderly way. Humans cannot change these laws and not a single person or being can break them. No matter what radical changes occur in the world, these laws continue to exist and they exist because God does. It is because of God’s rule and His management. With this type of orderly, larger environment, people’s lives go forward within these laws and rules. These laws cultivated generation after generation of people and generation after generation of people have survived within these laws. People have enjoyed the beings and this orderly environment for survival created by God for generation after generation of humans. Even though people feel that these types of laws are innate, even though they are entirely dismissive of them, and even though they cannot feel that God is orchestrating these laws, that God is ruling over these laws, no matter what, God is always engaged in this unchanging work. His purpose in this unchanging work is for the survival of mankind, and so that humans may continue on.”

(Continuation of The Word Appears in the Flesh)

A psychologist walked around a room while teaching stress management to an audience. As she raised a glass of water, everyone expected they'd be asked the "half empty or half full" question. Instead, with a smile on her face, she inquired: "How heavy is this glass of water?" Answers called out ranged from 8 oz. to 20 oz. She replied, "The absolute weight doesn't matter. It depends on how long I hold it. If I hold it for a minute, it's not a problem. If I hold it for an hour, I'll have an ache in my arm. If I hold it for a day, my arm will feel numb and paralyzed. In each case, the weight of the glass doesn't change, but the longer I hold it, the heavier it becomes." She continued, "The stresses and worries in life are like that glass of water. Think about them for a while and nothing happens. Think about them a bit longer and they begin to hurt. And if you think about them all day long, you will feel paralyzed – incapable of doing anything." It’s important to remember to let go of your stresses. As early in the evening as you can, put all your burdens down. Don't carry them through the evening and into the night. Remember to put the glass down!

Change of scene for the next series, to the Pajares pass line in northern Spain. It was originally planned to have been bypassed in 2012 by a base tunnel, but financial and geological difficulties mean that everything for the time being still has to be hauled over the 1270 metres high pass. Here, a southbound train loaded with rails is descending towards La Robla (and possibly onwards) behind ADIF 319 243, ADIF being the company charged with the management of most of Spain's railway infrastructure. Golpejar de la Tercia, 05-08-2014.

www.holyspiritspeaks.org

“Ever since God created them, based on the laws that He determined, all things have been operating and have been continuing to develop regularly. Under His gaze, under His rule, all things have been developing regularly alongside the survival of humans. Not a single thing is able to change these laws, and not a single thing can destroy these laws. It is because of God’s rule that all beings can multiply, and because of His rule and management that all beings can survive. This is to say that under God’s rule, all beings come into existence, thrive, disappear, and reincarnate in an orderly fashion. When spring arrives, drizzling rain brings that feeling of spring and moistens the earth. The ground begins to thaw, grass germinates and pushes its way up through the soil and the trees gradually turn green. All these living things bring fresh vitality to the earth. This is the sight of all beings coming into existence and thriving. All sorts of animals also come out of their burrows to feel the warmth of spring and start a new year. All beings bask in the heat during the summer and enjoy the warmth brought by the season. They grow rapidly; trees, grass, and all types of plants are growing very quickly, then they bloom and bear fruit. All beings are very busy during the summer, including humans. In the fall, rains bring autumn’s coolness, and all types of living beings start to experience the harvest season. All beings bear fruit, and humans also begin to harvest all kinds of things because of the fall production of these beings, in order to prepare food for the winter. In the winter all beings gradually begin to rest in the coldness, to become quiet, and people also take a break during this season. These transitions from spring to summer to fall and to winter—these changes all occur according to the laws established by God. He leads all beings and humans using these laws and has established for mankind a rich and colorful way of life, preparing an environment for survival that has different temperatures and different seasons. Under these orderly environments for survival, humans can also survive and multiply in an orderly way. Humans cannot change these laws and not a single person or being can break them. No matter what radical changes occur in the world, these laws continue to exist and they exist because God does. It is because of God’s rule and His management. With this type of orderly, larger environment, people’s lives go forward within these laws and rules. These laws cultivated generation after generation of people and generation after generation of people have survived within these laws. People have enjoyed the beings and this orderly environment for survival created by God for generation after generation of humans. Even though people feel that these types of laws are innate, even though they are entirely dismissive of them, and even though they cannot feel that God is orchestrating these laws, that God is ruling over these laws, no matter what, God is always engaged in this unchanging work. His purpose in this unchanging work is for the survival of mankind, and so that humans may continue on.”

(Continuation of The Word Appears in the Flesh)

This remarkable structure in the Rijn Harbour in Rotterdam will become the showcase and centre of expertise for the National Water Centre that is currently in the process of formation. The floating pavilion is the reference centre for the innovative and inspiring approach to water management, climate change and energy issues

 

I noticed the plastic balls look quite interesting at dusk, so I went back there to take this picture.

 

www.manhattanofeurope.com

Waste management awareness- Upasana Society- Feb 2017

 

Upasna Society NGO in association with Patkar college students ( Duheeta Joshi, Yash Chavan, Chaitali Pawar, Arya Vaidya, Hardik Rane, Trishant Bhatt and Vyanketesh Lutkurthi) is organising an awareness campaign on waste management in United English school at Malad Marve on 13th of Feb 2017 at 3pm . It is a school for under privileged children. Believing in the idea of, “What we sow, so shall we reap”, is the main motto of the campaign.

Students will be taught about waste management and its importance through audio visual aids.

Upasana Society volunteers would be demonstrating them what exactly is dry and wet waste.

"Best out of waste" competition will also be conducted for the kids.

Upasana Society volunteers will be installing two separate dustbins for the segregation of waste at the school so that the students can take this example to their own house.

At Upasana Society NGO, It is important to know how and what affects us and how we can bring out sustainable change. Thus this will be a small step towards bringing about a positive change in the society.

Those who wish to be a part of such events and campaigns can contact Saurabh- 9769727057 or Dipti- 7045127770.

At Allies for Change, we look at pain differently. We assess every aspect of life that might contribute to chronic pain. We develop a collaborative, individualized treatment plan that addresses each of the contributing factors. We provide short and long-term support to help develop and implement the needed life style changes that result in true healing.

Low tide, a forever changing sky, an upheaval of sand

mixes with surf, foam whipped to a frenzy washes

ashore, and a audacious spectator with his point and

shoot as Sandy advances upon Florida's coast. I stood

in watched and got a sense of proportion of the surf

against the size of this man daring to photograph.

 

"The earth is art, the photographer is only a witness"

..........Yann Arthus- Bertrand

 

More dramatic on black....press L.

 

iso 100

focal length 200mm

aperture f/22

exposure 1sec.

 

b+w 6 stop

Nik silver efex pro2

Waste management awareness- Upasana Society- Feb 2017

 

Upasna Society NGO in association with Patkar college students ( Duheeta Joshi, Yash Chavan, Chaitali Pawar, Arya Vaidya, Hardik Rane, Trishant Bhatt and Vyanketesh Lutkurthi) is organising an awareness campaign on waste management in United English school at Malad Marve on 13th of Feb 2017 at 3pm . It is a school for under privileged children. Believing in the idea of, “What we sow, so shall we reap”, is the main motto of the campaign.

Students will be taught about waste management and its importance through audio visual aids.

Upasana Society volunteers would be demonstrating them what exactly is dry and wet waste.

"Best out of waste" competition will also be conducted for the kids.

Upasana Society volunteers will be installing two separate dustbins for the segregation of waste at the school so that the students can take this example to their own house.

At Upasana Society NGO, It is important to know how and what affects us and how we can bring out sustainable change. Thus this will be a small step towards bringing about a positive change in the society.

Those who wish to be a part of such events and campaigns can contact Saurabh- 9769727057 or Dipti- 7045127770.

For Better Viewing... Press "L"

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

The Singapore Flyer was first conceived in the early 2000s by Patrick MacMahon of Melchers Project Management, a subsidiary of German company Melchers. Formal planning commenced in 2002. A new company, Singapore Flyer Pte Ltd, was formed as the developer, with Melchers Project Management holding a 75% stake, and the remainder held by Orient & Pacific Management.

 

The project was formally announced and endorsed on 27 June 2003 by the Singapore Tourism Board with the signing of a memorandum of understanding, formalising the understanding between the developer and tourism board with regard to the land-acquisition process. Under this agreement, the tourism board was to purchase the plot of land in Marina Centre from the Singapore Land Authority, and lease it to Singapore Flyer Pte Ltd for 30 years with an option to extend the lease by another 15 years. The land was to be rent-free during the construction phase of the project. In July 2003, Jones Lang LaSalle was appointed as the real estate advisor. Takenaka and Mitsubishi were selected as the main contractors, and Arup as the structural engineer.

 

Early designs showed a 169 m (554 ft) tall wheel similar to the London Eye, drawing criticism that it lacked originality. The developers pointed out that the design wasn't finalised and was merely for conceptualisation purposes, though the final project changed little from the early designs. Subsequently, the project was to grind almost to a halt when the developer faced difficulties in sourcing funds to build the wheel. Original plans to complete the wheel by the end of 2005 were thus postponed indefinitely, and there were reports (denied by the Singapore Tourism Board) that the tourism board has set an ultimatum date of 31 March 2005 for the developer to iron out its financial issues and to keep the development going.

 

By September 2005, the project was revived when funds were successfully sourced from two German banks. Collin William Page, a subsidiary of ABN AMRO, was to provide equity to a maximum of S$100 million, with a further S$140 million coming from HypoVereinsbank. With this injection of S$240 million, the largest single foreign investment in the Singaporean entertainment industry, construction was slated to begin by the end of the month. The stakeholders then were AAA Equity Holdings, Melchers Project Management, and Orient & Pacific Management.

 

In August 2007, Florian Bollen, Singapore Flyer Pte Ltd chairman, raised his stake in the Singapore Flyer from 60% to 90% through acquisition of Melchers Project Management's 30% stake. The deal was done via AAA Equity Holdings, a private investment vehicle headed by Bollen. Orient & Pacific Management, which spearheaded the project development management, owns the remaining 10%.

 

In March 2010, Great Wheel Corporation, a consultant for the Singapore Flyer, was one of several companies named in a report alleging embezzlement, lodged with the prosecutor's office in Berlin, Germany. Transfers of €3 million to companies in the Virgin Islands and UK, and monthly payments of €40,000 from the Berlin wheel's project company, Great Berlin Wheel, to its linked company Great Wheel in Singapore, are questioned. A prosecutor's office spokesperson said: "We understand there were false contracts concerning non-existing deals, and these contracts were made to take the money for private concerns."

 

Florian Bollen is chairman of both Great Wheel Corporation, registered in Singapore as GWC Holdings, and Singapore Flyer Pte Ltd. A spokesperson for the Singapore Flyer said: "The giant observation wheel in Berlin is separate from the Singapore Flyer and it is separately owned and operated. Great Wheel Corporation is also a separate entity from the Singapore Flyer. Any investigations relating to the Berlin wheel and Great Wheel Corporation have no effect on and no relationship with the Singapore Flyer's operations and finances."

 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

While your comments are highly appreciated, your presence is not enough reward.

Leave a comment or a thought before leaving..God Bless!!

 

Thanks for viewing my stream......

Waste management awareness- Upasana Society- Feb 2017

 

Upasna Society NGO in association with Patkar college students ( Duheeta Joshi, Yash Chavan, Chaitali Pawar, Arya Vaidya, Hardik Rane, Trishant Bhatt and Vyanketesh Lutkurthi) is organising an awareness campaign on waste management in United English school at Malad Marve on 13th of Feb 2017 at 3pm . It is a school for under privileged children. Believing in the idea of, “What we sow, so shall we reap”, is the main motto of the campaign.

Students will be taught about waste management and its importance through audio visual aids.

Upasana Society volunteers would be demonstrating them what exactly is dry and wet waste.

"Best out of waste" competition will also be conducted for the kids.

Upasana Society volunteers will be installing two separate dustbins for the segregation of waste at the school so that the students can take this example to their own house.

At Upasana Society NGO, It is important to know how and what affects us and how we can bring out sustainable change. Thus this will be a small step towards bringing about a positive change in the society.

Those who wish to be a part of such events and campaigns can contact Saurabh- 9769727057 or Dipti- 7045127770.

Forest land management is providing environmental assessments, surveys and monitoring for fish and wildlife habitat, watersheds, vegetation, access and terrain, as well as environmental monitoring and change detection. www.Silvatech.ca

2nd October. In the Ashurst centre on the edge of the New Forest. I used to work here a long time ago and one of my mates still does. It's a very odd place, full of converted buildings; a hotchpotch of NHS and management services. This lovely little church has been turned into meeting rooms. If you look through the proper leaded windows you see plasterboard walls. A shame.

Really sorry to post and run but off to see another of my oldest friends tonight and late already

Key #Elements of an Effective #Regulatory_Change_ManagementProgram

Due to the increasing number of #regulations and the constant #changes to those #regulations, the cost and #complexity of doing #business is increasing. In order to

this article which you can read by clicking here

www.360factors.com/blog/key-elements-of-an-effective-regu...

The world would never be the same again

 

It was a year of seismic social and political change across the globe. From the burgeoning anti-Vietnam war and civil rights movements in the United States, protests and revolutions in Europe and the first comprehensive coverage of war and resultant famine in Africa.

 

To some, 1968 was the year of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. Yet it was also the year of the Martin Luther King, Jr., and Bobby Kennedy assassinations; the riots at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago; Prague Spring; the antiwar movement and the Tet Offensive; Black Power; the generation gap; avant-garde theater; the upsurge of the women’s movement; and the beginning of the end for the Soviet Union.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ehCU3oUtVY

 

1968 In both Europe and America Japanese imported cars and other goods were continuing to rise and trouble the governments of UK and USA as they worried about industries in their own countries being effected and jobs lost. In the spring of 1968 on 4th April The Rev Martin Luther King was assassinated and Robert Kennedy was mortally wounded when he is shot by Sirhan Sirhan.

 

The peace movement had continued to grow and more and more Americans were against the war in Vietnam, and once again more riots occurred throughout cities in America. The music scene was once again set by the "Beatles" and the "Rolling Stones" , and fashion flirted with see through blouses and midis and maxis skirts joined the Mini Skirt as part of the fashion trends. There is a Flu Pandemic in Hong Kong and the first Black power salute is seen on Television worldwide during an Olympics medal ceremony.

 

Another 96 Indians and Pakistanis from Kenya had arrived in Britain, the latest in a growing exodus of Kenyan Asians fleeing from laws which prevent them making a living. The party included nine children under two, and all flew in on cut-price one-way tickets costing about £60 - less than half the normal single fare. Omar Sharmar, an Indian who was forced to close his haulage business in Mombasa when the government refused to grant him a licence, estimates he has lost £2,000.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMamOIdcS9A

 

Enoch Powell's Rivers Of Blood Speech

 

The Conservative right-winger Enoch Powell has made a hard-hitting speech attacking the government's immigration policy. Addressing a Conservative association meeting in Birmingham, Mr Powell said Britain had to be mad to allow in 50,000 dependents of immigrants each year.

 

He compared it to watching a nation busily engaged in heaping up its own funeral pyre.

 

The MP for Wolverhampton South West called for an immediate reduction in immigration and the implementation of a Conservative policy of "urgent" encouragement of those already in the UK to return home.

 

"It can be no part of any policy that existing families should be kept divided. But there are two directions on which families can be reunited," he said.

 

Mr Powell compared enacting legislation such as the Race Relations Bill to "throwing a match on to gunpowder".

 

He said that as he looked to the future he was filled with a sense of foreboding.

 

"Like the Roman, I seem to see the river Tiber foaming with much blood," he said.

 

He estimated that by the year 2000 up to seven million people - or one in ten of the population - would be of immigrant descent.

 

Mr Powell, the shadow defence spokesman, was applauded during and after his 45-mintue speech.

 

However, it is likely his comments will be less warmly received by the Conservative party leader, Edward Heath.

 

Several opinion polls were stating that the majority of the public shares Mr Powell's fears.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gkBr-qvo-4

 

Top Of The Pops from 15th February 1968 introduced by Jimmy Savile & Dave Cash and featuring: Manfred Mann - Mighty Quinn, The Foundations - Back On My Feet Again, Status Quo - Pictures Of Matchstick Men, Alan Price Set - Don't Stop The Carnival, Brenton Wood - Gimme Little Sign, The Move - Fire Brigade, Hermans Hermits - I Can Take Or Leave Your Loving, Amen Corner - Bend Me Shape Me, Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich - Legend Of Xanadu.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=qrBwPfcJpfI

 

1968 Timeline

 

January – The Ford Escort car is introduced to replace the Anglia.

 

Dutch Elm Disease continues to increase with tens of thousands of trees now destroyed.

 

British Post office introduces First Class Post.

 

London Bridge sold for 1 million. and later re-erected in Arizona.

 

The popular rock band the Beatles released the “White Album,” an untitled double album that featured some of the legendary band’s most experimental music. Many of the songs were written when the band was in Rishikesh, India while they were attending a meditation camp. While the album received mixed reviews at the time, it still reached the number one spot on the music charts in both the United Kingdom and United States. Modern critics mark the album as on of the best albums ever created and it remains popular today.

 

The first public demonstration of the computer mouse, video conferencing, teleconferencing, email, and hypertext.

 

1 January – The Colour television licence is introduced when a £5 "colour supplement" is added to the £5 monochrome licence fee, therefore making the cost of a colour licence £10.

 

1 January – Cecil Day-Lewis is announced as the new Poet Laureate.

 

5 January – Gardeners' World debuts on BBC1 television, featuring Percy Thrower.

 

8 January – The Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, endorses the 'I'm Backing Britain' campaign, encouraging workers to work extra time without pay or take other actions to help competitiveness, which is spreading across Britain.

 

16 January – The Prime Minister announces that the Civil Defence Corps is being stood down.

 

4 February – 96 Indians and Pakistanis arrive in Britain from Kenya. Some 1,500 Asians have now arrived in Britain from Kenya, where they were forced out by increasingly draconian immigration laws.

 

4 February – The cult series The Prisoner finishes its first run on British television.

 

16 February – The Beatles, Mike Love, Mia Farrow, Donovan and others travel to India to visit Maharishi Mahesh Yogi at Rishikesh.

 

6 – 18 February – Great Britain and Northern Ireland compete at the Winter Olympics in Grenoble, France, but do not win any medals.

 

18 February – David Gilmour joins Pink Floyd, replacing founder Syd Barrett, who had checked himself into a psychiatric hospital.

 

14 February – Northampton, the county town of Northamptonshire, is designated as a New town, with the Wilson government hoping to double its size and population by 1980.

 

24 February – Announcement of the first discovery (last year) of a pulsar by astronomer Jocelyn Bell Burnell working with Antony Hewish at the University of Cambridge.

 

1 March – First performance of an Andrew Lloyd Webber–Tim Rice musical, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat in its original form as a "pop cantata", by pupils of Colet Court preparatory school in Hammersmith.

 

2 March – Coal mining in the Black Country, which played a big part in the Industrial Revolution, ends after some 300 years with the closure of Baggeridge Colliery near Sedgley.

 

12 March – Mauritius achieves independence from British Rule.

 

15 March – George Brown, British Foreign Secretary, resigns.

 

17 March – A demonstration in London's Grosvenor Square against U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War leads to violence – 91 police injured, 200 demonstrators arrested.

 

30 March – The Yardbirds record their live album Live Yardbirds at the Anderson Theater.

 

1 April – Thames Valley Police is formed by the amalgamation of Berkshire Constabulary, Buckinghamshire Constabulary, Oxford City Police, Oxfordshire Constabulary and Reading Borough Police.

 

6 April – The 13th Eurovision Song Contest is held in the Royal Albert Hall, London. The winning song, Spain's "La, la, la" is sung by Massiel, after Spanish authorities refused to allow Joan Manuel Serrat to perform it in Catalan. The UK finish in second place, just one point behind, with the song "Congratulations" sung by Cliff Richard, which goes on to outsell the winning Spanish entry throughout Europe.

 

7 April – Motor racing world champion Jim Clark, 32, is killed when his car leaves the track at 170 mph and smashes into a tree during a Formula 2 race at Hockenheim.

 

11 April – Popularity of Harold Wilson's Labour government is shown to be slumping as opinion polls show the Conservatives, led by Edward Heath, with a lead of more than 20 points.

 

18 April – London Bridge sold to American entrepreneur Robert P. McCulloch who rebuilds it at Lake Havasu City, Arizona.

 

20 April – Enoch Powell makes his controversial Rivers of Blood Speech on immigration. The speech is made at the Midland Hotel in Birmingham to a meeting of the Conservative Political Centre at 2:30 pm. The Birmingham-based television company ATV saw an advance copy of the speech that morning, and its news editor ordered a television crew to go to the venue, where they filmed sections of the speech.

 

The speech provokes great outcry among the British public, making Powell one of the most popular and loathed politicians in the country, and leading to his dismissal from the Shadow Cabinet by Conservative party leader Edward Heath.

 

21 April – Enoch Powell is dismissed from the Shadow Cabinet by Opposition leader Edward Heath due to the Rivers of Blood Speech, despite several opinion polls stating that the majority of the public shares Mr Powell's fears.

 

23 April – Five and ten pence coins are introduced in the run-up to Decimalisation, which will be complete within the next three years.

 

27 April – The Abortion Act 1967 comes into effect, legalising abortion on a number of grounds, with free provision through the National Health Service.

 

3 May – Mr Frederick West (aged 45) becomes Britain's first heart transplant patient.

 

4 May – Mary Hopkin performs on the British TV show Opportunity Knocks. Hopkin catches the attention of model Twiggy, who recommends her to Paul McCartney. McCartney would soon sign Hopkin to Apple Records.

 

8 May – The Kray Twins, 34-year-old Ronnie and Reggie, are among 18 men arrested in dawn raids across London. They stand accused of a series of crimes including murder, fraud, blackmail and assault. Their 41-year-old brother Charlie Kray is one of the other men under arrest.

 

11 May – Manchester City win the Football League First Division title.

 

14 May – At a press conference, John Lennon and Paul McCartney introduce the Beatles' new business concept, Apple Corps, Ltd., a disastrously mismanaged entertainment company that included a recording studio, a record label, and clothing store.

 

16 May – Ronan Point tower block at Newham in east London collapses after a gas explosion, killing four occupants.

 

18 May – West Bromwich Albion win the FA Cup for the fifth time, with Jeff Astle scoring the only goal of the game against Everton at the Wembley Stadium.

 

20 May – Harlech (which became HTV in 1970) starts its dual service for Wales and the West Country, replacing the interim ITSWW, which had replaced TWW on 4 March.

 

22 May – The General Assembly of the Church of Scotland permits the ordination of women as ministers.

 

29 May – Manchester United become the first English winners of the European Cup after beating Benfica 4-1 in extra-time at Wembley Stadium.

 

30 May – The Beatles begin recording The White Album (officially titled, simply, The Beatles). Sessions would span over 4 months, ending on 14 October.

 

7 June – Start of Ford sewing machinists strike at the Dagenham assembly plant: women workers strike for pay comparable to that of men.

 

8 June – Martin Luther King, Jr.'s killer, James Earl Ray, arrested in London.

 

8 June - premiere of Harrison Birtwistle's opera Punch and Judy in the Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh during the Aldeburgh Festival.

 

10 June – National Health Service reintroduces prescription charges.

 

14 June - Manfred Mann appear in the first edition of the BBC2 series Colour Me Pop.

 

18 June – Frederick West, Britain's first heart transplant, dies 46 days after his operation.

 

20 June – Austin Currie, Member of Parliament at Stormont in Northern Ireland, along with others, squats a house in Caledon to protest discrimination in housing allocations.

 

4 July – Alec Rose returns from a 354-day single-handed round-the-world trip for which he receives a knighthood the following day.

 

7 July – The Yardbirds perform for the last time before disbanding.

 

10 July – Floods in South West England.

 

Flooding had been occurring throughout the South West from mid-day but the full fury of the flood was felt during the hours of darkness. By 5.am almost every stream, brook and river in the area had burst its banks causing death, devastation and despair on a scale greater than any in living memory.

 

That night, seven people lost their lives, hundreds more suffered a terrifying ordeal of hardship and loss, bridges that had stood for centuries were washed away or severely damaged and countless houses, shops, factories and other properties were engulfed. It was a night that re-kindled the ‘spirit of the blitz’, a night when numerous selfless acts of heroism and community spirit prevailed.

 

As night gave way to day and the full extent of the disaster was revealed, it became obvious that for a great many people life would not return to normal for a number of days yet to come.. . for same it never did.

 

www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/sets/72157603190...

 

17 July – The Beatles animated film Yellow Submarine debuts in London.

 

28 July – Final day on air for ABC which had broadcast to the North and Midlands regions during weekends.

 

The 1968 Contract Round sees the end of weekend franchises in these regions. From the following day, Granada and ATV broadcast seven days a week. The North is split into two regions with Granada broadcasting to the North West and Yorkshire Television broadcasting to the Yorkshire region. It is also the last day on air for ATV London which lost its weekend franchise to the newly formed London Weekend Television.

 

29 July – ATV begins broadcasting seven days a week in the Midlands, while Granada begins broadcasting seven days a week to the North West and Yorkshire Television does likewise in its newly created region.

 

30 July – Thames Television goes on air, having taken over the ITV London weekday franchise from Rediffusion, London. Thames is a result of a merger between ABC and Rediffusion, ABC having been awarded the London weekday franchise.

 

30 July – Magpie premieres on ITV.

 

31 July – Popular sitcom Dad's Army begins its nine-year run on BBC1.

 

August - John McVie marries Christine Perfect.

 

2 August – London Weekend Television takes over the ITV London weekend franchise from ATV London. They went on air initially using the name London Weekend Television but then adopted the name London Weekend before reverting to London Weekend Television (often abbreviated to LWT) in 1978.

 

August – Independent Television technicians strike immediately after the 1968 franchise changes, causing a national stoppage. The individual companies are off the air for several weeks and an emergency service is established.

 

The ITV Emergency National Service is presented by management personnel with no regional variations. This was the first time that a uniform presentation practice was adopted across all regions.

 

4 August – Yes performs for the first time, at a summer camp.

 

8 August – Royal Navy Leander-class frigate HMS Scylla is launched at Devonport, the last ship to be built in a Royal Dockyard.

 

11 August – British Rail's last steam train service runs on the standard gauge: steam locomotives make the 314-mile return passenger journey from Liverpool to Carlisle before being dispatched to the scrapyard or preservation.

 

31 August – First Isle of Wight Festival. Headline Acts – Jefferson Airplane. Other Acts – Arthur Brown, The Move, Smile, Tyrannosaurus Rex, Plastic Penny, Fairport Convention and The Pretty Things.

 

September - The new school year in England sees the first local authorities adopt three tier education, where 5-7 infant, 7-11 junior schools are replaced by 5-8 or 5-9 first schools and 8-12 or 9-13 middle schools, with the transfer age to grammar and secondary modern schools being increased to 12 or 13.

 

Japanese car maker Nissan began importing its range of Datsun badged family cars to Britain.

 

7 September – Led Zeppelin performs for the first time, billed as The New Yardbirds (the Yardbirds had disbanded two months earlier, and guitarist Jimmy Page subsequently formed this new group).

 

8 September – Tennis player Virginia Wade wins the 1968 U.S. Open Women's Singles event.

 

15 September – Floods in South East England.

 

15 September - Song of Summer, Ken Russell's noted TV documentary about Frederick Delius, is shown for the first time as part of the BBC's Omnibus series.

 

16 September – General Post Office divides post into first-class and second-class services.

 

19 September – The Who begin recording Tommy, a rock opera that tells the story about a deaf, dumb and blind boy, including his experiences with life and the relationship with his family.

 

26 September – Theatres Act 1968 ends censorship of the theatre.

 

27 September – The US musical Hair opens in London following the removal of theatre censorship.

 

October – The M1 motorway is completed when the final 35-mile section opens between Rotherham and Leeds.

 

2 October – A woman from Birmingham gives birth to the first recorded instance of live Sextuplets in the UK.

 

5 October – A civil rights march in Derry, Northern Ireland, which includes several Stormont and British MPs, is batoned off the streets by the Royal Ulster Constabulary.

 

6 October – British racing drivers Jackie Stewart, Graham Hill and John Surtees take the first three places at the United States Grand Prix.

 

8 October – Enoch Powell warns that immigrants "may change the character" of England.

 

12 – 27 October – Great Britain and Northern Ireland compete at the Olympics in Mexico City and win 5 gold, 5 silver and 3 bronze medals.

 

13 October – The rebuilt Euston railway station opens.

 

18 October – National Giro opens for business through the General Post Office, with administrative headquarters at Bootle.

 

27 October – Police and protestors clash at an anti-Vietnam War protest outside the Embassy of the United States in London.

 

31 October – Alan Bennett's play Forty Years On premiered at the Apollo Theatre in the West End.

 

8 November – John Lennon and his wife Cynthia are divorced.

 

18 November – James Watt Street fire: A warehouse fire in Glasgow kills 22.

 

21 November – The Cyril Lord carpet business goes into receivership.

 

22 November – The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society released.

 

22 November – The Beatles (also known as "The White Album") by The Beatles is released.

 

26 November – The Race Relations Act is passed, making it illegal to refuse housing, employment or public services to people in Britain because of their ethnic background.

 

26 November – Cream plays their farewell concert at the Royal Albert Hall. It will be the last time Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce, and Ginger Baker play together until their 1993 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

 

29 November – The Dawley New Town (Designation) Amendment (Telford) Order extends the boundaries of Dawley New Town in Shropshire and renames it Telford.

 

30 November – The Trade Descriptions Act comes into force, preventing shops and traders from describing goods in a misleading way.

 

2 December - Jimi Hendrix's manager Chas Chandler quits over differences with Hendrix during the recording of Electric Ladyland.

 

17 December - Mary Bell, an 11-year-old girl from Newcastle upon Tyne, is sentenced to life detention for the manslaughter of two small boys.

 

Official opening of first phase of the Royal Mint's new Llantrisant plant in South Wales.

 

22 December – The Animals reunite for one benefit concert at the Newcastle City Hall while Eric Burdon & The Animals are disbanding.

 

Obituarie: Chas Chandler

 

When Jimi Hendrix set fire to his guitar, Chas Chandler was ready with the lighter fuel. When Slade were desperate for a new image, Chandler dressed the band up as skinheads. The tough, outspoken Geordie was the perfect manager for both these diverse talents. A fouder member of The Animals, he could sympathise with musicians and understand their problems. As a canny businessman he also understood the power of publicity and the importance of image.

Few Sixties stars were able to make the jump from pop to business. They lacked the discipline and know-how. But when Chandler quit The Animals and swapped his caftan for a suit, he swiftly became one of the most respected and successful managers and producers of the rock age.

 

He discovered Jimi Hendrix, but it was his energy and commitment that helped turn a shy young American backing guitarist into a dynamic performer and a rock legend. Their mutual regard was based on trust and friendship. When their partnership eventually broke down, Chandler found it a bitter blow. But just before Hendrix died in September 1970, he called upon his old manager once more for help and guidance. Chas Chandler was a man that anxious artists knew they could trust.

 

He was born Bryan Chandler in Heaton, near Newcastle in 1938. After leaving school his first job was as a turner in the Tyneside shipyards. The first brush with with music came when he took up playing a homemade guitar. He later switched to bass and was in the Alan Price Trio when singer Eric Burdon joined the band in 1962.

 

Renamed The Animals, they quickly became one of Britain's most dynamic R&B groups. From Newcastle's Club A Go Go, they came to London in 1964, when they had a massive hit with "House of the Rising Sun". Many more followed, among them "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" (1964) and "We've Got To Get Out Of This Place" (1965), but disillusioned by their lack of financial reward and exhausted by touring,

 

The Animals broke up in late 1966. Said Chandler: "We toured non-stop for three years, doing 300 gigs a year and we hardly got a penny. But our manager Mike Jeffery did all right. 25 per cent of the gross of 300 gigs a year, that was good money."

 

During the Animals' last US tour Chandler was advised by Keith Richards' girlfriend, Linda Keith, to see an up-coming guitarist, Jimmy James, who was playing with the Blue Flames at the Cafe Wha in New York's Greenwich Village.

 

Chandler was especially impressed by Jimmy James's performance of the Tim Rose song "Hey Joe", offered to be his manager and invited him to London. James asked Chandler if he could introduce him to Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck, and that clinched the deal.

 

Chandler had already decided to stop playing himself. "I was never that good on bass guitar," he confessed. He brought his new find, now renamed Jimi Hendrix, to London in September 1966, and recruited Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding to form Hendrix's new group The Experience. He also formed a partnership with The Animals' manager Mike Jeffery to look after Hendrix's business affairs for the next two years.

 

Chandler eventually produced all Hendrix's hit singles including "Hey Joe", "Purple Haze", and "The Wind Cries Mary" and his first two albums, Are You Experienced and Axis: bold as love.

 

He first presented The Experience at a series of London showcase gigs where Mick Jagger and Paul McCartney were among the stars who flocked to see Hendrix kitted out in Afro hairstyle and military uniform.

 

When The Experience played with The Walker Brothers at the Finsbury Park Astoria in London, Hendrix and Chandler debated how they could liven up their act.

 

The journalist Keith Altham said that as Pete Townshend smashed up his guitar, it was a pity Hendrix couldn't set his on fire: "Chas immediately ordered his roadie Gerry Stickells to get some lighter fuel. Jimi only ever set fire to his guitar three times but it made history."

 

In 1968 Chandler quit as Hendrix's manager half way through the Electric Ladyland album sessions, fed up with endless re-recording and the surfeit of hangers-on in the studio. He fell out with Jeffery over the way Hendrix's career was being handled, and in 1969 returned to London to his Swedish wife Lotta, who was expecting their first child. Shortly afterwards he set up Montgrow Productions with Robert Stigwood.

 

Their aim was to find and develop new talent but Stigwood didn't share Chandler's enthusiasm for his next discovery, the Wolverhampton band Slade, and pulled out, leaving Chas Chandler as their sole manager. He paid off their previous management with pounds 100 and encouraged the adoption of a skinhead look, with cropped hair and bovver boots. Slade's lead singer Noddy Holder said that the band "worshipped" Chandler for the way he had transformed their fortunes.

 

Under his guidance they became of the most prolific hit makers of the 1970s - their singles included "Coz I Luv You" (1971) and "We've Got to Get Out of this Place" (1972) - though they failed to gain American success. In 1979 he withdrew from management and formed his own record label Barn Productions. At the same time he separated from his first wife, and left London to retire to Newcastle, where he married his second wife, Madeleine Stringer, a former Newcastle beauty queen.

 

In 1983 he became part of the re-formed Animals, and had to relearn the bass guitar. It was not a happy experience. The group spent most of the time arguing and at one point Chandler was seen grabbing Eric Burdon by the scruff of the neck.

 

In recent years he helped local bands in the North East to record their own music, and he also set up in business with architect and saxophonist Nigel Stranger. They established Park Arena Ltd, which developed the 10,500- seater Newcastle Arena, the largest sports and entertainment venue in the north-east. It opened last year after nine years work, and has already featured artists such as Neil Diamond, David Bowie and Pulp.

 

A big-built man who liked to drink and smoke, he had, said Keith Altham "enormous drive and self-belief. It was that enthusiasm that helped both Jimi Hendrix and Slade become stars. He'd just tell everyone: 'They are the best in the world!'"

 

Bryan "Chas" Chandler, bass player, manager and record producer: born Newcastle upon Tyne 18 December 1938; married twice (two sons, two daughters); died Newcastle 17 July 1996.

 

ITV

 

4 April – Freewheelers (1968–1973)

30 July – Magpie (1968–1980)

15 August – Nearest and Dearest (1968–1973)

21 September – Strange Report (1968–1969)

24 September – How We Used To Live (1968–2002)

25 September – The Champions (1968–1969)

5 November – Father, Dear Father (1968–1973)

8 November – Please Sir! (1968–1972)

16 November – Journey to the Unknown (1968–1969)

Unknown – The Big Match (1968–1992)

 

1967-1968 Football

 

First Division - Manchester City

Second Division - Ipswich Town

Third Division - Oxford United

Fourth Division - Luton Town

FA Cup - West Bromwich Albion

League Cup - Leeds United

Charity Shield - Manchester United and Tottenham Hotspur (shared)

Home Championship - England

Now for a change of subject...

 

We were almost home early Sunday afternoon when a bright headlamp and flashing ditch lights were spotted in the rear-view mirror; something big was coming round the curve behind us! Did we have time to get to Trentham and the good photo site right beside the track? There were two problems: one was that the road zigged and zagged and zigged again away from the track for the next two kilometres – and the track was (of course!)) dead straight, and the other was the slow-moving car in front of us...

 

“The Wife” was asked (very nicely of course!) to get the camera out of it’s bag as we crawled along, but as it turned out, the train had to stop at a “Red” just before the double track became single track, and by the time it got its “Green”, we were ready to ‘shoot’!

 

It seemed to take an age to start moving again as the Engineer notched the power upwards; it was clearly a heavy Unit (by N.Z. standards anyway!), yet by the time it reached us 300 metres north of where it had stopped, it was moving surprisingly quickly and still accelerating with two 1979-built General Motors (Canada) Class Df on the front – one a DfT (to acknowledge the Turbo fitted to the Class in the 1990s), and the second a DfB (to acknowledge the Brightstar engine management system installed in the 1980s). Both now generate 2400 horsepower and both were using that horsepower to the max as they passed by!

   

For over a decade, CIAT has tested agronomic and soil management practices in Western Kenya. From minimum tillage to integrated soil fertility management, these trials are the most comprehensive picture of tropical soil health that we have in Kenya. They show-case changes in soil fertility and health, which take time to develop, hence the importance of these long-term trails. CIAT’s “Climate-smart soil protection and rehabilitation in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, India and Kenya” project is implemented in collaboration with the Kenya Agriculture and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO); GOPA and implementing partners including PAFID, Welthungerhilfe and WOCAT - University of Bern. It is supported by the German Society for International Cooperation (GIZ) and the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). For more information, visit: “Seeing is believing” or contact g.smith (at) cgiar (dot) org. Please credit accordingly: Georgina Smith / CIAT.

For over a decade, CIAT has tested agronomic and soil management practices in Western Kenya. From minimum tillage to integrated soil fertility management, these trials are the most comprehensive picture of tropical soil health that we have in Kenya. They show-case changes in soil fertility and health, which take time to develop, hence the importance of these long-term trails. CIAT’s “Climate-smart soil protection and rehabilitation in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, India and Kenya” project is implemented in collaboration with the Kenya Agriculture and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO); GOPA and implementing partners including PAFID, Welthungerhilfe and WOCAT - University of Bern. It is supported by the German Society for International Cooperation (GIZ) and the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). For more information, visit: “Seeing is believing” or contact g.smith (at) cgiar (dot) org. Please credit accordingly: Georgina Smith / CIAT.

As it enters a new millennium humankind is undergoing a process of radical change. We are all witnesses to this transformation as humankind sets out the markers for a new civilization. In the northern hemisphere the industrial age is almost over. Knowledge, and thus humankind, is embarking on a new era in history. It seems that the new millennium will be more ‘ethical’.

 

The effective use of high technology and human skills is now a prerequisite for successful management. Kültür A.Ş.’s management philosophy is based on these two fundamentals. Our company aims to make maximum use of knowledge, high technology and human skills. The company’s communications infrastructure is based on an ISDN switchboard, the most advanced communications system in the world. Our working processes are integrated through extensive use of the Internet and other data transfer systems. Information technologies are adopted on the basis of a functionalist and production oriented approach rather than just applying what is ‘technologically fashionable’.‘Lax management’ is our country’s main problem. Yet modern management means ‘total quality awareness’. Last year our corporate agenda was dominated by restructuring and total quality awareness. Within this conceptual framework, positions and tasks were redefined and the corresponding regulations and directives rewritten in accordance with a Corporate Organizational Chart.

Kültür A. Ş. successfully organized cultural and artistic activities throughout 1999, mostly on behalf of the Metropolitan Municipality of Istanbul’s Department of Cultural Affairs. The ‘21st Century Conferences’ made a considerable contribution to intellectual life. A conference entitled ‘Istanbul and the Earthquake’ was also organized. Select artistic exhibitions were held at our cultural venues. The Bosphorus Festival, the Mystic Music Festival, the Youth Festival are among our important activities. Even more cultural and artistic activities will be organized on national and international platforms in the coming years.‘Culture, Arts and Istanbul’ has been prepared as a promotional book in which you can learn about our company and the events we organize. I would like to add that the book also aims to be informative. Our concept of ‘open management’ means that we attribute great importance to sharing information. Given that all the shares in our company are owned by the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality and its subsidiaries, for us sharing information is not just a principle, it is an obligation.

 

Kültür A.Ş. organizes activities in the fields of culture and the arts, operates cultural facilities, invests in culture and publishes books, CDs, CD-ROMs and DVDs. Yet, despite being a public sector company, in doing all of the above it strives for total quality awareness, profitability and productivity.I believe that setting such principles as our target which we achieved last year and will achieve this year as well, is as good, splendid and proper an example as the activities we organize and the products we produce.

 

Öyküsü su seslerine karışan 1500 yıllık bir mekan

 

Sultanahmet’te bulunan Yerebatan Sarnıcı, 542 yılında Bizans İmparatoru Justinyen tarafından At Meydanı’nın diğer tarafında bulunan Büyük Saray’ın su ihtiyacını karşılamak üzere yaptırılmıştır.

 

Fetihten sonra yaklaşık yüzyıl süreyle sarnıcın varlığı fark edilmemiş; ancak bodrumlarında su biriktiren ve deliklerden sepet sarkıtarak balık tutan insanların varlığının anlaşılmasıyla keşfedilmiştir. Osmanlı döneminde onarılarak kullanılan sarnıcın giriş kısmındaki evler 1940’larda belediye tarafından istimlak edilerek, giriş için düzenli bir bina yapılmıştır.

 

1985-1988’de Büyükşehir Belediyesi geniş ölçüde bir temizlik ve onarımdan geçirilen sarnıçtaki su ve dipteki çamur birikintisi boşaltılmış, temizlenmiş, batıdaki ucuna kadar uzanan bir iskele yapılmış, ayrıca kuzeydoğu köşeye de bir platform inşa edilmiştir.

 

Yerebatan Sarayı olarak adlandırılan sarnıç içten 145 metre uzunluğunda 65 metre genişliğindedir. Yaklaşık 9800 metrekarelik bir alanı kapsamaktadır.Her bir dizide 28 tane olmak üzere 12 sıra sütun tuğla kemerleri ve bunların desteklediği tonozları taşır. Toplam sayıları 336 olan sütunlardan 8’i kuzey bölümde Örme kılıf içine alınmış, güneybatıda 37 sütun, etraflarını çeviren bir dolgu duvarın içinde kalmıştır.

 

Son restorasyonda içi kuru olmasına rağmen sarnıca tekrar su geldiğinden bugün hala 1-2 m arasında su bulunmaktadır. Halen İstanbul Kültür ve Sanat Ürünleri Ticaret A.Ş. tarafından işletilen Yerebatan Sarnıcı’nda İstanbul Büyükşehir Belediyesi’nin çeşitli kültür etkinlikleri gerçekleştirilmektedir.

 

http://www.yerebatan.com

A management train makes their way towards Transload on Annacis Island, as they approach the Alex Fraser Bridge. Usually a night job switches Transload, but after Southern Railway of BC locked out their employees, the schedule has changed dramatically.

A change of pace...

 

The Wairarapa Line runs north-east out of New Zealand’s capitol through suburban Hutt Valley, under the Rimutaka mountain range via the 8 kilometre-long tunnel of the same name, and into the lush farming region of the Wairarapa. Passenger trains, consisting of carriages (or coaches) rebuilt from British Rail Mark II rolling stock, run between Wellington and the Wairarapa town of Masterton – a journey of approximately two hours.

 

On a recent sunny Wednesday afternoon, Mrs Lance joined me for the trip through the 8.5km tunnel beneath the Rimutaka mountain range and across the rich farming lands of the Wairarapa region to Masterton.

 

With a little over an hour to fill in before the return Journey, we just had time to walk into town for a quick Coffee before returning to the station for a "photo shoot"! Be assured however: the above photo was not taken from the middle of the tracks; I was sitting on the edge of the Platform, and right at the very end of it...! (I have a long arm...!!!).

 

For those interested in technical matters, the locomotive started out as a DF class Diesel-Electric built by General Motors Diesel of Canada between 1979 and 1981. Between 1992 and 1997, the Class was turbo-charged and re-classified as DFT, enabling the Class to generate 2400hp. In 2006, the Brightstar engine management system was installed in some of the locomotives, and they were duly reclassified “DFB”...

  

[ From en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand_DF_class_locomotive_(1979) ]

  

The light here changes incessantly and it was almost impossible to properly expose to the light without proper LV.

  

The coming death of Nikon as a camera brand 2

 

"We Nikon shooters tend to frequent these forums to maintan healthy loyalty to our brand of choice.,Nikon..May be we get a little nervous with every new mirrorless camera release. I know we lost so much ground to Sony already, with Fuji coming out strong we fear being dethroned completely."

 

A die-hard Nikon guy in a forum said the above and many of his fellows criticizing him of being brutally honest about his feeling.

But it seems like many Nikon fans feeling uneasy and may actually begin to consider gradual switch over to Sony or Fuji or maybe Canon....or some even considering the EM1MK2 seriously.

 

So is Nikon really heading straight down into the Toilet?

Is that any better than Olympus or Panasonic that Nikon fans always mocking trashing for the tiny sensor in those internet camera forums?

 

To me Nikon's results do look actually worse than a month ago and they seem to be a lot worse performing than their tiny sensor rivals such as Panasonic, Fuji and Olympus.

  

Again, in this winter, I went up to Tsukuba university in Ibaraki prefecture for work and academic conference held at Epochal Tsukuba.

I attended a social study conference for 3 days there and I traveled there after that for 3 days. I think I went to Tokyo, Tsukuba, Tsuchiura, and Mito, which is the capital city of Ibaraki prefecture.

After this short academic trip to North East Kanto, Japan I realized the death of consumer camera market issue is more serious than we once thought. It was really bad, I think it is not the right time to discuss mirrorless vs DSLRs or iPhone, but it is really the time to discuss how to save this industry at any cost...........anyway to my surprise, I did not see or meet any one with a Sony A7X camera, which is supposed to be the most popular innovative camera currently available according to many silly online camera forums. It seemed as though I was the only one person in Tsukuba area of Ibaraki shooting a Sony A7R series body.......to me it was really shocking.

I met a couple of American researchers from UC something at Tsukuba university, and one of them climbed a middle sized mountain together with me and he had 2 m43( GX80 and EM5MK2) and Fuji X-Pro2. And he let me try his new Panasonic G80, I actually liked it, found it very intuitive.

 

I think the puny Sony cameras I have are not very well suited for both urban documentary of my academic travels and mountain hiking climbing........Most of photographers I met in Tsukuba mountain complex area of Tsukuba had either a Canon 5D something or a m43 or a Fuji. My coworker said ," it was really surprising but no one other than us had a Sony, how come?"

Well it is nothing surprising since I know Sony Alpha 7 series cameras are not selling well in real world outside of camera forums. They are only popular among those camera fanatic forum denizens like us...........

But the maybe more shocking reality to those of us long time Nikon shooter is that no one seems to be shooting Nikon any more and even in a big anti Nuclear demo I encountered near Kasumigaseki station no one using Nikon due to the poor LV and video performance of all Nikon FX bodies. Also many many guys shooting the demo told me the excessively loud shutter sound of Nikon DSLRs would make the cops really irritated or even angry.

I guess Nikon is rapidly becoming kind of an irrelevant player here in Japan , no longer a rival of Canon but seems really like a rival of Ricoh.......Nikon really needs serious Fullframe or APS-C mirrorless system with silent shutter, or Nikon may have to go bankrupt very very soon.

 

Now the D5600 is out and I have tested it at a trade show here, and I confirmed its LV AF speed is a tiny bit faster than the D500 or anything from Nikon since 2011, but still no where near the level of Canon dual Pixel AF or Fuji X-T2 or Panasonic GX8 or G85, let alone the GH5 or the current fastest mirrorless champion the Olympus EM1 MK2.

     

When Nikon D800 and E were the greatest cameras among those armchair experts online and those avid Nikon lovers(Canon haters) all predicted the death of Canon and trashed all Canon cameras for a bit less DR at base ISO..........but did the D800E actually become a big commercial success for Nikon?

All those Nikon lovers made the sensor DR at very base ISO a huge issue and trashed all those having lesser DR at base ISO than their beloved Nikon as though they were all useless junks for any application without realizing their beloved a gen older Nikons all had lesser DR and resolution than the rival Canon and Sony back then.

Many Nikon avid fans make the D800 series a huge deal, but besides the sensor what has been so appealing to non Nikon users or even Nikon users who are not interested in a cheap landscape or a budget studio work camera set up under 10K USD range?

Often Thom Hogan and PhotographyLife,etc repeat in their review of any camera(either a mirrorless or a D-SLR).

"The D810 is overall still the best camera body to date even without the class leading sensor and the great F mount lens line for the FX , It was definitely the best DSLR on the market in this segment. So reducing a D810 to its sensor is an over simplification and stupid."

And he claims himself an unbiased Nikon shooter........Really? To me he seems like one of the biggest pro Nikon avid Nikon fanboy reviewer in the world. He may be trying to be neutral but it is obvious that he is not a neutral but a pro Nikon person.

Just imagine there was a Nikon D810b with the Canon 5D3 sensor, which would have been a slow, clumsy body with limited lens selection, poor live view, a slow frame rate, a weaker AF system than the 5D3 and no immense IQ advantage over the competition. It was the Exmor which got the D800 off the ground, prior to the D810's refinements. Without it, it would have gotten nowhere, but another boring 1970 style crappy retro camera offering. Bear in mind that, in 2012, Canon practically owned the high-resolution/low ISO crowd, since the 5D2 had such a huge resolution advantage over the D700 (which was, in every other way, a better stills camera). It's really a testament to the strength of the Exmor - and Canon's stagnation at the time - that the D800/D810 were able to get many those people who were obsessed with the base ISO DR thing to ditch their Canon setup and move to the Nikon system.

But it was just a very short time trend-until the A7R was out. The A7R was a terrible body ,but for those who loved the also terrible D800 series body, it was not a serious issue since their intended use of those high resolution so-called FF was on tripod-serious static thing shooting just like I do use my A7R or my old D800E.....the biggest attraction of the Sony over the Nikon for a Canon shooter was that they did not have to change the lenses they already owned, just buying adapter let you use the Sony sensor with your own Canon lenses.

Even back in 2012 when the D800E thing was the hottest and greatest ever, Nikon was losing sells to Canon and Sony, to a lesser extent to m43.

Nikon lost about 15 percent of its market share in 2012 from its peak in 2008(when the D3 was the hottest camera) despite of the crazy D800E hype generated online.

If the so-called amazing DR was so important to most and even besides that the camera was the best D-SLR ever, then why haven't those amazing Nikon D800 series been commercially successful for Nikon but rather money losing products?

This year Nikon has lost even more sales; sales down 20%, Income down 30%, disastrous Coolpix, Nikon1 performance and non-existent DL cameras all paint a dismal picture, and with no mirrorless or video/motion presence worth speaking of, an even worse outlook. The only area that made up for the loss in imaging was the successful Precision semiconductor group.Bottom line is the balance sheet doesn't lie. And this poor results of Nikon prove that no one outside of the internet camera forums really care about so called amazing DR at base ISO, or what Nikon call amazing pro AF, but more sophisticated overall hybrid functionality, with a bit more like universal mount design.

In fact, those do care about the base ISO DR or obsessed with it actually prefer it in a mirrorless body combined with the amazing Sony EPSON EVF used in the XT2 and A7R2 and thus the temporal switchers from Canon to Nikon for the D800 all moved to or moving to Sony for the A7R series. No one really cares about so-called pro AF in their very high DR high resolution camera since they are not intended to use handheld but on a solid tripod.

Those just needed a bit better DR with very good AF, fast performance, and pro class ergonomics all moved back to Canon for the 5D4 for its better LV and video performance compared to the poor Nikon way of LV in the D800E/D810.

So despite of the all crazy hype for the D8XX, Nikon has been losing serious amount of money to Sony Canon and now to Fuji and Olympus.

Internet is consisted of full of lies and disinfos or ones' wishful thinking, those who do not know anything about the actual sells speak about it as though they knew all with access to the real sells numbers of each camera company. So the D800, the D810, the D500, and the A7R are all huge hits in all camera forums online, but they haven't performed very well commercially......In fact, the one which has stabilized current Sony's market position in this market as the solid no2 player is the A6000, A6300, not the much more hyped A7R series. And the original A7 is the still best selling of the A7X series cameras.

And the all time best selling FF camera is still the Canon 6D, and the saddest reality for Nikon is the 6D alone simply outsells the all the Nikon FX sells combined.

Many Nikon fans never realize it but Nikon is a tiny company, in fact, it is even smaller than Olympus or Ricoh, who Nikon fans usually dismiss or mock as a tiny player, or as an irrelevant player.

Olympus is at least 4 times bigger than Nikon is in terms of total revenue and income in this year.

And there is rumor that Fuji will take over Nikon and produce Nikon branded endscopes soon.

Many Nikon fans still believe Nikon has all the mirrorless and video tech needed in house, but is it really true?

Nikon has no background in digital video and their supporting hardware is likely quite underdeveloped compared to Sony or Canon in catering to video. This is quite evident in their still cameras, which underperform video-wise compared to Canon, Sony, Panasonic or even Olympus and now Fuji still cameras. Doing so would also carry the same risk as their current offering - the complete lack of control over their sensor supply - while not really diversifying their market.

Digital video is a game for electronics companies (Sony, Panasonic, and Canon), not companies whose main strength is optics and who outsource their electronics. Nikon's best bet is just to build lenses for everyone else's video cameras, not to make them themselves.

So in that sense, Nikon's main rivals are Zeiss, Fuji, and Samyong.

So I am guessing if Nikon cannot design a decent F mount mirrorless hybrid system camera in the next 3 years, before the Tokyo Olympics, they will have to become a third-party lens manufacture designing and producing cheap lenses for the camera video manufactures such as Canon, Sony and m43- just like Samyong or Sigma. They cannot try to sell highend optics to labs or broadcast industry like Zeiss, Leica, Canon, or Fuji since Nikon does not have the luxurious name of Zeiss, Leica, Canon, Fujinon, etc.

I think this is why Nikon has tried to sue Sigma for a several times or so. They know that their real rivals are Sigma, Tamron, and Samyong , and they cannot produce better lens designs than those cheap off-brand manufactures.

So to me,it is sad to face, but the coming death of Nikon as a camera maker seems quite obvious and unavoidable.

  

UPDATE: Many people including myself thought Nikon is dying, if not already dead by now, but in reality Nikon still sells many many more units than Sony and Nikon is now working on new type of sensor design and they may collaborate with Pentax and Olympus to set up a new sensor company. If this plays out well, then Sony will be the loser since they will have no one to sell their mediocre so-called Fullframe sensors any more. And as a result their highend camera prices will go up significantly.

And now Sony has just announced they've just decided to spin off their imaging division and now it is an independent business under Sony corp's supervision, just like their sensor group.....

This means now Sony imaging is not a part of Sony but their subsidiary, and therefore, to Sony device group, the imaging group is just a customer,nothing special, in fact,considering its size of market share in relation to that of Nikon, Sony imaging group is a lower class customer to the device group.

So there is no more reason for Sony device technology to keep the best sensor for in-house use. In fact now Sony device tech must compete with the new sensor company Nikon Olympus Ricoh have just established here and some European sensor designers such as CMOSIS, who makes the Leica SL sensor and M sensor.

And do not forget there is always Canon if Sony does not sell anything to Nikon.........Canon will start selling it and there will be Panasonic and Tower Jazz also........so Nikon will not have any problem choosing sensor suppliers any more.

Sony must sell their best sensors to Nikon, Olympus, and Pentax , or Sony will lose them, Sony cannot choose customers any more.

If Sony is smart, it will not compete with Nikon or Olympus in camera market. After all, Nikon is the biggest customer of Sony.......but Sony also buys steppers from Nikon anyway. So Sony is not dominating the sensor market, or controlling Nikon as many Sony fanboys think..........and the just announced Spun-off of their imaging division makes Sony camera business less trust-worthy........... Sony thinks every business as a short term investment and runs it to make it temporarily profitable and then spins it off.

After that? of course sells it to anyone willing to buy it.........like Sony did with the Vaio PC business, TV business, etc,etc.

That is why no one really trust Sony in the long run, we long term Sony users just use its cameras but always know it is a back-up plan or step-gap solution......

After all no serious camera buyers are as obtuse as many spec-chasers and review sites think they are. None one buys into a big expensive camera system just for an amazing set of features in a body or two...................there are many many more important aspects to a system camera than just a set of great features...

  

UPDATE2: Nikon's response to digital cinema surprises me, especially if they trying to grow your market share. After all it is the only one area that is consistently growing in digital camera market.

 

Nikon is the only major camera company that had no territory to protect. No high end, limited at the medium, not much on the low end, so unlike Canon or Sony, Nikon didn't have to worry about making a whiz bang combination camera that would do high quality stills and motion at almost any price point and cannibalizing other cameras in Nikon DXXX line.

 

Also considering that prior to Canon, everyone in the cinema/motion biz used Nikon Lenses if they used still camera lenses. You could (still can) go to Century and get a Nikon mounted on any film camera, from 16mm Beaulieu to 75mm Panavision, because in the film days, everybody knew that most Nikon lenses were matched in contrast and color, in a very specific way. So Nikon had a foothold in the industry.

 

Of course unless you're on the management side of any of these companies, I doubt we know the whole story.

 

So I'm just wondering, but I have this feeling that when Sony sells sensors, Sony might have Nikon or any one sign a contract that says, yeah you guys can make a video cam, but it can't have ______ fill in the blanks.

 

Of course I could be wrong, but in case of Nikon its very odd corporate decision to be very low-profile in the motion industry does not make much strategic sense , given Nikon's historic name and ability to make excellent cameras and lenses.

 

I strongly think it is the case, and therefore , Nikon has been seeking for a new sensor fab that produces sensor for Nikon as Nikon designed.

 

Nikon has been patenting many many new types of sensor designs that are fully capable of 6k video and Olympus is also working on its own sensor designs, and the EM1MK2 sensor is the first Olympus designed sensor and it is said to be fabbed by TowerJazz or Panasonic(not by Sony).

 

Looks like now everybody is dumping Sony, and maybe Sony is the biggest loser in this game besides Pentax?

 

I have strong feeling Sony may become the next Samsung since Sony cannot keep up running the wide range of its camera business intact without sensor income from Nikon and Olympus.

 

Sensor is rapidly becoming a commodity product and so Sony no longer has any advantage over others. Now any one can design a great sensor, Tamron has just proved it.

 

Oh and the best rated Red Helium sensor is designed by Tower Jazz, not Sony.

 

UPDATE3: Nikon Df2 is coming soon and it will house 24mp sensor but a newer generation chip that Nikon designed or developed and produced by Renasus electronics.

It basically has the feature set of the D750 but in smaller more compact body with the classic camera style controls, which I hate. I am not sure about video feature but it sounds like getting FHD video at 25, 30, 60 p and i , nothing special.

It will also have the best OVF in any digital era camera with new focus screen.....but it is really too anachronistic now and I think Nikon needs to put a decent EVF, rather than an amazing OVF from film era. The price will be a bit more expensive than the current Df was when it was announced in 2014, and I heard that it will be about 25 percent more expensive than the D810 was at its launch price.

So I think it will be over 3k.

 

UPDATE4: Now the DL series is officially canceled and we dealers the biggest victims of it.

Anyway, now there are some Japanese analysts guessing(more like speculating) Nikon is in the process of planned bankruptcy, I am not sure about if it is the case but it actually makes very much sense as we carefully follow what Nikon has done since the 2011 Thai flood.

Nikon has produced nothing really innovative but all crappy flawed camera products that needed a few recalls or modifications to finally actually work as advertised. The D600 had terrible dust issue, the D750 had a several serious mirror related issues and Nikon has issued a several recalls for that.

The D800 and E had shutter, mirror and left AF issue but Nikon has never admitted it.

Now the DL disaster.

I am sure the CEO is incompetent but at least not as stupid or obtuse as he seems to be, and he is a person from Tochigi Nikon (precision group) and he has been said to be always hating the imaging group, and thus carefully planning the best(actually worst) way for Nikon to go out of the imaging business, just make some red financial reports a few times then the shareholders ask him to decide finally shutting down the imaging group, that is what many analysts here begin to report now.

Nikon is struggling we all know about it but it is not as bad as the many medias try hard to make it out to be, actually far from it. So I initially thought the prediction of the planned bankruptcy of the company or at least the imaging group ridiculous, but now I think it may be the case, other wise, it is really hard to explain this 50 billion loss Nikon has reported for the last quarter now as the final loss of the imaging group.

    

The light here changes incessantly and it was almost impossible to properly expose to the light without proper LV.

  

The coming death of Nikon as a camera brand 2

 

"We Nikon shooters tend to frequent these forums to maintan healthy loyalty to our brand of choice.,Nikon..May be we get a little nervous with every new mirrorless camera release. I know we lost so much ground to Sony already, with Fuji coming out strong we fear being dethroned completely."

 

A die-hard Nikon guy in a forum said the above and many of his fellows criticizing him of being brutally honest about his feeling.

But it seems like many Nikon fans feeling uneasy and may actually begin to consider gradual switch over to Sony or Fuji or maybe Canon....or some even considering the EM1MK2 seriously.

 

So is Nikon really heading straight down into the Toilet?

Is that any better than Olympus or Panasonic that Nikon fans always mocking trashing for the tiny sensor in those internet camera forums?

 

To me Nikon's results do look actually worse than a month ago and they seem to be a lot worse performing than their tiny sensor rivals such as Panasonic, Fuji and Olympus.

  

Again, in this winter, I went up to Tsukuba university in Ibaraki prefecture for work and academic conference held at Epochal Tsukuba.

I attended a social study conference for 3 days there and I traveled there after that for 3 days. I think I went to Tokyo, Tsukuba, Tsuchiura, and Mito, which is the capital city of Ibaraki prefecture.

After this short academic trip to North East Kanto, Japan I realized the death of consumer camera market issue is more serious than we once thought. It was really bad, I think it is not the right time to discuss mirrorless vs DSLRs or iPhone, but it is really the time to discuss how to save this industry at any cost...........anyway to my surprise, I did not see or meet any one with a Sony A7X camera, which is supposed to be the most popular innovative camera currently available according to many silly online camera forums. It seemed as though I was the only one person in Tsukuba area of Ibaraki shooting a Sony A7R series body.......to me it was really shocking.

I met a couple of American researchers from UC something at Tsukuba university, and one of them climbed a middle sized mountain together with me and he had 2 m43( GX80 and EM5MK2) and Fuji X-Pro2. And he let me try his new Panasonic G80, I actually liked it, found it very intuitive.

 

I think the puny Sony cameras I have are not very well suited for both urban documentary of my academic travels and mountain hiking climbing........Most of photographers I met in Tsukuba mountain complex area of Tsukuba had either a Canon 5D something or a m43 or a Fuji. My coworker said ," it was really surprising but no one other than us had a Sony, how come?"

Well it is nothing surprising since I know Sony Alpha 7 series cameras are not selling well in real world outside of camera forums. They are only popular among those camera fanatic forum denizens like us...........

But the maybe more shocking reality to those of us long time Nikon shooter is that no one seems to be shooting Nikon any more and even in a big anti Nuclear demo I encountered near Kasumigaseki station no one using Nikon due to the poor LV and video performance of all Nikon FX bodies. Also many many guys shooting the demo told me the excessively loud shutter sound of Nikon DSLRs would make the cops really irritated or even angry.

I guess Nikon is rapidly becoming kind of an irrelevant player here in Japan , no longer a rival of Canon but seems really like a rival of Ricoh.......Nikon really needs serious Fullframe or APS-C mirrorless system with silent shutter, or Nikon may have to go bankrupt very very soon.

 

Now the D5600 is out and I have tested it at a trade show here, and I confirmed its LV AF speed is a tiny bit faster than the D500 or anything from Nikon since 2011, but still no where near the level of Canon dual Pixel AF or Fuji X-T2 or Panasonic GX8 or G85, let alone the GH5 or the current fastest mirrorless champion the Olympus EM1 MK2.

     

When Nikon D800 and E were the greatest cameras among those armchair experts online and those avid Nikon lovers(Canon haters) all predicted the death of Canon and trashed all Canon cameras for a bit less DR at base ISO..........but did the D800E actually become a big commercial success for Nikon?

All those Nikon lovers made the sensor DR at very base ISO a huge issue and trashed all those having lesser DR at base ISO than their beloved Nikon as though they were all useless junks for any application without realizing their beloved a gen older Nikons all had lesser DR and resolution than the rival Canon and Sony back then.

Many Nikon avid fans make the D800 series a huge deal, but besides the sensor what has been so appealing to non Nikon users or even Nikon users who are not interested in a cheap landscape or a budget studio work camera set up under 10K USD range?

Often Thom Hogan and PhotographyLife,etc repeat in their review of any camera(either a mirrorless or a D-SLR).

"The D810 is overall still the best camera body to date even without the class leading sensor and the great F mount lens line for the FX , It was definitely the best DSLR on the market in this segment. So reducing a D810 to its sensor is an over simplification and stupid."

And he claims himself an unbiased Nikon shooter........Really? To me he seems like one of the biggest pro Nikon avid Nikon fanboy reviewer in the world. He may be trying to be neutral but it is obvious that he is not a neutral but a pro Nikon person.

Just imagine there was a Nikon D810b with the Canon 5D3 sensor, which would have been a slow, clumsy body with limited lens selection, poor live view, a slow frame rate, a weaker AF system than the 5D3 and no immense IQ advantage over the competition. It was the Exmor which got the D800 off the ground, prior to the D810's refinements. Without it, it would have gotten nowhere, but another boring 1970 style crappy retro camera offering. Bear in mind that, in 2012, Canon practically owned the high-resolution/low ISO crowd, since the 5D2 had such a huge resolution advantage over the D700 (which was, in every other way, a better stills camera). It's really a testament to the strength of the Exmor - and Canon's stagnation at the time - that the D800/D810 were able to get many those people who were obsessed with the base ISO DR thing to ditch their Canon setup and move to the Nikon system.

But it was just a very short time trend-until the A7R was out. The A7R was a terrible body ,but for those who loved the also terrible D800 series body, it was not a serious issue since their intended use of those high resolution so-called FF was on tripod-serious static thing shooting just like I do use my A7R or my old D800E.....the biggest attraction of the Sony over the Nikon for a Canon shooter was that they did not have to change the lenses they already owned, just buying adapter let you use the Sony sensor with your own Canon lenses.

Even back in 2012 when the D800E thing was the hottest and greatest ever, Nikon was losing sells to Canon and Sony, to a lesser extent to m43.

Nikon lost about 15 percent of its market share in 2012 from its peak in 2008(when the D3 was the hottest camera) despite of the crazy D800E hype generated online.

If the so-called amazing DR was so important to most and even besides that the camera was the best D-SLR ever, then why haven't those amazing Nikon D800 series been commercially successful for Nikon but rather money losing products?

This year Nikon has lost even more sales; sales down 20%, Income down 30%, disastrous Coolpix, Nikon1 performance and non-existent DL cameras all paint a dismal picture, and with no mirrorless or video/motion presence worth speaking of, an even worse outlook. The only area that made up for the loss in imaging was the successful Precision semiconductor group.Bottom line is the balance sheet doesn't lie. And this poor results of Nikon prove that no one outside of the internet camera forums really care about so called amazing DR at base ISO, or what Nikon call amazing pro AF, but more sophisticated overall hybrid functionality, with a bit more like universal mount design.

In fact, those do care about the base ISO DR or obsessed with it actually prefer it in a mirrorless body combined with the amazing Sony EPSON EVF used in the XT2 and A7R2 and thus the temporal switchers from Canon to Nikon for the D800 all moved to or moving to Sony for the A7R series. No one really cares about so-called pro AF in their very high DR high resolution camera since they are not intended to use handheld but on a solid tripod.

Those just needed a bit better DR with very good AF, fast performance, and pro class ergonomics all moved back to Canon for the 5D4 for its better LV and video performance compared to the poor Nikon way of LV in the D800E/D810.

So despite of the all crazy hype for the D8XX, Nikon has been losing serious amount of money to Sony Canon and now to Fuji and Olympus.

Internet is consisted of full of lies and disinfos or ones' wishful thinking, those who do not know anything about the actual sells speak about it as though they knew all with access to the real sells numbers of each camera company. So the D800, the D810, the D500, and the A7R are all huge hits in all camera forums online, but they haven't performed very well commercially......In fact, the one which has stabilized current Sony's market position in this market as the solid no2 player is the A6000, A6300, not the much more hyped A7R series. And the original A7 is the still best selling of the A7X series cameras.

And the all time best selling FF camera is still the Canon 6D, and the saddest reality for Nikon is the 6D alone simply outsells the all the Nikon FX sells combined.

Many Nikon fans never realize it but Nikon is a tiny company, in fact, it is even smaller than Olympus or Ricoh, who Nikon fans usually dismiss or mock as a tiny player, or as an irrelevant player.

Olympus is at least 4 times bigger than Nikon is in terms of total revenue and income in this year.

And there is rumor that Fuji will take over Nikon and produce Nikon branded endscopes soon.

Many Nikon fans still believe Nikon has all the mirrorless and video tech needed in house, but is it really true?

Nikon has no background in digital video and their supporting hardware is likely quite underdeveloped compared to Sony or Canon in catering to video. This is quite evident in their still cameras, which underperform video-wise compared to Canon, Sony, Panasonic or even Olympus and now Fuji still cameras. Doing so would also carry the same risk as their current offering - the complete lack of control over their sensor supply - while not really diversifying their market.

Digital video is a game for electronics companies (Sony, Panasonic, and Canon), not companies whose main strength is optics and who outsource their electronics. Nikon's best bet is just to build lenses for everyone else's video cameras, not to make them themselves.

So in that sense, Nikon's main rivals are Zeiss, Fuji, and Samyong.

So I am guessing if Nikon cannot design a decent F mount mirrorless hybrid system camera in the next 3 years, before the Tokyo Olympics, they will have to become a third-party lens manufacture designing and producing cheap lenses for the camera video manufactures such as Canon, Sony and m43- just like Samyong or Sigma. They cannot try to sell highend optics to labs or broadcast industry like Zeiss, Leica, Canon, or Fuji since Nikon does not have the luxurious name of Zeiss, Leica, Canon, Fujinon, etc.

I think this is why Nikon has tried to sue Sigma for a several times or so. They know that their real rivals are Sigma, Tamron, and Samyong , and they cannot produce better lens designs than those cheap off-brand manufactures.

So to me,it is sad to face, but the coming death of Nikon as a camera maker seems quite obvious and unavoidable.

  

UPDATE: Many people including myself thought Nikon is dying, if not already dead by now, but in reality Nikon still sells many many more units than Sony and Nikon is now working on new type of sensor design and they may collaborate with Pentax and Olympus to set up a new sensor company. If this plays out well, then Sony will be the loser since they will have no one to sell their mediocre so-called Fullframe sensors any more. And as a result their highend camera prices will go up significantly.

And now Sony has just announced they've just decided to spin off their imaging division and now it is an independent business under Sony corp's supervision, just like their sensor group.....

This means now Sony imaging is not a part of Sony but their subsidiary, and therefore, to Sony device group, the imaging group is just a customer,nothing special, in fact,considering its size of market share in relation to that of Nikon, Sony imaging group is a lower class customer to the device group.

So there is no more reason for Sony device technology to keep the best sensor for in-house use. In fact now Sony device tech must compete with the new sensor company Nikon Olympus Ricoh have just established here and some European sensor designers such as CMOSIS, who makes the Leica SL sensor and M sensor.

And do not forget there is always Canon if Sony does not sell anything to Nikon.........Canon will start selling it and there will be Panasonic and Tower Jazz also........so Nikon will not have any problem choosing sensor suppliers any more.

Sony must sell their best sensors to Nikon, Olympus, and Pentax , or Sony will lose them, Sony cannot choose customers any more.

If Sony is smart, it will not compete with Nikon or Olympus in camera market. After all, Nikon is the biggest customer of Sony.......but Sony also buys steppers from Nikon anyway. So Sony is not dominating the sensor market, or controlling Nikon as many Sony fanboys think..........and the just announced Spun-off of their imaging division makes Sony camera business less trust-worthy........... Sony thinks every business as a short term investment and runs it to make it temporarily profitable and then spins it off.

After that? of course sells it to anyone willing to buy it.........like Sony did with the Vaio PC business, TV business, etc,etc.

That is why no one really trust Sony in the long run, we long term Sony users just use its cameras but always know it is a back-up plan or step-gap solution......

After all no serious camera buyers are as obtuse as many spec-chasers and review sites think they are. None one buys into a big expensive camera system just for an amazing set of features in a body or two...................there are many many more important aspects to a system camera than just a set of great features...

  

UPDATE2: Nikon's response to digital cinema surprises me, especially if they trying to grow your market share. After all it is the only one area that is consistently growing in digital camera market.

 

Nikon is the only major camera company that had no territory to protect. No high end, limited at the medium, not much on the low end, so unlike Canon or Sony, Nikon didn't have to worry about making a whiz bang combination camera that would do high quality stills and motion at almost any price point and cannibalizing other cameras in Nikon DXXX line.

 

Also considering that prior to Canon, everyone in the cinema/motion biz used Nikon Lenses if they used still camera lenses. You could (still can) go to Century and get a Nikon mounted on any film camera, from 16mm Beaulieu to 75mm Panavision, because in the film days, everybody knew that most Nikon lenses were matched in contrast and color, in a very specific way. So Nikon had a foothold in the industry.

 

Of course unless you're on the management side of any of these companies, I doubt we know the whole story.

 

So I'm just wondering, but I have this feeling that when Sony sells sensors, Sony might have Nikon or any one sign a contract that says, yeah you guys can make a video cam, but it can't have ______ fill in the blanks.

 

Of course I could be wrong, but in case of Nikon its very odd corporate decision to be very low-profile in the motion industry does not make much strategic sense , given Nikon's historic name and ability to make excellent cameras and lenses.

 

I strongly think it is the case, and therefore , Nikon has been seeking for a new sensor fab that produces sensor for Nikon as Nikon designed.

 

Nikon has been patenting many many new types of sensor designs that are fully capable of 6k video and Olympus is also working on its own sensor designs, and the EM1MK2 sensor is the first Olympus designed sensor and it is said to be fabbed by TowerJazz or Panasonic(not by Sony).

 

Looks like now everybody is dumping Sony, and maybe Sony is the biggest loser in this game besides Pentax?

 

I have strong feeling Sony may become the next Samsung since Sony cannot keep up running the wide range of its camera business intact without sensor income from Nikon and Olympus.

 

Sensor is rapidly becoming a commodity product and so Sony no longer has any advantage over others. Now any one can design a great sensor, Tamron has just proved it.

 

Oh and the best rated Red Helium sensor is designed by Tower Jazz, not Sony.

 

UPDATE3: Nikon Df2 is coming soon and it will house 24mp sensor but a newer generation chip that Nikon designed or developed and produced by Renasus electronics.

It basically has the feature set of the D750 but in smaller more compact body with the classic camera style controls, which I hate. I am not sure about video feature but it sounds like getting FHD video at 25, 30, 60 p and i , nothing special.

It will also have the best OVF in any digital era camera with new focus screen.....but it is really too anachronistic now and I think Nikon needs to put a decent EVF, rather than an amazing OVF from film era. The price will be a bit more expensive than the current Df was when it was announced in 2014, and I heard that it will be about 25 percent more expensive than the D810 was at its launch price.

So I think it will be over 3k.

 

UPDATE4: Now the DL series is officially canceled and we dealers the biggest victims of it.

Anyway, now there are some Japanese analysts guessing(more like speculating) Nikon is in the process of planned bankruptcy, I am not sure about if it is the case but it actually makes very much sense as we carefully follow what Nikon has done since the 2011 Thai flood.

Nikon has produced nothing really innovative but all crappy flawed camera products that needed a few recalls or modifications to finally actually work as advertised. The D600 had terrible dust issue, the D750 had a several serious mirror related issues and Nikon has issued a several recalls for that.

The D800 and E had shutter, mirror and left AF issue but Nikon has never admitted it.

Now the DL disaster.

I am sure the CEO is incompetent but at least not as stupid or obtuse as he seems to be, and he is a person from Tochigi Nikon (precision group) and he has been said to be always hating the imaging group, and thus carefully planning the best(actually worst) way for Nikon to go out of the imaging business, just make some red financial reports a few times then the shareholders ask him to decide finally shutting down the imaging group, that is what many analysts here begin to report now.

Nikon is struggling we all know about it but it is not as bad as the many medias try hard to make it out to be, actually far from it. So I initially thought the prediction of the planned bankruptcy of the company or at least the imaging group ridiculous, but now I think it may be the case, other wise, it is really hard to explain this 50 billion loss Nikon has reported for the last quarter now as the final loss of the imaging group.

    

The light here changes incessantly and it was almost impossible to properly expose to the light without proper LV.

  

The coming death of Nikon as a camera brand 2

 

I went to Yufuin Onsen(hot spring complex) area of Oita prefecture for work and academic conference held in there.

I attended a social study conference for a couple of days there and I traveled there after that for 2 days. I think I went to Yufuin,Beppu, Oita, which is the captial city of Oita pref, Kuju(volcano complex), and Aso(volcano complex near Kumamoto).

After this short academic trip to North East Kyushu I realized the death of consumer camera market issue is more serious than we once thought; it is not time to discuss mirrorless vs DSLRs or iPhone, but it is really the time to discuss how to save this industry at any cost...........anyway to my surprise, I did not see or meet any one with a Sony A7X camera, which is supposed to be the most popular innovative camera currently available according to many silly online camera forums, other than my self in any of the 5 places I visited in this trip.

I met a couple of American researchers from UC something, and one of them climbed a middle sized mountain together with me and he had 2 m43( GX80 and EM5MK2) and Fuji X-Pro2.

 

I think the noisy puny Sony cameras I have are not very well suited for both urban documentary of my academic travels and mountain hiking climbing........Most of photographers I met in Volcanic complex areas of Oita prefecture had a Canon 5D something or a m43 or a Fuji. My coworker said ," it was really surprising but no one other than us had a Sony, how come?"

Well it is nothing surprising since I know Sony Alpha 7 series cameras are not selling well in real world outside of camera forums. They are only popular among those camera fanatic forum denizens like us...........

But the maybe more shocking reality to those of us long time Nikon shooter is that no one seems to be shooting Nikon any more and even in a big anti Nuclear demo I encountered near Oita station no one using Nikon due to the poor LV and video performance of all Nikon FX bodies. Also many many guys told me the excessively loud shutter sound of Nikon DSLRs would make the cops really irritated or angry.

I guess Nikon is rapidly becoming kind of an irrelevant player , no longer a rival of Canon but seems really like a rival of Ricoh.......Nikon really needs serious Fullframe or APS-C mirrorless system with silent shutter, or Nikon may have to die soon.

 

Now the D5600 is out and I have tested it at a trade show here, and I confirmed its LV AF speed is a tiny bit faster than the D500 or anything from Nikon since 2011, but still no where near the level of Canon dual Pixel AF or Fuji X-T2 or Panasonic GX8 or G85, let alone the GH5 or the current fastest mirrorless champion the Olympus EM1 MK2.

 

We all know that just a few months back, no Nikon fanboys admitted the fact Nikon might be losing the game and they insisted on there would never be a mirrorless camera that would rival the D500 in AF and overall speed............but now it seems all changing rapidly. The game has changed and Nikon seems unable to adapt to the new rules set by Sony, Olympus, Panasonic and Fuji..........it seems like Nikon has been and will be the most vulnerable one of the all consumer camera makers if not the biggest loser.

     

When Nikon D800 and E were the greatest cameras among those armchair experts online and those avid Nikon lovers(Canon haters) all predicted the death of Canon and trashed all Canon cameras for a bit less DR at base ISO..........but did the D800E actually become a big commercial success for Nikon?

All those Nikon lovers made the sensor DR at very base ISO a huge issue and trashed all those having lesser DR at base ISO than their beloved Nikon as though they were all useless junks for any application without realizing their beloved a gen older Nikons all had lesser DR and resolution than the rival Canon and Sony back then.

Many Nikon avid fans make the D800 series a huge deal, but besides the sensor what has been so appealing to non Nikon users or even Nikon users who are not interested in a cheap landscape or a budget studio work camera set up under 10K USD range?

Often Thom Hogan and PhotographyLife,etc repeat in their review of any camera(either a mirrorless or a D-SLR).

"The D810 is overall still the best camera body to date even without the class leading sensor and the great F mount lens line for the FX , It was definitely the best DSLR on the market in this segment. So reducing a D810 to its sensor is an over simplification and stupid."

And he claims himself an unbiased Nikon shooter........Really? To me he seems like one of the biggest pro Nikon avid Nikon fanboy reviewer in the world. He may be trying to be neutral but it is obvious that he is not a neutral but a pro Nikon person.

Just imagine there was a Nikon D810b with the Canon 5D3 sensor, which would have been a slow, clumsy body with limited lens selection, poor live view, a slow frame rate, a weaker AF system than the 5D3 and no immense IQ advantage over the competition. It was the Exmor which got the D800 off the ground, prior to the D810's refinements. Without it, it would have gotten nowhere, but another boring 1970 style crappy retro camera offering. Bear in mind that, in 2012, Canon practically owned the high-resolution/low ISO crowd, since the 5D2 had such a huge resolution advantage over the D700 (which was, in every other way, a better stills camera). It's really a testament to the strength of the Exmor - and Canon's stagnation at the time - that the D800/D810 were able to get many those people who were obsessed with the base ISO DR thing to ditch their Canon setup and move to the Nikon system.

But it was just a very short time trend-until the A7R was out. The A7R was a terrible body ,but for those who loved the also terrible D800 series body, it was not a serious issue since their intended use of those high resolution so-called FF was on tripod-serious static thing shooting just like I do use my A7R or my old D800E.....the biggest attraction of the Sony over the Nikon for a Canon shooter was that they did not have to change the lenses they already owned, just buying adapter let you use the Sony sensor with your own Canon lenses.

Even back in 2012 when the D800E thing was the hottest and greatest ever, Nikon was losing sells to Canon and Sony, to a lesser extent to m43.

Nikon lost about 15 percent of its market share in 2012 from its peak in 2008(when the D3 was the hottest camera) despite of the crazy D800E hype generated online.

If the so-called amazing DR was so important to most and even besides that the camera was the best D-SLR ever, then why haven't those amazing Nikon D800 series been commercially successful for Nikon but rather money losing products?

This year Nikon has lost even more sales; sales down 20%, Income down 30%, disastrous Coolpix, Nikon1 performance and non-existent DL cameras all paint a dismal picture, and with no mirrorless or video/motion presence worth speaking of, an even worse outlook. The only area that made up for the loss in imaging was the successful Precision semiconductor group.Bottom line is the balance sheet doesn't lie. And this poor results of Nikon prove that no one outside of the internet camera forums really care about so called amazing DR at base ISO, or what Nikon call amazing pro AF, but more sophisticated overall hybrid functionality, with a bit more like universal mount design.

In fact, those do care about the base ISO DR or obsessed with it actually prefer it in a mirrorless body combined with the amazing Sony EPSON EVF used in the XT2 and A7R2 and thus the temporal switchers from Canon to Nikon for the D800 all moved to or moving to Sony for the A7R series. No one really cares about so-called pro AF in their very high DR high resolution camera since they are not intended to use handheld but on a solid tripod.

Those just needed a bit better DR with very good AF, fast performance, and pro class ergonomics all moved back to Canon for the 5D4 for its better LV and video performance compared to the poor Nikon way of LV in the D800E/D810.

So despite of the all crazy hype for the D8XX, Nikon has been losing serious amount of money to Sony Canon and now to Fuji and Olympus.

Internet is consisted of full of lies and disinfos or ones' wishful thinking, those who do not know anything about the actual sells speak about it as though they knew all with access to the real sells numbers of each camera company. So the D800, the D810, the D500, and the A7R are all huge hits in all camera forums online, but they haven't performed very well commercially......In fact, the one which has stabilized current Sony's market position in this market as the solid no2 player is the A6000, A6300, not the much more hyped A7R series. And the original A7 is the still best selling of the A7X series cameras.

And the all time best selling FF camera is still the Canon 6D, and the saddest reality for Nikon is the 6D alone simply outsells the all the Nikon FX sells combined.

Many Nikon fans never realize it but Nikon is a tiny company, in fact, it is even smaller than Olympus or Ricoh, who Nikon fans usually dismiss or mock as a tiny player, or as an irrelevant player.

Olympus is at least 4 times bigger than Nikon is in terms of total revenue and income in this year.

And there is rumor that Fuji will take over Nikon and produce Nikon branded endscopes soon.

Many Nikon fans still believe Nikon has all the mirrorless and video tech needed in house, but is it really true?

Nikon has no background in digital video and their supporting hardware is likely quite underdeveloped compared to Sony or Canon in catering to video. This is quite evident in their still cameras, which underperform video-wise compared to Canon, Sony, Panasonic or even Olympus and now Fuji still cameras. Doing so would also carry the same risk as their current offering - the complete lack of control over their sensor supply - while not really diversifying their market.

Digital video is a game for electronics companies (Sony, Panasonic, and Canon), not companies whose main strength is optics and who outsource their electronics. Nikon's best bet is just to build lenses for everyone else's video cameras, not to make them themselves.

So in that sense, Nikon's main rivals are Zeiss, Fuji, and Samyong.

So I am guessing if Nikon cannot design a decent F mount mirrorless hybrid system camera in the next 3 years, before the Tokyo Olympics, they will have to become a third-party lens manufacture designing and producing cheap lenses for the camera video manufactures such as Canon, Sony and m43- just like Samyong or Sigma. They cannot try to sell highend optics to labs or broadcast industry like Zeiss, Leica, Canon, or Fuji since Nikon does not have the luxurious name of Zeiss, Leica, Canon, Fujinon, etc.

I think this is why Nikon has tried to sue Sigma for a several times or so. They know that their real rivals are Sigma, Tamron, and Samyong , and they cannot produce better lens designs than those cheap off-brand manufactures.

So to me,it is sad to face, but the coming death of Nikon as a camera maker seems quite obvious and unavoidable.

  

UPDATE: Many people including myself thought Nikon is dying, if not already dead by now, but in reality Nikon still sells many many more units than Sony and Nikon is now working on new type of sensor design and they may collaborate with Pentax and Olympus to set up a new sensor company. If this plays out well, then Sony will be the loser since they will have no one to sell their mediocre so-called Fullframe sensors any more. And as a result their highend camera prices will go up significantly.

And now Sony has just announced they've just decided to spin off their imaging division and now it is an independent business under Sony corp's supervision, just like their sensor group.....

This means now Sony imaging is not a part of Sony but their subsidiary, and therefore, to Sony device group, the imaging group is just a customer,nothing special, in fact,considering its size of market share in relation to that of Nikon, Sony imaging group is a lower class customer to the device group.

So there is no more reason for Sony device technology to keep the best sensor for in-house use. In fact now Sony device tech must compete with the new sensor company Nikon Olympus Ricoh have just established here and some European sensor designers such as CMOSIS, who makes the Leica SL sensor and M sensor.

And do not forget there is always Canon if Sony does not sell anything to Nikon.........Canon will start selling it and there will be Panasonic and Tower Jazz also........so Nikon will not have any problem choosing sensor suppliers any more.

Sony must sell their best sensors to Nikon, Olympus, and Pentax , or Sony will lose them, Sony cannot choose customers any more.

If Sony is smart, it will not compete with Nikon or Olympus in camera market. After all, Nikon is the biggest customer of Sony.......but Sony also buys steppers from Nikon anyway. So Sony is not dominating the sensor market, or controlling Nikon as many Sony fanboys think..........and the just announced Spun-off of their imaging division makes Sony camera business less trust-worthy........... Sony thinks every business as a short term investment and runs it to make it temporarily profitable and then spins it off.

After that? of course sells it to anyone willing to buy it.........like Sony did with the Vaio PC business, TV business, etc,etc.

That is why no one really trust Sony in the long run, we long term Sony users just use its cameras but always know it is a back-up plan or step-gap solution......

After all no serious camera buyers are as obtuse as many spec-chasers and review sites think they are. None one buys into a big expensive camera system just for an amazing set of features in a body or two...................there are many many more important aspects to a system camera than just a set of great features...

  

UPDATE2: Nikon's response to digital cinema surprises me, especially if they trying to grow your market share. After all it is the only one area that is consistently growing in digital camera market.

 

Nikon is the only major camera company that had no territory to protect. No high end, limited at the medium, not much on the low end, so unlike Canon or Sony, Nikon didn't have to worry about making a whiz bang combination camera that would do high quality stills and motion at almost any price point and cannibalizing other cameras in Nikon DXXX line.

 

Also considering that prior to Canon, everyone in the cinema/motion biz used Nikon Lenses if they used still camera lenses. You could (still can) go to Century and get a Nikon mounted on any film camera, from 16mm Beaulieu to 75mm Panavision, because in the film days, everybody knew that most Nikon lenses were matched in contrast and color, in a very specific way. So Nikon had a foothold in the industry.

 

Of course unless you're on the management side of any of these companies, I doubt we know the whole story.

 

So I'm just wondering, but I have this feeling that when Sony sells sensors, Sony might have Nikon or any one sign a contract that says, yeah you guys can make a video cam, but it can't have ______ fill in the blanks.

 

Of course I could be wrong, but in case of Nikon its very odd corporate decision to be very low-profile in the motion industry does not make much strategic sense , given Nikon's historic name and ability to make excellent cameras and lenses.

 

I strongly think it is the case, and therefore , Nikon has been seeking for a new sensor fab that produces sensor for Nikon as Nikon designed.

 

Nikon has been patenting many many new types of sensor designs that are fully capable of 6k video and Olympus is also working on its own sensor designs, and the EM1MK2 sensor is the first Olympus designed sensor and it is said to be fabbed by TowerJazz or Panasonic(not by Sony).

 

Looks like now everybody is dumping Sony, and maybe Sony is the biggest loser in this game besides Pentax?

 

I have strong feeling Sony may become the next Samsung since Sony cannot keep up running the wide range of its camera business intact without sensor income from Nikon and Olympus.

 

Sensor is rapidly becoming a commodity product and so Sony no longer has any advantage over others. Now any one can design a great sensor, Tamron has just proved it.

 

Oh and the best rated Red Helium sensor is designed by Tower Jazz, not Sony.

 

UPDATE3: Nikon Df2 is coming soon and it will house 24mp sensor but a newer generation chip that Nikon designed or developed and produced by Renasus electronics.

It basically has the feature set of the D750 but in smaller more compact body with the classic camera style controls, which I hate. I am not sure about video feature but it sounds like getting FHD video at 25, 30, 60 p and i , nothing special.

It will also have the best OVF in any digital era camera with new focus screen.....but it is really too anachronistic now and I think Nikon needs to put a decent EVF, rather than an amazing OVF from film era. The price will be a bit more expensive than the current Df was when it was announced in 2014, and I heard that it will be about 25 percent more expensive than the D810 was at its launch price.

So I think it will be over 3k.

 

UPDATE4: Now the DL series is officially canceled and we dealers the biggest victims of it.

Anyway, now there are some Japanese analysts guessing(more like speculating) Nikon is in the process of planned bankruptcy, I am not sure about if it is the case but it actually makes very much sense as we carefully follow what Nikon has done since the 2011 Thai flood.

Nikon has produced nothing really innovative but all crappy flawed camera products that needed a few recalls or modifications to finally actually work as advertised. The D600 had terrible dust issue, the D750 had a several serious mirror related issues and Nikon has issued a several recalls for that.

The D800 and E had shutter, mirror and left AF issue but Nikon has never admitted it.

Now the DL disaster.

I am sure the CEO is incompetent but at least not as stupid or obtuse as he seems to be, and he is a person from Tochigi Nikon (precision group) and he has been said to be always hating the imaging group, and thus carefully planning the best(actually worst) way for Nikon to go out of the imaging business, just make some red financial reports a few times then the shareholders ask him to decide finally shutting down the imaging group, that is what many analysts here begin to report now.

Nikon is struggling we all know about it but it is not as bad as the many medias try hard to make it out to be, actually far from it. So I initially thought the prediction of the planned bankruptcy of the company or at least the imaging group ridiculous, but now I think it may be the case, other wise, it is really hard to explain this 50 billion loss Nikon has reported for the last quarter now as the final loss of the imaging group.

    

Identifier: goldfishbreedsot00wolf

Title: Goldfish breeds and other aquarium fishes, their care and propagation : a guide to freshwater and marine aquaria, their fauna, flora and management. With 280 explanatory illustrations, printed with the text

Year: 1908 (1900s)

Authors: Wolf, Herman Theodore, 1855-

Subjects: Aquariums Goldfish

Publisher: Philadelphia : Innes & sons

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

black eyes; and others pearly-white bodies, and finsmottled with red, and red and black eyes, though none of these coloringsare necessarily permanent. The colors of these fishes are so fantastic thatFrench, German and American authorities class them as much by thesecolor peculiarities as by changes in body structure. The following are the most generally known of the Chinese telescopic-eyed goldfishes bred in the United States: THE CHINESE MOTTLED OR VARIEGATEDTELESCOPE GOLDFISH Carassius auratus, var. chinensis veriegatus. Figs. 19, 20, 21 and 22 This variety of the Telescope is commonly known as the Calico, asbest describing its fantastic markings. The body is short and thick ; thespine has a decided backward curve; the snout is formed to give the short 53 GOLDFISH BREEDS head a pugnacious appearance ; the mouth is placed almost vertically atthe front of the head ; the lips are distinct; the nostrils small but erect,and the eyes very large and usually disclike or tubular in form. The

 

Text Appearing After Image:

FIG. 19—Adult Chinese Mottled Telescope GoldfishCarassius auratus,var. chinensis veriegatus. Lateral view. Two-thirds life size dorsal fin is high and short; all the lower fins are paired, long and verybroad ; the tail is double and the two separate tails are carried at an angle

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Why many of our customers see m43 has failed 1:

 

The thing that would concern me if I was in management in Canon, or Nikon, or indeed Pentax, Olympus or Fuji is brand recognition among younger generations and in developing markets.

 

Of course to us (middle aged enthusiasts) Canon, Nikon, etc. means something positive. We recognize them as 'photo' brands And although we may be Nikon users (or Canon, Fuji, Olympus or Pentax users) we recognize and accept the others as photo brands because we know that historically they have earned their place in the market. They are familiar to us.

But a child born today is much more likely to be exposed to brands more relevant to him or her. Like the brands that manufacture phones, or tablets, or Apps, or even sportswear.

Similar is true of emerging markets. Some years back Yashica(I do not know what Yashica is, so he must be much older than me) used to be No. 1 in India. Why? Presumably because the Yashica importer / distributor did a better job at the time in establishing that brand in a market that was starting from a very low base and had few if any historical brand preconceptions.

So should, say, Nike suddenly decide to start marketing cameras aimed at younger people they might have a lot more brand recognition in a relatively short time than say the market leader, i.e. Canon. After all what does Canon do that really appeals to a teenager? Cameras? Granddad products. Copiers? Office Valium, and of course, medical equipment such as CT scan and X-Ray machine, but people even know that they make such variety of things? And the same also applies to the other 'established' photo companies maybe except Sony, whose one of main businesses is PlayStation.

 

Of course there are many technological hurdles that a new brand would have to overcome to compete, let alone dominate in the photo market but those are certainly not insurmountable, should of course anyone think it is actually worth doing, and if it is too difficult they can just buy the techs needed to enter into this market.

Remember this.... Olympus, Panasonic, Fujifilm and Samsung did not move to Mirrorless because they wanted to. They moved because they were forced to. They really had no other choice.

All four companies failed in the DSLR market, and had to try something else. They could not compete with Canon, Nikon and to a large extent Pentax in the DSLR market, and had to either retreat to fixed lens cameras, or try something else. So they tried so-called Mirrorless system camera with mixed success. It didn't end well for Samsung, but the other three seem to be doing fairly well, especially for Fuji.

At least they are doing better than when they were selling EVolt DSLRs (Olympus), Lumix DSLRs(Paasonic), re-branded Nikon DSLRs (Fujifilm), or re-branded Pentax DSLRs (Samsung).

And we all know it was a good thing for them even for a very temporal time that they did actually try something different, because the bottom fell out of the P&S market.

Without an ILC to sell when the market is moving to higher ground for survival, you end up becoming Casio, that said though, oddly enough , Casio is actually outdoing the 3 that tried something new. But the real question is why they did not do well in DSLR market?

I think because,like our old customers said it above, Panasonic, Olympus, Pentax and Fuji had no brand recognition and not enough number of fanatic supporters, at the time. At least not enough number to compete Canon, Nikon and Sony in DSLR business.

Sony is another story, and a more actually much more complicated one. They seem to compete in every market, hoping that something sticks. And right now Sony E/FE seems to have pretty good traction, and Sony A Mount is believed to be on the way out. However, Sony denies it firmly at CP Plus and NBA.

At the CP + show in Yokohama, I asked a few A mount related questions to a couple of Sony guys, and I got interesting answers to my questions.

Basically, Sony said the A7RMK2 is the 'the E mount' flagship, but not the real flagship for the Alpha system. The 2 different lines of Alpha systems will be merged but not the E takes over the A kind of merging.

Sony says, it will be very interesting to many and technologically shocking to the public. But it is really difficult to do that right, and Sony needs to improve or waiting for a few key techs for that incredible things to come into the A mount. This is why Sony has had to cancel out the planned announcement of the A99VMK2 or whatever called(Sony guys said at least 2 times they canceled it).

A few new techs not available at the time of the planned announcement for the A mount FF body became available right after that and Sony thought that would surely improve it further. Sony thinks we should wait to see it before making any firm decision on buying into any existing camera system because it will be Sony's first true pro-grade, grand-breaking true game changer. I hope it will be true, but how long will we have to wait? Why not just release a temporal stop gap solution camera with current best technology available? Sony is really odd, they seem to be really obsessed with shocking the public with every camera announcement kind of idea.

But is A mount really doomed ? I 'd say no. Many people think it is really long await, but hey see the reality, the A99 was announced in November 2012, the Canon EOS5DMK3 was announced in Feb,2012 and still not updated, so no need irrational panic just yet.

The D800/E was updated because it was a flawed camera from the start and Nikon could not hide the many many technical design flaws and many usability issues of that camera. The D800 did not do well in the camera market despite of the common forum myth that the D800 killed the 5DMK3 and the A99 in terms of sells,etc.

I think this clearly shows us what sells and no, following the idea proposed by the camera fanatics at many fora does not work. The D800 is a big mistake for Nikon, not many people wanted it, not many people obsessed with the tiny bit better DR at the very base ISO. By comparison, the Sony A7R was a huge success for Sony because it was a more logical choice for many of us who really wanted the tiny bit better DR of the D800 sensor since that tiny Sony took all our existing Canon EF, Nikon F, Leica M, Minolta Sony A, etc, without any issue. And for ultimate IQ work, we do not need the flappy mirror and the associated mirror shock.

I think, despite of the common forum myth that m43 is selling very well and no 1 in Japan,etc, it is the most doomed future-less system out there.

All the current ILC cameras are big to most of NORMAL non-photographer people, and they are very intimidating to most of NORMAL people(I mean regardless of mount type or sensor type).

I never realized it before but while walking around down town Fukuoka with one of my long time friends here forced me to understand it. A friend of mine told me that he thinks all interchangeable lens cameras are huge and intimidating to most of average people regardless of sensor size or format, it's just simply annoying!

I guess a big lens scares or annoys people more than a big body......I never saw it his way but I got his point and I decided to carry my tiny Canon G5X2 when I just walk around the city area with other people. If I am alone shooting something, then I usually carry my big camera, and I think it does not matter it's a m43, or FF, or an APS-C, it is all big to most of NORMAL people anyway.

Then why not just go all way up to FF or MFDB, or at least APS-C?

So maybe the one really doomed is not Nikon or Sony A mount but m43?

Nikon Fand Sony Alpha mount have historically had very enthusiastic and even fanatic core shooters and they are usually too old to adapt themselves fast to new EVF based hybrid-minded gear even if they understand it is the more logical thing for them as they are aged. So D-SLRs may survive as antique cameras, but m43 or Nikon One?

After all, to most of NORMAL people, Panasonic is really nothing but a microwave company as my Thai friend, who has been an assistant prof at Bangkok university.

He hated Panasonic cameras although he loved GH4 when I had him try my GH4 without Panasonic name, I covered the name with blacktape. And sadly enough, Panasonic understands it, so they tend to put Leica name on their lenses, but did not have the guts to change the brand name on their camera.

  

UPDATE : Now once again, it's proven that Sony and its E mount fanboys are all bark but never actually bite kind of dogs. Thanks to DXO for proving this, the over hyped, expensive, almost ridiculously huge Sony FE24-70mm f2.8G-Master is really just as good or a tiny bit better than the infamous so-called Zeiss fisheye zoom FE24-70mm f4Z even at the huge cost of the oversized barrel with the 82mm filter thread design. In fact , the expensive oversized FE24-70mmf2.8 G-Master(WTF is the G master anyway) is optically much worse than the Canon EF24-70mm f2.8L MK2 that all mean, ill-spirited Sony A7 fanboys despised a few months back(when the G master line was announced). And even sadly, the Sony G master is even worse than the equally huge but a bit lighter Nikon AF-S24-70mm f2.8E VR. Yeah Sony has again proved the E mount means overpriced trendy toy for old men, it might be taken as cool fashion item or cool old man's toy for the silly mount adapter game for a while(at least).

But for cost effective real world solution, Sony is not the answer to most of us. I am not anti mirrorless but becoming anti-Sony, and I am tired of all their immature products coming with their extremely condescending marketing.

 

Hope Red or someone like that will challenge the A7X line with better video minded ergonomics design.

  

Update2:now, I think FF mirrorless is, like self-driving car, it is the future, definitely, but not really mature enough to be practical for many real life tasks, and they are both still immensely overpriced just because newer tech relatively to their older more practical rivals.

The Sony a7R2 should be cheaper than the D810 considering it does not have the complex mirror and proper weather sealings on the shutter. The X-T2 should be as cheap as the D7200 or the 80D. The A6300 should be as cheap as its predecessor(about 650US), no more than that, it is a great camera but still not able to shoot from a fast running car or train like the 7DMK2 or the D500, and so if you were a paparazzi or anything like that, you would not choose the A6300 as your main camera.

When I wrote my previous A6300 vs D500 hands-on experience,I was very very impressed with the A6300 AF, especially with the FE55mm f1.8Z. But now I am sure if my work is completely relying on the best AF in the game, I'd definitely choose the D500, not the A6300, which could not focus well on a super fast moving thing from a fast running train or a car unless the light level is perfectly ideal.

In last week,I tried to shoot street snaps from a fast running super express train with my A6300, A7M2 and A7R2, none of my Sonys could focus on anything moving from a 300km/h fast running train, I was really glad I also brought my D750 with me for my last short train trip.

Like Thom Hogan said, the Sony Alpha E mount cameras are too slow for anything moving fast, I mean their single AF speed is very fast, but it cannot track fast, especially when the light level is not really ideal.

Plus, the general operation speed of the Sony is just painfully slow, even the most expensive A7SMK2 is very slow. I mean it takes about 30 seconds to format a card, about 5 seconds or more to wake up from a long sleep, etc, and is too slow for anything unpredictably moving or decisive once a life time kind of shot. Another big issue of the Sony FE system is terribly short battery life. I know if I bring this up, many Sony fans would tell me after adding a couple of extra batteries it is still lighter than any of Nikon Canon FF D-SLRs. Maybe so, but the real issue here is because we need to change the battery almost every couple of hours, we would miss many decisive moments, and it is really annoying.

 

Now, it is obvious this is the most difficult time to spend some serious amount of money into any of these already existing camera system since they all suck in some ways and all the camera companies are too arrogant or stupid to listen to the actual users.

 

The FE50mm f1.4Z is an amazing lens that may change the direction of the entire industry but it is a huge lens, honestly, if I knew where Sony were heading to at very first place in 2013, I would not have spent this much money into Sony FE system......I wanted it to be small, light and simple, but now it is a big, heavy, expensive and very complex system.

Really, why every new lens must be AF and this huge is beyond me. It is just making the system impractical with the terribly oversized lenses. I have never seen any 50 this big(except my Otus 55 and the old Sigma Art I hated both of those huge 50 primes), seriously it is as big as the 85mm f1.4 GM and is an ugly looking lens, too.

Sony should not try a D-SLR replacement system with the A7 system, but a great RangeFinder replacement system.

Hope they wake up soon.

 

The real reason why mirrorless cameras are not already successful replacing supposed to be primitive D-SLRs is they are bad value for our buck. Maybe it is newer better tech, but still very bad value.......almost all current mirrorless cameras are overpriced considering the fact most of them are still playing the catching-up game, every year they are replaced.

The A7MK2 was the first mirrorless camera to have stayed in the market for longer than a year. And the A7R2 seems to follow that trend.

   

For over a decade, CIAT has tested agronomic and soil management practices in Western Kenya. From minimum tillage to integrated soil fertility management, these trials are the most comprehensive picture of tropical soil health that we have in Kenya. They show-case changes in soil fertility and health, which take time to develop, hence the importance of these long-term trails. CIAT’s “Climate-smart soil protection and rehabilitation in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, India and Kenya” project is implemented in collaboration with the Kenya Agriculture and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO); GOPA and implementing partners including PAFID, Welthungerhilfe and WOCAT - University of Bern. It is supported by the German Society for International Cooperation (GIZ) and the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). For more information, visit: “Seeing is believing” or contact g.smith (at) cgiar (dot) org. Please credit accordingly: Georgina Smith / CIAT.

A black and white one for a change.

 

Danique Laken from Modelution Model Management

 

Special thanks to Transcontinenta for supplying Carl Zeiss Optics and Lastolite Reflectors I used a Zeiss Sonnar T* 135mm f/2 ZE for these images.

  

Feb. 21, 2017. Boston, MA.

Our Money, Our Communities Rally and March from Bank of America, 100 Federal St in Boston to Santander Bank Headquarters.

Bank worker unions are the norm in other countries around the world (and the US is the only country where Santander workers arenât unionized). Santander workers present their petition to management in Boston making them the first workers at a major US bank to try to unionize.

Jack Smith writes:

âThe U.S. bank workers have three demands. The first is greater wages and greater share of the profits, and the second is stable, full-time jobs. Crisp uniforms and polished storefronts aside, bank tellers are solidly low-wage employees â and wages have only taken a downturn over the past decade; as of May 2015, the median annual wage for a bank teller was $26,410.

The third demand isnât just about protecting workers or shoring up their jobs â itâs about stopping predatory banking practices that pit bank workers against their own communities.â

This third demand is especially important here in New England, as evidenced by a recent report documents Santanderâs discriminatory lending practices, which have had a particularly damaging impact in Massachusetts. Worker input could help to change those practices, as it did in the case of Wells Fargo last year.

Committee for Better Banks is a group of bank workers and consumers dedicated to improving the financial services industry for everyone by stopping foreclosures, displacement, and bank worker abuse.

Sponsored by: Committee for Better Banks, Massachusetts Jobs with Justice, Right to the City, City Life/Vida Urbana, Massachusetts Alliance against Predatory Lending, United for a Fair Economy, Massachusetts AFL-CIO, Communications Workers of America.

Â:copyright: 2017 Marilyn Humphries

For over a decade, CIAT has tested agronomic and soil management practices in Western Kenya. From minimum tillage to integrated soil fertility management, these trials are the most comprehensive picture of tropical soil health that we have in Kenya. They show-case changes in soil fertility and health, which take time to develop, hence the importance of these long-term trails. CIAT’s “Climate-smart soil protection and rehabilitation in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, India and Kenya” project is implemented in collaboration with the Kenya Agriculture and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO); GOPA and implementing partners including PAFID, Welthungerhilfe and WOCAT - University of Bern. It is supported by the German Society for International Cooperation (GIZ) and the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ). For more information, visit: “Seeing is believing” or contact g.smith (at) cgiar (dot) org. Please credit accordingly: Georgina Smith / CIAT.

Morro Bay CA Pink Sunset over the Pacific Ocean at Morro Rock

 

Eff. 20 Aug. 2013 license changes to "all rights reserved" due to adoption by Getty Images.

 

20 Aug 2013, the original 1024 x 1024 icon version has been replaced with a larger 3648x2736 original here due to a Getty request to represent the image.

 

The original 1024x1024 icon displayed here is now a hidden file www.flickr.com/photos/mikebaird/9555966139/

 

This is a proposed splash screen and icon for an iPhone and Android App I'm building using JamPot's The AppBuilder

Morro Rock at sunset on Morro Strand State Beach, Morro Bay, CA

 

To use this photo...

Eff. 20 Aug. 2013 license changes to "all rights reserved" due to adoption by Getty Images.

Please add comments/notes/tags to add to or correct information, identification, etc. Please, no comments or invites with badges, unrelated images, flashing icons, links to your photos, multiple invites, or invites with award levels and/or award/post rules. Critique is always welcomed.

 

PhotoMorroBay.com Social Network - An App to appear soon in the Apple and Android App stores.

PhotoMorroBay.com Social Network. Author: Mike Baird Created: 9/29/2011 8:10:55 PM Status: Awaiting store submission

Support url: photomorrobay.com

email: app{at] mikebaird d o t com

phone: 805-704-2064

 

Description: PhotoMorroBay.com Social Network, including Yahoo! Group discussions, Flickr photo sharing, Digital Photo Walk Meet-ups, Bay Birding Photo Cruises, and Morro Bay Bird Festival photo events.

 

Keywords: photomorrobay,DPW,digital photo walk,bay birding,photo cruise,morro bay,bird festival,Mike Baird,Michael Baird,Dos Osos,Sub Sea Tours,photomorrobay.com,

 

Details: Morro Bay, CA Central Coast Area (San Luis Obispo County, California, USA) PhotoMorroBay.com Social Network, including Yahoo! Group discussions, Flickr photo sharing, Digital Photo Walk Meet-ups, Bay Birding Photo Cruises, and Morro Bay Bird Festival events led by bairdphotos.com photographer "Mike" Michael L. Baird. Share your photography passion. PhotoMorroBay.com -- Gateway to our local Morro Bay, CA photographers' Yahoo! Group for discussions, events, meet-ups, polls, calendars, etc., and Gateway to our local Morro Bay, CA photographers' Flickr Group for photo sharing and critique.

 

*****

1024x1024 version of www.flickr.com/photos/mikebaird/3048731033/ a JamPot TheAppBuilder icon and splash screen resource photomorropbay.com theappbuilder.com

 

Shown as the lone bird is the Long-billed Curlew Numenius americanus) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long-billed_curlew

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Long-billed_Curlew_eating_sand... (another of mine on the Wiki pages)

 

***

11/24/2011 posted here to preserve some comments I recently made about using Apple's Aperture software.

I want to talk about Apple's Aperture 3, which is only $79 in the Mac App Store

(It is still $199 in the Apple Online Store, Amazon, etc., and, it is the same program, just not delivered on physical media).

You can download and install it as many times as you like to all of your machines using the same Apple ID. That beats searching for a DVD.

All of Apple's newer software is now being delivered/sold only online, even the latest Lion OS X.

 

Normally I use only Lightroom for my image management and processing (with some Photoshop CS5 if needed), but since the introduction of iCloud from Apple recently with the iOS 5 and Lion OS X upgrades, and the iPhone 4S,

I find myself taking a lot of iPhone photos (8MP, HDR, HD Video, GPS geo-tagging), the quality of which has astounded me and many others.

 

The cool thing about iCloud is that as soon as you enter a WiFi zone, all the photos you've taken earlier are automatically uploaded into the cloud (Your Photo Stream in iCloud is a rolling collection of your last 1000 photos), and

then they are automatically downloaded into the "Photo Stream" of every Mac device you own running OS X Lion (iMAc, MacBooks, iMAcs, iPads, etc.), where they are then automatically archived permanently.

 

No longer do I need to remove an SDHC card from a point-and-shoot camera and import the photos into a computer, and then worry about syncing all my photos from my different machines into consistent libraries.

 

For this to work on OSX Lion (iMac, MacBooks...), however, one MUST use either Apple's iPhoto or Aperture program.

Now many of you know I hate iPhoto (it tries as hard as possible not to let you know where your photos are on your hard drive; makes duplicate copies with every edit, etc.).

 

So I was curious and looked at Aperture again even though I was biased against it.

I didn't like the $199 price, but when I found that Apple lowered the download price in the App store to $79,

I bought it and played with it.

 

You can learn about Aperture at

www.apple.com/aperture/what-is.html

www.apple.com/aperture/action/

www.apple.com/aperture/action/frakes/

www.apple.com/aperture/what-is.html#overlay-jarvis

www.apple.com/aperture/iphoto-to-aperture/

store.apple.com/us/product/MB957Z/A#overview

--- you too will be impressed with it's power... many professionals use it for high-end production projects.

 

So, bottom line is that I'm done with iPhoto.

All my iPhone photos are sent to my Aperture Application on my Macs automatically (and I'll also know exactly where they are on the hard drive).

I then have the option to further export/import between Lightroom and Aperture or Photoshop if I want to preserve my usual workflow, and prepare the iPhone photos the same way I do all my RAW Canon SLR images.

I may well not even bother using Lightroom treatment for many of my social iPhone photos, as Aperture cleans them up in seconds... and provides automated Flickr and such uploads.

 

I highly recommend Apple's Aperture as a vehicle for integrating your iPhone iCloud images into your existing Lightroom/Bridge/Photoshop workflow.

And, many professionals find they prefer to use Aperture as their only image management/processing tool (it is nicely integrated into the Apple eco-system, using for example your Apple Contacts to aid in labeling faces in your images).

very impressive. Apple is doing a lot of things right.

 

I wonder when Canon and Nikon will catch up. 11/24/2011

 

08 July 2015 CC use as an unsplash photo

www.dropbox.com/s/snuyrz7v4xwi135/pool_456.jpg?dl=0

www.facebook.com/groups/Glitchcollective/786226681498886/

The light here changes incessantly and it was almost impossible to properly expose to the light without proper LV.

  

The coming death of Nikon as a camera brand 2

 

"We Nikon shooters tend to frequent these forums to maintan healthy loyalty to our brand of choice.,Nikon..May be we get a little nervous with every new mirrorless camera release. I know we lost so much ground to Sony already, with Fuji coming out strong we fear being dethroned completely."

 

A die-hard Nikon guy in a forum said the above and many of his fellows criticizing him of being brutally honest about his feeling.

But it seems like many Nikon fans feeling uneasy and may actually begin to consider gradual switch over to Sony or Fuji or maybe Canon....or some even considering the EM1MK2 seriously.

 

So is Nikon really heading straight down into the Toilet?

Is that any better than Olympus or Panasonic that Nikon fans always mocking trashing for the tiny sensor in those internet camera forums?

 

To me Nikon's results do look actually worse than a month ago and they seem to be a lot worse performing than their tiny sensor rivals such as Panasonic, Fuji and Olympus.

  

Again, in this winter, I went up to Tsukuba university in Ibaraki prefecture for work and academic conference held at Epochal Tsukuba.

I attended a social study conference for 3 days there and I traveled there after that for 3 days. I think I went to Tokyo, Tsukuba, Tsuchiura, and Mito, which is the capital city of Ibaraki prefecture.

After this short academic trip to North East Kanto, Japan I realized the death of consumer camera market issue is more serious than we once thought. It was really bad, I think it is not the right time to discuss mirrorless vs DSLRs or iPhone, but it is really the time to discuss how to save this industry at any cost...........anyway to my surprise, I did not see or meet any one with a Sony A7X camera, which is supposed to be the most popular innovative camera currently available according to many silly online camera forums. It seemed as though I was the only one person in Tsukuba area of Ibaraki shooting a Sony A7R series body.......to me it was really shocking.

I met a couple of American researchers from UC something at Tsukuba university, and one of them climbed a middle sized mountain together with me and he had 2 m43( GX80 and EM5MK2) and Fuji X-Pro2. And he let me try his new Panasonic G80, I actually liked it, found it very intuitive.

 

I think the puny Sony cameras I have are not very well suited for both urban documentary of my academic travels and mountain hiking climbing........Most of photographers I met in Tsukuba mountain complex area of Tsukuba had either a Canon 5D something or a m43 or a Fuji. My coworker said ," it was really surprising but no one other than us had a Sony, how come?"

Well it is nothing surprising since I know Sony Alpha 7 series cameras are not selling well in real world outside of camera forums. They are only popular among those camera fanatic forum denizens like us...........

But the maybe more shocking reality to those of us long time Nikon shooter is that no one seems to be shooting Nikon any more and even in a big anti Nuclear demo I encountered near Kasumigaseki station no one using Nikon due to the poor LV and video performance of all Nikon FX bodies. Also many many guys shooting the demo told me the excessively loud shutter sound of Nikon DSLRs would make the cops really irritated or even angry.

I guess Nikon is rapidly becoming kind of an irrelevant player here in Japan , no longer a rival of Canon but seems really like a rival of Ricoh.......Nikon really needs serious Fullframe or APS-C mirrorless system with silent shutter, or Nikon may have to go bankrupt very very soon.

 

Now the D5600 is out and I have tested it at a trade show here, and I confirmed its LV AF speed is a tiny bit faster than the D500 or anything from Nikon since 2011, but still no where near the level of Canon dual Pixel AF or Fuji X-T2 or Panasonic GX8 or G85, let alone the GH5 or the current fastest mirrorless champion the Olympus EM1 MK2.

     

When Nikon D800 and E were the greatest cameras among those armchair experts online and those avid Nikon lovers(Canon haters) all predicted the death of Canon and trashed all Canon cameras for a bit less DR at base ISO..........but did the D800E actually become a big commercial success for Nikon?

All those Nikon lovers made the sensor DR at very base ISO a huge issue and trashed all those having lesser DR at base ISO than their beloved Nikon as though they were all useless junks for any application without realizing their beloved a gen older Nikons all had lesser DR and resolution than the rival Canon and Sony back then.

Many Nikon avid fans make the D800 series a huge deal, but besides the sensor what has been so appealing to non Nikon users or even Nikon users who are not interested in a cheap landscape or a budget studio work camera set up under 10K USD range?

Often Thom Hogan and PhotographyLife,etc repeat in their review of any camera(either a mirrorless or a D-SLR).

"The D810 is overall still the best camera body to date even without the class leading sensor and the great F mount lens line for the FX , It was definitely the best DSLR on the market in this segment. So reducing a D810 to its sensor is an over simplification and stupid."

And he claims himself an unbiased Nikon shooter........Really? To me he seems like one of the biggest pro Nikon avid Nikon fanboy reviewer in the world. He may be trying to be neutral but it is obvious that he is not a neutral but a pro Nikon person.

Just imagine there was a Nikon D810b with the Canon 5D3 sensor, which would have been a slow, clumsy body with limited lens selection, poor live view, a slow frame rate, a weaker AF system than the 5D3 and no immense IQ advantage over the competition. It was the Exmor which got the D800 off the ground, prior to the D810's refinements. Without it, it would have gotten nowhere, but another boring 1970 style crappy retro camera offering. Bear in mind that, in 2012, Canon practically owned the high-resolution/low ISO crowd, since the 5D2 had such a huge resolution advantage over the D700 (which was, in every other way, a better stills camera). It's really a testament to the strength of the Exmor - and Canon's stagnation at the time - that the D800/D810 were able to get many those people who were obsessed with the base ISO DR thing to ditch their Canon setup and move to the Nikon system.

But it was just a very short time trend-until the A7R was out. The A7R was a terrible body ,but for those who loved the also terrible D800 series body, it was not a serious issue since their intended use of those high resolution so-called FF was on tripod-serious static thing shooting just like I do use my A7R or my old D800E.....the biggest attraction of the Sony over the Nikon for a Canon shooter was that they did not have to change the lenses they already owned, just buying adapter let you use the Sony sensor with your own Canon lenses.

Even back in 2012 when the D800E thing was the hottest and greatest ever, Nikon was losing sells to Canon and Sony, to a lesser extent to m43.

Nikon lost about 15 percent of its market share in 2012 from its peak in 2008(when the D3 was the hottest camera) despite of the crazy D800E hype generated online.

If the so-called amazing DR was so important to most and even besides that the camera was the best D-SLR ever, then why haven't those amazing Nikon D800 series been commercially successful for Nikon but rather money losing products?

This year Nikon has lost even more sales; sales down 20%, Income down 30%, disastrous Coolpix, Nikon1 performance and non-existent DL cameras all paint a dismal picture, and with no mirrorless or video/motion presence worth speaking of, an even worse outlook. The only area that made up for the loss in imaging was the successful Precision semiconductor group.Bottom line is the balance sheet doesn't lie. And this poor results of Nikon prove that no one outside of the internet camera forums really care about so called amazing DR at base ISO, or what Nikon call amazing pro AF, but more sophisticated overall hybrid functionality, with a bit more like universal mount design.

In fact, those do care about the base ISO DR or obsessed with it actually prefer it in a mirrorless body combined with the amazing Sony EPSON EVF used in the XT2 and A7R2 and thus the temporal switchers from Canon to Nikon for the D800 all moved to or moving to Sony for the A7R series. No one really cares about so-called pro AF in their very high DR high resolution camera since they are not intended to use handheld but on a solid tripod.

Those just needed a bit better DR with very good AF, fast performance, and pro class ergonomics all moved back to Canon for the 5D4 for its better LV and video performance compared to the poor Nikon way of LV in the D800E/D810.

So despite of the all crazy hype for the D8XX, Nikon has been losing serious amount of money to Sony Canon and now to Fuji and Olympus.

Internet is consisted of full of lies and disinfos or ones' wishful thinking, those who do not know anything about the actual sells speak about it as though they knew all with access to the real sells numbers of each camera company. So the D800, the D810, the D500, and the A7R are all huge hits in all camera forums online, but they haven't performed very well commercially......In fact, the one which has stabilized current Sony's market position in this market as the solid no2 player is the A6000, A6300, not the much more hyped A7R series. And the original A7 is the still best selling of the A7X series cameras.

And the all time best selling FF camera is still the Canon 6D, and the saddest reality for Nikon is the 6D alone simply outsells the all the Nikon FX sells combined.

Many Nikon fans never realize it but Nikon is a tiny company, in fact, it is even smaller than Olympus or Ricoh, who Nikon fans usually dismiss or mock as a tiny player, or as an irrelevant player.

Olympus is at least 4 times bigger than Nikon is in terms of total revenue and income in this year.

And there is rumor that Fuji will take over Nikon and produce Nikon branded endscopes soon.

Many Nikon fans still believe Nikon has all the mirrorless and video tech needed in house, but is it really true?

Nikon has no background in digital video and their supporting hardware is likely quite underdeveloped compared to Sony or Canon in catering to video. This is quite evident in their still cameras, which underperform video-wise compared to Canon, Sony, Panasonic or even Olympus and now Fuji still cameras. Doing so would also carry the same risk as their current offering - the complete lack of control over their sensor supply - while not really diversifying their market.

Digital video is a game for electronics companies (Sony, Panasonic, and Canon), not companies whose main strength is optics and who outsource their electronics. Nikon's best bet is just to build lenses for everyone else's video cameras, not to make them themselves.

So in that sense, Nikon's main rivals are Zeiss, Fuji, and Samyong.

So I am guessing if Nikon cannot design a decent F mount mirrorless hybrid system camera in the next 3 years, before the Tokyo Olympics, they will have to become a third-party lens manufacture designing and producing cheap lenses for the camera video manufactures such as Canon, Sony and m43- just like Samyong or Sigma. They cannot try to sell highend optics to labs or broadcast industry like Zeiss, Leica, Canon, or Fuji since Nikon does not have the luxurious name of Zeiss, Leica, Canon, Fujinon, etc.

I think this is why Nikon has tried to sue Sigma for a several times or so. They know that their real rivals are Sigma, Tamron, and Samyong , and they cannot produce better lens designs than those cheap off-brand manufactures.

So to me,it is sad to face, but the coming death of Nikon as a camera maker seems quite obvious and unavoidable.

  

UPDATE: Many people including myself thought Nikon is dying, if not already dead by now, but in reality Nikon still sells many many more units than Sony and Nikon is now working on new type of sensor design and they may collaborate with Pentax and Olympus to set up a new sensor company. If this plays out well, then Sony will be the loser since they will have no one to sell their mediocre so-called Fullframe sensors any more. And as a result their highend camera prices will go up significantly.

And now Sony has just announced they've just decided to spin off their imaging division and now it is an independent business under Sony corp's supervision, just like their sensor group.....

This means now Sony imaging is not a part of Sony but their subsidiary, and therefore, to Sony device group, the imaging group is just a customer,nothing special, in fact,considering its size of market share in relation to that of Nikon, Sony imaging group is a lower class customer to the device group.

So there is no more reason for Sony device technology to keep the best sensor for in-house use. In fact now Sony device tech must compete with the new sensor company Nikon Olympus Ricoh have just established here and some European sensor designers such as CMOSIS, who makes the Leica SL sensor and M sensor.

And do not forget there is always Canon if Sony does not sell anything to Nikon.........Canon will start selling it and there will be Panasonic and Tower Jazz also........so Nikon will not have any problem choosing sensor suppliers any more.

Sony must sell their best sensors to Nikon, Olympus, and Pentax , or Sony will lose them, Sony cannot choose customers any more.

If Sony is smart, it will not compete with Nikon or Olympus in camera market. After all, Nikon is the biggest customer of Sony.......but Sony also buys steppers from Nikon anyway. So Sony is not dominating the sensor market, or controlling Nikon as many Sony fanboys think..........and the just announced Spun-off of their imaging division makes Sony camera business less trust-worthy........... Sony thinks every business as a short term investment and runs it to make it temporarily profitable and then spins it off.

After that? of course sells it to anyone willing to buy it.........like Sony did with the Vaio PC business, TV business, etc,etc.

That is why no one really trust Sony in the long run, we long term Sony users just use its cameras but always know it is a back-up plan or step-gap solution......

After all no serious camera buyers are as obtuse as many spec-chasers and review sites think they are. None one buys into a big expensive camera system just for an amazing set of features in a body or two...................there are many many more important aspects to a system camera than just a set of great features...

  

UPDATE2: Nikon's response to digital cinema surprises me, especially if they trying to grow your market share. After all it is the only one area that is consistently growing in digital camera market.

 

Nikon is the only major camera company that had no territory to protect. No high end, limited at the medium, not much on the low end, so unlike Canon or Sony, Nikon didn't have to worry about making a whiz bang combination camera that would do high quality stills and motion at almost any price point and cannibalizing other cameras in Nikon DXXX line.

 

Also considering that prior to Canon, everyone in the cinema/motion biz used Nikon Lenses if they used still camera lenses. You could (still can) go to Century and get a Nikon mounted on any film camera, from 16mm Beaulieu to 75mm Panavision, because in the film days, everybody knew that most Nikon lenses were matched in contrast and color, in a very specific way. So Nikon had a foothold in the industry.

 

Of course unless you're on the management side of any of these companies, I doubt we know the whole story.

 

So I'm just wondering, but I have this feeling that when Sony sells sensors, Sony might have Nikon or any one sign a contract that says, yeah you guys can make a video cam, but it can't have ______ fill in the blanks.

 

Of course I could be wrong, but in case of Nikon its very odd corporate decision to be very low-profile in the motion industry does not make much strategic sense , given Nikon's historic name and ability to make excellent cameras and lenses.

 

I strongly think it is the case, and therefore , Nikon has been seeking for a new sensor fab that produces sensor for Nikon as Nikon designed.

 

Nikon has been patenting many many new types of sensor designs that are fully capable of 6k video and Olympus is also working on its own sensor designs, and the EM1MK2 sensor is the first Olympus designed sensor and it is said to be fabbed by TowerJazz or Panasonic(not by Sony).

 

Looks like now everybody is dumping Sony, and maybe Sony is the biggest loser in this game besides Pentax?

 

I have strong feeling Sony may become the next Samsung since Sony cannot keep up running the wide range of its camera business intact without sensor income from Nikon and Olympus.

 

Sensor is rapidly becoming a commodity product and so Sony no longer has any advantage over others. Now any one can design a great sensor, Tamron has just proved it.

 

Oh and the best rated Red Helium sensor is designed by Tower Jazz, not Sony.

 

UPDATE3: Nikon Df2 is coming soon and it will house 24mp sensor but a newer generation chip that Nikon designed or developed and produced by Renasus electronics.

It basically has the feature set of the D750 but in smaller more compact body with the classic camera style controls, which I hate. I am not sure about video feature but it sounds like getting FHD video at 25, 30, 60 p and i , nothing special.

It will also have the best OVF in any digital era camera with new focus screen.....but it is really too anachronistic now and I think Nikon needs to put a decent EVF, rather than an amazing OVF from film era. The price will be a bit more expensive than the current Df was when it was announced in 2014, and I heard that it will be about 25 percent more expensive than the D810 was at its launch price.

So I think it will be over 3k.

 

UPDATE4: Now the DL series is officially canceled and we dealers the biggest victims of it.

Anyway, now there are some Japanese analysts guessing(more like speculating) Nikon is in the process of planned bankruptcy, I am not sure about if it is the case but it actually makes very much sense as we carefully follow what Nikon has done since the 2011 Thai flood.

Nikon has produced nothing really innovative but all crappy flawed camera products that needed a few recalls or modifications to finally actually work as advertised. The D600 had terrible dust issue, the D750 had a several serious mirror related issues and Nikon has issued a several recalls for that.

The D800 and E had shutter, mirror and left AF issue but Nikon has never admitted it.

Now the DL disaster.

I am sure the CEO is incompetent but at least not as stupid or obtuse as he seems to be, and he is a person from Tochigi Nikon (precision group) and he has been said to be always hating the imaging group, and thus carefully planning the best(actually worst) way for Nikon to go out of the imaging business, just make some red financial reports a few times then the shareholders ask him to decide finally shutting down the imaging group, that is what many analysts here begin to report now.

Nikon is struggling we all know about it but it is not as bad as the many medias try hard to make it out to be, actually far from it. So I initially thought the prediction of the planned bankruptcy of the company or at least the imaging group ridiculous, but now I think it may be the case, other wise, it is really hard to explain this 50 billion loss Nikon has reported for the last quarter now as the final loss of the imaging group.

    

petitions.moveon.org/sign/change-flickr-back?source=s.em....

 

_________________________________________________________________________

 

Users of the English version of Flickr may have got the botton " try our new experience Beta"

 

This is an incredible regression .....once again

 

No longer any white space underneath pictures for comments, description, invitations etc....

 

Everything is gathered in a tiny sidebar to the right of the photo in the Lightbox

 

All features that allow interaction and sharing have gone so groups might also disappear ......

 

You may take a look here

  

yahoo.uservoice.com/forums/224533-flickr-photo-page-beta

 

If you want to save the groups from a certain death, Please click this blue link and go to vote

  

yahoo.uservoice.com/forums/224533-flickr-photo-page-beta/...

______________________________________________________________

 

We had got used (more or less) the first changes, but this time, it is a

total scuttling of Flickr and of its spirit of sharing :(

We can't see who faved our pictures

 

We can't see the groups the pictures appear in ( except only 8)

 

Awards images. are not shown

 

Invitations are not visible except for the last ones (only in "Recent Activity").They're lost.

 

For admins group management will become a work more and more difficult or even impossible

 

Groups might close......and groups add visibility to our pictures

 

Our descriptions including quotes or links to YouTube or other sites are hidden

 

NO LONGER ANY CONVIVIALITY.. ANY VISIBILITY . NO SENSE

 

*I specify for those who haven't seen the Beta page;that there is NO

white area under the pictures for descriptions / comments / invitations /

flickr Award Counter

 

Only a narrow sidebar to the right of the image ,showing ONLY the last 4 comments

 

White print on a black and depressive background, that hurts the eyes

Unfortunately everything we can do is absolutely useless ....

Unfortunately it is obvious that Yahoo wants to turn Flickr into another social network for teens and young using only tablets and smartphones and whose only interaction is Hi or Lol

Motivated photographers using computers and large screens are no longer interesting users.... ( nor groups since our invitations are only visible on our "Recent Activity "Page....The oldest are lost ....)

 

How many people know what represents the Beta Page ?? I wonder ?

Only some users of the English version of Flickr ..... but not all of them

 

All this is very discouraging

 

T H A N K Y O U !!!!!!!!!

Waste management awareness- Upasana Society- Feb 2017

 

Upasna Society NGO in association with Patkar college students ( Duheeta Joshi, Yash Chavan, Chaitali Pawar, Arya Vaidya, Hardik Rane, Trishant Bhatt and Vyanketesh Lutkurthi) is organising an awareness campaign on waste management in United English school at Malad Marve on 13th of Feb 2017 at 3pm . It is a school for under privileged children. Believing in the idea of, “What we sow, so shall we reap”, is the main motto of the campaign.

Students will be taught about waste management and its importance through audio visual aids.

Upasana Society volunteers would be demonstrating them what exactly is dry and wet waste.

"Best out of waste" competition will also be conducted for the kids.

Upasana Society volunteers will be installing two separate dustbins for the segregation of waste at the school so that the students can take this example to their own house.

At Upasana Society NGO, It is important to know how and what affects us and how we can bring out sustainable change. Thus this will be a small step towards bringing about a positive change in the society.

Those who wish to be a part of such events and campaigns can contact Saurabh- 9769727057 or Dipti- 7045127770.

The light here changes incessantly and it was almost impossible to properly expose to the light without proper LV.

  

The coming death of Nikon as a camera brand 2

 

"We Nikon shooters tend to frequent these forums to maintan healthy loyalty to our brand of choice.,Nikon..May be we get a little nervous with every new mirrorless camera release. I know we lost so much ground to Sony already, with Fuji coming out strong we fear being dethroned completely."

 

A die-hard Nikon guy in a forum said the above and many of his fellows criticizing him of being brutally honest about his feeling.

But it seems like many Nikon fans feeling uneasy and may actually begin to consider gradual switch over to Sony or Fuji or maybe Canon....or some even considering the EM1MK2 seriously.

 

So is Nikon really heading straight down into the Toilet?

Is that any better than Olympus or Panasonic that Nikon fans always mocking trashing for the tiny sensor in those internet camera forums?

 

To me Nikon's results do look actually worse than a month ago and they seem to be a lot worse performing than their tiny sensor rivals such as Panasonic, Fuji and Olympus.

  

Again, in this winter, I went up to Tsukuba university in Ibaraki prefecture for work and academic conference held at Epochal Tsukuba.

I attended a social study conference for 3 days there and I traveled there after that for 3 days. I think I went to Tokyo, Tsukuba, Tsuchiura, and Mito, which is the capital city of Ibaraki prefecture.

After this short academic trip to North East Kanto, Japan I realized the death of consumer camera market issue is more serious than we once thought. It was really bad, I think it is not the right time to discuss mirrorless vs DSLRs or iPhone, but it is really the time to discuss how to save this industry at any cost...........anyway to my surprise, I did not see or meet any one with a Sony A7X camera, which is supposed to be the most popular innovative camera currently available according to many silly online camera forums. It seemed as though I was the only one person in Tsukuba area of Ibaraki shooting a Sony A7R series body.......to me it was really shocking.

I met a couple of American researchers from UC something at Tsukuba university, and one of them climbed a middle sized mountain together with me and he had 2 m43( GX80 and EM5MK2) and Fuji X-Pro2. And he let me try his new Panasonic G80, I actually liked it, found it very intuitive.

 

I think the puny Sony cameras I have are not very well suited for both urban documentary of my academic travels and mountain hiking climbing........Most of photographers I met in Tsukuba mountain complex area of Tsukuba had either a Canon 5D something or a m43 or a Fuji. My coworker said ," it was really surprising but no one other than us had a Sony, how come?"

Well it is nothing surprising since I know Sony Alpha 7 series cameras are not selling well in real world outside of camera forums. They are only popular among those camera fanatic forum denizens like us...........

But the maybe more shocking reality to those of us long time Nikon shooter is that no one seems to be shooting Nikon any more and even in a big anti Nuclear demo I encountered near Kasumigaseki station no one using Nikon due to the poor LV and video performance of all Nikon FX bodies. Also many many guys shooting the demo told me the excessively loud shutter sound of Nikon DSLRs would make the cops really irritated or even angry.

I guess Nikon is rapidly becoming kind of an irrelevant player here in Japan , no longer a rival of Canon but seems really like a rival of Ricoh.......Nikon really needs serious Fullframe or APS-C mirrorless system with silent shutter, or Nikon may have to go bankrupt very very soon.

 

Now the D5600 is out and I have tested it at a trade show here, and I confirmed its LV AF speed is a tiny bit faster than the D500 or anything from Nikon since 2011, but still no where near the level of Canon dual Pixel AF or Fuji X-T2 or Panasonic GX8 or G85, let alone the GH5 or the current fastest mirrorless champion the Olympus EM1 MK2.

     

When Nikon D800 and E were the greatest cameras among those armchair experts online and those avid Nikon lovers(Canon haters) all predicted the death of Canon and trashed all Canon cameras for a bit less DR at base ISO..........but did the D800E actually become a big commercial success for Nikon?

All those Nikon lovers made the sensor DR at very base ISO a huge issue and trashed all those having lesser DR at base ISO than their beloved Nikon as though they were all useless junks for any application without realizing their beloved a gen older Nikons all had lesser DR and resolution than the rival Canon and Sony back then.

Many Nikon avid fans make the D800 series a huge deal, but besides the sensor what has been so appealing to non Nikon users or even Nikon users who are not interested in a cheap landscape or a budget studio work camera set up under 10K USD range?

Often Thom Hogan and PhotographyLife,etc repeat in their review of any camera(either a mirrorless or a D-SLR).

"The D810 is overall still the best camera body to date even without the class leading sensor and the great F mount lens line for the FX , It was definitely the best DSLR on the market in this segment. So reducing a D810 to its sensor is an over simplification and stupid."

And he claims himself an unbiased Nikon shooter........Really? To me he seems like one of the biggest pro Nikon avid Nikon fanboy reviewer in the world. He may be trying to be neutral but it is obvious that he is not a neutral but a pro Nikon person.

Just imagine there was a Nikon D810b with the Canon 5D3 sensor, which would have been a slow, clumsy body with limited lens selection, poor live view, a slow frame rate, a weaker AF system than the 5D3 and no immense IQ advantage over the competition. It was the Exmor which got the D800 off the ground, prior to the D810's refinements. Without it, it would have gotten nowhere, but another boring 1970 style crappy retro camera offering. Bear in mind that, in 2012, Canon practically owned the high-resolution/low ISO crowd, since the 5D2 had such a huge resolution advantage over the D700 (which was, in every other way, a better stills camera). It's really a testament to the strength of the Exmor - and Canon's stagnation at the time - that the D800/D810 were able to get many those people who were obsessed with the base ISO DR thing to ditch their Canon setup and move to the Nikon system.

But it was just a very short time trend-until the A7R was out. The A7R was a terrible body ,but for those who loved the also terrible D800 series body, it was not a serious issue since their intended use of those high resolution so-called FF was on tripod-serious static thing shooting just like I do use my A7R or my old D800E.....the biggest attraction of the Sony over the Nikon for a Canon shooter was that they did not have to change the lenses they already owned, just buying adapter let you use the Sony sensor with your own Canon lenses.

Even back in 2012 when the D800E thing was the hottest and greatest ever, Nikon was losing sells to Canon and Sony, to a lesser extent to m43.

Nikon lost about 15 percent of its market share in 2012 from its peak in 2008(when the D3 was the hottest camera) despite of the crazy D800E hype generated online.

If the so-called amazing DR was so important to most and even besides that the camera was the best D-SLR ever, then why haven't those amazing Nikon D800 series been commercially successful for Nikon but rather money losing products?

This year Nikon has lost even more sales; sales down 20%, Income down 30%, disastrous Coolpix, Nikon1 performance and non-existent DL cameras all paint a dismal picture, and with no mirrorless or video/motion presence worth speaking of, an even worse outlook. The only area that made up for the loss in imaging was the successful Precision semiconductor group.Bottom line is the balance sheet doesn't lie. And this poor results of Nikon prove that no one outside of the internet camera forums really care about so called amazing DR at base ISO, or what Nikon call amazing pro AF, but more sophisticated overall hybrid functionality, with a bit more like universal mount design.

In fact, those do care about the base ISO DR or obsessed with it actually prefer it in a mirrorless body combined with the amazing Sony EPSON EVF used in the XT2 and A7R2 and thus the temporal switchers from Canon to Nikon for the D800 all moved to or moving to Sony for the A7R series. No one really cares about so-called pro AF in their very high DR high resolution camera since they are not intended to use handheld but on a solid tripod.

Those just needed a bit better DR with very good AF, fast performance, and pro class ergonomics all moved back to Canon for the 5D4 for its better LV and video performance compared to the poor Nikon way of LV in the D800E/D810.

So despite of the all crazy hype for the D8XX, Nikon has been losing serious amount of money to Sony Canon and now to Fuji and Olympus.

Internet is consisted of full of lies and disinfos or ones' wishful thinking, those who do not know anything about the actual sells speak about it as though they knew all with access to the real sells numbers of each camera company. So the D800, the D810, the D500, and the A7R are all huge hits in all camera forums online, but they haven't performed very well commercially......In fact, the one which has stabilized current Sony's market position in this market as the solid no2 player is the A6000, A6300, not the much more hyped A7R series. And the original A7 is the still best selling of the A7X series cameras.

And the all time best selling FF camera is still the Canon 6D, and the saddest reality for Nikon is the 6D alone simply outsells the all the Nikon FX sells combined.

Many Nikon fans never realize it but Nikon is a tiny company, in fact, it is even smaller than Olympus or Ricoh, who Nikon fans usually dismiss or mock as a tiny player, or as an irrelevant player.

Olympus is at least 4 times bigger than Nikon is in terms of total revenue and income in this year.

And there is rumor that Fuji will take over Nikon and produce Nikon branded endscopes soon.

Many Nikon fans still believe Nikon has all the mirrorless and video tech needed in house, but is it really true?

Nikon has no background in digital video and their supporting hardware is likely quite underdeveloped compared to Sony or Canon in catering to video. This is quite evident in their still cameras, which underperform video-wise compared to Canon, Sony, Panasonic or even Olympus and now Fuji still cameras. Doing so would also carry the same risk as their current offering - the complete lack of control over their sensor supply - while not really diversifying their market.

Digital video is a game for electronics companies (Sony, Panasonic, and Canon), not companies whose main strength is optics and who outsource their electronics. Nikon's best bet is just to build lenses for everyone else's video cameras, not to make them themselves.

So in that sense, Nikon's main rivals are Zeiss, Fuji, and Samyong.

So I am guessing if Nikon cannot design a decent F mount mirrorless hybrid system camera in the next 3 years, before the Tokyo Olympics, they will have to become a third-party lens manufacture designing and producing cheap lenses for the camera video manufactures such as Canon, Sony and m43- just like Samyong or Sigma. They cannot try to sell highend optics to labs or broadcast industry like Zeiss, Leica, Canon, or Fuji since Nikon does not have the luxurious name of Zeiss, Leica, Canon, Fujinon, etc.

I think this is why Nikon has tried to sue Sigma for a several times or so. They know that their real rivals are Sigma, Tamron, and Samyong , and they cannot produce better lens designs than those cheap off-brand manufactures.

So to me,it is sad to face, but the coming death of Nikon as a camera maker seems quite obvious and unavoidable.

  

UPDATE: Many people including myself thought Nikon is dying, if not already dead by now, but in reality Nikon still sells many many more units than Sony and Nikon is now working on new type of sensor design and they may collaborate with Pentax and Olympus to set up a new sensor company. If this plays out well, then Sony will be the loser since they will have no one to sell their mediocre so-called Fullframe sensors any more. And as a result their highend camera prices will go up significantly.

And now Sony has just announced they've just decided to spin off their imaging division and now it is an independent business under Sony corp's supervision, just like their sensor group.....

This means now Sony imaging is not a part of Sony but their subsidiary, and therefore, to Sony device group, the imaging group is just a customer,nothing special, in fact,considering its size of market share in relation to that of Nikon, Sony imaging group is a lower class customer to the device group.

So there is no more reason for Sony device technology to keep the best sensor for in-house use. In fact now Sony device tech must compete with the new sensor company Nikon Olympus Ricoh have just established here and some European sensor designers such as CMOSIS, who makes the Leica SL sensor and M sensor.

And do not forget there is always Canon if Sony does not sell anything to Nikon.........Canon will start selling it and there will be Panasonic and Tower Jazz also........so Nikon will not have any problem choosing sensor suppliers any more.

Sony must sell their best sensors to Nikon, Olympus, and Pentax , or Sony will lose them, Sony cannot choose customers any more.

If Sony is smart, it will not compete with Nikon or Olympus in camera market. After all, Nikon is the biggest customer of Sony.......but Sony also buys steppers from Nikon anyway. So Sony is not dominating the sensor market, or controlling Nikon as many Sony fanboys think..........and the just announced Spun-off of their imaging division makes Sony camera business less trust-worthy........... Sony thinks every business as a short term investment and runs it to make it temporarily profitable and then spins it off.

After that? of course sells it to anyone willing to buy it.........like Sony did with the Vaio PC business, TV business, etc,etc.

That is why no one really trust Sony in the long run, we long term Sony users just use its cameras but always know it is a back-up plan or step-gap solution......

After all no serious camera buyers are as obtuse as many spec-chasers and review sites think they are. None one buys into a big expensive camera system just for an amazing set of features in a body or two...................there are many many more important aspects to a system camera than just a set of great features...

  

UPDATE2: Nikon's response to digital cinema surprises me, especially if they trying to grow your market share. After all it is the only one area that is consistently growing in digital camera market.

 

Nikon is the only major camera company that had no territory to protect. No high end, limited at the medium, not much on the low end, so unlike Canon or Sony, Nikon didn't have to worry about making a whiz bang combination camera that would do high quality stills and motion at almost any price point and cannibalizing other cameras in Nikon DXXX line.

 

Also considering that prior to Canon, everyone in the cinema/motion biz used Nikon Lenses if they used still camera lenses. You could (still can) go to Century and get a Nikon mounted on any film camera, from 16mm Beaulieu to 75mm Panavision, because in the film days, everybody knew that most Nikon lenses were matched in contrast and color, in a very specific way. So Nikon had a foothold in the industry.

 

Of course unless you're on the management side of any of these companies, I doubt we know the whole story.

 

So I'm just wondering, but I have this feeling that when Sony sells sensors, Sony might have Nikon or any one sign a contract that says, yeah you guys can make a video cam, but it can't have ______ fill in the blanks.

 

Of course I could be wrong, but in case of Nikon its very odd corporate decision to be very low-profile in the motion industry does not make much strategic sense , given Nikon's historic name and ability to make excellent cameras and lenses.

 

I strongly think it is the case, and therefore , Nikon has been seeking for a new sensor fab that produces sensor for Nikon as Nikon designed.

 

Nikon has been patenting many many new types of sensor designs that are fully capable of 6k video and Olympus is also working on its own sensor designs, and the EM1MK2 sensor is the first Olympus designed sensor and it is said to be fabbed by TowerJazz or Panasonic(not by Sony).

 

Looks like now everybody is dumping Sony, and maybe Sony is the biggest loser in this game besides Pentax?

 

I have strong feeling Sony may become the next Samsung since Sony cannot keep up running the wide range of its camera business intact without sensor income from Nikon and Olympus.

 

Sensor is rapidly becoming a commodity product and so Sony no longer has any advantage over others. Now any one can design a great sensor, Tamron has just proved it.

 

Oh and the best rated Red Helium sensor is designed by Tower Jazz, not Sony.

 

UPDATE3: Nikon Df2 is coming soon and it will house 24mp sensor but a newer generation chip that Nikon designed or developed and produced by Renasus electronics.

It basically has the feature set of the D750 but in smaller more compact body with the classic camera style controls, which I hate. I am not sure about video feature but it sounds like getting FHD video at 25, 30, 60 p and i , nothing special.

It will also have the best OVF in any digital era camera with new focus screen.....but it is really too anachronistic now and I think Nikon needs to put a decent EVF, rather than an amazing OVF from film era. The price will be a bit more expensive than the current Df was when it was announced in 2014, and I heard that it will be about 25 percent more expensive than the D810 was at its launch price.

So I think it will be over 3k.

 

UPDATE4: Now the DL series is officially canceled and we dealers the biggest victims of it.

Anyway, now there are some Japanese analysts guessing(more like speculating) Nikon is in the process of planned bankruptcy, I am not sure about if it is the case but it actually makes very much sense as we carefully follow what Nikon has done since the 2011 Thai flood.

Nikon has produced nothing really innovative but all crappy flawed camera products that needed a few recalls or modifications to finally actually work as advertised. The D600 had terrible dust issue, the D750 had a several serious mirror related issues and Nikon has issued a several recalls for that.

The D800 and E had shutter, mirror and left AF issue but Nikon has never admitted it.

Now the DL disaster.

I am sure the CEO is incompetent but at least not as stupid or obtuse as he seems to be, and he is a person from Tochigi Nikon (precision group) and he has been said to be always hating the imaging group, and thus carefully planning the best(actually worst) way for Nikon to go out of the imaging business, just make some red financial reports a few times then the shareholders ask him to decide finally shutting down the imaging group, that is what many analysts here begin to report now.

Nikon is struggling we all know about it but it is not as bad as the many medias try hard to make it out to be, actually far from it. So I initially thought the prediction of the planned bankruptcy of the company or at least the imaging group ridiculous, but now I think it may be the case, other wise, it is really hard to explain this 50 billion loss Nikon has reported for the last quarter now as the final loss of the imaging group.

    

When the economy of billionaires printed by The Federal Reserve counterfeiters becomes transparently criminal, just change the accounting sham again.

-RT

************************************************************************************

August 04, 2014

 

Redefinition Is America’s Most Powerful Factor of Production

Defining Away Economic Failure

by PAUL CRAIG ROBERTS

 

Last week’s government guesstimate that second quarter 2014 real GDP growth will be 4% seems nonsensical on its face. There is no evidence of increases in real median family incomes or real consumer credit that would lift the economy from a first quarter decline to 4% growth in the second quarter. Middle class store closings (Sears, Macy’s, J.C. Penney) have spread into the Dollar stores used by those with lower incomes. Family Dollar, a chain in the process of closing hundreds of stores is being bought by Dollar Tree, the only one of the three Dollar store chains that is not in trouble. Wal-Mart’s sales have declined for the past 5 quarters. Declining sales and retail store closings indicate shrinking consumer purchasing power. Retail facts do not support the claim of a 4% GDP growth rate for the second quarter, and they do not support last Friday’s payroll job claim of 26,700 new retail jobs in July.

 

What about the housing market? Don’t the headlines accompanying last Friday’s payroll jobs report, such as “Hiring Settles Into Steady Gains,” mean more people working and a boost to the economy from a housing recovery? No. What the financial press did not report is that the US is in a structural jobs depression. In the 12-month period from July 2013 through July 2014, 2.3 million Americans of working age were added to the population. Of these 2.3 million only 330 thousand entered the labor force. My interpretation of this is that the job market is so poor that only 14% of the increase in the working age population entered the labor force.

 

The decline in the labor force participation rate is bad news for the housing market. The US labor force participation rate peaked at 67.3% in 2000 and has been in a sustained downturn ever since. The rate of decline increased in October 2008 with the bank bailout and Quantitative Easing. From October 2008 to the present, 13.2 million Americans were added to the working age population, but only 818 thousand, or 6%,

 

entered the labor force. Despite government and financial press claims, the Federal Reserve’s multi-year policy of printing money with which to purchase bonds did not restore the housing or job markets.

 

What about the stock market? It has been down in recent days but is still high historically. Isn’t the stock market evidence of a good economy? Not if stocks are up because corporations are buying back their own stock. Corporations are now the largest buyers of stocks. Recently we learned that from 2006 through 2013 corporations authorized $4.14 trillion in buybacks of their publicly traded stocks. Moreover, it appears that corporations have been borrowing the money from banks with which to buy back their stocks. Last year there were $754.8 billion in authorized stock buybacks and $782.5 billion in corporate borrowing. In the first three months of this year, companies purchased $160 billion of their own stocks.

 

Borrowing to buyback stock leaves a company with debt but without new investment with which to produce revenues to service the debt. The massive stock buybacks demonstrate that American capitalism is now corrupt. In order to maximize personal short-term financial benefits flowing from bonuses, stock options, and capital gains, CEOs, boards of directors, and shareholders are decapitalizing public companies and loading them up with debt.

 

Well, isn’t the economy being helped by the return of manufacturing to America? Apparently not. Data for 1999-2012 indicate that the offshoring of manufacturing increased by 9%.

 

One economist, Susan Hester, an economist for the Retail Industry Leaders Association, has decided to turn the loss of manufacturing jobs into a virtue. Her argument is that retail employment dwarfs manufacturing employment and that more American jobs can be created by selling more imports than by encouraging manufacturing in order to provide exports.

 

According to Ms. Hester’s research, the US makes more money from the retail side than from the production side. She concludes that the value added to a product by offshore labor is a small percentage of the value added by “managing offshored production, handling Customs clearances, managing warehouses and distribution, marketing apparel products, and by millions of people in the retail sector stocking shelves and working cash registers.”

 

In other words, the US manufacturing jobs moved offshore are just a throwaway. The money is made in selling the imports.

 

Ms. Hester neglects to recognize that when offshored production is brought to the US to be marketed, it comes in as imports and results in a larger US trade deficit.

 

Foreigners use dollars paid to them for the products that they make for US firms to purchase ownership of US bonds, stocks, and real assets such as land, buildings, and companies. Consequently, interest, profits, capital gains, and rents associated with the foreign purchases of US assets now flow to foreigners and not to Americans. The current account worsens.

 

It works like this: The excess of US imports over US exports leaves foreigners with claims on US income and wealth that are settled by foreign purchases of US assets. The income produced by these assets now flows abroad with the consequence that income earned by foreigners on their US investments exceeds the income earned by the US on its foreign investments.

 

According to Ms. Hester’s reasoning, Americans would be better off it they produced nothing that they need and in place of manufacturing relied on the incomes of US fashion designers and pattern makers who specify the offshored production for US markets, on the compliance officers and freight agents, on production planning and expediting clerks, and on longshore workers and railroad employees who deliver the foreign-made goods to US consumer markets.

 

Ms. Hester believes that the value-added by offshored manufacturing is inconsequential. How then did China get rich from it, becoming the second largest economy and employing 100 million people in manufacturing (compared to America’s 12 million), and acquire the largest foreign reserves of any country?

 

After Ms. Hester answers that question she can explain why US corporations go to the trouble to offshore their manufacturing if the contribution to value-added is so low? The value added is obviously substantial enough for the labor cost savings to pay for transportation costs to the US from Asia, for the cost of set-up and management of foreign based facilities, and for the cost of the adverse publicity from abandoning US communities for Asia and still leave value-added after all costs to enlarge profits and drive up stock prices and executive bonuses.

 

Ms. Hester fools herself. The low value that she calculates Chinese, Indian, or Vietnamese labor adds to the price of a shirt reflects the low foreign labor cost, not a low value of the shirt in US markets or a low value of an iPhone in European markets. Marketing, warehousing and distribution are done in the US by more highly paid people, and this is why it looks like the value added comes from sources other than manufacturing. Ms. Hester overlooks that the lower cost of foreign labor does not translate into a less valued product but into higher profits.

 

Economists assume that the labor cost savings are passed on to the consumers in lower prices, but I have not experienced declining prices of Nike and Merrell sports shoes, of sheets and towels, of Brooks Brothers and Ralph Lauren shirts, of Apple computers, or whatever as a result of moving US production offshore. The labor cost savings go into profits, managerial bonuses, and capital gains for shareholders and is one reason for the extraordinary increase in income and wealth inequality in the US.

 

Focused on short-term profit, manufacturers and retailers are destroying the US consumer market. The average annual salary of a US apparel manufacturing worker is

 

$35,000. The average salary of US retail employees is less than half of that amount and provides no discretionary income with which to boost consumer spending in retail stores.

 

The American corporate practice of offshoring manufacturing has made it impossible for the Obama regime to keep its promises of creating manufacturing jobs and exports. Unable to create real jobs and real exports, the US government has proposed to create virtual jobs and virtual exports made by “factoryless goods producers.” In order to keep his promise of doubling the growth of US exports, the Obama regime wants to redefine foreign output as US output.

 

A “factoryless goods producer” is a newly invented statistical category. It is a company like Nike or Apple that outsources the production of its products to foreign companies. The Obama regime is proposing to redefine companies such as Apple that own a brand name or a product design as manufacturing companies even though the companies do not manufacture.

 

In other words, whether or not a US company is a manufacturer does not depend on its activity, but on its ownership of a brand name made for the company by a foreign manufacturer. For example, Apple iPhones made in China and sold in Europe would be reported as US exports of manufactured goods, and iPhones sold in the US would no longer be classified as imports but as US manufacturing output. Apple’s non-manufacturing employees would be transformed into manufacturing employment. Clearly, the purpose of this statistical deception is to inflate the number of US manufacturing jobs, US manufacturing output, and US exports and to convert imports into domestic production. It is a scheme that eliminates the large US trade deficit by redefinition.

 

The reclassification would leave the government’s Office of Statistical Lies with the anomaly that products made in China, India, Indonesia or wherever become US GDP as long as the brand name is owned by a US corporation, but the payments to the Asian workers who produced the products remain as claims on US wealth and can be converted into ownership of US bonds, companies, and real estate.

 

For example, Chinese workers produced the Apple products, and China has the claims on US wealth to prove it. How are these claims accounted for statistically by the Obama regime’s redefinition? The US can add China’s production of the Apple products to US GDP, but how does the US deduct the Chinese-produced Apple products from China’s GDP? And how does the Obama regime’s redefinition get rid of the payments by Apple to the Chinese labor that produced the products? These payments comprise claims on US wealth.

 

In other words, the reclassification would double count the output of Apple’s products. If every country does this, world GDP will rise statistically regardless of the fact that no more goods and services are produced. Perhaps this is the way to define away world poverty.

 

“Factoryless goods producers” was foreshadowed by Harvard professor Michael Porter’s 2006 competitiveness report, a justification for jobs offshoring. Defending jobs offshoring, Porter downplayed the rise in the US trade deficit and decline in the US GDP growth rate caused by jobs offshoring. Porter argued, in effect, that ownership of the revenues and products, not the location in which the revenues and products are produced, should determine their classification. As I pointed out in my critique (see The Failure of Laissez Faire Capitalism and Economic Dissolution of the West), the result would be to raise US GDP by the amount of US production outsourced abroad and by the output of US overseas subsidiaries and to decrease the GDP of the countries in which the manufacturing actually takes place. Consistency would require that the German and Japanese autos, for example, that are produced in the US with US labor would become deductions from US GDP and be reported as German and Japanese GDP.

 

As I have emphasized for years, the West already lives in the dystopia forecast by George Orwell. Jobs are created by hypothetical add-ons to the reported payroll figures and by inappropriate use of seasonal adjustments. Inflation is erased by substituting lower priced items in the inflation index for those that rise in price and by redefining rising prices as quality improvements. Real GDP growth is magicked into existence by deflating nominal GDP with the understated measure of inflation. Now corporations without factories are going to produce US manufacturing output, US exports, and US manufacturing jobs!

 

Every sphere of Western existence is defined by propaganda. Consequently, we have reached a perfect state of nihilism. We can believe nothing that we are told by government, corporations, and the presstitute media.

 

We live in a lie, and the lie is ever expanding.

 

Paul Craig Roberts is a former Assistant Secretary of the US Treasury and Associate Editor of the Wall Street Journal. Roberts’ How the Economy Was Lost is now available from CounterPunch in electronic format. His latest book is How America Was Lost.

 

In today's rapidly evolving business environment, under-performing companies and their management teams often require expert advise on how to effectively manage unwanted change and turn the business around. A thorough situational and financial analysis is the key to cost effective and timely results.

 

Caston Corporate advisory provides restructuring advisory services to companies and its stakeholders that is lenders, investors, etc. in under performing companies and companies experiencing liquidity problems, in all sectors and in all markets. We support you in managing work-out or turn-around processes and in allocating capital and investment — evaluating your business plans objectively. Drawing on our deep insights, we devise strategies to address potential covenant breaches, negotiating with stakeholders and complying with insolvency and other requirements.

 

We can assist banks, financial institutions and investors in achieving accelerated and enhanced results through the rehabilitation or recovery of problem loans. We are very keen to work on sell side transactions involving One Time Settlements (OTS) , Financial Restructuring and Securitization of Loans.

We offer Portfolio and Single Credit services for impaired accounts:

 

Portfolio Services

oNPL Portfolio Valuation

oNPL Portfolio / Single Asset Buy and Sell Side Advisory

oPortfolio diagnosis

oLoan recovery strategies.

For more information – check www.castoncorporateadvisory.in or contact on Caston Corporate Advisory Services : 6 / 5, Didar House Building, DLF Industrial Area, Moti Nagar New Delhi-110015 (India) Ph.:+91-11-25161294

 

Omaha ODN: Remodeling a Fresh Look at Change Management Conference 2012

Change of pace from all those flowers i've posted this week, here's another from last years 'Round the Island Race' on the Isle of Wight as captured on my early morning expedition around the West Wight.

 

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©2013 Jason Swain, All Rights Reserved

This image is not available for use on websites, blogs or other media without the explicit written permission of the photographer.

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my website

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Links to facebook and twitter can be found on my flickr profile

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You will never change your life until you change something you do daily. - Mike Murdock

You would be hard pressed to find many Americans who are even dimly aware of Rover, despite the fact that Land Rover and Range Rover are very well known and liked here. Rover cars never had much of an impact here, which is down mostly to Rover’s schizophrenic marketing schemes and constantly changing management. About once a decade, from the fifties to the nineties, the various incarnations of Rover would decide they needed more of a presense in the U.S., make an effort, and then abandon it just as quickly.

 

In the late 1960s, this effort focused on the P6 3500 S, which used the old Buick 215 V8, now in the form of the Rover V8. The P4 and P5 had trickled in to the U.S. through private importers and Rover’s official branch in New York, and P6 imports began in late 1965.

 

The sophisticated P6, with its rigid chassis, ample power, subtle modern styling, and comfortable interior deserved to be a winner. And overseas, it generally was – it was a quality executive car, fast, quiet, and advanced. But in the United States it suffered from a problem that several other import brands would experience – a small number of shaky dealers and a high price compared to what Americans were used to.

 

List prices for the P6 put it up against expensive conventional American cars like the Buick Riviera or even the cheapest Cadillacs and Lincolns. Consider that these early P6s were four-cylinder cars of relatively compact dimensions. Compared with the array of features, huge engines, and the known-quantity cachet those cars had, the Rover was a maverick choice.

 

This was really our market’s loss, because the P6 is a great car to drive if a complicated one to service in some respects.

 

Still, the press loved the P6 and the car was widely lauded at the time. The addition of the V8 helped a great deal. Aside from the power boost, there were also visual cues as to the hotter nature of the V8. U.S. spec 3500 S models got a unique triple hood scoop, as seen on this lovely red car, which lives in Bremerton, Wa.

 

For a brief time it looked like Rover might see some modest success with the 3500 S, but sales never topped more than 3,000 a year. And then the company changed its plans again and decided to pull Rover from the U.S. in late 1971.

 

Of course, during this period Rover had become part of Leyland, which then became part of British Leyland after the merger with British Motor Holdings. The management and integration issues of this era are well publicized and it’s no surprise that BL management decided to focus on selling more sports cars to Americans and not bother anymore with the Rovers.

 

A decade later, BL would again decide that Americans needed Rovers, this time in the form of the SD-1. They launched a pilot program, sold about 1,000 of them, and promptly packed up shop again. Seven years later, a different Rover management returned with the Rover 800-based Sterling...

 

:copyright:2015 A. Kwanten.

    

Fort Drum Wildlife Management Area

Slightly off Main Trail, just before Hog Island

 

Check it out On Black

 

I have been wanting to make a trip back to the Fort Drum WMA since i made my first trip the other day. So today i called up Sarah and i told her that i was planning on heading out that way again and she said she would love to come. So i picked her up and we were on the road by four fifteen, we got to the park at roughly four fifty leaving us about a hour of nice light left.

 

On the drive into the Park we saw several Hawks and the colors to the sky seemed to be really opening up through the rain clouds we just had received. So we were very excited as the night had just begun and things were already looking up.

 

So we drove to the Horseshoe Lake parking lot where we were greeted by some Hunters, they said there was not much game activity that they saw besides one little hog but they said that there had been dozens of Hawks and Eagles up ahead on the trail, on the fence line. So we rushed that way but we didnt come across any birds sadly.

 

We continued forward on the trail and passed another trail continuing to head south. After several minutes of walking we passed by a small body of water with alot of Cypress Tree's and i decided to turn around and head back into there. So we walked through the mucky ground and decided to shoot this great spot, the bugs were not to bad yet but as we started shooting more the bugs became a nightmare but the light had a nice warm tone so i stayed happy. After shooting this spot we continued on our journey forward but decided to turn back about a half mile ahead as it was getting darker and there was a incredible amount of hog trails and little holes all over the place.

 

So almost back to the parking i said to Sarah who was hating life due to the incredible amount of Mosquito's that had finally came out that we should head a little west off this trail and shoot the Sunset, so she agreed because she basically realized she had no choice. Well right as we go around the fence i hear something moving along the taller grass to my right. My heart started to pound because i knew it was a hog and with my past experience with the guys i was not excited.

 

So i place my camera bag on the ground and picked up my spotlight, i shined it his way and he didnt seem to care, so i decided to give these cute little creatures a second chance and i walked his way. As i got closer i could see his tusks that were about a inch or so long, so he was still young i am assuming. Well i got roughly ten or so feet from him and he didnt seem to care one second that i was there shining this light on him, he just went on sniffing the ground for something to eat. So i turned around and we headed our different ways.

 

So now that Sarah has had it with me and me changing the plan slightly she is basically jumping up and down from all the Mosquito's that have decided to eat her so i told her lets just leave. So we head back to the car after another short walk and its about pitch black now. So i decide to go looking for Alligators with the spot light, i came across about three small little guys before i finally got in the car and blasted the ac to get the bugs out.

 

So we made one more quick stop for me to take a few twilight shots of Lake Cara and then we headed back into town.

 

Overall it was a great trip and i cant wait to head out there to spend a longer amount of time and hopefully get some shots of the Hawks i managed to miss today as well as the other Wildlife in the Area.

 

Information on the park can be found here : myfwc.com/RECREATION/WMASites_FortDrum_index.htm

 

Exif

Canon 50D

2.00Sec

F11

ISO200

18MM

 

Not much changed here since the last time I photographed it a few years back. Now the entire building is surrounded by a fence, so you can no longer walk up to it.

 

The Red Apple Rest was a cafeteria-style restaurant on NY State Route 17, in the Southfields section of Tuxedo, NY. It was a noted way station for people travelling to the hotels of the Catskill Mountains of upstate New York.

 

Before the New York State Thruway was built, the travel time from New York City to the Catskill Mountains was often four or five hours, especially during weekends. The Red Apple Rest, located almost halfway, became a major roadside stopping place. The restaurant was opened in May 1931 by Reuben Freed.

 

The Red Apple Rest had much business during the 1940s and 1950s. It was open 365 days a year, 24 hours a day, and was patronized by so-called "Borscht Belt" comedians and professional athletes as well as families travelling to campgrounds and resorts. Although the Thruway (which was built beginning 1953) bypassed the restaurant, and vacationing in the Catskill Mountains became less popular after the 1960s, the restaurant remained very busy until the 1970s. In 1965 the Red Apple Rest served one million customers.

 

The Red Apple Rest went through several changes of management. It closed in September 2006 - purportedly for a "graduation and vacation," according to a sign posted on the door - and was condemned on January 23, 2007 because of roof damage.

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