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Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site occupies a special place in the national historic sites system. In the first half of the 20th century, fur trade posts and military forts constituted the majority of the national historic sites. More recently, events and individuals representing significant aspects of social and cultural history have been commemorated to present a broader view of Canadian historical development. Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site is one of the very few historic sites that has as its primary role the commemoration of man's inventive accomplishments. In the Atlantic Region, only Marconi National Historic Site shares this theme. The special role of Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site is confirmed in the historic sites system plan developed in 1980, which acknowledges the broad scope of the experiments conducted by Bell and his associates at Baddeck. The purpose of this site is to communicate the story of Bell's wide-ranging interests and inventive work, much of it undertaken at Baddeck.

 

SETTING

 

Located on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, the Site consists of 10 hectares of land, overlooking Baddeck Bay, part of the Bras d'Or Lakes, and Beinn Bhreagh, Bell's summer home, where much of his scientific work was pursued. The land slopes steeply from the exhibit complex to a small pond beside Highway 205. The Site is approximately two kilometers from the Trans Canada Highway 105, leading from Port Hawkesbury to North Sydney. It is located in a residential area on the edge of the village of Baddeck, a community of approximately 1000, which is the municipal and service center for Victoria County.

 

The Site provides a center for the commemoration and interpretation of Alexander Graham Bell and his associates. It also functions as a center for the study of Bell's scientific and humanitarian work as illustrated by the artifacts and documents preserved there. A variety of services are available to the public. Resources include the exhibit building with administration wing, maintenance compound, and parking lot with washroom facilities and picnic tables. The original part of the exhibit building (Hall A) was opened in 1956. Expansion to the building took place in the late 1970's and 1996 has brought improved accessibility, a children's area and the redesign of exhibits.

 

HISTORICAL RESOURCES

 

The major historical resources at the site are the large collection of artifacts related to Alexander Graham Bell's research, which he conducted both at Baddeck and elsewhere; books, photographs and copies of material from his personal archives; and various personal items, furniture and awards received by Bell during his lifetime. Most artifacts are original, but there are some reproductions that are also valuable, particularly ones such as the HD-4 reconstruction, which incorporates original parts. Some archival material are original, others are valuable copies of the original transcriptions located elsewhere.

 

BEINN BHREAGH

 

Still in private ownership, Bell's summer estate retains many elements, such as roads, wharfs and buildings, from Bell's time. His descendants maintain Beinn Bhreagh Hall and many of the historic outbuildings (e.g. the Kite House, the Lodge, and the Kia Ora boathouse), although some are considerably changed. The graves of Alexander Graham Bell and his wife Mabel are located on the Beinn Bhreagh estate. There is no public access to this property. It is a significant off-site resource because, as the scene of Bell's work, it provides the context for the exhibit complex.

 

HISTORICAL SUMMARY

 

Best known as the inventor of the telephone, Alexander Graham Bell was also one of the outstanding figures of his generation in the education of the deaf. Bell first came to Baddeck in 1885 and returned the next year to establish a vacation home for his family, far from the formality and summer heat of Washington. He regularly spent a substantial part of the year at Beinn Bhreagh and both he and his wife, Mabel Hubbard Bell, played an active role in the social and intellectual life of the village.

 

By the time of Bell's arrival in Baddeck, the success of the telephone had freed him from the need to earn a living and, at Beinn Bhreagh, Bell continued his busy routine of experimentation and analysis. His imagination and wide-ranging curiosity led him into scientific experiments in such areas as sound transmission, medicine, aeronautics, marine engineering and space-frame construction. Bell can be considered an inventor, an innovator, an inspirer of others and a humanitarian. Aeronautical work was a large part of his life at Beinn Bhreagh, from early kite-flying experiments to the success of the Silver Dart in February 1909. This achievement was a product of Bell's collaboration with four young men (Casey Baldwin, Douglas McCurdy, Lieutenant Thomas Selfridge and Glenn Curtiss) in the Aerial Experiment Association, founded in 1907. In later years, Bell and Baldwin turned to experiments with hydrofoil craft that culminated in the development of the HD-4, which set a world speed record in 1919.

 

Bell's activities at Beinn Bhreagh had a significant impact on the economic and social life at Baddeck. The estate provided work for men and women both in traditional service occupations and in jobs connected with Bell's experiments, such as production of thousands of tetrahedral cells for his massive kites. Mabel Bell played a vital role in her husband's career, providing him with both financial and moral support to pursue his diverse interests. It was Mabel Bell who inspired, founded and funded the Aerial Experiment Association which achieved heavier- than-air flight. Mrs. Bell was primarily responsible for the management of Beinn Bhreagh and was deeply involved in village life, helping to establish the local public library and Home and School Association as well as a reading club for young women.

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This stately house was one of Louisbourg’s most imposing homes. The military engineers who lived and worked here were town planners, architects and construction engineers all in one – their influence pervades the town. The royal engineers laid out the streets and blocks, planned the fortifications and outlying works, and designed all the colony’s public buildings. Consulted on all scientific and technical issues, they even influenced military tactics in the sieges.

 

Etienne Verrier (1683-1747) was chief engineer here from 1725 to 1745. For most of those years his wife and daughter remained in France, and Verrier sometimes spent the winter there. The two sons who had accompanied him here assisted his work, so the air of the residence is masculine and professional, except in the kitchen where the cooking creates a warmer atmosphere.

 

The garden is formal, combining vegetable beds, herbs and some flowers in geometric patterns and varied shades of green. Not every garden was so elaborate, but each was appreciated for the fresh food it added to a dried and salted diet. Beyond the garden are a laundry and stables and a poultry yard.

 

Etienne Verrier was criticized for his siege craft and he vastly overspent his estimates to build his house, but if you appreciate the aesthetic flair of Louisbourg and its public architecture, give the designer his due.

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St. Peters Canal is an 800 metre (2,625ft) canal linking the Atlantic Ocean with Bras d'Or Lake. Work started on the canal in 1854 and was completed in 1869. The canal also boasts the only functioning lock system in Nova Scotia.

 

There is tidal activity at both ends of the canal, and there can be a difference of up to 1.4 m (4.5 ft.) between the water level of the lake and ocean. For this reason, both entrances have double-lock gates. The lock is 91.44 m (301 ft.) long by 14.45 m (47 ft.) wide and can handle vessels with a 4.88 m (16 ft.) draught.

 

In the 1630s, enterprising merchants from La Rochelle in France built a small fortified settlement, called Saint Pierre, on a narrow isthmus of land separating the Atlantic Ocean from Bras d'Or Lake. The area had long been travelled by the Mi'kmaq people who portaged their canoes across the isthmus. To protect the new settlement and transportation across the isthmus, the French built a fort on the shore. Both the fort and the settlement were destroyed by the British in 1758 after their capture of Louisbourg.

 

With a steadily increasing volume of shipping, plans were soon made to replace the old portage road with a navigation channel. The first feasibility study was commissioned in 1825, and work on the canal began in 1854. A passage about 800 meters (2625ft.) long was cut through the narrowest point of land. After 15 years of digging, blasting and drilling, an opening averaging 30 meters (100 ft.) wide had been cut through a solid granite hill 20 meters (66 ft.) high. This passage was shored up with timbers and planking. Locks were then installed and the canal finally became a reality in 1869. Additions and renovations, widening the channel and lengthening the locks, continued until 1917. In 1985, Parks Canada completed a major project to restore both the Bras d'Or Lake and the Atlantic Ocean entrances to the canal. All kinds of pleasure craft now use the canal during the summer: canoes, schooners and power cruisers. Only occasionally does a commercial vessel pass through these locks that once were so vital to communication and the economy of Cape Breton Island.

 

Product Photography for the Cape Breton Center for Craft and Design

Event Coverage for the Cape Breton Center for Craft and Design

MITI E LEGGENDE DEL MARE

 

IL MISTERO DELLA MARY CELESTE

 

Benjamin Spooner Briggs e David Reed Morehouse oltre ad essere grandi amici erano accomunati dagli stessi interessi e dallo stesso lavoro, infatti, erano i comandanti di due navi da trasporto che percorrevano le rotte atlantiche tra l’America del nord e l’Europa: la Mary Celeste il primo e il Dei Gratia il secondo.

Malgrado il loro carattere completamente diverso ed opposto: introverso e religiosissimo il primo - tanto che la lettura preferita e quasi esclusiva era rappresentata dalla Bibbia - estroverso e più brillante il secondo, sapevano trovare il modo di intendersi e di rispettarsi, procedendo di comune accordo.

Nel Novembre 1872 le due navi, il brick-goletta Mary Celeste e il brigantino Dei Gratia, erano ormeggiati in un molo del porto di New York per le operazioni di carico; il Dei Gratia stava completando il riempimento dei serbatoi con petrolio grezzo da trasportare a Gibilterra, mentre la Mary Celeste, più avanti con i lavori, stava terminando di stivare il suo carico composto di 1700 barili di alcool da trasportare a Genova; da lì a pochi giorni, infatti, salperà il 5 novembre dello stesso anno. Il suo equipaggio era composto da due ufficiali americani, quattro marinai tedeschi e da un cuoco americano; il comandante, Benjamin Spooner Briggs, in quel viaggio, aveva voluto con se la moglie e la figlia di due anni, mentre aveva preferito lasciare a terra l’altro figlio di sei anni per consentirgli di continuare a frequentare la scuola.

Anche il Dei Grata dieci giorni dopo, il 15 novembre 1872, prese il largo alla volta del porto di Gibilterra con il suo carico di petrolio grezzo.

Le due navi, quindi, percorrevano a distanza di dieci giorni, la stessa rotta.

E’ risaputo che in quel periodo dell’anno l’Oceano Atlantico è quasi costantemente in burrasca a causa dei forti venti e delle piogge battenti; gli uni danneggiano le vele mentre le piogge continue impediscono le normali attività di bordo.

Il 5 dicembre il Dei Grata avvistò, all’altezza delle Azzorre, una nave che procedeva con un’insolita andatura a zig-zag in balia del vento e dei flutti; la nave alzava solo il fiocco e la trinchettina ed avanzava ad una velocità di circa due nodi; tutte le altre vele apparivano regolarmente imbrogliate sui pennoni.

In coperta e al timone non si vedeva nessuno.

Il Comandante Morehouse e il suo primo ufficiale, decisero di accostare per accertarsi se la nave avesse bisogno di aiuto e fu in quel momento che il Comandante si rese conto che l’imbarcazione era quella del suo amico Briggs, partita da New York dieci giorni prima.

Morehouse comprese immediatamente la delicatezza della situazione; fece, allora, ammainare una lancia ed inviò sulla Mary Celeste il suo secondo, Oliver Deveau, e due marinai, mentre lui da bordo del Dei Gratia, seguiva la ricognizione con il cannocchiale.

L’esplorazione confermò che a bordo della nave non c’era nessuno; mancava la lancia di salvataggio, i boccaporti principale e di prua erano aperti, il timone era in perfetto stato e non era stato bloccato, i vetri della chiesuola erano rotti, ma la bussola funzionava perfettamente, la vela di strallo era stata ammainata e posata sul castello di prua.

Il mare agitato di quei giorni, quasi sicuramente, aveva spazzato il ponte di coperta portando con se le manovre correnti, mentre il castello di prua era pieno d’acqua.

Tutti i portelli della cabina principale erano stati ben chiusi, ma l’osteriggio era completamente aperto e la pioggia e le ondate provocate dal maltempo, avevano bagnato ogni cosa all’interno, rovinando persino l’orologio.

Sul libro di bordo l’ultima annotazione risaliva al 25 novembre e dava la posizione della nave a sei miglia a est dalla punta di Santa Maria delle Azzorre.

Morehouse inviò allora a bordo della Mary Celeste altri due marinai e con quel limitato equipaggio ordinò al suo secondo di seguirlo a Gibilterra, dove Deveau giunse un giorno dopo di lui, il 13 dicembre.

Deveau scrisse nel rapporto che a suo parere l’equipaggio aveva abbandonato la nave in preda al panico, e questo farebbe pensare a una sola ipotesi: la nave trasportava un carico altamente infiammabile che stava evaporando e a conferma di questo, quando la nave raggiunse Genova, nove barili risultarono vuoti proprio a causa dell’evaporazione. I marinai, è noto, temono più il fuoco che l’acqua e la volatilità dell’alcool ne faceva un carico molto pericoloso. Forse l’odore dell’alcool che evaporava aveva messo in allarme l’equipaggio che, temendo un incendio o, peggio, un’esplosione, avrebbe temporaneamente abbandonato la nave imbarcandosi sulla scialuppa di salvataggio con l’intenzione di ritornare a reimbarcarsi una volta cessato il pericolo (i portelli aperti sarebbero serviti ad aerare la stiva); se non che il peggioramento del tempo verificatosi proprio in quei giorni sarebbe stato fatale alla piccola imbarcazione che sovraccarica sarebbe stata tragicamente spazzata via dalle onde.

L’inevitabile inchiesta che seguì l’episodio, suscitò accese polemiche e fece molto rumore; anche il Tribunale, investito dell’argomento, fu molto perplesso sulla storia del ritrovamento, anche a causa dell’alto valore del carico (30000 dollari).

Il sospetto che la scomparsa dell’equipaggio fosse una simulazione per intascare il premio dell’assicurazione, spettante a chi ritrovava in mare una nave abbandonata, rasentava la certezza.

L’inchiesta sulla scomparsa dell’equipaggio, però, non approdò a nulla per cui, nel marzo del 1873, il Tribunale assegnò al Dei Gratia, per il ritrovamento, un indennizzo di 1700 sterline che rappresentava, però, solo 1/5 del valore del carico e della Mary Celeste.

La cronaca descritta dai giornali dell’epoca pose in evidenza l’interrogativo: "…che fine fece l’equipaggio?…". Furono avanzate le più svariate ipotesi per spiegare il mistero della scomparsa dell’equipaggio della nave; fu ipotizzato un abbordaggio ad opera di pirati che avrebbero assassinato e gettato in mare tutti gli uomini, la moglie del comandante e la figliola ma tale ipotesi non trovò conferma dal momento che sulla nave non fu trovata traccia di lotta o di sangue.

Si pensò, anche, ad un ammutinamento, alcuni parlarono di piovre o calamari giganti che avrebbero assalito la nave, altri si espressero in ordine a tempeste magnetiche, altri ancora ipotizzarono un rapimento da parte degli extraterrestri, alcuni supposero che un gas misterioso avesse fatto impazzire l’intero equipaggio inducendolo ad un suicidio di massa; persino la commissione d’inchiesta incaricata di far luce sull’episodio, perse due giorni a discutere sulla possibilità che un mostro marino sconosciuto fosse improvvisamente emerso dalle profondità dell’Atlantico divorando l’intero equipaggio.

Gli anni, intanto, passavano e, quando l’interesse del pubblico cominciava ad affievolirsi, c’era sempre un presunto superstite dell’equipaggio che raccontava la sua brava storia che inevitabilmente smentiva quella del "superstite" precedente.

Ed è a questo punto che cominciò a delinearsi la leggenda del mistero della Mary Celeste.

La nave, in origine, si chiamava con un altro nome: Amazon, e i vecchi marinai – depositari delle più ferree superstizioni marine - sanno che porta male cambiare il nome alla nave, per cui la scomparsa dell’equipaggio non era altro che una delle inevitabili conseguenze cui era destinata la Mary Celeste; a conferma di ciò e soprattutto della maledizione che fin dall’origine accompagnava la nave, ricordavano che il primo comandante era morto in mare pochi giorni dopo il varo; che era entrata in collisione con un brigantino affondandolo; che nel 1867 si era arenata a Cape Breton; che molti marinai si rifiutavano di imbarcarsi su una nave che già godeva di nefasti presagi e che i meno titubanti venivano convinti con il suono di monete d’oro.

Una supposizione molto inquietante secondo una delle tante leggende che investirono la Mary Celeste, fu quella che tutto l’equipaggio, imbarcato sulla scialuppa di salvataggio, venne colpito da un attacco di irrefrenabile frenesia collettiva dovuta al caldo, all’umidità in mare e alla paura di morire di stenti su una barca alla deriva che convinse l’intero equipaggio di accelerare l’inevitabile morte gettandosi in mare e morire, con il capitano, come fanno gli eroi.

Anche la fine della Mary Celeste rispettò la fama di nave maledetta: nel 1880, il suo armatore, non trovando equipaggio disposto ad imbarcarsi, decise di vendere l’imbarcazione ad un individuo disonesto ed immorale, un certo Parker che, con altri infami, la utilizzò per il contrabbando finché naufragò con un carico di rottami, sebbene il carico fosse stato assicurato come fosse di gran valore.

L’influenza di nave maledetta si estese anche alle persone che in un qualche modo avevano avuto collegamenti con l’imbarcazione; molti marinai che su di essa erano stati imbarcati, perirono tragicamente e lo stesso Devau che l’aveva condotta a Gibilterra, su ordine del comandante del Dei Gratia, morì tragicamente pochi mesi dopo l’impresa.

 

___________________________________________________________________

 

Translation performed by the translator of google. I apologize for the imperfections

 

MYTHS AND LEGENDS OF THE SEA

   

THE MYSTERY OF THE MARY CELESTE

   

Benjamin Spooner Briggs and David Reed Morehouse addition to being great friends were sharing the same interests and the same job, in fact, were the commanders of two cargo ships traveling along the Atlantic routes between North America and Europe: the Mary Celeste the first and second Dei Gratia.

  

Despite their character totally different and opposite pious introvert and the first - so that reading was preferred and almost exclusively represented by the Bible - the second most brilliant and extrovert, they could find a way to understand and respect each other, by common agreement.

  

In November 1872 the two ships, the schooner-brig Mary Celeste and the brig Dei Gratia, were moored at a pier in New York for the loading, the Dei Gratia was completing the filling of tanks with crude oil to be transported to Gibraltar, while the Mary Celeste, with further work was finishing to stow her cargo consisting of 1,700 barrels of alcohol to be moved to Genoa, from there a few days, in fact, will leave on November 5 of that year. His crew consisted of two American officers, four German sailors and a cook American, Commander Benjamin Spooner Briggs, on that trip, he wanted with him his wife and daughter of two years, while he preferred to leave the land 'Another child of six years to enable it to continue to attend school.

  

Even the gods Grating ten days later, November 15, 1872, took time off the port of Gibraltar with its cargo of crude oil.

  

The two ships then traveled a distance of ten days, the same route.

  

And 'know that at that time of year the Atlantic Ocean is almost always rough because of strong winds and heavy rain, damaging one sails while the rain continued to impede the normal functioning board.

  

On 5 December the Dei Grata sighted at the Azores, a ship which proceeded with an unusual gait in a zig-zag at the mercy of wind and waves, the ship only raised the jib and the foresail and advancing at a speed of about two nodes, all other sails appeared regularly cheated on flagpoles.

  

On deck at the helm and did not see anyone.

  

The Captain Morehouse and his first officer, decided to pull the ship to see if he needed help and it was then that the captain realized that the boat was that of his friend Briggs, left New York ten days before .

  

Morehouse immediately understood the delicacy of the situation, he then launches a strike on the Mary Celeste and sent his assistant, Oliver Deveau, and two seamen, while he edge of Dei Gratia, followed reconnaissance with the telescope.

  

The scan confirmed that the ship was not there anyone missed the lifeboat, the main hatches were open and forward, the rudder was in perfect condition and was not locked, the windows of the small church were broken, but compass worked perfectly, the forestay sail was lowered and placed on the forecastle.

  

The rough seas of those days, almost certainly, had swept the deck, bringing with them running rigging, and the forecastle was full of water.

  

All main cabin doors were tightly closed, but the hatch was completely open and the rain and waves caused by storms, they wet everything inside, ruining even the clock.

  

The logbook of the last entry was dated 25 November and gave the vessel's position six miles east from the tip of Santa Maria in the Azores.

  

Morehouse then sent on board the Mary Celeste and two other sailors that limited ordered his crew to follow him second in Gibraltar, where Deveau came a day after him, on December 13.

  

Deveau wrote in the report that in its view the crew had abandoned ship in a panic, and this suggests a simple fact: the ship carrying a cargo that was highly flammable and evaporates confirmation of this, when the ship reached Genoa nine empty barrels were found just due to evaporation. The sailors, you know, most fear the fire that the water and the volatility of the alcohol made it a very dangerous cargo. Perhaps the smell of alcohol evaporating had alarmed the crew, fearing a fire, or worse, an explosion, he temporarily abandoned the ship embarks on a lifeboat with the intention of returning to re-embark once ceased danger (doors open would serve to ventilate the hold), except that the worsening weather that occurred in those days was fatal to the small boat was overloaded tragically swept away by waves.

  

The inevitable investigation that followed the incident, provoked heated controversy and made a lot of noise, even the Court seised of the matter, was very puzzled about the history of the discovery, also because of the load value ($ 30,000).

  

The suspicion that the disappearance of the crew was a simulation to pocket the insurance premium, payable to someone who had found an abandoned ship at sea, bordering on certainty.

  

The investigation into the disappearance of the crew, however, lead to nothing which, in March 1873, the Court gave the Dei Gratia, for the discovery, a compensation of 1,700 pounds was, however, only one fifth of the value load and the Mary Celeste.

  

The chronicle described by newspapers of put out the question: "... what happened to the crew did? ...." Were the most advanced several hypotheses to explain the mystery of the missing crew of the ship was suggested by a collision of pirates who were murdered and thrown overboard all men, the commander's wife and daughter, but this hypothesis is not confirmed since the ship was not found trace of struggle or blood.

  

Consider, also, for a mutiny, some spoke of giant squids or octopuses that have attacked the ship, others were expressed in relation to magnetic storms, others hypothesized a kidnapping by extraterrestrials, some assumed that a mysterious gas had made a fool causing the entire crew to a mass suicide, even the Board of Inquiry to shed light on, lost two days to discuss the possibility that an unknown sea monster had suddenly emerged from the depths of the Atlantic devouring the whole crew .

  

Years, meanwhile, passed, and when the public's interest began to wane, there was always an alleged survivor of the crew who told her story that good inevitably contradicted that of "Survivor" before.

  

And it is here that the legend began to emerge of the mystery of the Mary Celeste.

  

The ship, originally called by another name: the Amazon, and the old sailors - custodians of the most strict nautical superstitions - they know that change brings bad name to the ship, so the disappearance of the crew was just one of the inevitable which had consequences for the Mary Celeste, to confirm this and especially since the origin of the curse that accompanied the ship, remember that the first captain died at sea a few days after the launch, which had collided with a sinking brig; which in 1867 had run aground in Cape Breton, that many sailors refused to board a ship that already enjoyed adverse omens were hesitant and less confident that with the sound of gold coins.

  

A very disturbing assumption by one of the many legends which enveloped the Mary Celeste, was that all the crew aboard the lifeboat, was hit by an attack of uncontrollable collective frenzy due to heat, moisture in the sea and fear dying of starvation on a boat adrift convinced that the entire crew of accelerating the inevitable death and dying into the sea with the captain as a hero.

  

The end of the Mary Celeste respected reputation for cursed ship: in 1880, its owner, finding crew prepared to embark, he decided to sell the boat to a dishonest and immoral person, a Parker with other infamous, the used for smuggling until shipwrecked with a cargo of scrap, while the cargo was insured as it was of great value.

  

The influence of the cursed ship is extended to persons who somehow had connections with the craft, many sailors were on board on it, and tragically died the same Devau that had led to Gibraltar on the order the master of Gratia Dei, died tragically a few months after the company.

PLEASE, no multi invitations, glitters or self promotion in your comments. My photos are FREE for anyone to use, just give me credit and it would be nice if you let me know, thanks - NONE OF MY PICTURES ARE HDR.

 

St. Peters Canal is an 800 metre (2,625ft) canal linking the Atlantic Ocean with Bras d'Or Lake. Work started on the canal in 1854 and was completed in 1869. The canal also boasts the only functioning lock system in Nova Scotia.

 

There is tidal activity at both ends of the canal, and there can be a difference of up to 1.4 m (4.5 ft.) between the water level of the lake and ocean. For this reason, both entrances have double-lock gates. The lock is 91.44 m (301 ft.) long by 14.45 m (47 ft.) wide and can handle vessels with a 4.88 m (16 ft.) draught.

 

In the 1630s, enterprising merchants from La Rochelle in France built a small fortified settlement, called Saint Pierre, on a narrow isthmus of land separating the Atlantic Ocean from Bras d'Or Lake. The area had long been travelled by the Mi'kmaq people who portaged their canoes across the isthmus. To protect the new settlement and transportation across the isthmus, the French built a fort on the shore. Both the fort and the settlement were destroyed by the British in 1758 after their capture of Louisbourg.

 

With a steadily increasing volume of shipping, plans were soon made to replace the old portage road with a navigation channel. The first feasibility study was commissioned in 1825, and work on the canal began in 1854. A passage about 800 meters (2625ft.) long was cut through the narrowest point of land. After 15 years of digging, blasting and drilling, an opening averaging 30 meters (100 ft.) wide had been cut through a solid granite hill 20 meters (66 ft.) high. This passage was shored up with timbers and planking. Locks were then installed and the canal finally became a reality in 1869. Additions and renovations, widening the channel and lengthening the locks, continued until 1917. In 1985, Parks Canada completed a major project to restore both the Bras d'Or Lake and the Atlantic Ocean entrances to the canal. All kinds of pleasure craft now use the canal during the summer: canoes, schooners and power cruisers. Only occasionally does a commercial vessel pass through these locks that once were so vital to communication and the economy of Cape Breton Island.

 

PLEASE, no multi invitations, glitters or self promotion in your comments. My photos are FREE for anyone to use, just give me credit and it would be nice if you let me know, thanks - NONE OF MY PICTURES ARE HDR.

 

St. Peters Canal is an 800 metre (2,625ft) canal linking the Atlantic Ocean with Bras d'Or Lake. Work started on the canal in 1854 and was completed in 1869. The canal also boasts the only functioning lock system in Nova Scotia.

 

There is tidal activity at both ends of the canal, and there can be a difference of up to 1.4 m (4.5 ft.) between the water level of the lake and ocean. For this reason, both entrances have double-lock gates. The lock is 91.44 m (301 ft.) long by 14.45 m (47 ft.) wide and can handle vessels with a 4.88 m (16 ft.) draught.

 

In the 1630s, enterprising merchants from La Rochelle in France built a small fortified settlement, called Saint Pierre, on a narrow isthmus of land separating the Atlantic Ocean from Bras d'Or Lake. The area had long been travelled by the Mi'kmaq people who portaged their canoes across the isthmus. To protect the new settlement and transportation across the isthmus, the French built a fort on the shore. Both the fort and the settlement were destroyed by the British in 1758 after their capture of Louisbourg.

 

With a steadily increasing volume of shipping, plans were soon made to replace the old portage road with a navigation channel. The first feasibility study was commissioned in 1825, and work on the canal began in 1854. A passage about 800 meters (2625ft.) long was cut through the narrowest point of land. After 15 years of digging, blasting and drilling, an opening averaging 30 meters (100 ft.) wide had been cut through a solid granite hill 20 meters (66 ft.) high. This passage was shored up with timbers and planking. Locks were then installed and the canal finally became a reality in 1869. Additions and renovations, widening the channel and lengthening the locks, continued until 1917. In 1985, Parks Canada completed a major project to restore both the Bras d'Or Lake and the Atlantic Ocean entrances to the canal. All kinds of pleasure craft now use the canal during the summer: canoes, schooners and power cruisers. Only occasionally does a commercial vessel pass through these locks that once were so vital to communication and the economy of Cape Breton Island.

  

Identifier: n3rodgun10cana

Title: Rod and gun

Year: 1898 (1890s)

Authors: Canadian Forestry Association

Subjects: Fishing Hunting Outdoor life

Publisher: Beaconsfield, Que. [etc.] Rod and Gun Pub. Co. [etc.]

Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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SHAKING OUT THE SPINNAKERS. summer season, the harbor is dotted withthe pleasure craft sailing the racing sche-dule of the seasons series. The Royal Cape Breton Yacht Clubwas organized in 1899, and during thefew years it has been in existence theboats of the fleet have brought homesome of the verybest trophies of-fered for com-petition in thesailing world ofEastern Canada. The first not-able victory wonby the squadronwas when theclipper boatCibou, design-ed by HerrickK. Duggan.anJcommanded h\the late ShirleDavidson, oMontreal, wassent to Halifax

 

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THE ST. LAWRENCE, SEWAXHAKA CUP DEFENCE. in the summer of 1901,and,pitted againstthe best yachts in Nova Scotia and NewBrunswick, fairly ran away with thethe Prince of Wales and the Wenonahtrophies. In 1902, the Cibou was shipped to St.John N. B. and entered in the race forthe CoronationCup,atrophy do-nated by Com-modore Thomp-son, of the RoyalKennebec a s i sYacht Club.Agaiii, victoryperched on thebanner of thefleet Sydney rep-resentative andthe valued pieceof silverware, thepride of St. Johnyachtsmen, wastaken away tothe city by thesea.

  

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History re-enactor tatting lace at Fortress Louisbourg, Cape Breton Island. The colony was expected to be self-sustaining by the Imperial powers-that-be, and was almost a necessity in any case given the isolation of the fortress.

 

PLEASE, no multi invitations or self promotion in your comments. My photos are FREE for anyone to use, just give me credit and it would be nice if you let me know, thanks - NONE OF MY PICTURES ARE HDR.

 

St. Peters Canal is an 800 metre (2,625ft) canal linking the Atlantic Ocean with Bras d'Or Lake. Work started on the canal in 1854 and was completed in 1869. The canal also boasts the only functioning lock system in Nova Scotia.

 

There is tidal activity at both ends of the canal, and there can be a difference of up to 1.4 m (4.5 ft.) between the water level of the lake and ocean. For this reason, both entrances have double-lock gates. The lock is 91.44 m (301 ft.) long by 14.45 m (47 ft.) wide and can handle vessels with a 4.88 m (16 ft.) draught.

 

In the 1630s, enterprising merchants from La Rochelle in France built a small fortified settlement, called Saint Pierre, on a narrow isthmus of land separating the Atlantic Ocean from Bras d'Or Lake. The area had long been travelled by the Mi'kmaq people who portaged their canoes across the isthmus. To protect the new settlement and transportation across the isthmus, the French built a fort on the shore. Both the fort and the settlement were destroyed by the British in 1758 after their capture of Louisbourg.

 

With a steadily increasing volume of shipping, plans were soon made to replace the old portage road with a navigation channel. The first feasibility study was commissioned in 1825, and work on the canal began in 1854. A passage about 800 meters (2625ft.) long was cut through the narrowest point of land. After 15 years of digging, blasting and drilling, an opening averaging 30 meters (100 ft.) wide had been cut through a solid granite hill 20 meters (66 ft.) high. This passage was shored up with timbers and planking. Locks were then installed and the canal finally became a reality in 1869. Additions and renovations, widening the channel and lengthening the locks, continued until 1917. In 1985, Parks Canada completed a major project to restore both the Bras d'Or Lake and the Atlantic Ocean entrances to the canal. All kinds of pleasure craft now use the canal during the summer: canoes, schooners and power cruisers. Only occasionally does a commercial vessel pass through these locks that once were so vital to communication and the economy of Cape Breton Island.

 

missing pieces the title of my newest covered stone blogged at www.resurrectionfern.typepad.com/

A flock of six artists created work for the exhibit at the Cape Breton Centre for Craft and Design called Home to Roost. Here we are in wool! :)

Identifier: intercolonialrai00unse

Title: The Intercolonial Railway of Canada

Year: 1909 (1900s)

Authors:

Subjects: Intercolonial Railway (Canada) Railroads

Publisher: Moncton, Intercolonial Railway

Contributing Library: Queen's University Library, W.D. Jordan Special Collections and Music Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Queen's University - University of Toronto Libraries

  

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s Antigonish, long ago describedby Sam Slick as the prettiest village in Nova Scotia,and still bearing out the description of him who was theforemost writer of his time. These places passed onereaches Mulgrave, on the Strait of Canso, the border landof the Summer Paradise of Canada. SH M&m • v- *.• -V--:. ! r~ i 91 Public Gardens, Halifax, N. S. Intercolonial Railway of Canada. The Strait of Canso is one of the great arteries in thecirculation of ocean commerce. For the width of a mile itdivides Cape Breton from the mainland of Nova Scotia, andthrough its waters pass crafts of all tonnage and rigs, flyingthe flag of every maritime nation. The traveller by theIntercolonial Railway crosses it quickly on one of the mostmodern transfer steamers, and at Point Tupper he begins hisjourney through Cape Breton. Yet, if not in haste, there is much to be enjoyed both atMulgrave and on the steamer routes from that point up anddown the Strait. Canso, one of the great fishing stations of 35

 

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36

  

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Event Coverage for the Cape Breton Center for Craft and Design

This barn, of mortice and tenon construction with hand-hewn timbers, was built in the mid-nineteenth century. Moved from its original location, it was reassembled here and now houses the Museum's collection of carriages and farm implements.

Views of the marina at St. Peters near the St. Peters Canal which offers water craft and entrance in to the Bras d'Or Lake from the Atlantic Ocean. The large craft in these pictures is a privately-owned luxury yacht, one of many that cruise the inland salt-water lake each summer

The whole week was like this: heavy rains, flood warnings, and driving winds.

Identifier: seacoastresor00inte

Title: The sea coast resorts of eastern Maine, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Cape Breton

Year: 1893 (1890s)

Authors: International Steamship Company

Subjects: Seaside resorts

Publisher: [Boston, s.n.]

Contributing Library: Queen's University Library, W.D. Jordan Special Collections and Music Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Queen's University - University of Toronto Libraries

  

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fter removing the entire stern of the craft, for inher construction this part had been secured by screw bolts for thisexpress purpose, and while submerged the steamer was floated withinand secured by ballast and freight tightly packing the entire hold of thebarque. Then the Fanny was raised, her stern once more secured, herhold freed from water, her masts stepped, two of them passing directlythrough the steamer, her rigging and sails supplied, and out of Passama-quoddy she sailed round The Horn to San Francisco. Arrived there, the same process was carried out for the removal of thesteamer, which, reconstructed, sailed for years the Sacramento river, thefirst river steamer in California waters. No part of the steamer was removed when she was engulfed withinthe barque, save her funnel and walking-beam. She furnished accom-modations for the passengers taken out in this way, and possibly someforty-niners of the Pacific coast may yet remain of those who made thevoyage in this novel manner.

 

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SEA COAST RESORTS. 2f EASTPORT, MAINE. Eastport, prominent upon the school maps as the extreme easternsettlement under the American flag, prominent in history of old-timeboundary disputes, and the home of the American sardine, is situatedupon Moose Island, at the entrance of Passamaquoddy Bay, separatedby a wooden bridge twelve hundred feet in length from the mainlandtown of Perry. It is a town of white wooden buildings, a big hotel flying the Americanflag, an exceedingly peaceful-looking arsenal, a fort and a United StatesCoaling Station. Along its water front the many wharves are occupied by numerousfactories, where minute herring are cooked in salad oil, packed in cansexactly resembling the conventional sardine box, and placed on the-market, a close imitation of the imported article, whose market pricethey have greatly cheapened. Fourteen of these sardine factories lie-within the radius of a circle drawn one-half mile from the post-office.They simply line the water front. Previous

  

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Product Photography for the Cape Breton Center for Craft and Design

1977. Photograph by Shirley Chernin. Reference number: MG 21.5. Beaton Institute, Cape Breton University.

Halifax & Cape Breton Nova Scotia - Holiday - September 2013

 

The Alexander Graham Bell Museum:

 

Bell and an associate (Baldwin) turned to experiments with hydrofoil craft that culminated in the development of the HD-4 (replica shown above), which set a world speed record in 1919.

 

www.pc.gc.ca/lhn-nhs/ns/grahambell/natcul.aspx

 

Halifax & Cape Breton Nova Scotia - Holiday - September 2013

 

The Alexander Graham Bell Museum:

 

Bell and an associate (Baldwin) turned to experiments with hydrofoil craft that culminated in the development of the HD-4, which set a world speed record in 1919.

 

www.pc.gc.ca/lhn-nhs/ns/grahambell/natcul.aspx

 

The Worlds Largest Fiddle, crafted by artist-welder Cyril Hearn at Elks Fabricators.

 

4.5 meters wide and 16.5 meters high, this fiddle weighs 10 tons and cost over $100,000.

 

Located at Sydney, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.

 

10 second exposure taken shortly before twilight.

 

Taken 05/30/2010

  

These tours take place under a Cape Breton sunset, overlooking the spectacular Bras d'Or.

Pottery by Jack Ouelette for the Cape Breton Center of Craft and Design, Sydney NS

Product Photography for the Cape Breton Center for Craft and Design

Identifier: seacoastresor00inte

Title: The sea coast resorts of eastern Maine, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Cape Breton

Year: 1893 (1890s)

Authors: International Steamship Company

Subjects: Seaside resorts

Publisher: [Boston, s.n.]

Contributing Library: Queen's University Library, W.D. Jordan Special Collections and Music Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Queen's University - University of Toronto Libraries

  

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edestroyed the previous season. Beautiful cottages also adorn Cushings,which is the most exclusive of Cascos isles. Immediately after rounding the point of this island the city burstsupon the view from its commanding position upon the peninsula heightsthree miles distant. The view from seaward in the approach to the city is incomparable,and is, indeed, the only point of view which shows Portland to advantage.The time of arrival at this point is most opportune for sight-seeing.The sun, yet well up in the heavens directly above the city, behindwhose roofs and spires it sinks into the west with most charming cloudeffects of ever-varying hue. The harbor scene is most attractive, for the mammoth steamer is nowin the path of the many excursion boats plying between the city and itscottage-covered suburban islands. Among them our ship seems colossal,and we are, for the passing moment, the centre of attraction to the gaygroups who throng the decks of the smaller craft, which now are dancing fi

 

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SEA COAST XESORTS. 15 in the huge swell of our wake. Thousands visit The Islands daily,a fleet of ten boats making constant trips; cottages and club-houses,innumerable almost, shelter the summer population, while the white tentsof campers are anchored in every available spot. Steam and sailing craft of every style are met or passed in the ascentof the harbor — a harbor which bears this distinction — let us turn fromdescriptive to incident, and relate it. This busy harbor formed the theatre of action for the only invasion ofa northern port by the enemy during the war of the rebellion; when therevenue cutter Caleb Cushing was cut out from under the guns of thenow obsolete fort upon the right, by an armed force, who, at midnight —1863 — overpowered her crew and succeeded in getting away with thecraft, an armed sailing schooner of modest size. No doubt the Cushing would have been turned into a privateer byher captors, had not her absence been discovered at daybreak from theobserva

  

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Another piece of the panoramic view surrounding the Village

Due to the popularity of Candlelight Tours we now offer this unique evening every Thursday.

Thursday at the Gaelic College of Celtic Arts and Crafts in Englishtown on the Cabot Trail, Cape Breton Island.

This working shop is named after Alex Matheson, a blacksmith from the St. Anns area. It is referred to as a "modern forge" for it represents the period of the late 1800's to the mid 1900's. You will find teh blacksmith here making tools for the fireplace, repairing farm implements and occasionally shoeing horses.

La Mi-Careme masks are carefully crafted to ensure 'Watchers' have a tough time identifying the Mi-Careme. The unique Cape Breton Island festival attracts a growing number of visitors annually. Fishing for tourists? Photo: Ursula Maxwell-Lewis:copyright:

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