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October is sometimes a creepy month for some as we head towards Hallowe'en so I guess this fits into that genre......

It is still dark here and Algie is sleeping beside me...looking glamorous after his beauty treatment yesterday......

It won't last...smiling....

 

I wish you all a great day dear ones. Do what makes you happy....

 

Love from June and Algie xxx

*UPDATE...So, it turns out Bat was sick when I took this photo, explains his demeanor. He is at the Alta Vista Animal Hospital in Ottawa since Saturday night and waiting to be seen by the vet this morning.

Not sure what made him ill, he has a bit of a fever but his vitals are good, hopefully, all goes well. We miss him terribly. Not a good Caturday / Saturday I'm afraid and with the Covid19 things are now so different, we had to leave him behind, alone. Makes us think just how hard it must be for a family who leaves their sick loved ones behind in the hospital.

 

And Bat who has a passion for books always finds the perfect spot to sit on one or in this case a stack of them. In a room with a view, I believe Bat chose the best seat in the house, lol.

 

We're having a heat wave, 35 feels like 43 so, we stay inside and keep cool, watch the birds, do some reading and look back at a fun Jimmy Stewart and Kim Novak movie, Bell, Book, and Candle. youtu.be/9TesRoMisEw

*UPDATE...So, it turns out Bat was sick when I took this photo, explains his demeanor. He is at the Alta Vista Animal Hospital in Ottawa since Saturday night and waiting to be seen by the vet this morning.

Not sure what made him ill, he has a bit of a fever but his vitals are good, hopefully, all goes well. We miss him terribly. Not a good Caturday / Saturday I'm afraid and with the Covid19 things are now so different, we had to leave him behind, alone. Makes us think just how hard it must be for a family who leaves their sick loved ones behind in the hospital.

 

What can I say about Maggie, she is a doll, super affectionate.

 

We're having a heatwave, 35 feels like 43 so, we stay inside and keep cool, watch the birds, do some reading and look back at a fun Jimmy Stewart and Kim Novak movie, Bell, Book, and Candle.

 

youtu.be/9TesRoMisEw

*UPDATE...So, it turns out Bat was sick when I took this photo, explains his demeanor. He is at the Alta Vista Animal Hospital in Ottawa since Saturday night and waiting to be seen by the vet this morning.

Not sure what made him ill, he has a bit of a fever but his vitals are good, hopefully, all goes well. We miss him terribly. Not a good Caturday / Saturday I'm afraid and with the Covid19 things are now so different, we had to leave him behind, alone. Makes us think just how hard it must be for a family who leaves their sick loved ones behind in the hospital.

  

Bat does not look happy after I woke him for this shot, lol, GRUMPY CAT!

We're having a heatwave, 35 feels like 43 so, we stay inside and keep cool, watch the birds, do some reading and look back at a fun Jimmy Stewart and Kim Novak movie, Bell, Book, and Candle.

 

youtu.be/9TesRoMisEw

This is in the church Marienkirche in Lübeck, Germany

Maybe we need witch doctors to take care of the coronavirus.

 

Another experiment with blue lighting.

*UPDATE...So, it turns out Bat was sick when I took this photo, explains his demeanor. He is at the Alta Vista Animal Hospital in Ottawa since Saturday night and waiting to be seen by the vet this morning.

Not sure what made him ill, he has a bit of a fever but his vitals are good, hopefully, all goes well. We miss him terribly. Not a good Caturday / Saturday I'm afraid and with the Covid19 things are now so different, we had to leave him behind, alone. Makes us think just how hard it must be for a family who leaves their sick loved ones behind in the hospital.

 

We're having a heat wave, 35 feels like 43 so, we stay inside and keep cool, watch the birds, do some reading and look back at a fun Jimmy Stewart and Kim Novak movie, Bell, Book, and Candle.

  

youtu.be/9TesRoMisEw

Whether the ghost of (a presumably silent) handless piper roams the parapet of Dunure Castle or not, or whether there is even any truth in the story at all, I can't say, but it is said that during long-ago renovations to the castle, workers unearthed a handless human skeleton under a stone path, whose hands had been removed by clean cuts to the wrist, who is believed to have been mac Colla's piper. There is said to have been evidence of an Episcopalian burial (I am not sure what that would look like!), which fits, because many of the Highlanders serving the Royalist cause were Episcopalian, while the Campbells, as followers of the Covenant, were Presbyterian.

 

Nigel Tranter states that the ghost no longer haunts the castle as it was solemnly exorcised with the traditional bell, book and candle by an Episcopalian clergyman, when in modern times part of the basement was used as a church.

 

The 5000 acre Duntrune Castle estate has five holiday cottages available for rent, for which see here:- www.duntrunecastle.com/ .

 

I can think of few lovelier places to spend a week or two in the West Highlands - so beautiful and peaceful - apart from the occasional drone of course!

Storms roll through San Francisco, evoking the song and the movie stars Kim Novak and Pywacket the familiar, as they magically appear on the Giant Value back wall and cast spells. The tv shot is from "Bell, Book and Candle." Giant Value never looked so good.

 

View On Black

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

"And it sure been a cold, cold winter

And the wind ain't been blowin' from the south

It's sure been a cold, cold winter

And a lotta love is all burned out

It sure been a hard, hard winter

My feet been draggin' 'cross the ground

And I hope it's gonna be a long, hot summer

And a lotta love will be burnin' bright

And I wish I been out in California

When the lights on all the Christmas trees went out

But I been burnin' my bell, book and candle

And the restoration plays have all gone 'round

It sure been a cold, cold winter

My feet been draggin' 'cross the ground

And the fields has all been brown and fallow

And the springtime take a long way around

Yeah, and I wish I been out in Stone Canyon

When the lights on all the Christmas trees went out

But I been burnin' my bell, book and candle

And the restoration plays have all gone 'round

Sometimes I think about you, baby

Sometimes I cry about you

Sometimes I wanna wrap my coat around you

Sometimes I wanna keep you warm

Sometimes I wanna wrap my coat around you

Sometimes I wanna but I can't afford you"

 

(Winter - The Rolling Stones)

BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE (1958). Gorgeous Technicolor romantic fantasy set in New York City at Christmas.

 

Based on the Broadway play.

Marilyn Monroe Five Drops No 5 " - 1955

 

24 de marzo de 1955, foto de Ed Feingersh.

 

Chanel Archive Archivos de Michael Ochs

 

___

 

Poemas de Marilyn Monroe

  

CARA Y CRUZ

 

Vida: soy de tu cara y tu cruz.

Casi siempre

colgada boca abajo,

pero fuerte como una telaraña al viento.

Mi corazón arde,

pero yo soy escarcha fría resplandeciente.

  

PUENTES

 

Me gustaría estar muerta.

Me gustaría no haber existido.

Me gustan los puentes,

especialmente el de Brooklyn,

tan tranquilo a pesar

del rugido de los automóviles

debajo de los pies de los transeúntes.

Pero no hay ningún puente feo.

Quizá alguno no demasiado alto.

  

PIEDRAS

 

Piedras en el camino.

Son de todos los colores.

Yo las miro desde lo alto,

Pero sois vosotros

las que estáis más arriba

en un mundo perfecto

del que algún día yo

formaré parte.

  

CUERPO Y ALMA

 

Por mucho que acaricie tu cuerpo,

nunca llegaré hasta tu alma.

Aunque los que a mí me gustan

son más bien cuerpos desalmados.

En cambio yo,

no os lo vais a creer,

a veces tengo la sensación

de que soy un alma sin cuerpo.

  

QUÉ EXTRAÑO

 

Qué extraños los humanos.

Algunas veces los miro

y no me reconozco

como formando parte de ellos.

  

HOY

 

Hoy no tengo ninguna

preocupación,

hoy respiro aire libre

al aire libre,

hoy no sufro

por el amor de nadie

ni recuerdo a la niña

humillada que fui,

hoy soy feliz,

hoy quisiera estar muerta.

  

SOLA

 

Sola. Estoy sola.

Siempre he estado sola,

pero hoy

ni siquiera me tengo a mí misma

para hacerme compañía.

  

MIEDO

 

Tengo tanto miedo a que no me quieran

que cuando me quieren

solo soy capaz de pensar

en el instante

cercano o lejano

en que dejarán de quererme.

  

TAL COMO SOY

 

Soy hermosa por fuera,

pero horrible por dentro.

Por eso me avergüenza

mirarme en el espejo

y en los ojos de los demás.

Temo que me vean

desnuda

toda mocos y llanto.

Tal como soy.

  

PROGRAMA

 

Conocer la realidad,

ver las cosas como son,

no hacerme ilusiones,

no enamorarme nunca:

ese es mi programa para la vida.

Para una vida

que no sé si vale la pena vivir.

  

IDEAS LOCAS

 

Mi cabeza nunca está vacía.

Las ideas locas siempre

danzan en ella.

Por eso tengo miedo,

por eso estoy

siempre asustada.

Miedo de hacer burla

a esa señora tan seria,

al señor presidente.

Miedo de lanzarme de pronto

sobre el marinerito que pasa

y revolcarnos los dos sobre el césped

de Central Park

o directamente sobre la acera.

  

AYUDA

 

Me hace falta mi ayuda

para salir del pozo,

mi ayuda y la de nadie más.

Me hace falta mi ayuda

y siempre me la niego.

  

VERGÜENZA

 

Qué vergüenza tener treinta años

y ser una niña asustada.

Qué vergüenza que todos me miren

y tener ganas de llorar.

Qué vergüenza los periodistas

preguntándome cosas

y que yo no recuerde

ninguna de las cosas inteligentes

que aprendí para responderles

Qué vergüenza esta máscara

de hermosa rubia tonta

que tapa mi verdadero rostro

de tonta rubia tonta.

  

QUÉ MARAVILLOSO SERÍA

 

Cuando comienzo a hundirme

pienso en qué maravilloso sería

poder tirarme de los pelos

sin miedo a quedarme

con ellos en las manos

y ponerme otra vez

de pie sobre la acera.

  

IDEAS

 

Tengo una idea de mí misma,

tengo muchas ideas de mí misma.

Pero ninguna es una buena idea

  

ÁRBOLES

 

Tristes y dulces árboles

que veo desde mi ventana,

cuánto daría yo por ser

uno de vosotros,

siempre en un lugar hermoso

rodeados de niños y de rosas,

acariciados por el viento,

ajenos,

al amor y al dolor,

al dolor y al amor.

  

EL RÍO

 

Amo el río,

ese río silencioso

que cruzan gaviotas y navíos,

amo su agua oscura y dulce,

sucia por fuera,

tierna por dentro.

Me gusta pasear por sus orillas,

escuchar las cosas que me dice.

Me gusta

mirarlo desde el puente,

cerrar los ojos,

soñar con que me tiene

entre sus brazos,

me tiene para siempre.

  

OLVIDO

 

Como un buen cirujano

has abierto una herida

nn mi corazón

y la has vuelto a cerrar.

Has arreglado

como un buen relojero

todo lo que no funcionaba bien.

Ahora mi corazón

da siempre la hora en punto,

me despierta a su hora.

Pero dime, amor mío,

al cerrar la hendidura

qué olvidaste allá dentro

que yo no puedo olvidar.

  

EN EL ASCENSOR

 

Tuve un sueño horrible.

Yo sola en el ascensor

y el ascensor se detenía

y el resto de mi vida

la pasaba sola en el ascensor.

Exactamente igual

como paso mi vida.

  

CARNE HUMANA

 

Soy dulce por fuera,

un cordero

que todos quieren acariciar.

Pero por dentro tengo garras

y enormes dientes

y ganas de devorar

carne humana.

Por dentro tengo tanta hambre

que me devoro a mí misma

y no me sacio nunca.

  

NUNCA MÁS

 

No vuelvas a visitarme,

niñita sola y asustada,

no vuelvas nunca más,

no vuelvas cuando todos me miran,

cuando mi amor me abraza,

cuando cientos de manos

aplauden fervorosas

y cientos de ojos

me desean.

No vuelvas nunca más,

niña que nunca te has ido

de mi lado.

  

CUANDO NO ESTOY

 

Por favor

no hables de mí

cuando no estoy,

no digas cosas malas

ni cosas bonitas.

Cuando no estoy

bésame en los labios,

acaríciame

una y otra vez.

Acaríciate

como si tus manos

fueran las mías.

  

ERA

 

Era joven,

era oscura

y sin embargo

por cualquier sitio que pasara

lo dejaba lleno de luz.

  

NO ME FÍO

 

No me fío de mí

ni de ti

ni de Dios.

Todos me han traicionado.

Y yo misma

más que nadie.

  

SINCERIDAD

 

La sinceridad

es una cosa estúpida.

Siempre que he sido sincera

me ha ido mal.

Siempre que he dicho te quíero

debería haberme callado.

En realidad,

si he de ser sincera,

siempre que digo algo

es mejor que me hubiera callado.

La sinceridad

es una cosa estúpida,

pero yo soy una estúpida

absolutamente sincera.

  

TAN HERMOSO

 

Mi amor duerme junto a mí.

Es tan hermoso ahora

como el niño que fue,

pero un niño que fuera

un león poderoso.

Es tan hermoso como

si ya estuviera muerto

y no pudiera dejar de amarme.

  

SER FELIZ

 

Creo que soy feliz,

pero no siento alegría alguna.

¿Es posible ser feliz

y no se capaz de estar alegre?

Mi amor me mira

y yo sonrío.

Lágrimas que nadie ve

ruedan por mis mejillas.

  

PARA SIEMPRE

 

Silencio.

Silencio.

Silencio.

Solo se escucha

el fluir de mi sangre

como un río que anhela

un tranquilo lago

en que perderse para siempre.

 

NADA

Aunque tuviera

toda la riqueza del mundo

si no tengo tu corazón

no tengo nada.

  

UN MAL SUEÑO

 

Soñamos con que nos quieran,

soñamos con amar a alguien,

pero es solo un mal sueño

del que conviene despertar.

La quimera del amor

ha hecho más daño al mundo

que lobos y que ratas y asesinos feroces.

  

NADA SEGURO

 

No hay que dar nada por seguro

ni siquiera aquello

que más te consuela,

desdichada mujer.

Quizá estás condenada

a vivir para siempre.

  

ESE JARDÍN

 

Mi cuerpo es el lugar

que prefieren tus ojos

y tus manos también.

Déjalos que corran,

colegiales traviesos,

hacia ese jardín.

Para ellos

yo nunca cerraré

la alta verja

puntiaguda.

  

ÚNICO DESEO

 

Socorro, socorro, socorro.

Siento que la vida

me está acechando

cada vez más cerca

y yo lo único

que deseo

es morir.

  

Poemas de Marilyn Monroe

 

Para sobrevivir, habría tenido que ser más cínica o por lo menos estar más cerca de la realidad. En lugar de eso, era una poeta callejera intentando recitar sus versos a una multitud que, mientras tanto, le hace jirones la ropa.

 

Arthur Miller

  

"Nada ni nadie va a hundirme. Realmente me molesta la forma en que la prensa ha estado hablando de mi, que los Estudios no me quieren, que estoy llena de pastillas, que bebo mucho... ! Todo una mentira!... Últimamente estoy algo deprimida y en baja forma, son cosas del corazón, pero pasaran, todo pasa, pero nunca estaré acabada. Nada va a hundirme... Podría ser un alivio dejar el cine, dedicarme al teatro, a escribir... me encanta escribir notas, poemas. Este tipo de trabajo que realizo es como correr los cien metros: enseguida estás en la línea de llegada, y suspiras y dices que lo has logrado. Pero nunca llegarás, enseguida hay otra escena, otra película, mucho dinero y tienes que volver a empezar "-

 

Marilyn Monroe

 

(4 Agosto 1962)

 

___

  

Marilyn oculta tras sus libros

  

Hay una fotografía de Marilyn Monroe que siempre ha despertado mi curiosidad porque creo que desvela una parte desconocida del mito. Es una foto que le sacó Alfred Eisenstaedt para la revista Life, y en la que Marilyn aparece en su casa, vestida con pantalones blancos y un top negro, acurrucada en el sofá, leyendo, delante de un estante de libros en su biblioteca persona. Está ensimismada en la lectura, y aparece alegre y liviana, como en pocas ocasiones.

 

Ese estante de libros terminaría convirtiéndose en la biblioteca personal de esta mujer, que llegó a atesorar hasta 400 volúmenes y contó con la obra de algunos autores por los que la actriz estaba fascinada: James Joyce, Walt Whitman, el poeta Heinrich Heine, Saul Bellow y Carl Sandbury todos eran auténticos héroes literarios para ella, al igual que Truman Capote e Isak Dinesen fueron además sus amigos. Marilyn se sentía bien entre escritores y de hecho, se casó con el dramaturgo Arthur Miller. Pocos conocen ese aspecto de ávida lectora y coleccionista de libros de Marilyn Monroe, pero definitivamente, ese rasgo también la definió.

 

Los libros llegaron a ser sus compañeros y su refugio. Lo cuenta Sam Kashner, cuando escribe para la revista Vanity Fair: "Varias fotografías de todas las que se tomaron de Marilyn la mostraban leyendo. Y esas son las que especialmente ella prefería”. Hay muchas: Eve Arnold la fotografió para la revista Esquire en un parque infantil en Amagansett mientras leía el Ulises de James Joyce. “Si algunos fotógrafos pensaron que podía resultar divertido hacer posar a la rubia voluptuosa más famosa del mundo, a la rubia tonta, con un libro en las manos (y de James Joyce o Heinrich Heine nada menos), para ella no era una broma”.

 

En los textos y poemas de su diario, incluidos en el libro “Fragments”, Marilyn se revela como una mujer joven para quien la escritura y la poesía eran herramientas vitales de primer orden. Formaban parte de su vida, y forjaron su forma de mirar y estar el mundo. Los libros aparecen como el compañero fiel de Marilyn durante sus ataques de insomnio y depresión.

 

En el libro “Fragments: Poems, Intimate Notes, Letters por Marilyn Monroe”, editado en Estados Unidos por Stanley Buchthal y Bernard Comment, se puede entrever a una Marilyn alejada de la imagen que las grandes productoras de cine crearon, la de la rubia tonta que apenas sabía hablar en público.

 

Capítulo tras capítulo descubrimos otro perfil de MM y recorremos de mano de la actriz algunas de sus impresiones vitales y también literarias. De hecho, se reproducen sus notas manuscritas cronológicamente, porque resulta que ella también escribía. El libro nos permite ser testigos de una búsqueda intelectual que hunde sus raíces en la experiencia vital de este icono americano.

 

Dicen quienes la conocieron que su amor por los libros no era una pose, sino que era algo genuino y sincero. No perdía oportunidad de ser fotografiada con un libro porque “estaba desesperada por ser tomada en serio, por ser vista como un ser humano con curiosidad intelectual, como una mujer con intereses culturales que tenía los pies en la tierra y que era algo más que la rubia de las curvas escandalosas. El castillo mágico de Hollywood y la imagen que de ella habían creado se convirtieron en una prisión dorada y Marilyn hizo lo que muchos prisioneros hacen para evitar volverse locos: se encerró en el mundo privado de los libros, explorando sus sentimientos y pensamientos más íntimos a través de la escritura, en la forma de diarios o escritos aparentemente inconexos”.

 

Pensar en Marilyn es sinónimo de tristeza. No sé si compartís esa impresión. Se acaban de conmemorar los 50 años del fallecimiento de NormaJeane Baker, verdadero nombre de la actriz. Con motivo de esa efeméride, salieron a la luz buena parte de sus diarios personales y escritos , realizados entre 1943 y 1962, que ponen de relieve la faceta de escritora de esta mujer, mostrando sin remilgos toda su ingenua creatividad. Esos textos hablan una mujer de profundos pensamientos que escribe acerca de la vida, la existencia y el amor. Llama especialmente la atención que Marilyn se atreviese con la poesía. En sus poemas habla de su sensibilidad, siempre con esa particular tendencia al pesimismo, la nostalgia y la tristeza. Algunos versos son claros a este respecto:

 

“Ahora que lo pienso siempre he estado aterrada de llegar a ser realmente

la esposa de alguien

pues la vida me ha enseñado que nadie puede amar a otro

nuncarealmente.”

  

LOS 400 LIBROS DE MARILYN

 

Por si tenéis curiosidad, añado la lista de los libros que formaron parte de la biblioteca particular de Marilyn Monroe y que fueron subastados Christies-NY el 28 y 29 de octubre de 1999, en lotes individuales o agrupados. A mí me ha resultado interesante y sorprendente. Espero que también lo sea para alguien más.

 

1) Let's Make Love por Matthew Andrews

 

2) How To Travel Incognito por Ludwig Bemelmans

 

3) To The One I Love Best por Ludwig Bemelmans

 

4) Thurber Country por James Thurber

 

5) The Fall por Albert Camus

 

6) Marilyn Monroe por George Carpozi

 

7) Camille por Alexander Dumas

 

8) Invisible Man por Ralph Ellison

 

9) The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book por Fannie Merritt-Farmer

 

10) The Great Gatsby por F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

11) From Russia With Love por Ian Fleming

 

12) The Art Of Loving por Erich Fromm

 

13) The Prophet por Kahlil Gilbran

 

14) Ulysses por James Joyce

 

15) Stoned Like A Statue: A Complete Survey Of Drinking Cliches, Primitive, Classical & Modern por Howard Kandel & Don Safran, con una introducción de Dean Martin

 

16) The Last Temptation Of Christ por Nikos Kazantzakis

 

17) On The Road por Jack Kerouac

 

18) Selected Poems por DH Lawrence

 

19 and 20) Sons And Lovers por DH Lawrence (2 ediciones)

 

21) The Portable por DH Lawrence

 

22) Etruscan Places (DH Lawrence?)

 

23) DH Lawrence: A Basic Study Of His Ideas por Mary Freeman

 

24) The Assistant por Bernard Malamud

 

25) The Magic Barrel por Bernard Malamud

 

26) Death In Venice & Seven Other Stories por Thomas Mann

 

27) Last Essays por Thomas Mann

 

28) The Thomas Mann Reader

 

29) Hawaii por James Michener

 

30) Red Roses For Me por Sean O'Casey

 

31) I Knock At The Door por Sean O'Casey

 

32) Selected Plays por Sean O'Casey

 

33) The Green Crow por Sean O'Casey

 

34) Golden Boy por Clifford Odets

 

35) Clash por Night por Clifford Odets

 

36) The Country Girl por Clifford Odets

 

37) 6 Plays Of Clifford Odets

 

38) The Cat With 2 Faces por Gordon Young

 

39) Long Day's Journey Into Night por Eugene O'Neill

 

40) Part Of A Long Story: Eugene O'Neill As A Young Man In Love por Agnes Boulton

 

41) The Little Engine That Could por Piper Watty

 

42) The New Joy Of Cooking por Irma S. Rombauer & Marion Rombauer-Becker

 

43) Selected Plays Of George Bernard Shaw

 

44) Ellen Terry And Bernard Shaw - Correspondencia

 

45) Bernard Shaw & Mrs Patrick Campbell - Su Correspondencia

 

46) The Short Reigh Of Pippin IV por John Steinbeck

 

47) Once There Was A War por John Steinbeck

 

48) Set This House On Fire por William Styron

 

49) Lie Down In Darkness (William Styron?)

 

50) The Roman Spring Of Mrs Stone por Tennessee Williams

 

51) Camino Real por Tennessee Williams

 

52) A Streetcar Named Desire por Tennessee Williams

 

53) The Flower In Drama And Glamour por Stark

   

Literatura Americana

 

54) Tender Is The Night por F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

55) The Story Of A Novel por Thomas Wolfe

 

56) Look Homeward Angel por Thomas Wolfe

 

57) A Stone, A Leaf, A Door (Thomas Wolfe?)

 

58) Thomas Wolfe's Letters To His Mother, ed. John Skally Terry

 

59) A Farewell To Arms por Ernest Hemingway

 

60) The Sun Also Rises por Ernest Hemingway

 

61) Winesburg, Ohio por Sherwood Anderson

 

62) Sister Carrie por Theodore Dreiser

 

63) Tortilla Flat por John Steinbeck

 

64) The American Claimant & Other Stories & Sketches por Mark Twain

 

65) In Defense of Harriet Shelley & Other Essays (Mark Twain?)

 

66) The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn por Mark Twain

 

67) Roughing It (Mark Twain?)

 

68) The Magic Christian por Terry Southern

 

69) A Death In The Family por James Agee

 

70) The War Lover por John Hersey

 

71) Don't Call Me por My Right Name & Other Stories por James Purdy

 

72) Malcolm por James Purdy

   

Antologías

 

73) The Portable Irish Reader

 

74) The Portable Poe - Edgar Allen Poe

 

75) The Portable Walt Whitman

 

76) This Week's Short Stories (New York, 1953)

 

77) Bedside Book Of Famous Short Stories

 

78) Short Novels Of Colette

 

79) Short Story Masterpieces (New York, 1960)

 

80) The Passionate Playgoer por George Oppenheimer

 

81) Fancies And Goodnights por John Collier

 

82) Evergreen Review, Vol 2, No. 6

 

83) The Medal & Other Stories por Luigi Pirandello

   

Arte

 

84) Max Weber

 

85) Renoir por Albert Skira

 

86) Max por Giovannetti Pericle

 

87) The Family Of Man por Carl Sandburg

 

88-90) Horizon, A Magazine Of The Arts (Nov 1959, Jan 1960, Mar 1960.)

 

91) Jean Dubuffet por Daniel Cordier

   

Biografías

 

92) The Summing Up por W. Somerset Maugham

 

93) Close To Colette por Maurice Goudeket

 

94) This Demi-Paradise por Margaret Halsey

 

95) God Protect Me From My Friends por Gavin Maxwell

 

96) Minister Of Death: The Adolf Eichmann Story por Quentin Reynolds, Ephraim Katz and Zwy Aldouby

 

97) Dance To The Piper por Agnes DeMille

 

98) Goodness Had Nothing To Do With It por Mae West

 

99) Act One por Moss Hart

   

Ciencia cristiana

 

100) Science And Health With Key To The Scriptures por Mary Baker Eddy

 

101) Poems, Including Christ And Christmas por Mary Baker Eddy

   

Clásicos

 

102) 2 Plays: Peace And Lysistrata por Aristophanes

 

103) Of The Nature Of Things por Lucretius

 

104) The Philosophy Of Plato

 

105) Mythology por Edith Hamilton

 

106) Theory Of Poetry And Fine Art por Aristotle

 

107) Metaphysics por Aristotle

 

108-111) Plutarch's Lives, Vols 3-6 only (of 6) por William and John Langhorne

   

Cultura

 

112) Bound For Glory por Woody Guthrie

 

113) The Support Of The Mysteries por Paul Breslow

 

114) Paris Blues por Harold Flender

 

115) The Shook-Up Generation por Harrison E. Salisbury

   

Traducciones

 

116) An Mands Ansigt por Arthur Miller

 

117) Independent People por Halldor Laxness

 

118) Mujer por Lina Rolan

 

119) The Havamal, ed. D.E. Martin Clarke

 

120) Yuan Mei: 18th Century Chinese Poet por Arthur Waley

 

121) Almanach: Das 73 Jahr por S. Fischer Verlag

   

Literatura francesa

 

122) Madame Bovary por Gustave Flaubert

 

123) The Works Of Rabelais

 

124) The Guermantes Way por Marcel Proust

 

125) Cities Of The Plain por Marcel Proust

 

126) Within A Budding Grove por Marcel Proust

 

127) The Sweet Cheat Gone por Marcel Proust

 

128) The Captive por Marcel Proust

 

129) Nana por Emile Zola

 

130) Plays por Moliere

   

Freud

 

131) The Life And Work of Sigmund Freud por Ernest Jones

 

132) Letters Of Sigmund Freud, ed. Ernest L. Freud

 

133) Glory Reflected por Martin Freud

 

134) Moses And Monotheism por Sigmund Freud

 

135) Conditioned Reflex Therapy por Andrew Salter

   

Jardinería y mascotas

 

136-137) The Wise Garden Encyclopedia, ed. E.L.D. Seymour (2 editions)

 

138) Landscaping Your Own Home por Alice Dustan

 

139) Outpost Nurseries - publicity brochure

 

140) The Forest And The Sea por Marston Bates

 

141) Pet Turtles por Julien Bronson

 

142) A Book About Bees por Edwin Way Teale

 

143) Codfish, Cats & Civilisation por Gary Webster

   

Humor

 

144) How To Do It, Or, The Art Of Lively Entertaining por Elsa Maxwell

 

145) Wake Up, Stupid por Mark Harris

 

146) Merry Christmas, Happy New Year por Phyllis McGinley

 

147) The Hero Maker por Akbar Del Piombo & Norman Rubington

 

148) How To Talk At Gin por Ernie Kovacs

 

149) VIP Tosses A Party, por Virgil Partch

 

150) Who Blowed Up The House & Other Ozark Folk Tales, ed. Randolph Vance

 

151) Snobs por Russell Lynes

   

Judaísmo (MM oficialmente se convirtió al judaísmo tras su matrimonio con Arthur Miller).

 

152) The Form of Daily Prayers

 

153) Sephath Emeth: Order Of Prayers For The Wholes Year In Jewish and English

 

154) The Holy Scriptures According To The Masoretic Text

   

Literatura

 

155) The Law por Roger Vailland

 

156) The Building por Peter Martin

 

157) The Mermaids por Boros

 

158) They Came To Cordura por Glendon Swarthout

 

159) The 7th Cross por Anna Seghers

 

160) A European Education por Romain Gary

 

161) Strike For A Kingdom por Menna Gallie

 

162) The Slide Area por Gavin Lambert

 

163) The Woman Who Was Poor por Leon Bloy

 

164) Green Mansions por W.H. Hudson

 

165) The Contenders por John Wain

 

166) The Best Of All Worlds, Or, What Voltaire Never Knew por Hans Jorgen Lembourn

 

167) The Story Of Esther Costello por Nicholas Montsarrat

 

168) Oh Careless Love por Maurice Zolotow

 

169) Add A Dash Of Pity por Peter Ustinov

 

170) An American Tragedy por Theodore Dreiser

 

171) The Mark Of The Warrior por Paul Scott

 

172) The Dancing Bear por Edzard Schaper

 

173) Miracle In The Rain por Ben Hecht

 

174) The Guide por R.K. Narayan

 

175) Blow Up A Storm por Garson Kanin

 

176) Jonathan por Russell O'Neill

 

177) Fowlers End por Gerald Kersh

 

178) Hurricane Season por Ralph Winnett

 

179) The un-Americans por Alvah Bessie

 

180) The Devil's Advocate por Morris L. West

 

181) On Such A Night por Anthony Quayle

 

182) Say You Never Saw Me por Arthur Nesbitt

 

183) All The Naked Heroes por Alan Kapener

 

184) Jeremy Todd por Hamilton Maule

 

185) Miss America por Daniel Stren

 

186) Fever In The Blood por William Pearson

 

187) Spartacus por Howard Fast

 

188) Venetian Red por L.M. Pasinetti

 

189) A Cup Of Tea For Mr Thorgill por Storm Jameson

 

190) Six O'Clock Casual por Henry W. Cune

 

191) Mischief por Charlotte Armstrong

 

192) The Gingko Tree por Sheelagh Burns

 

193) The Mountain Road por Theodore H. White

 

194) Three Circles Of Light por Pietro Di Donato

 

195) The Day The Money Stopped por Brendan Gill

 

196) The Carpetbaggers por Harold Robbins

 

197-198) Justine por Lawrence Durrell

 

199) Balthazar por Lawrence Durrell

 

200) Brighton Rock por Graham Greene

 

201) The Secret Agent por Joseph Conrad

 

202) The Unnamable por Samuel Beckett

 

203) Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Dog por Dylan Thomas

 

204) Hear Us O Lord From Heaven Thy Dwelling Place, por Malcolm Lowry

 

205) The Sound And The Fury/As I Lay Dying, por William Faulkner

 

206) God's Little Acre por Erskine Caldwell

 

207) Anna Christie/The Emperor Jones/The Hairy Ape por Eugene O'Neill

 

208) The Philosophy Of Schopenhauer por Irwin Edman

 

209) The Philosophy Of Spinoza por Joseph Ratner

 

210) The Dubliners por James Joyce

 

211) Selected Poems por Emily Dickinson

 

212) The Collected Short Stories por Dorothy Parker

 

213) Selected Works por Alexander Pope

 

214) The Red And The Black por Stendhal

 

215) The Life Of Michelangelo por John Addington

 

216) Of Human Bondage por W. Somerset Maugham

 

217) Three Famous French Romances

 

218) Napoleon por Emil Ludwig

 

219) Madame Bovary por Gustave Flaubert

 

220) The Poems And Fairy-Tales por Oscar Wilde

 

221) Alice's Adventures In Wonderland/Through The Looking Glass/The Hunting Of The Snark, por Lewis Carroll

 

222) A High Wind In Jamaica por Richard Hughes

 

223) An Anthology Of American Negro Literature, ed. Sylvestre C. Watkins

   

Música

 

224) Beethoven: His Spiritual Development por J.W.N. Sullivan

 

225) Music For The Millions por David Ewen

 

226) Schubert por Ralph Bates

 

227) Men Of Music por Wallace Brockaway and Herbert Weinstock

   

Teatro

 

228) The Potting Shed por Graham Greene

 

229) Politics In The American Drama por Caspar Nannes

 

230) Sons Of Men por Herschel Steinhardt

 

231) Born Yesterday por Garson Kanin

 

232) Untitled & Other Radio Drams por Norman Corwin

 

233) Thirteen por Corwin, por Norman Corwin

 

234) More por Corwin, por Norman Corwin

 

235) Long Day's Journey Into Night por Eugene O'Neill (a second copy)

 

236) Best American Plays: Third Series, 1945-1951

 

237) Theatre '52 por John Chapman

 

238) 16 Famous European Plays, por Bennett Cerf and Van H. Cartmell

 

239) The Complete Plays Of Henry James

 

240) 20 Best Plays Of The Modern American Theatre, por John Glassner

 

241) Elizabethan Plays por Hazelton Spencer

 

242) Critics' Choice por Jack Gaver

 

243) Modern American Dramas por Harlan Hatcher

 

244) The Album Of The Cambridge Garrick Club

   

Poesía europea

 

245) A Shropshire Lad por A.E. Houseman

 

246) The Poetry & Prose Of Heinrich Heine por Frederich Ewen

 

247) The Poetical works Of John Milton, por H.C. Beeching

 

248) The Poetical Works Of Robert Browning (H.C. Beeching?)

 

249) Wordsworth por Richard Wilbur

 

250) The Poetical Works Of Shelley (Richard Wilbur?)

 

251) The Portable Blake, por William Blake

 

252) William Shakespeare: Sonnets, ed. Mary Jane Gorton

 

253) Poems Of Robert Burns, ed. Henry Meikle & William Beattie

 

254) The Penguin Book Of English Verse, ed. John Hayward

 

255) Aragon: Poet Of The French Resistance, por Hannah Josephson & Malcolm Cowley

 

256) Star Crossed por Margaret Tilden

   

Poesía americana

 

257 and 258) Collected Sonnets por Edna St Vincent Millay (2 editions)

 

259) Robert Frost's Poems por Louis Untermeyer

 

260) Poe: Complete Poems por Richard Wilbur

 

261) The Life And Times Of Archy And Mehitabel por Don Marquis

 

262) The Pocketbook Of Modern Verse por Oscar Williams

 

263) Poems por John Tagliabue

 

264) Selected Poems por Rafael Alberti

 

265) Selected Poetry por Robinson Jeffers

 

266) The American Puritans: Their Prose & Poetry, por Perry Miller

 

267) Selected Poems por Rainer Maria Rilke

 

268) Poet In New York por Federico Garcia Lorca

 

269) The Vapor Trail por Ivan Lawrence Becker

 

270) Love Poems & Love Letters For All The Year

 

271) 100 Modern Poems, ed. Selden Rodman

 

272) The Sweeniad, por Myra Buttle

 

273) Poetry: A Magazine Of Verse, Vol.70, no. 6

   

Política

 

274) The Wall Between por Anne Braden

 

275) The Roots Of American Communism por Theodore Draper

 

276) A View Of The Nation - An Anthology : 1955-1959, ed. Henry Christian

 

277) A Socialist's Faith por Norman Thomas

 

278-279) Rededication To Freedom por Benjamin Ginzburg (2 copies)

 

280) The Ignorant Armies por E.M. Halliday

 

281) Commonwealth Vs Sacco & Vanzetti, por Robert P. Weeks

 

282) Journey To The Beginning por Edgar Snow

 

283) Das Kapital por Karl Marx

 

284) Lidice por Eleanor Wheeler

 

285) The Study Of History por Arnold Toynbee

 

286) America The Invincible por Emmet John Hughes

 

287) The Unfinished Country por Max Lerner

 

288) Red Mirage por John O'Kearney

 

289) Background & Foreground - The New York Times Magazine: An Anthology, ed. Lester Markel (a friend of MM)

 

290) The Failure Of Success por Esther Milner

 

291) A Piece Of My Mind por Edmund Wilson

 

292) The Truth About The Munich Crisis por Viscount Maugham

 

293) The Alienation Of Modern Man por Fritz Pappenheim

 

294) A Train Of Powder por Rebecca West

 

295) Report From Palermo por Danilo Dolci

 

296) The Devil In Massachusetts por Marion Starkey

 

297) American Rights: The Constitution In Action, por Walter Gellhorn

 

298) Night por Francis Pollini

 

299) The Right Of The People por William Douglas

 

300) The Jury Is Still Out por Irwin Davidson and Richard Gehman

 

301) First Degree por William Kunstler

 

302) Democracy In America por Alexis De Tocqueville

 

303) World Underworld por Andrew Varna

   

Oraciones

 

304) Catechism For Young Children (1936, so may be from Norma Jeane's childhood)

 

305) Prayer Changes Things (1952, inscribed to MM - perhaps from Jane Russell?)

 

306) The Prophet por Kahlil Bibran (a second copy?)

 

307) The Magic Word L.I.D.G.T.T.F.T.A.T.I.M. por Robert Collier

 

308) The Prophet por Kahlil Gibran (a third copy?)

 

309) His Brother's Keeper por Milton Gross (3-page extract from Readers' Digest, Dec 1961)

 

310) Christliches ergissmeinnicht por K. Ehmann

 

311) And It Was Told Of A Certain Potter por Walter C. Lanyon

 

312) Bahai Prayers

   

Psicología

 

313) Man Against Himself por Karl A. Menninger

 

314) The Tower And The Abyss por Erich Kahler

 

315) Something To Live By, por Dorothea S. Kopplin

 

316) Man's Supreme Inheritance por Alexander F. Matthias

 

317) The Miracles Of Your Mind por Joseph Murphy

 

318) The Wisdom Of The Sands por Antoine de Saint-Exupery

 

319) A Prison, A Paradise por Loran Hurnscot

 

320) The Magic Of Believing por Claude M. Bristol

 

321) Peace Of Mind por Joshua Loth Liebman

 

322) The Use Of The Self por Alexander F. Matthias

 

323) The Power Within You por Claude M. Bristol

 

324) The Call Girl por Harold Greenwald

 

325) Troubled Women por Lucy Freeman

 

326) Relax And Live por Joseph A. Kennedy

 

327) Forever Young, Forever Healthy por Indra Devi

 

328) The Open Self por Charles Morris

 

329) Hypnotism Today por Leslie Lecron & Jean Bordeaux

 

330) The Masks Of God: Primitive Mythology, por Joseph Campbell

 

331) Some Characteristics Of Today por Rudolph Steiner

   

Referencias

 

332) Baby & Child Care por Dr Benjamin Spock (pub. 1958)

 

333) Flower Arranging For Fun por Hazel Peckinpaugh Dunlop

 

334) Hugo's Pocket Dictionary: French-English And English-French

 

335) Spoken French For Travellers And Tourists, por Charles Kany & Mathurin Dondo

 

336) Roget's Pocket Thesaurus, por C.O. Mawson & K.A. Whiting

   

Religión

 

337) What Is A Jew? por Morris Kertzer

 

338) A Partisan Guide To The Jewish Problem, por Milton Steinberg

 

339) The Tales Of Rabbi Nachman, por Martin Buber

 

340) The Saviours Of God: Spiritual Exercises, por Nikos Kazantzakis

 

341) The Prophet por Kahlil Gilbran

 

342) The Dead Sea Scrolls por Millar Burrows

 

343) The Secret Books Of The Egyptian Gnostics, por Jean Doresse

 

344) Jesus por Kahlil Gilbran

 

345) Memories Of A Catholic Girlhood, por Mary McCarthy

 

346) Why I Am Not A Christian, por Bertrand Russell

   

Literatura rusa

 

347) Redemption & Other Plays por Leo Tolstoy

 

348) The Viking Library Portable Anton Chekhov

 

349) The House Of The Dead, por Fyodor Dostoevsky

 

350) Crime And Punishment por Fyodor Dostoevsky

 

351) Best Russian Stories: An Anthology, ed. Thomas Seltzer

 

352) The Plays Of Anton Chekhov

 

353) Smoke por Ivan Turgenev

 

354) The Poems, Prose & Plays Of Alexander Pushkin

 

355) The Brothers Karamazov por Fyodor Dostoevsky

   

Ciencia

 

356) Our Knowledge Of The External World, por Bertrand Russell

 

357) Common Sense And Nuclear Warfare, por Bertrand Russell

 

358) Out Of My Later Years por Albert Einstein

 

359) Men And Atoms por William Laurence

 

360) Man Alive por Daniel Colin Munro

 

361) Doctor Pygmalion por Maxwell Maltz

 

362) Panorama: A New Review, ed. R.F. Tannenbaum

 

363) Everyman's Search por Rebecca Beard

 

364) Of Stars And Men por Harlow Shapley

 

365) From Hiroshima To The Moon, por Daniel Lang

 

366) The Open Mind por J. Robert Oppenheimer

 

367) Sexual Impotence In The Male, por Leonard Paul Wershub

   

Otras lecturas

 

368) Medea por Jeffers Robinson

 

369) Antigone por Jean Anouilh

 

370) Bell, Book And Candle por John Van Druten

 

371) The Women por Clare Boothe

 

372) Jean Of Lorraine por Maxwell Anderson

   

Viajes

 

373) The Sawbwa And His Secretary por C.Y. Lee

 

374) The Twain Shall Meet por Christopher Rand

 

375) Kingdom Of The Rocks por Consuelo De Saint-Exupery

 

376) The Heart Of India por Alexander Campbell

 

377) Man-Eaters Of India por Jim Corbett

 

378) Jungle Lore por Jim Corbett

 

379) My India por Jim Corbett

 

380) A Time In Rome por Elizabeth Bowen

 

381) London por Jacques Boussard

 

382) New York State Vacationlands

 

383) Russian Journey por William O. Douglas

 

384) The Golden Bough por James G. Frazer

   

Con toque femenino

 

385) The Portable Dorothy Parker

 

386) My Antonia por Willa Cather

 

387) Lucy Gayheart por Willa Cather

 

388) The Ballad Of The Sad Cafe por Carson McCullers

 

389) The Short Novels Of Colette

 

390) The Little Disturbances Of Man por Grace Paley

   

Otros más

 

391) The Autobiography Of Lincoln Steffens

 

392-403) Carl Sandburg's 12-volume biography of Abraham Lincoln

 

404) The Little Prince por Antoine De Saint-Exupery

 

405) Poems Of W.B. Yeats

 

406) Mr Roberts por Joyce Cary

 

407) The Thinking Body por Mabel Elsworth Todd

 

408) The Actor Prepares por Konstantin Stanislavsky

 

409) The Bible

 

410) The Biography Of Eleanora Duse, por William Weaver

 

411) De Humani Corporis Fabrica (Study Of Human Bone Structure) por Andreas Vesalius

 

412) Essays por Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

413) Gertrude Lawrence As Mrs A, por Richard Aldrich

 

414) Goodnight Sweet Prince por Gene Fowler

 

415) Greek Mythology por Edith Hamilton

 

416) How Stanislavsky Directs por Mikhail Gorchakov

 

417) I Married Adventure por Olso Johnson

 

418) The Importance Of Living por Lin Yutang

 

419) Letters To A Young Poet por Rainer Maria Rilke

 

420) Psychology Of Everyday Life por Sigmund Freud

 

421) The Rains Came por Louis Broomfield

 

422) The Rights Of Man por Thomas Paine

 

423) Swann's Way por Marcel Proust

 

424) To The Actor por Michael Chekhov

 

425) Captain Newman, M.D.

 

427) A Lost Lady por Willa Cather

 

428) Lust For Life por Irving Stone

 

429) The Deer Park por Norman Mailer

 

430) The Rebel por Albert Camus

  

www.diariodenavarra.es/noticias/blogs/sopa-letras/2013/12...

 

___

 

Amor - Vladímir Mayakovski

  

Tal vez,

quizá,

alguna vez,

por el camino de una alameda del zoológico,

entrará también ella.

 

Ella,

ella también amaba a los animales,

y sonriendo llegará,

así como está,

en la foto de la mesa.

 

Ella es tan hermosa,

a ella con seguridad la resucitarán.

 

Vuestro siglo XXX

vencerá,

al corazón destrozado por las pequeñeces.

 

Ahora,

trataremos de terminar,

todo lo que no hemos podido amar en la vida,

en innumerables noches estrelladas.

 

¡Resucitádme,

aunque más no sea,

porque soy poeta,

y esperaba el futuro,

luchando contra las mezquindades de la vida cotidiana!

 

¡Resucitádme,

aunque más no sea por eso!

 

¡Resucitádme!

Quiero acabar de vivir lo mío,

mi vida

para que no exista un amor sirviente,

ni matrimonios, sucios,

concuspiscentes.

 

Maldiciendo la cama,

dejando el sofá,

alzaré por el mundo,

un amor universal.

 

Para que un día,

que el dolor degrada,

cambie,

y no implorar más,

mendigando,

y al primer llamado de:

 

¡Camarada!

se dé vuelta toda la tierra.

 

Para no vivir,

sacrificándose por una casa, por un agujero.

 

Para que la familia,

desde hoy,

cambie,

el padre,

sea por lo menos el Universo,

y la madre

sea por lo menos la Tierra.

  

Vladímir Mayakovski

German postcard by Krüger, no. 902/29.

 

American film and television actress Kim Novak (1933) starred in such popular successes as Picnic (1955), The Man with the Golden Arm (1955) and Pal Joey (1957). However, she is perhaps best known today for her ‘dual role’ as both Judy Barton and Madeleine Elster in Alfred Hitchcock's classic thriller Vertigo (1958). She withdrew from acting in 1966, and has only sporadically returned since.

 

Kim Novak was born as Marilyn Pauline Novak, professionally in Chicago, Illinois in 1933. She is the daughter of history teacher Joseph Novak and factory worker Blanche (née Kral) Novak. She won two scholarships to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and during the summer break in her last semester of junior college, Novak went on a cross-country tour modeling for a refrigerator company at trade shows. While stopping by Los Angeles, Novak was crowned Miss Deepfreeze by the refrigerator company. While there, she and two other models stood in line to be extras in The French Line (Lloyd Bacon, 1954), a film starring Jane Russell. It was here that she was discovered by an agent, who signed her to a long-term contract with Columbia Pictures. Columbia intended for Novak to be their successor to Rita Hayworth, their biggest star of the 1940s, whose career had declined. The studio also hoped that Novak would bring them the same success 20th Century-Fox was having with Marilyn Monroe. Her first role for the studio was in the film noir Pushover (Richard Quine, 1954). She then co-starred in the romantic comedy Phffft! (Mark Robson, 1954) as Janis, a Monroe-type character who finds Jack Lemmon's character, Robert Tracey, "real cute". Both films were reasonably successful at the box office, and Novak received favorable reviews for her performances. The film version of Picnic (Joshua Logan, 1955), co-starring William Holden, was a resounding critical and box office triumph. Novak won a Golden Globe Award for Most Promising Newcomer. She was also nominated for BAFTA Film Award for Best Foreign Actress, but did not win. Director Otto Preminger then cast her in The Man with the Golden Arm (1955), in which she played Frank Sinatra's sultry ex-girlfriend. The film was a box office triumph. After appearing in a series of successful movies, Novak became one of the biggest box office draws. Columbia placed her in a film adaptation of Pal Joey (George Sidney, 1957). She played Linda English, a naive showgirl, opposite Frank Sinatra and Rita Hayworth. The movie was a box office hit and has been considered one of Novak's better performances.

 

Kim Novak is perhaps best known today for the classic thriller Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958), opposite James Stewart. During the production, Novak was striking for more money from Columbia, and refused to show up for work on the Vertigo set to protest her salary of $1,250 a week. Novak hired new agents to represent her and demanded an adjustment in her contract. Harry Cohn of Columbia suspended her but, after a few weeks of negotiations, he relented and offered her a new contract worthy of a major star. Vertigo was poorly received at the time of its release in 1958 and failed at the box office, but has since been re-evaluated and is widely considered one of the director's best works. In 1958, Novak again worked with Stewart in Richard Quine's Bell, Book and Candle, a comedy tale of modern-day witchcraft, that proved to be a box office success. The following year, she starred opposite Fredric March in the acclaimed drama Middle of the Night (Delbert Mann, 1959), and opposite Kirk Douglas in Strangers When We Meet (Richard Quine, 1960). Although still young, her career declined in the early 1960s, and after several years in a series of lackluster films, she withdrew from acting in 1966. She has only sporadically returned since. She later returned to the screen in the West-German film Schöner Gigolo, armer Gigolo/ Just a Gigolo (David Hemmings, 1978), starring David Bowie, and the British mystery The Mirror Crack'd (Guy Hamilton, 1980), based on the story by Agatha Christie. She also had a regular role on the prime time TV series Falcon Crest (1986–1987). After a disappointing experience during the filming of the mystery Liebestraum (Mike Figgis, 1991), Kim Novak has permanently retired from acting, citing she has no desire to return. In 2013, she attended the 2013 Cannes Film Festival where she introduced a new restored version of Vertigo. Audiences gave Novak a standing ovation.

 

Sources: Wikipedia and IMDb.

Three talismans for exorcising the presence creeping up...

 

Flickr Lounge Weekly Theme (Week 16) ~ Rule of Odds.

www.flickr.com/groups/1912892@N23/discuss/72157682485470656/

 

“BELL, BOOK AND CANDLE were props in the medieval excommunication ceremony before they were invoked by the bastard Faulconbridge in [Shakespeare's] King John (Act 3, scene 3). Faulconbridge may perhaps leave us with the first written record of this particular permutation of the three words, but the phrase “candle, book, and bell” shows up around 1300." www.enotes.com/shakespeare-quotes/appendix-faux-candel

 

"Concerning Exorcism: The practice of expelling evil spirits by means of prayer and set formulas derives its authority from the Lord himself who identified these acts as signs of his messiahship. Very early in the life of the Church the development and exercise of such rites were reserved to the bishop, at whose discretion they might be delegated to selected presbyters and others deemed competent." www.riteseries.org/brain/bos/3/53/

German postcard by ISV, no. T-13.

 

American film, stage and television actress Carroll Baker (1931) enjoyed popularity as both a serious dramatic actress and as a sex symbol. Cast in a wide range of roles during her heyday in the 1960s, Baker was especially memorable playing brash, flamboyant women, due to her beautiful features, striking blonde hair, and distinctive Southern drawl. In the late 1960s she moved to Italy, where she starred in numerous giallo thrillers and horror films.

 

Carroll Baker was born Karolina Piekarski in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, in 1931. Her parents were Virginia (née Duffy) and Polish born William Watson Baker (Piekarski), who was a travelling salesman. After spending a year in college, she began working as the assistant of magician the Great Volta and joined a dance company. Baker moved to New York City. In 1953, she married furrier Louie Ritter, but the marriage ended the same year. She studied acting under Lee Strasberg, eventually becoming part of the famed Actors Studio, where she was an acquaintance of Marilyn Monroe and became a close friend of James Dean. Baker began her film career with a small part in Easy to Love (Charles Walters, 1953). After appearing in television commercials, she took a role in the Broadway production of All Summer Long. Then director Elia Kazan cast her as the title character in his controversial Baby Doll (1956), based on a script by Tennessee Williams. Her role as the thumb-sucking teenage bride to a failed middle-aged cotton gin owner (Karl Malden) brought Baker instant fame as well as a certain level of notoriety. It earned her an Oscar nomination and a Golden Globe. She also appeared in Giant (George Stevens, 1956) alongside Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, and James Dean.

 

Carroll Baker would go on to work steadily in films throughout the late fifties and early sixties. She appeared in a variety of genres: romances, such as The Miracle (Irving Rapper, 1959), co-starring a young Roger Moore, and But Not for Me (Walter Lang, 1959) with Clark Gable, as well as westerns, including The Big Country (William Wyler, 1958) and a lead role in the epic How the West Was Won (Henry Hathaway, John Ford, George Marshall, 1962); and steamy melodramas, including the controversial independent film Something Wild (1961), directed by her then-husband Jack Garfein, in which she plays a rape victim; and Station Six-Sahara (1962). Baker was also chosen by MGM for the lead in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, but her contract with Warner Brothers prevented her from accepting the role, which ultimately went to Elizabeth Taylor. Baker's portrayal of a Jean Harlow-type movie star in The Carpetbaggers (Edward Dmytryk, 1964) brought her a second wave of notoriety. The film was the top money-maker of that year, with domestic box-office receipts of $13,000,000 and marked the beginning of a tumultuous relationship with the film's producer, Joseph E. Levine. Based on her Carpetbaggers performance, Levine began to develop Baker as a sex symbol, casting her in the title roles of Sylvia (Gordon Douglas, 1965) and Harlow (Joseph E. Levine, 1965). Despite much pre-publicity, the latter film was not a success, and relations between Baker and Levine soured.

 

In the late 1960s, Carroll Baker moved to Italy after a protracted legal battle with Paramount Pictures, as well as a divorce from her second husband, Jack Garfein. The next decade, she starred in a multitude of Italian films. These included several horror films and giallo thrillers such as L’Harem/Her Harem (Marco Ferreri, 1967) with Renato Salvatori, Il dolce corpo di Deborah/The Sweet Body of Deborah (Romolo Guerrieri, 1968) opposite Jean Sorel, and Il diavolo a sette face/The Devil Has Seven Faces (Osvaldo Civirani, 1971). She became a favourite of cult director Umberto Lenzi who directed her in the horror films Così dolce... così perversa/So Sweet... So Perverse (1969) with Jean-Louis Trintignant, Orgasmo/Paranoia (1969) with Lou Castel, Paranoia/A Quiet Place to Kill (1970), and Il coltello di ghiaccio/Knife of Ice (1972). She followed her roles in Lenzi's films with a leading role in Baba Yaga/Black Magic (Corrado Farina, 1973) as the titular witch, alongside George Eastman. In those years, film locations would take her all around the world, including Spain, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Mexico. She returned to American cinema with a leading part as a beauty salon owner who provides hit men with jobs in Andy Warhol's Bad (Jed Johnson, 1977). She played a washed-up actress living among expatriates in a Spanish village in Las flores del vicio/The Sky Is Falling (Silvio Narizzano, 1979) with Dennis Hopper. She appeared in British theatre productions of Bell, Book, and Candle; Rain, Lucy Crown, and Motive. There she met her third husband, stage actor Donald Burton. Baker starred in the Walt Disney-produced horror film, The Watcher in the Woods (John Hough, 1980), alongside Bette Davis and played the mother of Dorothy Stratten in Star 80 (Bob Fosse, 1983). She also played Jack Nicholson's wife in Ironweed (Héctor Babenco, 1987). She later had supporting roles in Kindergarten Cop (Ivan Reitman, 1990) and the acclaimed thriller The Game (David Fincher, 1997), before retiring in 2002. During a career spanning 50 years, Carroll Baker appeared in over 80 roles in film, television, and theatre. In 1983, Baker published a well-received autobiography entitled Baby Doll: An Autobiography, and later wrote two other books, To Africa with Love, and a novel entitled A Roman Tale. Baker has two children with Jack Garfein, Blanche Baker (1956) and Herschel Garfein (1958).

 

Sources: AllMovie, Glamour Girls of the Silver Screen, Wikipedia and IMDb.

"- She used a cat." (Bell Book and Candle - 1958)

 

Another one from this serie, O'Malley's gone.

The Flatiron Building, originally the Fuller Building, is a triangular 22-story, 285-foot (87 m) tall steel-framed landmarked building located at 175 Fifth Avenue in the borough of Manhattan, New York City, which is considered to be a groundbreaking skyscraper. Upon completion in 1902, it was one of the tallest buildings in the city at 20 floors high and one of only two skyscrapers north of 14th Street – the other being the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower, one block east. The building sits on a triangular block formed by Fifth Avenue, Broadway, and East 22nd Street – where the building's 87-foot (27 m) back end is located – with East 23rd Street grazing the triangle's northern (uptown) peak. As with numerous other wedge-shaped buildings, the name "Flatiron" derives from its resemblance to a cast-iron clothes iron.

 

The building, which has been called "one of the world's most iconic skyscrapers and a quintessential symbol of New York City", anchors the south (downtown) end of Madison Square and the north (uptown) end of the Ladies' Mile Historic District. The neighborhood around it is called the Flatiron District after its signature building, which has become an icon of New York City.

 

The Flatiron Building was designated a New York City landmark in 1966, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979, and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1989.

 

The site on which the Flatiron Building would stand was bought in 1857 by Amos Eno, who shortly built the Fifth Avenue Hotel on a site diagonally across from it. Eno tore down the four-story St. Germaine Hotel on the south end of the lot, and replaced it with a seven-story apartment building, the Cumberland. On the remainder of the lot he built four three-story buildings for commercial use. This left four stories of the Cumberland's northern face exposed, which Eno rented out to advertisers, including The New York Times, who installed a sign made up of electric lights. Eno later put a canvas screen on the wall, and projected images onto it from a magic lantern on top of one of his smaller buildings, presenting advertisements and interesting pictures alternately. Both the Times and the New York Tribune began using the screen for news bulletins, and on election nights tens of thousands of people would gather in Madison Square, waiting for the latest results.

 

During his life Eno resisted suggestions to sell "Eno's flatiron", as the site had become known, but after his death in 1899 his assets were liquidated, and the lot went up for sale. The New York State Assembly appropriated $3 million for the city to buy it, but this fell through when a newspaper reporter discovered that the plan was a graft scheme by Tammany Hall boss Richard Croker. Instead, the lot was bought at auction by William Eno, one of Amos's sons, for $690,000 – the elder Eno had bought the property for around $30,000 forty years earlier. Three weeks later, William re-sold the lot to Samuel and Mott Newhouse for $801,000. The Newhouses intended to put up a 12-story building with street-level retail shops and bachelor apartments above, but two years later they sold the lot for about $2 million to Cumberland Realty Company, an investment partnership created by Harry S. Black, CEO of the Fuller Company. The Fuller Company was the first true general contractor that dealt with all aspects of building construction except design, and they specialized in building skyscrapers.

 

Black intended to construct a new headquarters building on the site, despite the recent deterioration of the surrounding neighborhood, and he engaged Chicago architect Daniel Burnham to design it. The building, which would be Burnham's first in New York City, would also be the first skyscraper north of 14th Street. It was to be named the Fuller Building after George A. Fuller, founder of the Fuller Company and "father of the skyscraper", who had died two years earlier, but locals persisted in calling it "The Flatiron", a name which has since been made official.

 

The Flatiron Building was designed by Chicago's Daniel Burnham as a vertical Renaissance palazzo with Beaux-Arts styling. Unlike New York's early skyscrapers, which took the form of towers arising from a lower, blockier mass, such as the contemporary Singer Building (built 1902–08), the Flatiron Building epitomizes the Chicago school conception:[C] like a classical Greek column, its facade – limestone at the bottom changing to glazed terra-cotta from the Atlantic Terra Cotta Company in Tottenville, Staten Island as the floors rise – is divided into a base, shaft and capital.

 

Early sketches by Daniel Burnham show a design with an (unexecuted) clockface and a far more elaborate crown than in the actual building. Though Burnham maintained overall control of the design process, he was not directly connected with the details of the structure as built; credit should be shared with his designer Frederick P. Dinkelberg, a Pennsylvania-born architect in Burnham's office, who first worked for Burnham in putting together the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, for which Burnham was the chief of construction and master designer. Working drawings for the Flatiron Building, however, remain to be located, though renderings were published at the time of construction in American Architect and Architectural Record.

 

Building the Flatiron was made feasible by a change to New York City's building codes in 1892, which eliminated the requirement that masonry be used for fireproofing considerations. This opened the way for steel-skeleton construction.[8] Since it employed a steel skeleton – it could be built to 22 stories (285 feet) relatively easily, which would have been difficult using other construction methods of that time. It was a technique familiar to the Fuller Company, a contracting firm with considerable expertise in building such tall structures. At the vertex, the triangular tower is only 6.5 feet (2 m) wide; viewed from above, this pointed end of the structure describes an acute angle of about 25 degrees.

 

The "cowcatcher" retail space at the front of the building was not part of Burnham or Dinkelberg's design, but was added at the insistence of Harry Black in order to maximize the use of the building's lot and produce some retail income to help defray the cost of construction. Black pushed Burnham hard for plans for the addition, but Burnham resisted because of the aesthetic effect it would have on the design of the "prow" of the building, where it would interrupt the two-story high Classical columns which were echoed at the top of the building by two columns which supported the cornice. Black insisted, and Burnham was forced to accept the addition, despite the interruption of the design's symmetry. Another addition to the building not in the original plan was the penthouse, which was constructed after the rest of the building had been completed to be used as artists' studios, and was quickly rented out to artists such as Louis Fancher, many of whom contributed to the pulp magazines which were produced in the offices below.

 

Once construction of the building began, it proceeded at a very fast pace. The steel was so meticulously pre-cut that the frame went up at the rate of a floor each week. By February 1902 the frame was complete, and by mid-May the building was half-covered by terra-cotta tiling. The building was completed in June 1902, after a year of construction.

 

New York's Flatiron Building was not the first building of its triangular ground-plan: aside from a possibly unique triangular Roman temple built on a similarly constricted site in the city of Verulamium, Britannia,[28] the Maryland Inn in Annapolis (1782), the Granger Block in Syracuse, New York (1869), the Phelan Building in San Francisco (1881), the Gooderham Building of Toronto (1892), and the English-American Building in Atlanta (1897) predate it. All, however, are smaller than their New York counterpart.

 

The facade of the Flatiron Building was restored in 1991 by the firm of Hurley & Farinella.

 

The Flatiron Building has become an icon of New York City, and the public response to it was enthusiastic, but the critical response to it at the time was not completely positive, and what praise it garnered was often for the cleverness of the engineering involved. Montgomery Schuyler, editor of Architectural Record, said that its "awkwardness [is] entirely undisguised, and without even an attempt to disguise them, if they have not even been aggravated by the treatment. ... The treatment of the tip is an additional and it seems wanton aggravation of the inherent awkwardness of the situation." He praised the surface of the building, and the detailing of the terra-cotta work, but criticized the practicality of the large number of windows in the building: "[The tenant] can, perhaps, find wall space within for one roll top desk without overlapping the windows, with light close in front of him and close behind him and close on one side of him. But suppose he needed a bookcase? Undoubtedly he has a highly eligible place from which to view processions. But for the transaction of business?"

 

When the building was first constructed, it received a lot of mixed feedback. The most known criticism received was known as "Burnham's Folly". This criticism, focused on the structure of the building, was made on the grounds that the "combination of triangular shape and height would cause the building to fall down." Critics believed that the building created a dangerous wind-tunnel at the intersection of the two streets, and could possibly knock the building down. Although the wind is strong at the intersection, the building’s structure was meant to accommodate four times the typical wind loads in order to stabilize and retain the building's iconic triangular shape.

 

The New York Tribune called the new building "A stingy piece of pie ... the greatest inanimate troublemaker in New York", while the Municipal Art Society said that it was "Unfit to be in the Center of the City". The New York Times called it a "monstrosity".

 

But some saw the building differently. Futurist H. G. Wells wrote in his 1906 book The Future in America: A Search After Realities:

 

I found myself agape, admiring a sky-scraper the prow of the Flat-iron Building, to be particular, ploughing up through the traffic of Broadway and Fifth Avenue in the afternoon light.

 

The Flatiron was to attract the attention of numerous artists. It was the subject of one of Edward Steichen's atmospheric photographs, taken on a wet wintry late afternoon in 1904, as well as a memorable image by Alfred Stieglitz taken the year before, to which Steichen was paying homage. Stieglitz reflected on the dynamic symbolism of the building, noting upon seeing it one day during a snowstorm that "... it appeared to be moving toward me like the bow of a monster ocean steamer – a picture of a new America still in the making," and remarked that what the Parthenon was to Athens, the Flatiron was to New York.[1] When Stieglitz' photograph was published in Camera Work, his friend Sadakichi Hartmann, a writer, painter and photographer, accompanied it with an essay on the building: "A curious creation, no doubt, but can it be called beautiful? Beauty is a very abstract idea ... Why should the time not arrive when the majority without hesitation will pronounce the 'Flat-iron' a thing of beauty?"

 

Besides Stieglitz and Steichen, photographers such as Alvin Langdon Coburn, Jessie Tarbox Beals, painters of the Ashcan School like John Sloan, Everett Shinn and Ernest Lawson, as well as Paul Cornoyer and Childe Hassam, lithographer Joseph Pennell, illustrator John Edward Jackson as well the French Cubist Albert Gleizes all took the Flatiron as the subject of their work.[39] But decades after it was completed, others still could not come to terms with the building. Sculptor William Ordway Partridge remarked that it was "a disgrace to our city, an outrage to our sense of the artistic, and a menace to life".

 

After the end of World War I, the 165th Infantry Regiment passes through the Victory Arch in Madison Square, with the Flatiron Building in the background (1919).

 

The Fuller Company originally took the 19th floor of the building for its headquarters. In 1910, Harry Black moved the company to Francis Kimball's Trinity Building at 111 Broadway, where its parent company, U.S. Realty, had its offices. They moved them back to the Flatiron in 1916, and left permanently for the Fuller Building on 57th Street in 1929.

 

The Flatiron's other original tenants included publishers (magazine publishing pioneer Frank Munsey, American Architect and Building News and a vanity publisher), an insurance company (the Equitable Life Assurance Society), small businesses (a patent medicine company, Western Specialty Manufacturing Company and Whitehead & Hoag, who made celluloid novelties), music publishers (overflow from "Tin Pan Alley" up on 28th Street), a landscape architect, the Imperial Russian Consulate, the Bohemian Guides Society, the Roebling Construction Company, owned by the sons of Tammany Hall boss Richard Croker, and the crime syndicate, Murder, Inc.

 

The retail space in the building's "cowcatcher" at the "prow" was leased by United Cigar Stores, and the building's vast cellar, which extended into the vaults that went more than 20 feet (6.1 m) under the surrounding streets, was occupied by the Flatiron Restaurant, which could seat 1,500 patrons and was open from breakfast through late supper for those taking in a performance at one of the many theatres which lined Broadway between 14th and 23rd Streets.

 

In 1911, the building introduced a restaurant/club in the basement. It was among the first of its kind that allowed a black Jazz band to perform, thus introducing ragtime to affluent New Yorkers.

 

Even before construction on the Flatiron Building had begun, the area around Madison Square had started to deteriorate somewhat. After U.S. Realty constructed the New York Hippodrome, Madison Square Garden was no longer the venue of choice, and survived largely by staging boxing matches. The base of the Flatiron became a cruising spot for gay men, including some male prostitutes. Nonetheless, in 1911 the Flatiron Restaurant was bought by Louis Bustanoby, of the well-known Café des Beaux-Arts, and converted into a trendy 400-seat French restaurant, Taverne Louis. As an innovation to attract customers away from another restaurant opened by his brothers, Bustanoby hired a black musical group, Louis Mitchell and his Southern Symphony Quintette, to play dance tunes at the Taverne and the Café. Irving Berlin heard the group at the Taverne and suggested that they should try to get work in London, which they did. The Taverne's openness was also indicated by its welcoming a gay clientele, unusual for a restaurant of its type at the time. The Taverne was forced to close due to the effects of Prohibition on the restaurant business.

 

In October 1925, Harry S. Black, in need of cash for his U.S. Realty Company, sold the Flatiron Building to a syndicate set up by Lewis Rosenbaum, who also owned assorted other notable buildings around the U.S. The price was $2 million, which equaled Black's cost for buying the lot and erecting the Flatiron. The syndicate defaulted on its mortgage in 1933, and was taken over by the lender, Equitable Life Assurance Company after failing to sell it at auction. To attract tenants, Equitable did some modernization of the building, including replacing the original cast-iron birdcage elevators, which had cabs covered in rubber tiling and were originally built by Hecla Iron Works, but the hydraulic power system was not replaced. By the mid-1940s, the building was fully rented.

 

When the U.S. entered World War I, the Federal government instituted a "Wake Up America!" campaign, and the United Cigar store in the Flatiron's cowcatcher donated its space to the U.S. Navy for use as a recruiting center. Liberty Bonds were sold outside on sidewalk stands. By the mid-1940s, the cigar store had been replaced with a Walgreens drug store. During the 1940s, the building was dominated by clothing and toy companies.

 

Equitable sold the building in 1946 to the Flatiron Associates, an investor group headed by Harry Helmsley, whose firm, Dwight-Helmsley (which would later become Helmsley-Spear) managed the property. The new owners made some superficial changes, such as adding a dropped ceiling to the lobby, and, later, replacing the original mahogony-panelled entrances with revolving doors. Because the ownership structure was a tenancy-in-common, in which all partners have to agree on any action, as opposed to a straightforward partnership, it was difficult to get permission for necessary repairs and improvements to be done, and the building declined during the Helmsley/Flatiron Associates era. Helmsley-Spear stopped managing the building in 1997, when some of the investors sold their 52% of the building to Newmark Knight-Frank, a large real estate firm, which took over management of the property. Shortly afterwards, Helmsley's widow, Leona Helmsley, sold her share as well. Newmark made significant improvements to the property, including installing new electric elevators, replacing the antiquated hydraulic ones, which were the last hydraulic elevators in New York City.

 

During a 2005 restoration of the Flatiron Building a 15-story vertical advertising banner covered the facade of the building. The advertisement elicited protests from many New York City residents, prompting the New York City Department of Buildings to step in and force the building's owners to remove it.

 

In January 2009, Italian real estate investment firm Sorgente Group, based in Rome, bought a majority stake in the Flatiron Building, with plans to turn it into a luxury hotel, although the conversion may have to wait ten years until the leases of the current tenants run out. The firm's Historic and Trophy Buildings Fund owns a number of prestigious buildings in France and Italy, and was involved in buying, and then selling, a stake in the Chrysler Building in Midtown New York. The value of the 22-story Flatiron Building, which is already zoned by the city to allow it to become a hotel, was estimated to be $190 million.

 

As an icon of New York City, the Flatiron Building is a popular spot for tourist photographs, making it "possibly one of the most photographed buildings in the world", but it is also a functioning office building which is currently the headquarters of publishing companies held by Verlagsgruppe Georg von Holtzbrinck of Stuttgart, Germany, under the umbrella name of Macmillan, including St. Martin's Press, Tor/Forge, Picador and Henry Holt and Company.[56] Macmillan, which is renovating some floors, published the following on their website:

 

The Flatiron's interior is known for having its strangely-shaped offices with walls that cut through at an angle on their way to the skyscraper's famous point. These "point" offices are the most coveted and feature amazing northern views that look directly upon another famous Manhattan landmark, the Empire State Building.

 

There are oddities about the building's interior. Bathrooms for males and females are placed on alternating floors, with the men's rooms on even floors and the women's rooms on odd ones. Additionally, to reach the top floor—the 21st, which was added in 1905, three years after the building was completed—a second elevator has to be taken from the 20th floor. On the 21st floor, the bottoms of the windows are chest-high.

 

When construction on the building began, locals took an immediate interest, placing bets on how far the debris would spread when the wind knocked it down. This presumed susceptibility to damage had also given it the nickname "Burnham's Folly". But thanks to the steel bracing designed by engineer Corydon Purdy, which enabled the building to withstand four times the amount of windforce it could be expected to ever feel, there was no possibility that the wind would knock over the Flatiron Building. Nevertheless, the wind was a factor in the public attention the building received.

 

Due to the geography of the site, with Broadway on one side, Fifth Avenue on the other, and the open expanse of Madison Square and the park in front of it, the wind currents around the building could be treacherous. Wind from the north would split around the building, downdrafts from above and updrafts from the vaulted area under the street would combine to make the wind unpredictable. This is said to have given rise to the phrase "23 skidoo", from what policemen would shout at men who tried to get glimpses of women's dresses being blown up by the winds swirling around the building due to the strong downdrafts.

 

In the 1958 comedy film Bell, Book and Candle, James Stewart and Kim Novak were filmed on top of the Flatiron Building in a romantic clinch, and for Warren Beatty's 1980 film Reds, the base of the building was used for a scene with Diane Keaton.

 

Today, the Flatiron Building is frequently used on television commercials and documentaries as an easily recognizable symbol of the city, shown, for instance, in the opening credits of the Late Show with David Letterman or in scenes of New York City that are shown during scene transitions in the TV sitcoms Friends, Spin City, and Veronica's Closet. In 1987 the building was used as the scene of a murder for the TV series Murder, She Wrote, in the episode "No Accounting for Murder". In the 1998 film Godzilla, the Flatiron Building is accidentally destroyed by the US Army while in pursuit of Godzilla, and it is depicted as the headquarters of the Daily Bugle, for which Peter Parker is a freelance photographer, in the Spider-Man movies. It is shown as the location of the Channel 6 News headquarters where April O'Neil works in the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles TV series. The Flatiron Building is also the home of the fictional company Damage Control in the Marvel Universe comics and for the CIA sponsored, super hero management team "The Boys" in the Dynamite Comics title of the same name.

 

In 2013, the Whitney Museum of American Art installed a life-sized 3D-cutout replica of Edward Hopper's 1942 painting Nighthawks in the Flatiron Art Space located in the "prow" of the Flatiron building. Although Hopper said his picture was inspired by a diner in Greenwich Village, the prow is reminiscent of the painting, and was selected to display the two-dimensional cutouts.

 

In 2014, the Lego Architecture series produced a model of the Flatiron Building to add to their landmark series. The subsequent New York City set, introduced in 2015, also included the building (Wikipedia).

Spanish postcard by Postal Oscarcolor, no. 372.

 

American film and television actress Kim Novak (1933) starred in such popular successes as Picnic (1955), The Man with the Golden Arm (1955) and Pal Joey (1957). However, she is perhaps best known today for her ‘dual role’ as both Judy Barton and Madeleine Elster in Alfred Hitchcock's classic thriller Vertigo (1958). She withdrew from acting in 1966, and has only sporadically returned since.

 

Kim Novak was born as Marilyn Pauline Novak, professionally in Chicago, Illinois in 1933. She is the daughter of history teacher Joseph Novak and factory worker Blanche (née Kral) Novak. She won two scholarships to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and during the summer break in her last semester of junior college, Novak went on a cross-country tour modeling for a refrigerator company at trade shows. While stopping by Los Angeles, Novak was crowned Miss Deepfreeze by the refrigerator company. While there, she and two other models stood in line to be extras in The French Line (Lloyd Bacon, 1954), a film starring Jane Russell. It was here that she was discovered by an agent, who signed her to a long-term contract with Columbia Pictures. Columbia intended for Novak to be their successor to Rita Hayworth, their biggest star of the 1940s, whose career had declined. The studio also hoped that Novak would bring them the same success 20th Century-Fox was having with Marilyn Monroe. Her first role for the studio was in the film noir Pushover (Richard Quine, 1954). She then co-starred in the romantic comedy Phffft! (Mark Robson, 1954) as Janis, a Monroe-type character who finds Jack Lemmon's character, Robert Tracey, "real cute". Both films were reasonably successful at the box office, and Novak received favorable reviews for her performances. The film version of Picnic (Joshua Logan, 1955), co-starring William Holden, was a resounding critical and box office triumph. Novak won a Golden Globe Award for Most Promising Newcomer. She was also nominated for BAFTA Film Award for Best Foreign Actress, but did not win. Director Otto Preminger then cast her in The Man with the Golden Arm (1955), in which she played Frank Sinatra's sultry ex-girlfriend. The film was a box office triumph. After appearing in a series of successful movies, Novak became one of the biggest box office draws. Columbia placed her in a film adaptation of Pal Joey (George Sidney, 1957). She played Linda English, a naive showgirl, opposite Frank Sinatra and Rita Hayworth. The movie was a box office hit and has been considered one of Novak's better performances.

 

Kim Novak is perhaps best known today for the classic thriller Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958), opposite James Stewart. During the production, Novak was striking for more money from Columbia, and refused to show up for work on the Vertigo set to protest her salary of $1,250 a week. Novak hired new agents to represent her and demanded an adjustment in her contract. Harry Cohn of Columbia suspended her but, after a few weeks of negotiations, he relented and offered her a new contract worthy of a major star. Vertigo was poorly received at the time of its release in 1958 and failed at the box office, but has since been re-evaluated and is widely considered one of the director's best works. In 1958, Novak again worked with Stewart in Richard Quine's Bell, Book and Candle, a comedy tale of modern-day witchcraft, that proved to be a box office success. The following year, she starred opposite Fredric March in the acclaimed drama Middle of the Night (Delbert mann, 1959), and opposite Kirk Douglas in Strangers When We Meet (Richard Quine, 1960). Although still young, her career declined in the early 1960s, and after several years in a series of lackluster films, she withdrew from acting in 1966. She has only sporadically returned since. She later returned to the screen in the West-German film Schöner Gigolo, armer Gigolo Just a Gigolo (David Hemmings, 1978), starring David Bowie, and the British mystery The Mirror Crack'd (Guy Hamilton, 1980), based on the story by Agatha Christie. She also had a regular role on the prime time TV series Falcon Crest (1986–1987). After a disappointing experience during the filming of the mystery Liebestraum (Mike Figgis, 1991), Kim Novak has permanently retired from acting, citing she has no desire to return. In 2013, she attended the 2013 Cannes Film Festival where she introduced a new restored version of Vertigo. Audiences gave Novak a standing ovation.

 

Sources: Wikipedia and IMDb.

Made Explore 15 February: Highest position 101 Yay!

 

'Vanitas vanitatum et omnia vanitas' Vanity, Vanity all is Vanity.

 

This was my daughter's idea - that I try to replicate a renaissance genre painting representing vanity and the transience of human life. Amongst other things I chose; the Lady's Magazine from 1793, my daughter's Oxford Degree; my great great grandfather's civil war sword; my grandmother's school bell; a vintage camera; a mask I brought back from Venice, a second edition of Richardson's 'Pamela,' a 1741 Stackhouse Bible, my grandfather's Asbury Park High School Diploma from 1907, a Regency copy of 'Elegant Extracts in Poetry' the book Emma and Harriet mention in Austen's novel, the Royal Seal from the wall of the old Covent Garden Opera House and my father's Purple Heart that he was given for being wounded in action at Guadalcanal. The phrenology head represents the mind, I guess. Plus it just looks good. And the snuffed candle is pretty obvious. (As a happy accident, this photograph includes Bell, Book and Candle, so it could also symbolise ex-communication.)

German postcard by Ufa, Berlin-Tempelhof, no. CK 280. Photo: Terb Agency.

 

American film and television actress Kim Novak (1933) starred in such popular successes as Picnic (1955), The Man with the Golden Arm (1955) and Pal Joey (1957). However, she is perhaps best known today for her ‘dual role’ as both Judy Barton and Madeleine Elster in Alfred Hitchcock's classic thriller Vertigo (1958). She withdrew from acting in 1966, and has only sporadically returned since.

 

Kim Novak was born as Marilyn Pauline Novak, professionally in Chicago, Illinois in 1933. She is the daughter of history teacher Joseph Novak and factory worker Blanche (née Kral) Novak. She won two scholarships to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and during the summer break in her last semester of junior college, Novak went on a cross-country tour modeling for a refrigerator company at trade shows. While stopping by Los Angeles, Novak was crowned Miss Deepfreeze by the refrigerator company. While there, she and two other models stood in line to be extras in The French Line (Lloyd Bacon, 1954), a film starring Jane Russell. It was here that she was discovered by an agent, who signed her to a long-term contract with Columbia Pictures. Columbia intended for Novak to be their successor to Rita Hayworth, their biggest star of the 1940s, whose career had declined. The studio also hoped that Novak would bring them the same success 20th Century-Fox was having with Marilyn Monroe. Her first role for the studio was in the film noir Pushover (Richard Quine, 1954). She then co-starred in the romantic comedy Phffft! (Mark Robson, 1954) as Janis, a Monroe-type character who finds Jack Lemmon's character, Robert Tracey, "real cute". Both films were reasonably successful at the box office, and Novak received favorable reviews for her performances. The film version of Picnic (Joshua Logan, 1955), co-starring William Holden, was a resounding critical and box office triumph. Novak won a Golden Globe Award for Most Promising Newcomer. She was also nominated for BAFTA Film Award for Best Foreign Actress, but did not win. Director Otto Preminger then cast her in The Man with the Golden Arm (1955), in which she played Frank Sinatra's sultry ex-girlfriend. The film was a box office triumph. After appearing in a series of successful movies, Novak became one of the biggest box office draws. Columbia placed her in a film adaptation of Pal Joey (George Sidney, 1957). She played Linda English, a naive showgirl, opposite Frank Sinatra and Rita Hayworth. The movie was a box office hit and has been considered one of Novak's better performances.

 

Kim Novak is perhaps best known today for the classic thriller Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958), opposite James Stewart. During the production, Novak was striking for more money from Columbia, and refused to show up for work on the Vertigo set to protest her salary of $1,250 a week. Novak hired new agents to represent her and demanded an adjustment in her contract. Harry Cohn of Columbia suspended her but, after a few weeks of negotiations, he relented and offered her a new contract worthy of a major star. Vertigo was poorly received at the time of its release in 1958 and failed at the box office, but has since been re-evaluated and is widely considered one of the director's best works. In 1958, Novak again worked with Stewart in Richard Quine's Bell, Book and Candle, a comedy tale of modern-day witchcraft, that proved to be a box office success. The following year, she starred opposite Fredric March in the acclaimed drama Middle of the Night (Delbert mann, 1959), and opposite Kirk Douglas in Strangers When We Meet (Richard Quine, 1960). Although still young, her career declined in the early 1960s, and after several years in a series of lackluster films, she withdrew from acting in 1966. She has only sporadically returned since. She later returned to the screen in the West-German film Schöner Gigolo, armer Gigolo Just a Gigolo (David Hemmings, 1978), starring David Bowie, and the British mystery The Mirror Crack'd (Guy Hamilton, 1980), based on the story by Agatha Christie. She also had a regular role on the prime time TV series Falcon Crest (1986–1987). After a disappointing experience during the filming of the mystery Liebestraum (Mike Figgis, 1991), Kim Novak has permanently retired from acting, citing she has no desire to return. In 2013, she attended the 2013 Cannes Film Festival where she introduced a new restored version of Vertigo. Audiences gave Novak a standing ovation.

 

Sources: Wikipedia and IMDb.

Dark, warm tones this week — quite tricky when it's a bright sunny day! Not an easy composition to great right — the tall candelabra and low-down (but massive) bible didn't want to both fit in the frame.

My biggest pet peeve in SL is when people expect others to conform to some kind of rules. There are enough rules and expectations and social prejudices in RL. Please don't impose your personal views and try to limit other people's freedom in SL. People can CHOSE to be any thing they want in SL. That's the beauty of it.

 

I had a self proclaimed "fashionista" IM me out of the blue at a shopping event, as if she knew me, to say "Cer, you forgot to attach your shoes."

 

I informed her that infact I had chosen NOT to wear shoes and did she have a problem with that? It went down hill from there.

 

Does Cer LOOK like she needs to wear shoes? I mean, considering she has on long elf-ish fairy ears, glowing blind eyes and a "witch craft" collar -- I'm pretty sure she can NOT wear shoes if she feels like it and positively doesn't give a f@ck about what's "proper".

 

Also -- THIS: youtu.be/lvGJ9GuvIeo?t=227

 

Rolling Stones - WINTER

 

And it sure been a cold, cold winter

And the wind ain't been blowin' from the south

It's sure been a cold, cold winter

And a lotta love is all burned out

  

It sure been a hard, hard winter

My feet been draggin' 'cross the ground

And I hope it's gonna be a long, hot summer

And a lotta love will be burnin' bright

  

And I wish I been out in California

When the lights on all the Christmas trees went out

But I been burnin' my bell, book and candle

And the restoration plays have all gone 'round

  

It sure been a cold, cold winter

My feet been draggin' 'cross the ground

And the fields has all been brown and fallow

And the springtime take a long way around

  

Yeah, and I wish I been out in Stone Canyon

When the lights on all the Christmas trees went out

But I been burnin' my bell, book and candle

And the restoration plays have all gone 'round

  

Sometimes I think about you, baby

Sometimes I cry about you

  

Sometimes I wanna wrap my coat around you

Sometimes I wanna keep you warm

Sometimes I wanna wrap my coat around you

Sometimes I wanna but I can't afford you

Unfortunately I didn't have a proper bell for this little scenario, so I had to improvise with little jingle bells for the Christmas tree!! :-D Hopefully you get the idea...

Unfortunately I didn't have a proper bell for this little scenario, so I had to improvise with little jingle bells for the Christmas tree!! :-D Hopefully you get the idea...

Title from the 1958 Movie of the same name.

"Oh pye, pye, pyewacket what's the matter with me?"

and rat and squeeze bulb camera release thingy

 

4x5 crown graphic, large format

A very moody composition of three, always a good number in photography, but I feel the candle is just too bright. If this could be 'toned down' it would make a great shot.

Unfortunately I didn't have a proper bell for this little scenario, so I had to improvise with little jingle bells for the Christmas tree!! :-D Hopefully you get the idea...

A single bell tolls, hymn books are ready and the candles are lit - a perfect setting for a sunday evening service in an ancient granite church.

No water, no electricity but plenty of candles and an old organ that plays in perfect harmony with the waves that lap the nearby shore and the gulls that call above.

Read more about the bell, book and candle here:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell,_book,_and_candle

 

Thank you to the members of the Faith Centre at my workplace for the loan of the items used in this photograph. Didn't want to light the candle so near to the fabric, so I borrowed the flame from another photo!

 

© 2013 Nicola Riley

 

French postcard by Editions P.I., Paris, no. FK 3287. Photo: Baron Studios / Ufa.

 

American film and television actress Kim Novak (1933) starred in such popular successes as Picnic (1955), The Man with the Golden Arm (1955) and Pal Joey (1957). However, she is perhaps best known today for her ‘dual role’ as both Judy Barton and Madeleine Elster in Alfred Hitchcock's classic thriller Vertigo (1958). She withdrew from acting in 1966, and has only sporadically returned since.

 

Kim Novak was born as Marilyn Pauline Novak, professionally in Chicago, Illinois in 1933. She is the daughter of history teacher Joseph Novak and factory worker Blanche (née Kral) Novak. She won two scholarships to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and during the summer break in her last semester of junior college, Novak went on a cross-country tour modeling for a refrigerator company at trade shows. While stopping by Los Angeles, Novak was crowned Miss Deepfreeze by the refrigerator company. While there, she and two other models stood in line to be extras in The French Line (Lloyd Bacon, 1954), a film starring Jane Russell. It was here that she was discovered by an agent, who signed her to a long-term contract with Columbia Pictures. Columbia intended for Novak to be their successor to Rita Hayworth, their biggest star of the 1940s, whose career had declined. The studio also hoped that Novak would bring them the same success 20th Century-Fox was having with Marilyn Monroe. Her first role for the studio was in the film noir Pushover (Richard Quine, 1954). She then co-starred in the romantic comedy Phffft! (Mark Robson, 1954) as Janis, a Monroe-type character who finds Jack Lemmon's character, Robert Tracey, "real cute". Both films were reasonably successful at the box office, and Novak received favorable reviews for her performances. The film version of Picnic (Joshua Logan, 1955), co-starring William Holden, was a resounding critical and box office triumph. Novak won a Golden Globe Award for Most Promising Newcomer. She was also nominated for BAFTA Film Award for Best Foreign Actress, but did not win. Director Otto Preminger then cast her in The Man with the Golden Arm (1955), in which she played Frank Sinatra's sultry ex-girlfriend. The film was a box office triumph. After appearing in a series of successful movies, Novak became one of the biggest box office draws. Columbia placed her in a film adaptation of Pal Joey (George Sidney, 1957). She played Linda English, a naive showgirl, opposite Frank Sinatra and Rita Hayworth. The movie was a box office hit and has been considered one of Novak's better performances.

 

Kim Novak is perhaps best known today for the classic thriller Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958), opposite James Stewart. During the production, Novak was striking for more money from Columbia, and refused to show up for work on the Vertigo set to protest her salary of $1,250 a week. Novak hired new agents to represent her and demanded an adjustment in her contract. Harry Cohn of Columbia suspended her but, after a few weeks of negotiations, he relented and offered her a new contract worthy of a major star. Vertigo was poorly received at the time of its release in 1958 and failed at the box office, but has since been re-evaluated and is widely considered one of the director's best works. In 1958, Novak again worked with Stewart in Richard Quine's Bell, Book and Candle, a comedy tale of modern-day witchcraft, that proved to be a box office success. The following year, she starred opposite Fredric March in the acclaimed drama Middle of the Night (Delbert mann, 1959), and opposite Kirk Douglas in Strangers When We Meet (Richard Quine, 1960). Although still young, her career declined in the early 1960s, and after several years in a series of lackluster films, she withdrew from acting in 1966. She has only sporadically returned since. She later returned to the screen in the West-German film Schöner Gigolo, armer Gigolo Just a Gigolo (David Hemmings, 1978), starring David Bowie, and the British mystery The Mirror Crack'd (Guy Hamilton, 1980), based on the story by Agatha Christie. She also had a regular role on the prime time TV series Falcon Crest (1986–1987). After a disappointing experience during the filming of the mystery Liebestraum (Mike Figgis, 1991), Kim Novak has permanently retired from acting, citing she has no desire to return. In 2013, she attended the 2013 Cannes Film Festival where she introduced a new restored version of Vertigo. Audiences gave Novak a standing ovation.

 

Sources: Wikipedia and IMDb.

Located in the north Liverpool district of Aintree (home of the world famous Grand National horse race). The Palace Cinema was opened on 20th November 1913. It originally had an attractive decorated stone façade. All seating was on a single floor.

 

In 1954 the façade was given a modern makeover, and the auditorium was modernised. The Palace Cinema was closed on 27th June 1959 with James Stewart in “Bell, Book and Candle”. It was converted into a supermarket and in recent years has been a shoe store, named Shoemarket.

 

Contributed by Ken Roe

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