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Piratininga - Niterói.

 

Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon, Portugal

 

Material: Oil on canvas

Collection: Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Modern Collection

Inv.:

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

António Teixeira Carneiro Júnior was born in Amarante.

 

He was one of the great names in Portuguese painting and drawing from the transitional period between the decadence of fin de siècle art and modernist experimentation.

 

His frenetic creation of landscapes, self-portraits and historical and religious scenes, in hundreds of oil paintings, sanguines and water-colours, was a reaction against the naturalism of his peers and was an erudite approach to symbolist culture.

 

He advocated art as the worship of the spiritual and beautiful and put these values at the centre of his poetic and artistic work; these were two trends that he articulated in the literary movement of Águia and Renascença Portuguesa. He cultivated a prophetic persona, concentrating religiously on art; and his growing focus on introspection and idiosyncrasy led him to make expressionist, abstract, and lyrical gestures.

 

His vast body of work garnered awards overseas, gained him success in Brazil, was the subject of official praise in Portugal, placing him in history as one of the major figures in modern Portuguese art. António Carneiro passed away in Porto. The António Carneiro house-workshop was opened to the public (1973), his work was acquired by major national museum collections, and permanent spaces were also set aside for him in several regional cultural institutions.

 

Estranged from his father and with his mother having passed away, António Carneiro was sent to the Barão da Nova Sintra orphanage in Porto (1879-90), where his talent for copying religious illustrations meant he was able to relatively quickly get a place at the Porto Academy of Fine Arts, where he studied historical drawing with Marques de Oliveira (1884-90).

 

He continued his studies by learning sculpture with Soares dos Reis (1889), but the latter's suicide meant he transferred to painting with João António Correia (1890-96). He was also involved in other creative circles of the times, and published poems took part in exhibitions and edited the periodical, Geração Nova.

 

These literary and artistic connections continued in his association with the philosophical movement of the tragic fin de siècle generation of Porto intellectuals.

 

Of these, the most significant was Teixeira de Pascoaes, whom he met in Amarante, and with whom he formed a long-term creative friendship. Sponsored by the Marquis de Praia e Monforte, Carneiro went to Paris to study at the Académie Julian under the painters Jean-Paul Laurens and Benjamin Constant (1897).

 

He travelled through Italy and Belgium (1899), and over this period he gradually distanced himself from the naturalist values predominant in Portugal and adopted a symbolist discourse.

 

While still in France, he was awarded the silver medal at the Paris Universal Exhibition (1900) for his triptych A Vida [Life], which is still considered to be one of the greatest masterpieces in the history of Portuguese painting.

  

He returned to Portugal the following year. He had two solo exhibitions, at Misericórdia do Porto (and again in 1902) and the Salão da Ilustração Portuguesa [Portuguese Illustration show], Lisbon; although the market of the time could not keep up with the pace at which he produced his work, with its sacralising and erudite approach paying tribute to national figures. He participated in the 3rd Salão da Sociedade Nacional de Belas-Artes [National Society of Fine Arts show] (1903).

 

He was also awarded silver medals at the Louisiana Purchase Exhibition (1904) and jointly with Carlos Reis at the Barcelona International Exhibition (1907), and received a gold medal at the Rio de Janeiro Centennial Exhibition (1908). In 1911, Carneiro was nominated a Professor at the Porto Academy of Fine Arts (which became a life-time position in 1918), and after a temporary sojourn in Paris, the following year he took the helm at the magazine Águia together with Pascoaes, where he was responsible for the illustration and literary direction.

 

Over the 1910s, he also illustrated books by António Correia de Oliveira, João de Deus and Visconde de Vila Moura. However, as he was unable to make a living from his art, he sought his fortune in Brazil, where he spent two years (1914-16). There he held several solo shows at the Galeria Jorge (Rio de Janeiro) and at the Associação Commercial do Paraná [Commercial Association of Paraná] (Curitiba).

 

In addition to the proliferation of self-portraits, and starting out on his fabled, unconventional and experimental tale of family life, Carneiro, who did not yet have a studio, spent long periods at friends' houses in the north of Portugal, and this is from where he took the emblematic landscapes seen in his work: hundreds of little seascapes of the beaches of Leça da Palmeira and Figueira and Foz, and the Melgaço thermal baths, in oils, line-drawing and watercolours. However, while his work was moving towards a solipsist, intimate and spiritual form of expression, the 1920s were actually years of revelation, exhibition and public recognition.

 

As well as a solo show at the National Society of Fine Arts (1922), the town of Amarante paid tribute to Carneiro and to Teixeira de Pascoaes (1924), and this period also saw the inauguration (with an exhibition) of his house-workshop in Rua de Barros Lima (now Rua António Carneiro), Porto, where he lived with his son, Carlos Carneiro, and which paved the way for his gilded and idealistic sonnets. Having managed to obtain his workshop, and once again honoured by Porto's Palácio da Bolsa, Carneiro returned to Brazil (1929), where he held exhibitions in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo and sold the most work of his career.

 

Although he was then nominated Director of the Porto Academy of Fine Arts, he was never able to take up the position. The ’Franciscan da Belleza‘ [Franciscan of beauty], as he became known in Brazil, died shortly after his return. Since his death, his work has been shown in several exhibitions, from his illustrations for the Divine Comedy (Rome, 1964, Ateneu Comercial do Porto, 1965, Assumption College, 1967), to smaller retrospectives (SNI, Lisbon; Porto Fine Arts school, Porto, 1958; CMT Matosinhos, 1960) and larger ones at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation and the Museu Soares dos Reis (1973), and a major retrospective at the CAM (2005). After the publication of his poems Solilóquios: sonetos póstumos [Soliloquies: posthumous sonnets] (1936), with an introduction by Júlio Brandão, the António Carneiro gallery was also set up at the Museu Municipal Amadeo de Souza Cardoso (1953), his house-workshop was opened to the public in Porto (1973), and a space for his work was set aside at the Museu da Quinta de Santiago da Câmara in Matosinhos (1996).

 

Afonso Ramos

 

February 2013

 

SOURCE: gulbenkian.pt/museu/en/artist/antonio-carneiro/

  

Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon, Portugal

 

Material: Oil on wood

Collection: Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Modern Collection

Inv.: 83P970

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

António Teixeira Carneiro Júnior was born in Amarante. He was one of the great names in Portuguese painting and drawing from the transitional period between the decadence of fin de siècle art and modernist experimentation.

 

His frenetic creation of landscapes, self-portraits and historical and religious scenes, in hundreds of oil paintings, sanguines and water-colours, was a reaction against the naturalism of his peers and was an erudite approach to symbolist culture.

 

He advocated art as the worship of the spiritual and beautiful and put these values at the centre of his poetic and artistic work; these were two trends that he articulated in the literary movement of Águia and Renascença Portuguesa. He cultivated a prophetic persona, concentrating religiously on art; and his growing focus on introspection and idiosyncrasy led him to make expressionist, abstract, and lyrical gestures.

 

His vast body of work garnered awards overseas, gained him success in Brazil, was the subject of official praise in Portugal, placing him in history as one of the major figures in modern Portuguese art. António Carneiro passed away in Porto. The António Carneiro house-workshop was opened to the public (1973), his work was acquired by major national museum collections, and permanent spaces were also set aside for him in several regional cultural institutions.

 

Estranged from his father and with his mother having passed away, António Carneiro was sent to the Barão da Nova Sintra orphanage in Porto (1879-90), where his talent for copying religious illustrations meant he was able to relatively quickly get a place at the Porto Academy of Fine Arts, where he studied historical drawing with Marques de Oliveira (1884-90).

 

He continued his studies by learning sculpture with Soares dos Reis (1889), but the latter's suicide meant he transferred to painting with João António Correia (1890-96). He was also involved in other creative circles of the times, and published poems took part in exhibitions and edited the periodical, Geração Nova.

 

These literary and artistic connections continued in his association with the philosophical movement of the tragic fin de siècle generation of Porto intellectuals. Of these, the most significant was Teixeira de Pascoaes, whom he met in Amarante, and with whom he formed a long-term creative friendship.

 

Sponsored by the Marquis de Praia e Monforte, Carneiro went to Paris to study at the Académie Julian under the painters Jean-Paul Laurens and Benjamin Constant (1897). He travelled through Italy and Belgium (1899), and over this period he gradually distanced himself from the naturalist values predominant in Portugal and adopted a symbolist discourse.

 

While still in France, he was awarded the silver medal at the Paris Universal Exhibition (1900) for his triptych A Vida [Life], which is still considered to be one of the greatest masterpieces in the history of Portuguese painting.

 

He returned to Portugal the following year. He had two solo exhibitions, at Misericórdia do Porto (and again in 1902) and the Salão da Ilustração Portuguesa [Portuguese Illustration show], Lisbon; although the market of the time could not keep up with the pace at which he produced his work, with its sacralising and erudite approach paying tribute to national figures. He participated in the 3rd Salão da Sociedade Nacional de Belas-Artes [National Society of Fine Arts show] (1903). He was also awarded silver medals at the Louisiana Purchase Exhibition (1904) and jointly with Carlos Reis at the Barcelona International Exhibition (1907), and received a gold medal at the Rio de Janeiro Centennial Exhibition (1908).

 

In 1911, Carneiro was nominated a Professor at the Porto Academy of Fine Arts (which became a life-time position in 1918), and after a temporary sojourn in Paris, the following year he took the helm at the magazine Águia together with Pascoaes, where he was responsible for the illustration and literary direction. Over the 1910s, he also illustrated books by António Correia de Oliveira, João de Deus and Visconde de Vila Moura.

 

However, as he was unable to make a living from his art, he sought his fortune in Brazil, where he spent two years (1914-16). There he held several solo shows at the Galeria Jorge (Rio de Janeiro) and at the Associação Comercial do Paraná [Commercial Association of Paraná] (Curitiba). In addition to the proliferation of self-portraits, and starting out on his fabled, unconventional and experimental tale of family life, Carneiro, who did not yet have a studio, spent long periods at friends' houses in the north of Portugal, and this is from where he took the emblematic landscapes seen in his work: hundreds of little seascapes of the beaches of Leça da Palmeira and Figueira and Foz, and the Melgaço thermal baths, in oils, line-drawing and watercolours.

 

However, while his work was moving towards a solipsist, intimate and spiritual form of expression, the 1920s were actually years of revelation, exhibition and public recognition.

 

As well as a solo show at the National Society of Fine Arts (1922), the town of Amarante paid tribute to Carneiro and to Teixeira de Pascoaes (1924), and this period also saw the inauguration (with an exhibition) of his house-workshop in Rua de Barros Lima (now Rua António Carneiro), Porto, where he lived with his son, Carlos Carneiro, and which paved the way for his gilded and idealistic sonnets.

 

Having managed to obtain his workshop, and once again honoured by Porto's Palácio da Bolsa, Carneiro returned to Brazil (1929), where he held exhibitions in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, and sold the most work of his career. Although he was then nominated Director of the Porto Academy of Fine Arts, he was never able to take up the position. The ’Franciscan da Belleza‘ [Franciscan of beauty], as he became known in Brazil, died shortly after his return.

 

Since his death, his work has been shown in several exhibitions, from his illustrations for the Divine Comedy (Rome, 1964, Ateneu Comercial do Porto, 1965, Assumption College, 1967), to smaller retrospectives (SNI, Lisbon; Porto Fine Arts school, Porto, 1958; CMT Matosinhos, 1960) and larger ones at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation and the Museu Soares dos Reis (1973), and a major retrospective at the CAM (2005).

 

After the publication of his poems Solilóquios: sonetos póstumos [Soliloquies: posthumous sonnets] (1936), with an introduction by Júlio Brandão, the António Carneiro gallery was also set up at the Museu Municipal Amadeo de Souza Cardoso (1953), his house-workshop was opened to the public in Porto (1973), and a space for his work was set aside at the Museu da Quinta de Santiago da Câmara in Matosinhos (1996).

 

Afonso Ramos

 

February 2013

 

SOURCE: gulbenkian.pt/museu/en/artist/antonio-carneiro/

Museu Nacional de Belas Artes

(MNBA)

Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

Art Week Gallery Group: Creative Classics

12/07/2019

Manipulated image of photos taken from works exhibited in the Gallery of Moldings of the National Museum of Fine Arts

The two Molding Galleries are home to over 150 plaster works. This magnificent collection consists of pieces molded on originals from the Hellenistic, Roman, and classical Greek period (the so-called Golden Age). Most of the moldings exhibited in the two galleries of the second floor of the MNBA are pieces made from the beginning of the 19th century until 1928, mainly in the period between 1860 and 1875 in France. (Source: MNBA).

Imagem manipulada de fotos tiradas de obras expostas na Galeria de Moldagens do Museu Nacional de Belas Artes

As duas Galerias de Moldagens abrigam mais de 150 obras em gesso. Esta magnífica coleção é constituída por peças moldadas sobre originais do período helenístico, romano, e do greco clássico (a chamada Era de Ouro). A maioria das Moldagens expostas nas duas galerias do 2º piso do MNBA são peças realizadas do inicio do século XIX até 1928, principalmente no período entre 1860 e 1875, na França. (Fonte: MNBA).

Museu Nacional de Belas Artes

Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

Art Week Gallery Group: Creative Classics

12/07/2019

Kerepesi/Salgótarjáni utca Cemetery, Budapest

On the right: Secession style mausoleum of Sváb family, designed by the notable Hungarian architect, Lajta Béla in 1909. In the background: the remnants of (roofless) Secession style Ceremonial Hall, designed also by Lajta Béla (1904-1908). www.budapestarchitect.com/text/architecten/lajta_en.php#....

 

Jobbra Sváb Jakab fiai és családjaik síremléke, tervezte Lajta Béla 1909-ben.

A háttérben a volt szertartás-épület, szintén Lajta tervezte, 1904-1908.

 

Salgótarjáni út, a legrégibb zsidó temető Pesten.

epiteszforum.hu/a-mulandosag-kepei-a-salgotarjani-uti-zsi...

mult-kor.hu/cikk.php?id=8718&pIdx=6

Founded in 1874, this is the oldest Jewish cemetery in the Pest side of Budapest. It is the Jewish section of the city’s Kerepesi monumental cemetery, where national heroes are buried — and is the final resting place of the crème de la crème of Hungarian Jewry of the time. Massive family tombs of Jewish noble families and industrialists line the perimeter; but there are also the graves of ordinary people. There is also a section where Holocaust victims are buried.

Quite a few of the tombs are the work of leading architects of the day — such as Ignác Alpár, Sándor Fellner, Albert Körössy, Emil Vidor and Béla Lajta. Lajta, whose work prefigured art deco, also designed the entry way from the street and the massive Ceremonial Hall (now roofless), built around 1908.

Today the cemetery is densely overgrown and tragically neglected. The huge tombs of families who once wielded social, political and financial power are literally crumbling; collapsing and being swallowed by vines and other vegetation. Some of them have been broken open: you can even see the coffins in the crypts

A few of the big tombs have been maintained and/or cleaned. And there have been fitful efforts to clear parts of the cemetery over the years — but it cries out for a concerted effort to clear the vegetation and save some of the family tombs.

Plants of the graveyard, according to the Talmud, must not be used in any way. Therefore in traditional Jewish communities trees and bushes of the cemetery are not pruned, grass is not mown, only the paths are paved and maintained. For the visitor this may suggest, usually without reason, untidiness, whereas the aim is the preservation of the natural environment. Moreover, this tradition expresses: it is futile to oppose decay.

www.jewish-heritage-europe.eu/galleries/hungary-photo-gal...

Vidovszky Béla: Parlor of the Kohner Palace, 1910

Kohner Adolf was a great art collector.

A Kohner-palota szalonja

Kohner Adolfról, a nagy műgyűjtőről: www.kieselbach.hu/gyujtoknek/tudastar/szakmai-dokumentumo...

 

Symmetry of a Seated Lady -Museu Nacional de Belas Artes- (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Gustavo Thomas © 2015)

Saída Fotocultura - FotoLove

12.feb.09 - © All rights reserved !!!!

 

2.535 / 145 / 334 / 4 galleries

 

thank you all so much !!!!

 

the signs of change are every where

in shadows and reflections

light hitting objects

shadow in reflections on water

light dancing across waves

shadows reflecting what is close by

-Terri Turner-

 

dew drops .four in a row

 

~a gorgeous green thursday to every one ~

   

---------

Follow me : FaceBook // My Web Site // Instagram

---------

To discover my universe, please take a look on my website.

All photographs are available for sale Fine Art Print.

Photographies et Formations Photos disponibles ici :

www.antoniogaudenciophoto.com/

---------

Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Modern Collection, Lisbon, Portugal

 

BIOGRAPHY:

 

Isabel Simões (1981) licenciou-se em Pintura na Faculdade de Belas-Artes de Lisboa em 2005. Em 2011 foi artista residente na Künstlerhaus Bethanien ao abrigo da bolsa João Hogan – Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian.

 

Das suas exposições individuais podem destacar-se Camuflagem (2016) Casa Museu Medeiros e Almeida; Rules for a Subjective Sundial (2013), Galeria Caroline Pagès; An Oblique Fiction (2011), Kunstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlim; Esperem Entrem (2010) e Plongée (2009) MARZ Galeria; Blame the city (2006), Módulo – Centro Difusor de Arte.

 

Isabel Simões participou em exposições colectivas como Atlas de Imagens (2014-15) que passou pelo Porto, Évora, Coimbra, Setúbal e Aveiro; BYTS- Bosch Young Talent Sow (2011), Stedelijk Museum, Hertogenbosch, Holanda; Unfolding: Space (2011), Grimmuseum, Berlim;

 

O Museu em Ruínas (2011), Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Elvas – Colecção António Cachola, Elvas; A Iminência da Queda (2009), Galeria do Diário de Notícias, Lisboa; Prémio Fidelidade Mundial Jovens Pintores (2007), Culturgest, Lisboa; 7 artistas ao 10o mês (2005), Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisboa; Expanded Painting (2005), Segunda Bienal de Praga, Praga, República Checa e Anteciparte, Estufa Fria, Lisboa (2004).

Blum Bernát

Kerepesi/Salgótarjáni utca Cemetery, Budapest

Salgótarjáni út, a legrégibb zsidó temető Pesten.

epiteszforum.hu/a-mulandosag-kepei-a-salgotarjani-uti-zsi...

Founded in 1874, this is the oldest Jewish cemetery in the Pest side of Budapest. It is the Jewish section of the city’s Kerepesi monumental cemetery, where national heroes are buried — and is the final resting place of the crème de la crème of Hungarian Jewry of the time. Massive family tombs of Jewish noble families and industrialists line the perimeter; but there are also the graves of ordinary people. There is also a section where Holocaust victims are buried.

Quite a few of the tombs are the work of leading architects of the day — such as Ignác Alpár, Sándor Fellner, Albert Körössy, Emil Vidor and Béla Lajta. Lajta, whose work prefigured art deco, also designed the entry way from the street and the massive Ceremonial Hall (now roofless), built around 1908.

Today the cemetery is densely overgrown and tragically neglected. The huge tombs of families who once wielded social, political and financial power are literally crumbling; collapsing and being swallowed by vines and other vegetation. Some of them have been broken open: you can even see the coffins in the crypts

A few of the big tombs have been maintained and/or cleaned. And there have been fitful efforts to clear parts of the cemetery over the years — but it cries out for a concerted effort to clear the vegetation and save some of the family tombs.

Plants of the graveyard, according to the Talmud, must not be used in any way. Therefore in traditional Jewish communities trees and bushes of the cemetery are not pruned, grass is not mown, only the paths are paved and maintained. For the visitor this may suggest, usually without reason, untidiness, whereas the aim is the preservation of the natural environment. Moreover, this tradition expresses: it is futile to oppose decay.

www.jewish-heritage-europe.eu/galleries/hungary-photo-gal...

Esta imagen participó en el juego En un lugar de Flickr

Si no perteneces al grupo, no contestes, por favor.

Si quieres contestar, únete. :-)

 

Pista 1: Obra de una artista que hizo sus estudios en esa localidad

 

Dalila Gonçalves PT

Nasceu em Castelo de Paiva em 1982.

 

Licenciatura em Artes Plásticas – Pintura, Faculdade de Belas Artes da Univesidade do Porto (FBAUP), 2005

2ª Edição do Curso de Fotografia do Programa Gulbenkian Criatividade e Criação Artística, 2008

Mestrado – Ensino de Artes Visuais, Faculdade de Belas Artes e Faculdade de Psicologia da Universidade do Porto, 2009

Programa Inov-Art em Barcelona no Atelier do Artista Ignasi Aballí, 2010 /2011

Doutoramento Arte e Design – Faculdade de Belas Artes UP (em Frequência)

Hungary, Budapest, Art Hall, 1896. Műcsarnok. Pyrogranit work by Zsolnay.

Pyrogranite refers to a type of ornamental ceramics that were developed by Zsolnay and placed in production by 1886. Fired under high temperature this durable material remains acid and frost-resistant making it suitable for the use as roof tiles, indoor and outdoor decorative ceramics, and fireplaces. Architects that used the material in their buildings include Miklós Ybl, Ödön Lechner, Béla Lajta, Samu Pecz, and Imre Steindl. It can be seen in buildings such as Matthias Church in Budapest, the Hungarian Parliament Building, the Museum of Applied Art, the Geological Institute, the Kőbánya Church, the Gellért Baths, the Town Hall in Kecskemét, and the Post Office Palace in Pécs.

- The Műcsarnok (“art hall”) was founded in 1877 on the initiative of the Hungarian National Fine Arts Association. The original building was situated at 69–71 Andrássy Street, now home to the University of Fine Arts. The exhibition hall on Heroes’ Square was erected in 1896 for the millennium celebrations, and was designed by Albert Schikedanz. Today the hall operates on the pattern of the German Kunsthalle: it is an institution run by artists that does not maintain its own collection. The three-bayed, semi-circular apse houses a roofed exhibition hall that allows in light through the roof. Since the building was renovated in 1995 the Műcsarnok has welcomed visitors and leading Hungarian and international contemporary artists alike, mediating and representing modern artistic tendencies whilst not maintaining its own permanent collection.

www.mucsarnok.hu/new_site/index.php?lang=en&about=5&a...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Schickedanz

Artistas de vários países expoem obras em diversos suportes, como papel, papelão, reciclaveis, telas, gravuras, fotografia, madeira, entre outros.

 

No final do evento todas obras são distribuidas gratuitamente para os visitantes.

Também performances de breaking e rappers sobre a discotecagem dos DJs Guinho e Brown.

 

artistas confirmados:

{somos} - SP

5 zonas- SP

Adelia Klinke- SP

Beatriz Franco- BA

Beth Turkiniez - SP

Bruno Capella -SP

Bruno di Chico - SP

Bruno Pere - SP

Caps- SP

Cleisson Vidal - SP

Cris- SP

Cristiano Cury - SP

Daniel Jabra - SP

Danilo Blanco - SP

Dingos - SP

Dino - SP

Dogtired - Irlanda do Norte

Elaine Gomes - SP

Fernando Ribeiro - SP

Florian Raiss - SP

Fonthor - SP

Fredone Fone - ES

Gejo - SP

Gene Johnsom - SP

Gryllo - SP

Ian Monteiro - SP

Ivan Veras - MA

Johab Silva - EUA

Julio Barreto - SP

Kelly Polato - SP

Lea Van Steen - SP

Magy Imoberdorf - FRA

Minerox - EUA

Monica Rubinho - SP

Monica Vendramini - SP

Monica Zalla - ARG

Mr. Klevra - ITA

Neco Soares - SP

No Name - FRA

Nosde - SP

Omino71 - ITA

Ozi - SP

Padang Tatoo - SP

Patrica Kaufmann - SP

Patricia Ramiro - SP

Paulo Von Poser - SP

Rapto - SP

Raquel Kogan - SP

Ren - ES

Mheinproduktion - ALE

Rogerio Carnaval - SP

Sidney Philocreon - SP

Sipros- SP

Tumulos - SP

Turnip - EUA

Vea - SP

Viviane Leite - SP

 

Freeart

7 de novembro partir das 12 hs

Monica Figueiras Galeria de Arte

Bela Cintra. 1533 - Jardins

São Paulo - SP

organização : gejo e monica filgueiras

Contato: sp9370@yahoo.com.br

011-7508-5800- gejo

   

Por. Rogério Carnaval

www.9370.org

www.flickr.com/photos/gejo/

twitter.com/rogeriocarnaval

brunodichico.blogspot.com/

www.flickr.com/photos/necosoares/

www.fotolog.com.br/triposo

www.flickr.com/photos/rogeriocarnaval/

www.twitter.com/vistaskateart

www.fotolog.com/dingos_fc

www.flickr.com/photos/dingos1

        

Classical Heads -Museu Nacional de Belas Artes- (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Gustavo Thomas © 2015)

Monumento em frente ao prédio da Belas Artes, campus UFMG.

tantas fotos de la gira aburren un poco (mucho).

Kerepesi/Salgótarjáni utca Cemetery, Budapest

 

On the right: Secession style mausoleum of Sváb family with bird motifs, designed by the notable Hungarian architect, Lajta Béla in 1909. www.budapestarchitect.com/text/architecten/lajta_en.php#....

 

Jobbra Sváb Jakab fiai és családjaik síremléke, madármotívummal, tervezte Lajta Béla 1909-ben.

 

Salgótarjáni út, a legrégibb zsidó temető Pesten.

epiteszforum.hu/a-mulandosag-kepei-a-salgotarjani-uti-zsi...

mult-kor.hu/cikk.php?id=8718&pIdx=6

Founded in 1874, this is the oldest Jewish cemetery in the Pest side of Budapest. It is the Jewish section of the city’s Kerepesi monumental cemetery, where national heroes are buried — and is the final resting place of the crème de la crème of Hungarian Jewry of the time. Massive family tombs of Jewish noble families and industrialists line the perimeter; but there are also the graves of ordinary people. There is also a section where Holocaust victims are buried.

Quite a few of the tombs are the work of leading architects of the day — such as Ignác Alpár, Sándor Fellner, Albert Körössy, Emil Vidor and Béla Lajta. Lajta, whose work prefigured art deco, also designed the entry way from the street and the massive Ceremonial Hall (now roofless), built around 1908.

Today the cemetery is densely overgrown and tragically neglected. The huge tombs of families who once wielded social, political and financial power are literally crumbling; collapsing and being swallowed by vines and other vegetation. Some of them have been broken open: you can even see the coffins in the crypts

A few of the big tombs have been maintained and/or cleaned. And there have been fitful efforts to clear parts of the cemetery over the years — but it cries out for a concerted effort to clear the vegetation and save some of the family tombs.

Plants of the graveyard, according to the Talmud, must not be used in any way. Therefore in traditional Jewish communities trees and bushes of the cemetery are not pruned, grass is not mown, only the paths are paved and maintained. For the visitor this may suggest, usually without reason, untidiness, whereas the aim is the preservation of the natural environment. Moreover, this tradition expresses: it is futile to oppose decay.

www.jewish-heritage-europe.eu/galleries/hungary-photo-gal...

Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Garden, Lisbon, Portugal

 

Material: Polished stainless steel/Variable dimensions

Collection: Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

Estudou na Escola de Artes Decorativas António Arroio (1978-1981), no Ar.Co. (1981-1982) e na Escola Superior de Belas-Artes de Lisboa (1983-1987).

 

Na sua extensa obra, Fernanda Fragateiro (Montijo, Portugal, 1962) desenvolve um trabalho fortemente apoiado num interesse por práticas artísticas e arquitectónicas da vanguarda do séc. XX. Um interesse que informa o próprio trabalho e muitas vezes ganha forma através de alterações subtis de paisagens ou objectos existentes, que naturalmente revelam histórias contidas em si mesmos.

 

Trabalhando sobre uma vasta gama de materiais e referências, a sua obra conserva um estilo claramente definido, resultado de uma estética minimalista no que toca à forma, à cor e à textura da superfície.

 

Ao longo do seu percurso, Fernanda Fragateiro sempre usou a escultura e a instalação como principal meio de expressão, trabalhando sobre espaço nas suas variadas manifestações fenomenológicas, - arquitectónica, escultórica, privada, pública, temporal, socialmente determinada,– seja através de obras de escultura, instalações ou intervenções ao ar livre, como jardins, colaborações em projetos arquitectónicos ou obras que se baseiam na participação pública.

 

Fernanda Fragateiro expôs no Anozero – Bienal de Arte Contemporânea de Coimbra (Coimbra, 2017), Museu de Arte, Arquitectura e Tecnologia (Lisboa, 2017), Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea de Roma (2017), na Fundação Eugénio de Almeida (Évora, 2017, 2015), Palm Springs Art Museum (2016), Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian (Lisboa, 2016, 2012, 2004; Paris, 2013; Londres, 2013), CaixaForum (Barcelona, 2016, 2004), Orlando Museum of Art (2015), Palais des Beaux-Arts de Paris (2015), Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Harvard University (Cambridge, 2015), Krannert Art Museum (Champaign, 2015), CIFO Art Space (Miami, 2014), Bronx Museum (Nova Iorque, 2014), Mitxelena Kulturunea (San Sebastian, 2014), MUAC Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo (Cidade do México, 2014), Dublin Contemporary (2011), Trienal de Arquitectura de Lisboa (2010) Institut Valencià d'Art Modern (Valencia, 2008); Centro Cultural de Belém (Lisboa, 2007); Centro Galego de Arte Contemporánea (Santiago de Compostela, 2006), Fundação de Serralves (Porto, 2005), Culturgest (Lisboa, 2003).

 

A sua obra está representada em várias colecções públicas e privadas, entre as quais: The Ella Fontanals Cisneros Collection, Miami; Fundación Neme, Bogotá; Fundação de Serralves, Porto; Fundação EDP, Lisbon, Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon; António Cachola Collection, Elvas, Berardo Museum Collection, Lisbon; Caixa Geral de Depósitos Contemporary Art Collection, Lisbon; Centro Galego de Arte Contemporanea, Santiago de Compostela; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid; Marcelino Botín Foundation, Santander; La Caixa Foundation, Barcelona; Fundación Helga de Alvear, Cáceres.

 

Fernanda Fragateiro é representada pela Galeria Elba Benitez, Madrid; Arratia Beer Gallery, Berlim; Baginski Galeria/Projectos, Lisboa; e Josée Bienvenue Gallery, New York.

 

SOURCE: pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fernanda_Fragateiro

The top of the Astronomical Clock Tower, Prague.

 

The higher the position, the more you can discover@

photo taken at the backyard of my nephew in Cuiabá - MT - Brazil

View On Black

 

View Awards Count

MnBA (Museu Nacional de Belas Artes - Rio)

 

MnBA (Museu Nacional de Belas Artes)

 

Calouste Gulbenkian Museum, Modern Collection, Lisbon, Portugal

 

Material: Iron polychromatic

Collection: Calouste Gulbenkian Museum - the Modern collection

Inv.: 83E1026

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

José Rodrigues – The sculptor who made his mark in Porto

18 April 2018 / Profile

 

José Rodrigues is one of the greatest Portuguese sculptors, deceased on September 10, but his works continue to mark the landscape of the city.

 

Born in Luanda, Angola, in 1936, José Rodrigues demonstrated at a very early age a taste for sculpture and even as a child he liked to mould clay. Later in Portugal, he studied sculpture at the Escola Superior de Belas Artes do Porto, where he would become a teacher sometime later. He was Founder and chairman of Cooperativa de Ensino Artístico Árvore and founder of the Bienal de Cerveira.

 

In addition to sculpture, he also dedicated himself to other artistic expressions. He Illustrated books for writers and poets, produced ceramics and medals, created scenographies and designed the set for the classification ceremony of Porto as a World Heritage City.

 

His foundation, located in a former hat factory, embraced not only his studio but also a place for dissemination of arts, with exhibition halls and an auditorium, receiving a ballet and theatre company as well.

 

Among his most famous works are O Cubo da Praça da Ribeira (The Cube of Ribeira Square) (1976) or the Entrepreneur Monument (1992).

 

SOURCE: www.heyporto.com/en/perfil/

Budapest. This week walking in Ferencváros and Józsefváros, detail of Museum of Applied Arts. Art Nouveau, stylized Hungarian folk motifs.. Architect: Ödön Lechner. Ceramics: Pyrogranite by Vilmos Zsolnay. Pyrogranite refers to a type of ornamental ceramics that were developed by Zsolnay and placed in production by 1886. Fired under high temperature this durable material remains acid and frost-resistant making it suitable for the use as roof tiles, indoor and outdoor decorative ceramics, and fireplaces. Architects that used the material in their buildings include Miklós Ybl, Ödön Lechner, Béla Lajta, Samu Pecz, and Imre Steindl. It can be seen in buildings such as Matthias Church in Budapest, the Hungarian Parliament Building, the Museum of Applied Art, the Geological Institute, the Kőbánya Church, the Gellért Baths, the Town Hall in Kecskemét, and the Post Office Palace in Pécs.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%c3%96d%c3%b6n_Lechner

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zsolnay

www.museum.hu/museum/index_en.php?ID=33

www.museum.hu/museum/index_hu.php?ID=33

hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lechner_%c3%96d%c3%b6n

 

Hungarian Art at Earl's Court - Erdőssy Béla: "A Snowy Road" (linoleum engraving)

Erdőssy Béla: kieselbach.hu/artist/erdossy_-bela_8168

hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Begin%C3%A1k

The Studio was an illustrated fine arts and decorative arts magazine published in London from 1893 until 1964. The founder and first editor was Charles Holme. The full title was The Studio: an illustrated magazine of fine and applied art

The Studio exerted a major influence on the development of the Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts movements.

The magazine was monthly; 853 issues were published between April 1893 and May 1964.

The Studio promoted the work of "New Art" artists, designers and architects—it played a major part in introducing the work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Charles Voysey to a wide audience—and it was especially influential in Europe.

In 1964 it was absorbed into Studio International magazine.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Studio_%28magazine%29

Tulajdonos (ld. a pecsétet): Budai Mór, építészeti, mű-és műipari könyvkereskedő, Budapest, VIII. Népszínház utca 33. sz.

www.oroklet.hu/bent.php?nyelv=1&igy=&kmod=5&t...

library.hungaricana.hu/hu/view/BPLAKCIMJEGYZEK_10_1898/?p...

Előző tulajdonos: Róna József (ceruzával áthúzva.)

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