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Title: American bee journal

Identifier: americanbeejourn541914hami

Year: 1861 (1860s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bee culture; Bees

Publisher: [Hamilton, Ill. , etc. , Dadant & Sons]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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August, 1914. 279 American Hee Journal committee. (Signed) "Mrs. Bi.\by." " Papa, dear," said my better half, a half formed tear in either eye, "that's tomorrow. I ought to go, but how in the world could you manage this ex- tracting alone ? ' The world stopped revolving. The sun stood still. The moon went out, and the stars refused to shine. After about four ;cons—" Never mind, my dear, 1 can manage to do it somehow. Fossibly get a man to help me," I ven- tured. Now I am not on principle opposed to woman suffrage. Indeed, I had written several articles for the local press during the campaign in its favor. And, too, when my wife was appointed upon a committee to go before the legislature and lobby for the bill, I felt that the whole family had been hon- ored, and now that a call had come for her to go I could not say her nay. But as for me—if the seven labors of Hercules had just then been thrust un- der my nose they would have looked as tiddledywinks beside the dumbfound- ing work befoie me. To e.xtract or not to extract—that was the question ; whether it was nobler to run and hire a man to "juice" those bees for me, or to stand my ground and fight it out by main strength and awkwardness! I chose the latter course. And before the erstwhile companion of my stings and hysteria was out of hearing I was evermore making that old extractor hum. It hummed so loudly that its toe-hold gave way, a cable " busted," and I was forced to put it in dry dock for repairs. The riext thing that went end-to was when, in my muscular enthusiasm, I turned so fast that the honey overran the pail and found a receptacle in my boot. When my wife left she gave me a spoonful of lard and cautioned me to keep all the bearings of the machine oiled. I wanted to use axle grease or cylinder oil, but she insisted on the lard. I was soon to find out why. I guess I failed to open the gate to the extractor wide enough, for the bottom of the tank soon filled with honey. I began to notice concentric circles of dark honey. On examination I found that a too generous application of lard on the bearings in that neigh- borhood was the cause of the streaks. Then I was forced to throw away the honey and oil the bearings again. That night I attempted to put the empty supers back on the hives. Every time I lifted a cover from a hive the bees literally blackened me. The little rascals acted as though they were say- ing : "Now, here comes the fellow who took our cloak; now he will take our coat, also. Let's go for him." And they went. My veil was the first one Eve made for our ancestor, and my gloves had ringworm in the fingers. To enhance my esteem for the job, I wore low shoes! Now, don't smile, you smug, complacent veteran! I maintain there is nothing funny in a bee sting. It's the most matter-of-fact, business-like transaction I ever met with. But there are some folks who are mean enough to smile or even guf- faw when some poor dupe gets the " hot stuff." The following day I managed to swipe " 25 or 30 supers from the bees and began extracting. The honey-flow had ceased ; the bees began to " whee- whee "all around the house for a taste. I couldn't keep the uncapping knives hot. The honey was so thick the ex- tractor wouldn't throw it out. I got hot and began to slam-bang things around in great shape. In the me/t;- I turned over .5 gallons of honev, which proceeded to splash out of the honey house to feed the bees. I soon had the nicest mess of robbing on my hands you ever saw. I was still warm under the collar when the uncapping knife ricocheted over a bumpy comb and shaved a quarter-section off the palm of my hand. A little later my shirt sleeve caught in the free-running crank of the extractor, which incident left me in a state of statuesq e nudity. Then I sat down to perspire and medi- tate. "Thinks I, if these are the joys of beekeeping spoken of by the ABC book, then let me to more peaceful pursuits; such, for instance, as lion taming or lassoing crocodiles." The man who had made up these hives had evidently got hold of the wrong instruction sheet—possibly a sheet explaining how to put together a Wright aeroplane. The tin rabbets were put in flat so that the rib stuck out inside the hive. The frames were the Hoffman shoulder spacing type. These he had nailed so that both shoul- ders were on the same side of the frame. The bees had been trained to swim in propolis and subsist upon slumgum. So that the tools needed to manipulate the hives consisted of a crowbar and a can of nitroglycerine. In spite of all these things, like Paul of Tarsus, I persevered. By the last of the week I finished the job, and Sunday morning greeted my smiling family at home. "My, but you area mess!" greeted my better three-quarters. "You look as though the land was flowing with milk and honey, and there were no boats for you to cross in. But were you as successful on your mission as I on mine ?" "Three thousand pounds," replied I boastfully, "and a wagon load of cap- pings! But say, old girl, do you know I'm the biggest fool that ever swatted a bee or fanned an extractor." "How's that?" asked my wife anx- iously." "Why, I went and bought that bloomin' yard." Cottonwood, Ariz.

 

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Send Questions either to the office of the American Bee Journal or direct to Dr. C. C. Miller. Marengo, III. He does not answer bee-keepine questions by mail. Requeening During Summer In reading an old Bee Journal of nine years ago ([505). I noticed an article on " Re- queening During Summer," by its present editor, in which he says: "It is a mistake to requeen colonies that have good prolific queens just because they are two years old." Is that still his view ? Ontario. Answer.—"A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush." and while requeening we may replace a prolific queen by one equally prolific. I have seen so many good queens prove good the third year that I prefer not to replace a first-class two-year old queen by one whose ability is unknown to me. The bees usually requeen in good time, if the matter is left to them. But with an in- ferior queen or one just fair, requeening is necessary.—C. P. D. Requeening I. Is a table cloth an advantage on frames; if so. state what months to keep it on in Ontario? 2 Colonies with one. two or three cells of European foul brood, say first of June, and it I kill the queen the last half of clover flow and let these bees rear their own queen, will this cure foul brood ^ If so. state time to do it. Clover flow from June 20 to July 20. 1. If hives are broodless and queenless by June I. and if given a frame of eggs, larvas. and sealed brood to rear a queen, will the queen be fairly good ? 4. if I lift a frame of brood above queen- excluder, will the bees start queen-cells; then when queen is hatched take off ex- cluder ? Will the young queen go down and kill the old queen ? Ontario. Answers—I. You probably mean enam- eled cloth or oil-cloth. 1 used such cover- ings at one time, but have not had any for years, having nothing between top-bars and flat covers, except when supers are on. I think they are not in use nearly so much as formerly. If you use such coverings at all, you will use them at any and all times ex- cept when supers are on. and may even use them over supers. 2 A cure would be likely to follow. Better not wait until the last half of the flow, as the case would be getting worse all the time, but act at the beginning of the flow. But if only two or threediseased cellsare present, and the queen is good, all you need do is to cage her in the hive for 10 days. 3. Young bees are the ones to rear a good queen, and in the case you mention there are probably few or no young bees, so the resulting queen would not be likely to be very good. The best thing to do with such a colony is to break it up and unite with an- other colony or with other colonies. If you haven't the heart to do that, then a better way than the one you mention is to give your queenless colony the queen of some other colony, and let that other colony rear its own queen. 4. The bees are not at all certain to start cells over an excluder, and if they do, when you take away the excluder the young queen is likely to be killed if the old queen is a good one. Large Hivet To prevent swarming why don't they use a larger hive than they do ? They say a col- ony swarms because they haven't room to work; also the queen runs out of comb to lay in. Oregon. Answers.-"Why don't they?" They do. Ask Dadant & Sons, and you'll find they use

  

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Most veils connect to the beekeeping jacket by a sturdy zipper.

Title: American bee journal

Identifier: americanbeejourn5657hami

Year: 1861 (1860s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bee culture; Bees

Publisher: [Hamilton, Ill. , etc. , Dadant & Sons]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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About This Book: Catalog Entry

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1917 AMERICAN BEK JOURNAL 235 education by first getting grounded in the physiology of the bee. It would be an enormous task forme to do this..." "The hives I use are not made or sold by any dealer; I have to make them myself and do not think it would be practical for you to make them— better use the dovetailed Langstroth style of hive sold by the dealers." " Don't go into this or any other ex- pert business too largely at first, liees can be bought from any dealer. Don't start with more than from three to six hives, and increase in proportion as your knowledge increases " A neighbor informed me that bees can be bought by the pound, and ad- vised getting none but fertile, tested queens. Many of my questions were answered by him, but those I forgot to ask were legion. What kind of hive to use? Vaguely I know thatPoppleton's hive, as written up by the Roots years ago, was radical, being one story and long, like a carpenter's tool chest, to facilitate its removal to and from the launch, piling in tiers, and to obviate the building of "brace comb", as the odds and ends of comb built by the bees between the first story or brood- chamber, and super or second storage chamber, are known. And, most im- portant of all—a question I learn which has troubled beginners since time be- gan—how to get the bees into the hive and how to keep them there ? Wild thoughts of using-chloroform haunted me, pending the arrival of some text books I had sent for. I thought bees, dreamed bees, and had bees in my mind as I ate whatever was put before me. " Please get me some bed ticking like the last," said my wife one day as I started for town, "three yards of it, a set of darning needles, and the grocer- ies in this list And don't let him give you common brown sugar this time—we are entirely out of it, and I must have the white !" "Bed ticking, three yards, darning needles, and sugar, only the white," I unconsciously repeated between the perfunctory or choleric 'Get up, Dol- ly's!" and "What are you doing there's!" on the way in. What I got, by some subconscious trick of the mind, was insect powder, and fly paper. To the grocer I had said—I shudder yet as I think of it— " I want three pounds of bees and a fertile queen. Give me nothing but the white, please — the last I got were brown, and I know I said white." What the man said didn't amount to much— it was what he thought and looked. But I came home in triumph with white sugar. " Some day," I said to my wife in a burst of patronage and confidence, "I may write a book," Three Years Among the Bees." Langstroth's hobby was ants for many years—it was only through seeing honey in the comb on a friend's table that he was led to pur- chase some bees and make a study of them. They all write about them— Dr. C. C. Miller " wrote ' A Year Among the Bees', Quinby wrote a book, Root wrote a book. Cook wrote a—" " That's it, you forgot to get me that cook book I sent you over for yester- day", interjected my wife severely. Guiltily I thought of the bee book I had borrowed at thi neighbor's in- stead, and said nothing. My first hive came at last. I had sent for one minus bees and plus the fixtures, smoker, etc., in order that I might study them better. Then came the day—it will retain its vernal fresh- ness in my mind as long as I live—-I remember it for the first thrill, and all the little and big thrills that came after. " Mother says you know about bees ", said a small boy at the kitchen door. " There's a bunch hanging on the wash line, and she says come and get them and you can have 'em." " So already my reputation as a skilled apiarist has spread among the neigh- bors," I exulted, visions of that book to be written flitting as industriously through the nooks in my cranium as a bee flits from flower to flower. With smoker in my left hand, swarm basket under an arm, bee veil in my right hand—and directions concealed in my pocket, I strode gaily forth to my doom. " Don't let them sting you—aren't you afraid of them ? Don't you use gloves? Are they glad to see you want to put them in a nice new hive ? I believe

 

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"My Head is Larger than its Wont, so THAT Even the Dog Stares in Bristling Wonder." they are glad—hear them hum !" were a few of the questions hurled at me. " A beekeeper never uses gloves," I replied less gaily, perhaps with a trifle of weariness in my tone. " Bees are always full of honey when they swarm, and in that condition never sting!" Who wrote that last phrase? Ordi- nary killing with a club, fists or pois- onous gas would be too refined for him. Those bees ivere glad to see me. Perhaps they mistook the veil I wore for a crown, hence decided that I was the queen. To see the haste with which they forsook that plain hemp clothes line for me was flattering—at first. Did they merely desire to embrace me? Wildly, and with a sinking feeling clutching me about the pit of the stomach, I hoped so. Vain, hollow bauble is hope in this cruel world. "Stung!" Literally and figuratively I was stung. Four quarts of fond, lov- ing and affectionate bees fell, by some perverse process, into a fold of my bee- veil, inside of it, and refused to be dis- lodged from that haven. A pint of bees dropped into each sleeve; adventure- some and shameless hussies crawled up my pants leg, due to the sudden loosening of a refractory leggin. caus- ing me to shed bitter tears of humilia- tion and outraged modesty. Cheerfully would I have disrobed, there before Mrs. L's. kitchen, only the commiserating matron insisted on standing there, just back of the screen door, telling me just what to do. Vaguely, as one hears joyful picnickers in a passing boat, through the murmur- ing, roaring surf, while bathing, I heard neighbors, female neighbors, big ones, middling, frying sized girls in the gig- gling stage, wild-eyed youngsters in skirts, skirted tots, millions of omni- present small boys. And not a knot hole big enough tor me to crawl into. The bees were enjoying themselves meanwhile—or did my antics annoy them ? Some broke their stingers off in my skin, and seemed desirous of retrieving them. Others got them in, and in some way could not withdraw them, which caused a wild, twisting, boring motion, like a man having teeth all over his head and body, and all be- ing filled at once, only much worse. What happened in the next five min- utes—Mrs. L insists it was only five minutes, though to me it seems a long summer's day and an arctic night for good measure—I know not. Perhaps I hit my head mercifully against the cel- lar door (Mrs. L. says I fainted, but I know better). When I came to I was in the L's cel- lar, my head on the soft side of a brick, and Mrs. L. was bending over me, with a greasy dish pan, empty, in her left hand. (The water it had held was mostly down my neck and over my clothes.) Her right hand was engaged in bathing my fevered and swollen brow with the dish rag, with what my wife, who un- luckily chanced to come at that mo- ment, insists was a caressing motion. As a consequence, there is a coolness between my wife and Mrs. L., in spite of the hot weather, and they don't speak to each other. Possibly I might explain, but my lips are sealed—they are so swollen that I cannot speak to either. My head, also, is larger than its usual wont, resembling that of a rather distinguished ex-president to such an extent that even the dog stares in bristling wonder—as a consequence I proudly avert my head as I pass the neighbors, and fail to see them, for, owing to the swelling, I couldn't see any one if I tried. Glendale, Ariz. No. 6.—Seventy Years of Bee- keeping IN our last issue we gave a list of the present periodical publications on bees in the United States. This list was prepared before the opening of the year. Since Jan. 1 another periodi- cal has apppeared which is worthy of mention. It is entitled "The Beekeep- ers' Item," and is published at New Braunfels, Tex. The vast State of Texas has entirely different beekeeping con- ditions from the other States of the Union, and therefore needs a special periodical. This need has made itself felt so often that already at least three publications made the attempt without

  

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After inspecting his three bee colonies, Michael Jaross takes off his beekeeping veil and exposes his face to the warm sun.

Fully protected against bee and cedar pollen.

Spring is here and I've received two packages of bees from Knight Family Honey to rebuild my apiary. Unfortunately over pre-winter we lost both our hives. These are Carniolan bees, and I'm excited to get to know them better this year.

Bill Pike has been keeping bees since he was 12 yrs old, he says. He's an old guy now. He just set out fifty hives at different yards around Salem Ridge, Avalanche and Coon Valley. He met the bees coming across Wisconsin in a semi-truck delivering boxes of swarms, each with its queen in her own special container, to bee keepers across the state.

 

He likes the way the bees look this year.

 

The bee swarms and queen are placed in the lowest box of the stack. They have some honey to keep them until there are more blooming flowers, but we have seen bees flying in and out during the last spring snow falls. The upper boxes are the "supers" or the boxes where the bees pack in the excess of honey they make. As the summer progresses, Bill comes by in his bee-man veil and with a little hand-held smoker. He opens the boxes, puffing in a little smoke, to monitor the honey production. He will add more supers to the boxes of the most productive bees. By the end of the season, there might be five boxes stacked on top of each other.

 

Why are his boxes so colorful? The colors on the boxes help the new bees not to drift over into the wrong hive when they come back from gathering. Bill buys cans of mixed wrong-color paint that people have returned to Walmart, repainting his boxes in the winter time, when he isn't operating his ham radio. He's a ham in the winter.

  

I've been on a course with the local Beekeeping Association for a couple of month, and we've finished in the class room and finally got to hives! We all had a go and inspecting the frames, looking for the various things (nectar, pollen, honey, eggs, larvae, sealed brood, the queen etc). I even had a go at handling the frames with no gloves on, it feels much nicer, and these bees are very calm so I didn't get stung!

 

I was hoping to have got some of my own bees by now, but the spring in the UK has been cold and slow to arrive, so the bees won't be ready for another month or 6 weeks. But I'd prefer to get them when they're ready, rather under strength and liable to failure.

 

One of the hives was very heathly looking, and we even think there was two queens present (supercedure), the other was a little further behind, less brood, less stored honey, but still looking ok. Tomorrow I'm going back for another session, and we'll be marking the queens, so we'll see for sure if there are two queens.

bees.chrisinch.com - This is my typical beehive inspection kit. If you'd like to read about what I recommend for taking to your hive, read my article here: bees.chrisinch.com/what-to-bring-to-a-hive-inspection/

Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu40medi

Title: Gleanings in bee culture

Year: 1874 (1870s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bees Bee culture

Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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used a smoker.It is not necessary to blow smoke over thebees continually; but very often a littlewhiff of smoke at the right time prevents ageneral uprising, and enables the operatorto go right on with the work without lettingthe bees find out they can have things alltheir own way.—Ed.] BEEKEEPING AND FRUITGROWING BY C. KOPPENHAFER I have a fruit farm of 7l4 acres in the vil-lage of Brownhelm Center, located amongthe trees as shown in Fig. 1. There areover forty colonies of bees which I find agreat help in fertilizing the fruit-blossoms.In 1910 I secured $200 worth of fine honeyfrom 23 colonies, spring count. Some of my neighbors across the street aremaking me a lot of trouble, and threaten-ing to compel me to get rid of my bees. Iam not able to make them believe that thebees do not spoil their fruit, nor that theyare of any benefit in the spring in fertilizingthe blossoms. One man in particular saidit was an imposition to the neighborhood tohave the bees there; and if there was any

 

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Mr. and Mrs. (. Koppenhafer and their family of honey-eaters. Gleanings in Bee Culture law to make me dispose of them he wouldtake advantage of it. However, for all thatwe are friends so far as I know. He was ex-asperated only when the grapes and plumswere ripe. For a few days at that time thebirds were very bad; and as the bees hadnothing else to do, they of course were trou-blesome. I have over forty plum trees my-self, and also some grapes, and I know wellenough that it is not the bees that do themischief. It is also claimed that the beesdamage the peaches; but I have my beesright in the peach orchard, and I find thatthey never work on any except the peckedor decayed ones. I picked all of my peacheswithout a veil, and never get stung. The other illustration shows you my fam-ily of honey-eating boys. I think the useof honey in the home avoids many a doctorbill. My wife is also of the same opinion.She takes great interest in the bees, andoften hives swarms when I am not at home. Amhe

  

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The farmers let us put on bee suits and interact with the bee hives. I had to switch my camera to live mode for the first time ever and watch the screen through a veil. I usually have a phobia about bees but the combination of the farmers and the bee suit made me feel relaxed.

 

This is what a bee looks like while she's gorging. When they smoke the hive, the bees think that it's on fire and that they need to fill up on honey and leave. So they get so gorged that they can't sting you even if they wanted to.

May 25, 2011 - Beekeeping Congress

 

A veiled beekeeper participates in a hive inspection during the field visits of the 6th Caribbean Beekeeping Congress, facilitated by SGU's School of Veterinary Medicine.

 

Batihk Apiary

Golf Course, Grenada

Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu40medi

Title: Gleanings in bee culture

Year: 1874 (1870s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bees Bee culture

Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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Distributing Depots In ManyLarge Centers The A. I. Root Company Executive Offices and Factory MEDINA, OHIO

 

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AUGUST 1, 1912 RUSH-ORDER PRICE LIST FALCON BeekeepersSupplies Plain Sections. 25c per 1000 less. Dewey Foundationmail, 81.50. fastener, each, $1.25; by Beeway Sections— 250, No. 1, $1.60 No. 2, $1.40 500, 2.75 • 2.50 1000. 5.50 5.00 5000, 23.75 21.25 Light Section Foundation, per pound . . . . i lb., 65c; Light Brood Foundation, per pound . . . . . i ib.^ sgc; Hoffman Brood-frames No. 14 one-story Dovetailed hive, cover, body, bottom, frames, 8-frame— 10-frame—Dovetailed Supers complete without sections and starters-No. 2. 4Kxl% sections . . . . . . I o f.- No. 2B, 4i/ixlj^ sections .... l 8-irame: No. 2F, 4x5 sections . ..... j 10-frame: Ideal Bee-veil. 65c: by mall, 75c. Standard Smoker, 85c; by mail Si 10 Untested Italian Queens, one, SI.00; six, $5.50. Tested Queens, one, $1.50; six, $8.50 Dealers Everywhere. See Last Gleanings for List. Red Catalog, postpaid. Simplified Beekeeping, postpaid. 5 lbs., 64c; 50 lbs., 59c5 lbs., 57c; 50 lbs., 52c10, 85c; 100, 13.005, $7.00; 1

  

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Now I just need to get an outfit in her size so she can check on the hive in the pasture.

Title: American bee journal

Identifier: americanbeejourn6061hami

Year: 1861 (1860s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bee culture; Bees

Publisher: [Hamilton, Ill. , etc. , Dadant & Sons]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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About This Book: Catalog Entry

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86 AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL March may be lowered and queen-cells looked for by hand mirror between the bottom-bars of the frames. 2. In a double brood chamber, lifting the back part of the upper half and looking for the queen-cells between the bottom bars. 3. having a slot between two horizontal bars in one of the combs on which cells will be built. By treating only those colo- nies that are preparing to swarm, the loss of morale will be further re- duced and the work of treatment re- duced, and spread over a longer time. Out of eighteen colonies that were requeened at the central apiary by the system method described above, four swarmed or attempted to swarm. It was found, however, that in three of these cases there was a third queen-cell that had been missed when the cells were de- stroyed, and in the other (attempt- ed only) a drone pupa was found in a third queen-cell. When the white honey crop was removed in early August ten colonies out of the eighteen had young queens and brood on both sides, four on one side only, and four on neither side. In some cases virgins were run in in- stead of cells left or given, and in four cases the old queen was placed in the top super, with a separate en- trance. Out of these four colonies two failed to requeen on either side. It is a question whether the old queen is worth keeping unless she is a particularly good one, except for maintaining morale. Honey Produced at the Central Apiary, 1919, Spring Count Six 10-frame hives, 2 queens, win- tered in cellar, requeened by system, average yield each, 189 pounds. Eleven 10-frame hives, 1 queen, wintered in cellar, queen-cells de- stroyed weekly, average yield each, 178 pounds. Eight 10-frame hives, 1 queen, win- tered outside, queen-cells destroyed weekly, average yield each, 167 pounds. Four 12-frame hives, 2 queens, win- tered in cellar, requeened by sys- tem, average yield each, 228 pounds. It is hardly expected that outside ■wintering will be so satisfactory for hives containing two queens as cel- lar wintering, but it is being tried in some specially designed 4-colony cases. Another method of wintering that is being tried and seems more hopeful for outapiaries in the north, is to place the colonies in a building (it can be a portable honey-extract- ing house about 10 feet by 12 feet), surrounded with a thick layer of straw, the windows to be left open to prevent the sun from heating the building in early spring, and screened with cotton to keep out snow and rain. The use of the ex- tracting house as a house-apiary in winter has been found a good plan for a small apiary of regular colonies. The contention that this two- queen system may not build up the colonics strong enough for the honey flow is met by the following considerations: 1. A hive that has been requeened with two queens in July goes into winter considerably stronger in young bees than one containing only one queen. 2. The colonies in which the queen fails on one side reach full strength for win- ter and can spare bees or brood in spring to strengthen the weakest of the half colonies. 3. The half colo- nies can be united at the be- ginning of the honey flow if neces- sary. This was done in four out of the six 10-frame hives at the cen- tral apiary in 1919. 4. The evidence has shown that when the principal honey flow does not begin until about four weeks after the com- mencement of the swarming season, as at Ottawa in 1918, the half colo- nies will build up plenty strong enough for it. At present the two-queen system is recommended only for localities like Ottawa, that have the last- named condition in average years but some of its developments and modifications are expected to have a wider application. It is expected to produce particularly good results in places where the principal honey flow comes from fireweed or other July sources, and with the larger hives that are now receiving in-

 

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creased attention, the 10-frame Jum- bo and the 12-frame Langstroth. It also includes the essential features of the modern treatment of Euro- pean foulbrood. (In the April, 1919, American Bee Journal, Mr. Siaden describes this system. The bees on the two sides of the division board meet in the su- pers through queen excluders until the last super is removed in the fall. From this time on the two divisions are entirely separated.—Ed.) Bees in China Mr. Frank C. Pellett: Dear Sir: I am an amateur apiarist with a colony of 20 hives of Chinese bees. The native queen is, however, not as good as the Italian, and I have ordered six Italian queens from Cali- fornia, but they have not been deliv- ered yet. I intend to replace all my Chinese queens with Italians next year. I enclose two snapshots which may interest you. One shows 4 of my colonies housed in the English ("W. B. C") hive. The climate here is sub- tropical in summer and the ther- mometer ranges from 80 to 106 de- grees in the shade; so a shed is abso- lutely necessary. Our winters are bit- terly cold, but I do not move my hives into a cellar—they remain in the open the year around. All my colonies were purchased from Chinese farmers and I had con- siderable trouble in obtaining them, as the natives regard bees as "joss pidgin," i. e., symbols of good fortune. They think whenever they sell bees they are selling away their "good luck." They keep bees in baskets generally, suspended against a wall, and one of my pictures shows a cou- ple of these basket hives after I had transferred the colonies. Occasionally bees are housed in wooden tubs or boxes. They know nothing about modern beekeeping methods. The Chinese bee is the gentlest of its species, rarely using its sting. I never use a smoker, wear a veil or gloves when handling my colonies. The first book I ever read on bee- keeping was the one you wrote, "Pro- ductive Beekeeping," one of the Lip- pincott series. I purchased this in China. C. G. GOLDING. Chinese basket hives. Wiring Frames In the June issue of the American Bee Journal E. S. Miller gives a method of wiring frames that ap- pealed to me very much, and I found on trial, that he was on the track of a good thing. Ai'tcr a little experi- menting, I believe I have evolved an improvement of !iis method. I wire the frames in the usual man- ner, leaving slack in the third wire from the top, so that the wire can be carried up to the center of the top- liar and wound around the head of a five-eighth inch cigar box nail that is driven in at the edge of the large saw kerf or wedge pocket, as the case may be, as Mr. Miller does, and then

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

are funny-looking.

An old Kodak slide featuring my sister and I and bees. We both had bee veils on and my sister is trying to eat honey from the comb through the veil...cute!

It was sad to hear of Kodak's troubles, my first camera was a Kodak instamatic -not the easiest camera to use, in fact I class it as a point and hope :-)

A senior beekeeper in a white bee suit with veil waits patiently while the bee blower is being repaired on the ground. The bee blower is a fragile piece of machinery - they don't last very long anymore it seems... That maybe because the intake is constantly getting plugged with dead bees?

 

I used this picture in a travel blog piece entitled Harvesting Honey with Commercial Beekeepers in Eastern Ontario, on my World Nomads travel journal and I also put this gem on my Facebook page where it gathered up a great many comments and LIKES as you can imagine.

A veiled beekeeper participates in a hive inspection during the field visits of the 6th Caribbean Beekeeping Congress.

 

Batihk Apiary

Golf Course, Grenada

From Cornell University

 

Published before 1923

Judith was brave this morning and before I got there, she decided she was going to check out the monitor board unprotected by gloves or suit or veil. And she got stung, nothing dramatic though. Fact is, I did almost the same thing. You get so used to them. There I was, reaching right into what you see here with my bare hand, going for the hook to pull out the drawer when suddenly, as half a dozen bees crawled on my hand and I'm begin to think--hmm, probably not a good idea.

BEE BUFFET -- Students, decked out in bee veils, jackets and gloves, watch while instructor Jon Zawislak shows them how to prep a jar of bee food. The students, part of "Beekeeping for Beeginners," were transferring bees to their own hives on April 24, 2013. (U of A System Division of Agriculture photo by Mary Hightower.)

I took this snap of one of my beehives the other day, but I was wearing a beesuit and veil and gloves at the time, so it was pure accident that I caught the queen in this photo. I didn't see her until I processed the shot on my computer. This is a newly-mated black queen that has just started to lay eggs a few days earlier. It's a wonderful time of year for beekeepers.

 

If you haven't seen her, she is on the bottom edge of the image, and her abdomen is much longer than her worker-daughters around her.

  

Newly mated Black Queen

Another little helper eager to care for the bees. This little helper is also the owner of his own hive.

Shortly after I shot this, the bees from one of the hives got all irritated and they made their way over to the truck. With Mark's door still open, there were about 20 that buzzed in, thank goodness I was fully suited and veiled. These bees lasted about 15 seconds. The other bees swooped in and fought and killed them. Guess they didn't like the new scent in their territory. Queenie was smart enough to move down where they couldn't reach her in her little cage. :-(

Smoker, gloves, bee brush, bee bar and veil. We only used the smoker and the bar.

The Uniform Project Little Black Dress.

The cone has small drywall screws holding it up to to the wood. Additional screws along the bottom of the board as close to the brick as possible warped the screen in such a way that it was a pretty close fit all the way around. Liberal use of duct tape and steel wool should do the rest. I left the homeowner more steel wool, a spare veil, and spare gloves, and instructions: Keep checking the duct tape, and plug up any other entrances, inside or out, with steel wool.

I like this man's bee veil and hat. I've never seen one like this before.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Bee Research Laboratory research entomologists let, from left, Brendan (3) and Owen Baynard (5) wear veiled hats and hold a beekeeping smoker tool, while next to a window box planter with flowers that help support pollinators such as bees, during the 138th White House Easter Egg Roll, Monday, March 28, 2016, in Washington, D.C. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) urged Americans of all ages to “Plant a Window Box for Pollinators” by using a new, free online tool available at the redesigned People’s Garden Initiative website (www.usda.gov/peoplesgarden).

More than 35,000 people are in attendance at the White House South Lawn for the games, stories, music, cooking demonstrations and traditional egg rolls. The official theme of the event is "Lets Celebrate” in celebration of the final Easter Egg Roll of the Obama Administration. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

 

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