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Title: American bee journal

Identifier: americanbeejourn541914hami

Year: 1861 (1860s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bee culture; Bees

Publisher: [Hamilton, Ill. , etc. , Dadant & Sons]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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August, 1914. 279 American Hee Journal committee. (Signed) "Mrs. Bi.\by." " Papa, dear," said my better half, a half formed tear in either eye, "that's tomorrow. I ought to go, but how in the world could you manage this ex- tracting alone ? ' The world stopped revolving. The sun stood still. The moon went out, and the stars refused to shine. After about four ;cons—" Never mind, my dear, 1 can manage to do it somehow. Fossibly get a man to help me," I ven- tured. Now I am not on principle opposed to woman suffrage. Indeed, I had written several articles for the local press during the campaign in its favor. And, too, when my wife was appointed upon a committee to go before the legislature and lobby for the bill, I felt that the whole family had been hon- ored, and now that a call had come for her to go I could not say her nay. But as for me—if the seven labors of Hercules had just then been thrust un- der my nose they would have looked as tiddledywinks beside the dumbfound- ing work befoie me. To e.xtract or not to extract—that was the question ; whether it was nobler to run and hire a man to "juice" those bees for me, or to stand my ground and fight it out by main strength and awkwardness! I chose the latter course. And before the erstwhile companion of my stings and hysteria was out of hearing I was evermore making that old extractor hum. It hummed so loudly that its toe-hold gave way, a cable " busted," and I was forced to put it in dry dock for repairs. The riext thing that went end-to was when, in my muscular enthusiasm, I turned so fast that the honey overran the pail and found a receptacle in my boot. When my wife left she gave me a spoonful of lard and cautioned me to keep all the bearings of the machine oiled. I wanted to use axle grease or cylinder oil, but she insisted on the lard. I was soon to find out why. I guess I failed to open the gate to the extractor wide enough, for the bottom of the tank soon filled with honey. I began to notice concentric circles of dark honey. On examination I found that a too generous application of lard on the bearings in that neigh- borhood was the cause of the streaks. Then I was forced to throw away the honey and oil the bearings again. That night I attempted to put the empty supers back on the hives. Every time I lifted a cover from a hive the bees literally blackened me. The little rascals acted as though they were say- ing : "Now, here comes the fellow who took our cloak; now he will take our coat, also. Let's go for him." And they went. My veil was the first one Eve made for our ancestor, and my gloves had ringworm in the fingers. To enhance my esteem for the job, I wore low shoes! Now, don't smile, you smug, complacent veteran! I maintain there is nothing funny in a bee sting. It's the most matter-of-fact, business-like transaction I ever met with. But there are some folks who are mean enough to smile or even guf- faw when some poor dupe gets the " hot stuff." The following day I managed to swipe " 25 or 30 supers from the bees and began extracting. The honey-flow had ceased ; the bees began to " whee- whee "all around the house for a taste. I couldn't keep the uncapping knives hot. The honey was so thick the ex- tractor wouldn't throw it out. I got hot and began to slam-bang things around in great shape. In the me/t;- I turned over .5 gallons of honev, which proceeded to splash out of the honey house to feed the bees. I soon had the nicest mess of robbing on my hands you ever saw. I was still warm under the collar when the uncapping knife ricocheted over a bumpy comb and shaved a quarter-section off the palm of my hand. A little later my shirt sleeve caught in the free-running crank of the extractor, which incident left me in a state of statuesq e nudity. Then I sat down to perspire and medi- tate. "Thinks I, if these are the joys of beekeeping spoken of by the ABC book, then let me to more peaceful pursuits; such, for instance, as lion taming or lassoing crocodiles." The man who had made up these hives had evidently got hold of the wrong instruction sheet—possibly a sheet explaining how to put together a Wright aeroplane. The tin rabbets were put in flat so that the rib stuck out inside the hive. The frames were the Hoffman shoulder spacing type. These he had nailed so that both shoul- ders were on the same side of the frame. The bees had been trained to swim in propolis and subsist upon slumgum. So that the tools needed to manipulate the hives consisted of a crowbar and a can of nitroglycerine. In spite of all these things, like Paul of Tarsus, I persevered. By the last of the week I finished the job, and Sunday morning greeted my smiling family at home. "My, but you area mess!" greeted my better three-quarters. "You look as though the land was flowing with milk and honey, and there were no boats for you to cross in. But were you as successful on your mission as I on mine ?" "Three thousand pounds," replied I boastfully, "and a wagon load of cap- pings! But say, old girl, do you know I'm the biggest fool that ever swatted a bee or fanned an extractor." "How's that?" asked my wife anx- iously." "Why, I went and bought that bloomin' yard." Cottonwood, Ariz.

 

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Send Questions either to the office of the American Bee Journal or direct to Dr. C. C. Miller. Marengo, III. He does not answer bee-keepine questions by mail. Requeening During Summer In reading an old Bee Journal of nine years ago ([505). I noticed an article on " Re- queening During Summer," by its present editor, in which he says: "It is a mistake to requeen colonies that have good prolific queens just because they are two years old." Is that still his view ? Ontario. Answer.—"A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush." and while requeening we may replace a prolific queen by one equally prolific. I have seen so many good queens prove good the third year that I prefer not to replace a first-class two-year old queen by one whose ability is unknown to me. The bees usually requeen in good time, if the matter is left to them. But with an in- ferior queen or one just fair, requeening is necessary.—C. P. D. Requeening I. Is a table cloth an advantage on frames; if so. state what months to keep it on in Ontario? 2 Colonies with one. two or three cells of European foul brood, say first of June, and it I kill the queen the last half of clover flow and let these bees rear their own queen, will this cure foul brood ^ If so. state time to do it. Clover flow from June 20 to July 20. 1. If hives are broodless and queenless by June I. and if given a frame of eggs, larvas. and sealed brood to rear a queen, will the queen be fairly good ? 4. if I lift a frame of brood above queen- excluder, will the bees start queen-cells; then when queen is hatched take off ex- cluder ? Will the young queen go down and kill the old queen ? Ontario. Answers—I. You probably mean enam- eled cloth or oil-cloth. 1 used such cover- ings at one time, but have not had any for years, having nothing between top-bars and flat covers, except when supers are on. I think they are not in use nearly so much as formerly. If you use such coverings at all, you will use them at any and all times ex- cept when supers are on. and may even use them over supers. 2 A cure would be likely to follow. Better not wait until the last half of the flow, as the case would be getting worse all the time, but act at the beginning of the flow. But if only two or threediseased cellsare present, and the queen is good, all you need do is to cage her in the hive for 10 days. 3. Young bees are the ones to rear a good queen, and in the case you mention there are probably few or no young bees, so the resulting queen would not be likely to be very good. The best thing to do with such a colony is to break it up and unite with an- other colony or with other colonies. If you haven't the heart to do that, then a better way than the one you mention is to give your queenless colony the queen of some other colony, and let that other colony rear its own queen. 4. The bees are not at all certain to start cells over an excluder, and if they do, when you take away the excluder the young queen is likely to be killed if the old queen is a good one. Large Hivet To prevent swarming why don't they use a larger hive than they do ? They say a col- ony swarms because they haven't room to work; also the queen runs out of comb to lay in. Oregon. Answers.-"Why don't they?" They do. Ask Dadant & Sons, and you'll find they use

  

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Fully protected against bee and cedar pollen.

one of my chap learning beekeeping ---I highly recommend to wear protections --the bee veil

 

As I was at our dining room table doing some editing, I heard leaf crunching sounds from outside - something decidedly bigger than a squirrel! It was a Buddha fairy leaving this beauty to provide calm guidance to my bee yard! No bees yet (about two more weeks depending on weather) but other insects have visited the pond. A raccoon pooped on the walking path. The Fishsticks are happy and I see them cruising about in their pond each day. My fencing-style veil came in the mail. #happiness

 

Photo by Kristine K. Stevens, a curious traveler, author and beekeeper, who is writing a book about her adventures in Iceland.

 

Previously, Kristine sold her house, quit her job and traveled around the world. Learn more at "If Your Dream Doesn't Scare You, It Isn't Big Enough: A Solo Journey Around the World."

Spring is here and I've received two packages of bees from Knight Family Honey to rebuild my apiary. Unfortunately over pre-winter we lost both our hives. These are Carniolan bees, and I'm excited to get to know them better this year.

I've been on a course with the local Beekeeping Association for a couple of month, and we've finished in the class room and finally got to hives! We all had a go and inspecting the frames, looking for the various things (nectar, pollen, honey, eggs, larvae, sealed brood, the queen etc). I even had a go at handling the frames with no gloves on, it feels much nicer, and these bees are very calm so I didn't get stung!

 

I was hoping to have got some of my own bees by now, but the spring in the UK has been cold and slow to arrive, so the bees won't be ready for another month or 6 weeks. But I'd prefer to get them when they're ready, rather under strength and liable to failure.

 

One of the hives was very heathly looking, and we even think there was two queens present (supercedure), the other was a little further behind, less brood, less stored honey, but still looking ok. Tomorrow I'm going back for another session, and we'll be marking the queens, so we'll see for sure if there are two queens.

Title: American bee journal

Identifier: americanbeejourn5657hami

Year: 1861 (1860s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bee culture; Bees

Publisher: [Hamilton, Ill. , etc. , Dadant & Sons]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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About This Book: Catalog Entry

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1917 AMERICAN BEK JOURNAL 235 education by first getting grounded in the physiology of the bee. It would be an enormous task forme to do this..." "The hives I use are not made or sold by any dealer; I have to make them myself and do not think it would be practical for you to make them— better use the dovetailed Langstroth style of hive sold by the dealers." " Don't go into this or any other ex- pert business too largely at first, liees can be bought from any dealer. Don't start with more than from three to six hives, and increase in proportion as your knowledge increases " A neighbor informed me that bees can be bought by the pound, and ad- vised getting none but fertile, tested queens. Many of my questions were answered by him, but those I forgot to ask were legion. What kind of hive to use? Vaguely I know thatPoppleton's hive, as written up by the Roots years ago, was radical, being one story and long, like a carpenter's tool chest, to facilitate its removal to and from the launch, piling in tiers, and to obviate the building of "brace comb", as the odds and ends of comb built by the bees between the first story or brood- chamber, and super or second storage chamber, are known. And, most im- portant of all—a question I learn which has troubled beginners since time be- gan—how to get the bees into the hive and how to keep them there ? Wild thoughts of using-chloroform haunted me, pending the arrival of some text books I had sent for. I thought bees, dreamed bees, and had bees in my mind as I ate whatever was put before me. " Please get me some bed ticking like the last," said my wife one day as I started for town, "three yards of it, a set of darning needles, and the grocer- ies in this list And don't let him give you common brown sugar this time—we are entirely out of it, and I must have the white !" "Bed ticking, three yards, darning needles, and sugar, only the white," I unconsciously repeated between the perfunctory or choleric 'Get up, Dol- ly's!" and "What are you doing there's!" on the way in. What I got, by some subconscious trick of the mind, was insect powder, and fly paper. To the grocer I had said—I shudder yet as I think of it— " I want three pounds of bees and a fertile queen. Give me nothing but the white, please — the last I got were brown, and I know I said white." What the man said didn't amount to much— it was what he thought and looked. But I came home in triumph with white sugar. " Some day," I said to my wife in a burst of patronage and confidence, "I may write a book," Three Years Among the Bees." Langstroth's hobby was ants for many years—it was only through seeing honey in the comb on a friend's table that he was led to pur- chase some bees and make a study of them. They all write about them— Dr. C. C. Miller " wrote ' A Year Among the Bees', Quinby wrote a book, Root wrote a book. Cook wrote a—" " That's it, you forgot to get me that cook book I sent you over for yester- day", interjected my wife severely. Guiltily I thought of the bee book I had borrowed at thi neighbor's in- stead, and said nothing. My first hive came at last. I had sent for one minus bees and plus the fixtures, smoker, etc., in order that I might study them better. Then came the day—it will retain its vernal fresh- ness in my mind as long as I live—-I remember it for the first thrill, and all the little and big thrills that came after. " Mother says you know about bees ", said a small boy at the kitchen door. " There's a bunch hanging on the wash line, and she says come and get them and you can have 'em." " So already my reputation as a skilled apiarist has spread among the neigh- bors," I exulted, visions of that book to be written flitting as industriously through the nooks in my cranium as a bee flits from flower to flower. With smoker in my left hand, swarm basket under an arm, bee veil in my right hand—and directions concealed in my pocket, I strode gaily forth to my doom. " Don't let them sting you—aren't you afraid of them ? Don't you use gloves? Are they glad to see you want to put them in a nice new hive ? I believe

 

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"My Head is Larger than its Wont, so THAT Even the Dog Stares in Bristling Wonder." they are glad—hear them hum !" were a few of the questions hurled at me. " A beekeeper never uses gloves," I replied less gaily, perhaps with a trifle of weariness in my tone. " Bees are always full of honey when they swarm, and in that condition never sting!" Who wrote that last phrase? Ordi- nary killing with a club, fists or pois- onous gas would be too refined for him. Those bees ivere glad to see me. Perhaps they mistook the veil I wore for a crown, hence decided that I was the queen. To see the haste with which they forsook that plain hemp clothes line for me was flattering—at first. Did they merely desire to embrace me? Wildly, and with a sinking feeling clutching me about the pit of the stomach, I hoped so. Vain, hollow bauble is hope in this cruel world. "Stung!" Literally and figuratively I was stung. Four quarts of fond, lov- ing and affectionate bees fell, by some perverse process, into a fold of my bee- veil, inside of it, and refused to be dis- lodged from that haven. A pint of bees dropped into each sleeve; adventure- some and shameless hussies crawled up my pants leg, due to the sudden loosening of a refractory leggin. caus- ing me to shed bitter tears of humilia- tion and outraged modesty. Cheerfully would I have disrobed, there before Mrs. L's. kitchen, only the commiserating matron insisted on standing there, just back of the screen door, telling me just what to do. Vaguely, as one hears joyful picnickers in a passing boat, through the murmur- ing, roaring surf, while bathing, I heard neighbors, female neighbors, big ones, middling, frying sized girls in the gig- gling stage, wild-eyed youngsters in skirts, skirted tots, millions of omni- present small boys. And not a knot hole big enough tor me to crawl into. The bees were enjoying themselves meanwhile—or did my antics annoy them ? Some broke their stingers off in my skin, and seemed desirous of retrieving them. Others got them in, and in some way could not withdraw them, which caused a wild, twisting, boring motion, like a man having teeth all over his head and body, and all be- ing filled at once, only much worse. What happened in the next five min- utes—Mrs. L insists it was only five minutes, though to me it seems a long summer's day and an arctic night for good measure—I know not. Perhaps I hit my head mercifully against the cel- lar door (Mrs. L. says I fainted, but I know better). When I came to I was in the L's cel- lar, my head on the soft side of a brick, and Mrs. L. was bending over me, with a greasy dish pan, empty, in her left hand. (The water it had held was mostly down my neck and over my clothes.) Her right hand was engaged in bathing my fevered and swollen brow with the dish rag, with what my wife, who un- luckily chanced to come at that mo- ment, insists was a caressing motion. As a consequence, there is a coolness between my wife and Mrs. L., in spite of the hot weather, and they don't speak to each other. Possibly I might explain, but my lips are sealed—they are so swollen that I cannot speak to either. My head, also, is larger than its usual wont, resembling that of a rather distinguished ex-president to such an extent that even the dog stares in bristling wonder—as a consequence I proudly avert my head as I pass the neighbors, and fail to see them, for, owing to the swelling, I couldn't see any one if I tried. Glendale, Ariz. No. 6.—Seventy Years of Bee- keeping IN our last issue we gave a list of the present periodical publications on bees in the United States. This list was prepared before the opening of the year. Since Jan. 1 another periodi- cal has apppeared which is worthy of mention. It is entitled "The Beekeep- ers' Item," and is published at New Braunfels, Tex. The vast State of Texas has entirely different beekeeping con- ditions from the other States of the Union, and therefore needs a special periodical. This need has made itself felt so often that already at least three publications made the attempt without

  

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Visual Media: Photography

 

I was born and raised in San Diego, California, where most of my days were spent soaking up the sun. On this particular day, I was sitting in front of my fish pond, admiring the weather as I see my father passing by wearing his full body suit with his bee veil securely positioned on his head. He was getting ready to do his daily apiary inspection. To him, it was just like any ordinary day, but for me that was the day I realized that it was something I overlooked and never took the time to appreciate. Through my father’s perspective, beekeeping is a hobby that he truly loves. Because of his curiosity of how bee colonies operated, he decided to build his own apiary one day using materials and supplies he found in our backyard. I find myself now recognizing that I inherited my artistic traits from my father. Understanding that art and design is something I truly love, I can see myself constantly creating.

bees.chrisinch.com - This is my typical beehive inspection kit. If you'd like to read about what I recommend for taking to your hive, read my article here: bees.chrisinch.com/what-to-bring-to-a-hive-inspection/

I think thats the correct collective noun. - Jonathan is demonstrating in the middle.

The farmers let us put on bee suits and interact with the bee hives. I had to switch my camera to live mode for the first time ever and watch the screen through a veil. I usually have a phobia about bees but the combination of the farmers and the bee suit made me feel relaxed.

Accidental double exposure taken with a Baldi 3x4 (127 film) camera in week 112 of my 52 film cameras in 52 weeks project:

52cameras.blogspot.com/

www.flickr.com/photos/tony_kemplen/collections/72157623113584240

The large ghostly face was me setting (and accidentally firing!) the shutter prior to donning the hat and veil.

Efke 100 film developed in Ilfosol 3.

Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu40medi

Title: Gleanings in bee culture

Year: 1874 (1870s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bees Bee culture

Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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used a smoker.It is not necessary to blow smoke over thebees continually; but very often a littlewhiff of smoke at the right time prevents ageneral uprising, and enables the operatorto go right on with the work without lettingthe bees find out they can have things alltheir own way.—Ed.] BEEKEEPING AND FRUITGROWING BY C. KOPPENHAFER I have a fruit farm of 7l4 acres in the vil-lage of Brownhelm Center, located amongthe trees as shown in Fig. 1. There areover forty colonies of bees which I find agreat help in fertilizing the fruit-blossoms.In 1910 I secured $200 worth of fine honeyfrom 23 colonies, spring count. Some of my neighbors across the street aremaking me a lot of trouble, and threaten-ing to compel me to get rid of my bees. Iam not able to make them believe that thebees do not spoil their fruit, nor that theyare of any benefit in the spring in fertilizingthe blossoms. One man in particular saidit was an imposition to the neighborhood tohave the bees there; and if there was any

 

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Mr. and Mrs. (. Koppenhafer and their family of honey-eaters. Gleanings in Bee Culture law to make me dispose of them he wouldtake advantage of it. However, for all thatwe are friends so far as I know. He was ex-asperated only when the grapes and plumswere ripe. For a few days at that time thebirds were very bad; and as the bees hadnothing else to do, they of course were trou-blesome. I have over forty plum trees my-self, and also some grapes, and I know wellenough that it is not the bees that do themischief. It is also claimed that the beesdamage the peaches; but I have my beesright in the peach orchard, and I find thatthey never work on any except the peckedor decayed ones. I picked all of my peacheswithout a veil, and never get stung. The other illustration shows you my fam-ily of honey-eating boys. I think the useof honey in the home avoids many a doctorbill. My wife is also of the same opinion.She takes great interest in the bees, andoften hives swarms when I am not at home. Amhe

  

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This beekeeper tells me that he does not use any veil, only smoke. He gets the smoke by burning a branch with a cloth on it, not by using a modern smoker. At the start of the season he says the first time he is stung near the eye, his eye swells shut for a few days, but after that there is little effect from being stung. Each log hive costs about 1500 YR or about 7 USD, but a complete hive costs at least 6000 YR or 30 USD. The honey produced is very expensive, with a half litre bottle of honey costing about 5000 YR or 25 USD. In the honey shops in the capital the price is about double. However the taste of the honey does not seem that special. Rather it is partly the difficulty in producing honey in large quantities and tradition that makes the price much higher than imported honey. Obviously comb honey is much better quality and cleaner. I am told that no chemical or medicines are used in beekeeping here.

Bees prefer light colors, which is why beesuits are white.

 

I removed my rings in case I got stung on a finger. I wore no leather because they don't like the smell of leather ... but the long-gauntleted gloves made specifically for beekeeping are made of goatskin. They fit snugly so you lose as little dexterity as possible. Mine could be snugger but it's bad enough I have to wear pants. The constriction of tight gloves would exacerbate my claustrophobia.

  

I bought the helmet (not a hat because it has an inner structure like a hard hat's) that looks like a pith helmet, and the netting over the top called a veil.

 

I repurposed a pair of hiking pants (that unzip into shorts) that I haven't worn in yonks (I prefer skirts) and a long-sleeved tee-shirt from the Gap from 1987. I wore it with my big denim skirt, a lot. It is worn to an exquisite softness and packed with memory. I'm glad to give it a second life as a beekeeping shirt.

The farmers let us put on bee suits and interact with the bee hives. I had to switch my camera to live mode for the first time ever and watch the screen through a veil. I usually have a phobia about bees but the combination of the farmers and the bee suit made me feel relaxed.

Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu40medi

Title: Gleanings in bee culture

Year: 1874 (1870s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bees Bee culture

Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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About This Book: Catalog Entry

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wlien I got it I wasvery much disappointed, for I could notuse it Avith any kind of control. It painedme all the lime, had no knee action, andwas a dead drag con-tinually. I knew thentliat I had lost myhaid-earned m o n e y,and had woiss thannothing for it. I have tried ma.iyof the makes of arti-ficial limbs with wood-en and leather soekels,but never found anyrelief. By this timeI was becoming skilledin leather-work of allkinds, having taken upthe harness business:and as I was a sort ofingenious fellow anyw ay, I commencedover 25 years ago tomanufacture a leg ofmy own that wouldfill all the require-ments. For a year Ikept studying and ex-perimenting, and final-ly hit on the plan ofusing an air-cushionand other new fea-tures until my leg wasa complete success. During my work inthe harness-shop I be-c a m e interested inbees. My father al-ways kept bees in anold - fashioned w a y,never realizing muchout of them, nor giv-ing them the proper which he user. In his GLEANINGS IN BEE CULTURE

 

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bees on my head, uiuler the hat, in the spe-cially constructed headgear, and then in myntiticial leg as shown. 1 often go about inthis way at fairs from six in the morninguntil nine oclock in the evening,Chariton, la. [Mr. Riebel is certainly a genius in moreways than one. He has made such a studyof beekeeping that he has published a smallbook on the subject, Hints in Bee C.il-ture, which we find is very interesting.We are sure our friend deserves a gooddeal of credit for forging ahead as he hasdone for thirty years in spite of so great ahandicap.—Ed.] BEE-VEILS AND BEE-VEILS BY ARTHUR C. MILLER A bee-veil is a necessity and a nuisance,(illy some of them are more so. There aieahuost as many kinds of bee-veils as thereare beekeepers, but often none are to behad when most wanted. First, there aie the ki; ds made out ofsundry yards of white mosquito netting,hung in voluminous folds over a prehistoric A colony of bees in a wooden leg. cjire and attention; but I became so inter-ested tha

  

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Beekeeping supplies,equipment, smokers,veils beehive tools, honey extractors,John Pluta,Millegeville Georgia

More Beekeeping at GeorgiaBees.blogspot.com

Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu40medi

Title: Gleanings in bee culture

Year: 1874 (1870s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bees Bee culture

Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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Distributing Depots In ManyLarge Centers The A. I. Root Company Executive Offices and Factory MEDINA, OHIO

 

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AUGUST 1, 1912 RUSH-ORDER PRICE LIST FALCON BeekeepersSupplies Plain Sections. 25c per 1000 less. Dewey Foundationmail, 81.50. fastener, each, $1.25; by Beeway Sections— 250, No. 1, $1.60 No. 2, $1.40 500, 2.75 • 2.50 1000. 5.50 5.00 5000, 23.75 21.25 Light Section Foundation, per pound . . . . i lb., 65c; Light Brood Foundation, per pound . . . . . i ib.^ sgc; Hoffman Brood-frames No. 14 one-story Dovetailed hive, cover, body, bottom, frames, 8-frame— 10-frame—Dovetailed Supers complete without sections and starters-No. 2. 4Kxl% sections . . . . . . I o f.- No. 2B, 4i/ixlj^ sections .... l 8-irame: No. 2F, 4x5 sections . ..... j 10-frame: Ideal Bee-veil. 65c: by mall, 75c. Standard Smoker, 85c; by mail Si 10 Untested Italian Queens, one, SI.00; six, $5.50. Tested Queens, one, $1.50; six, $8.50 Dealers Everywhere. See Last Gleanings for List. Red Catalog, postpaid. Simplified Beekeeping, postpaid. 5 lbs., 64c; 50 lbs., 59c5 lbs., 57c; 50 lbs., 52c10, 85c; 100, 13.005, $7.00; 1

  

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May 25, 2011 - Beekeeping Congress

 

A veiled beekeeper participates in a hive inspection during the field visits of the 6th Caribbean Beekeeping Congress, facilitated by SGU's School of Veterinary Medicine.

 

Batihk Apiary

Golf Course, Grenada

are funny-looking.

An old Kodak slide featuring my sister and I and bees. We both had bee veils on and my sister is trying to eat honey from the comb through the veil...cute!

It was sad to hear of Kodak's troubles, my first camera was a Kodak instamatic -not the easiest camera to use, in fact I class it as a point and hope :-)

My uncle is going to start keeping bees this year - he recently built some new hive boxes, and I was playing around with the veil and smoker. I see some yummy honey in the future!

Identifier: americanapicultu03wenh

Title: The American apiculturist: a journal devoted to scientific and practical beekeeping

Year: 1883 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bee culture

Publisher: Wenham, Mass. S. M. Locke and co

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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ith smoker and THE AMERICAN APTCULTURIST. veil. Now, friends, you tliat havewritten to me for information andall others desiring it can, I think,from the above draw 3^our own con-clusions as to Avhat you can do inthe way of managing bees so as tobuild them here in fall and springand carry them north for the clovercrop. Ten years ago I would havethought it would paj?^ to do so, but,as now I am past forty years, Ihardly think it will. A. J. Goodwin, M. D. Neio Smyrna, Florida, Nov., 1884. the safe vtintering of bees. Dear Sir : This is one of the most impor-tant topics with which we as bee-keepers have to cope and my successin this regard has been such thatit may benefit your readers to con-sider carefully the following. Tn this communication I shallhope to supply some needed inform-ation regarding a properly con-structed hive and healthful food forbees as these are inseparaljly con-nected with success in winteringand no art or skill can remedy thedefect or mistakes in this particu-lar.

 

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The hive that I use is called theNew England No. 7 hive and oneupon which I have been employedfor a number of years and embodiesmany and oft-repeated experiments.The hive is constructed in sections ;the cap, two sections and the base.The brood-nest is disconnectedfrom the hive being separated there- from both beneath and at the sidesso that it can be removed by handwithout any disturbance of the outercase. The space between the brood-nest and the hive is packed duringthe entire year with buckwheat orIndia-wheat or dry sawdust or anymaterial that is dry and fine. Theobject of this packing is to protectthe bees from the extremes of bothheat and cold. The packing be-neath the brood-nest is serviceableduring winter in that it inclinesthe bees to seek the bottom of thehive (which is the warmest part ofit) instead of at the top. In thiscase when the bees drop from thecombs they do not die of exposurebut finding a place among the clus-ter are warmed and revived. It isalso an advantage to hav

  

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Judith was brave this morning and before I got there, she decided she was going to check out the monitor board unprotected by gloves or suit or veil. And she got stung, nothing dramatic though. Fact is, I did almost the same thing. You get so used to them. There I was, reaching right into what you see here with my bare hand, going for the hook to pull out the drawer when suddenly, as half a dozen bees crawled on my hand and I'm begin to think--hmm, probably not a good idea.

From Cornell University

 

Published before 1923

I spent a day in late May with a group of beekeepers from the 6th Caribbean Beekeeping Congress. Now I'm not afraid of a bee or two, but when I realized I was surrounded by 100,000+ honey bees...

 

Batihk Apiary

Golf Course, Grenada

Now I just need to get an outfit in her size so she can check on the hive in the pasture.

Identifier: beekeepingforcon00yate

Title: Beekeeping for Connecticut

Year: 1918 (1910s)

Authors: Yates, A. W

Subjects: Bee culture

Publisher: [New Haven] : Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation

  

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Figure 14. Junior Figure 15. Bee-glove with fingers.Smoker. (After the (After the A j Root c } A. I. Root Co.) Figure 16. TheVEILS. Alexander bee veil. .... (After the A. I. In addition to the smoker, a veil is necessary for Root Co.) the beginner, and possibly gloves for the hands.It is foolish for the novice to undertake to handle bees withoutproper protection. One type of veil is shown in figure 16 and aglove in figure 15. Hive Tool.Some kind of a hive tool is a necessity. The one illustrated infigure 17 is excellent, though a screwdriver will do. 432 connecticut experiment station bulletin 205. Comb Foundation.The comb foundation is a thin sheet of pure beeswax, shown infigure 18, embossed to imitate the base or septum of the naturalbuilt comb. The use of this is almost indispensable in securingstraight worker brood combs. For economy some beekeepers useonly starters, which are narrow strips about one inch wide. Thisresults in the building by-the bees of a considerable amount of u

  

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The farmers let us put on bee suits and interact with the bee hives. I had to switch my camera to live mode for the first time ever and watch the screen through a veil. I usually have a phobia about bees but the combination of the farmers and the bee suit made me feel relaxed. I just liked the feet.

I took this snap of one of my beehives the other day, but I was wearing a beesuit and veil and gloves at the time, so it was pure accident that I caught the queen in this photo. I didn't see her until I processed the shot on my computer. This is a newly-mated black queen that has just started to lay eggs a few days earlier. It's a wonderful time of year for beekeepers.

 

If you haven't seen her, she is on the bottom edge of the image, and her abdomen is much longer than her worker-daughters around her.

  

Newly mated Black Queen

New frames are fun! Plastic foundation Rocks!

The cone has small drywall screws holding it up to to the wood. Additional screws along the bottom of the board as close to the brick as possible warped the screen in such a way that it was a pretty close fit all the way around. Liberal use of duct tape and steel wool should do the rest. I left the homeowner more steel wool, a spare veil, and spare gloves, and instructions: Keep checking the duct tape, and plug up any other entrances, inside or out, with steel wool.

Some of the items I brought to share with the Home Ec class. They enjoyed trying on the suit and veil; and squeezing the smoker.

I like this man's bee veil and hat. I've never seen one like this before.

One of father's little helpers.

Side view of Hive #1 monitor board. I didn't gear up to slide this out for a look-see, and even though I went gently and took all of 15 seconds to see what I could see, still a cheeky little police bee decided it was going to give me a warning about getting any closer and divebombed me right in the middle of the forehead with a big bump. I heeded the warning before it escalated into stinging and withdrew posthaste to get my suit and veil, before going any further.

Nadine with honey dripping down her fly veil after Marty conned her into eating the honey through the veil

...Anna and Em. Check out Anna's handmade bee veil! So very cool and chic! :-D

I was a little over prepared, as I'd never done this before. I probably didn't actually need the suit and veil, but I had them, so I thought I'd use 'em.

Title: The American apiculturist: a journal devoted to scientific and practical beekeeping

Identifier: americanapicultu10wenh

Year: 1883 (1880s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bee culture

Publisher: Wenham, Mass. S. M. Locke and co

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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THE AMERICAN APICULTURIST. 115 ADVERTISEMENTS. I have prepared an illustrated cir- cular which will be mailed free to all who desire my Italian, golden Car- niolan and Punic queens. Punic queens reared from imported moth- ers only. Prices of hives, smokers, drone-traps, automatic swarmers, foundation, and in fact of all nec- essary articles used in the apiary given in my list.—IIenky E. Allky, Wenham,3Ltss. THE LONE STAR APIARY ^ soils queens ;mil bees at tlie following lovv prices: Untested Queens bel'ore June 1st at $1.00. or $10 per dozen; altei- dune l>t, To ots. each or $8 per dozen. Tesied Queens belorc June 1st, $1 i")0 or $15 per doz.; .dier June 1st, $1 each or$iOper doz. Tbiee ininie nuclei and Untested Q\ieen $2.00. Two IVame nuclei and Untested Qneen'

 

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$1.50. Full colonies, $6 before June 1st; after $5, (in Langstrotli hives.) My bees ai'e liied iVoni tlie best blood procurable in tliis m imported niotliers are wanted it must be stated in the or- der, otherwise American Ijred stocii will lie sent. OTTO J. E. UEBAN, Proprietor, Thorndale, Texas. S4JJ BEE-KEEPER! Send for a free sample copy of KOOT'S hand- somely illustrated, Semi-Monthly. 3ii-page, GliEANIJN GS IN BEE-CULTURE, (*l.uo a year) and lii.s .5-2-page illuslraled catalogue of BEE-KEEPERS' SUPPLIES 4fg-FREE lor your name and address on a lios- t:d. Hi.- ABC of BPlE-CUf/!UBE. 40U itoublecolumn )iages, piice $l.-.>o, is just tlie book for YOU. /address A. I. ROOT, THE BEE-MAN, Medina, Ohio. HALF A MILLION SECTIONS. Bees, Hives, Queens, Comb Foundation, Smokers, etc , etc Alnsi be ^(>bl. send for price list to E T. FLANAGAN, Box 783, Belleville, Saint Clair County, Illinois. Mention tliis paper. Qanrf t^H P+e For my Book, entitled—"A OcllU vJU \^lb. Year Among the Bees,"— lU pages, cloth bound. Address DR. C. C. MILLER, MARENGO, ILL. PLYMOUTH BOCK FOWLS. Pure barred Plymouth Kotk Cockrels, $L25 to .'i*3.00 each. Eggs from stock that will produce Prize Winners, $1.25 per dozen. L. C. AXTELL, KosEviLLE, III, A FREE TICKET TO THE TV^ORLD'S F^IR would surprise every Beekeeper; so will our Catalogue of Apiarian Su))plie.s, for it contains many things to be found in no other. QUEENS, BEES, HIVES, best quality, best cpieens, best bees,—in fact the best kind oi'supplies. 4:registered:=" Send for Free Catalogne to-day. R. STRATTON & SON, Mention API. HAZARDVILLE, CoNN. COMB FOUNDATION, WE are beadquarlers for IT. Write for spec- ial.discount; our prices c.iiuKit be equal- led. VVe luniish EVERYTHING used in the apiary. A CHAFF HIVE two stories, including 9 frames and two section cases, nailed for $1.95. Circular on application. I. J. STBINGHAM, 92 Barclay St., Xew York. LOOK! LOOK! T inaniifactiire tlie Moi>el nEE-HiVE, Frames Sections, Smokers, Honey Cans, Shu-ping Cases, ]$ee Veils, etc., etc. Also breeder of Italian Queens. «:registered:=-Send for price list. Address ■W. K. STIRLING, Box 9. KoNU Eau, Ont.

  

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