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After inspecting his three bee colonies, Michael Jaross takes off his beekeeping veil and exposes his face to the warm sun.

Fully protected against bee and cedar pollen.

Spring is here and I've received two packages of bees from Knight Family Honey to rebuild my apiary. Unfortunately over pre-winter we lost both our hives. These are Carniolan bees, and I'm excited to get to know them better this year.

Bill Pike has been keeping bees since he was 12 yrs old, he says. He's an old guy now. He just set out fifty hives at different yards around Salem Ridge, Avalanche and Coon Valley. He met the bees coming across Wisconsin in a semi-truck delivering boxes of swarms, each with its queen in her own special container, to bee keepers across the state.

 

He likes the way the bees look this year.

 

The bee swarms and queen are placed in the lowest box of the stack. They have some honey to keep them until there are more blooming flowers, but we have seen bees flying in and out during the last spring snow falls. The upper boxes are the "supers" or the boxes where the bees pack in the excess of honey they make. As the summer progresses, Bill comes by in his bee-man veil and with a little hand-held smoker. He opens the boxes, puffing in a little smoke, to monitor the honey production. He will add more supers to the boxes of the most productive bees. By the end of the season, there might be five boxes stacked on top of each other.

 

Why are his boxes so colorful? The colors on the boxes help the new bees not to drift over into the wrong hive when they come back from gathering. Bill buys cans of mixed wrong-color paint that people have returned to Walmart, repainting his boxes in the winter time, when he isn't operating his ham radio. He's a ham in the winter.

  

I've been on a course with the local Beekeeping Association for a couple of month, and we've finished in the class room and finally got to hives! We all had a go and inspecting the frames, looking for the various things (nectar, pollen, honey, eggs, larvae, sealed brood, the queen etc). I even had a go at handling the frames with no gloves on, it feels much nicer, and these bees are very calm so I didn't get stung!

 

I was hoping to have got some of my own bees by now, but the spring in the UK has been cold and slow to arrive, so the bees won't be ready for another month or 6 weeks. But I'd prefer to get them when they're ready, rather under strength and liable to failure.

 

One of the hives was very heathly looking, and we even think there was two queens present (supercedure), the other was a little further behind, less brood, less stored honey, but still looking ok. Tomorrow I'm going back for another session, and we'll be marking the queens, so we'll see for sure if there are two queens.

Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu40medi

Title: Gleanings in bee culture

Year: 1874 (1870s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bees Bee culture

Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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used a smoker.It is not necessary to blow smoke over thebees continually; but very often a littlewhiff of smoke at the right time prevents ageneral uprising, and enables the operatorto go right on with the work without lettingthe bees find out they can have things alltheir own way.—Ed.] BEEKEEPING AND FRUITGROWING BY C. KOPPENHAFER I have a fruit farm of 7l4 acres in the vil-lage of Brownhelm Center, located amongthe trees as shown in Fig. 1. There areover forty colonies of bees which I find agreat help in fertilizing the fruit-blossoms.In 1910 I secured $200 worth of fine honeyfrom 23 colonies, spring count. Some of my neighbors across the street aremaking me a lot of trouble, and threaten-ing to compel me to get rid of my bees. Iam not able to make them believe that thebees do not spoil their fruit, nor that theyare of any benefit in the spring in fertilizingthe blossoms. One man in particular saidit was an imposition to the neighborhood tohave the bees there; and if there was any

 

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Mr. and Mrs. (. Koppenhafer and their family of honey-eaters. Gleanings in Bee Culture law to make me dispose of them he wouldtake advantage of it. However, for all thatwe are friends so far as I know. He was ex-asperated only when the grapes and plumswere ripe. For a few days at that time thebirds were very bad; and as the bees hadnothing else to do, they of course were trou-blesome. I have over forty plum trees my-self, and also some grapes, and I know wellenough that it is not the bees that do themischief. It is also claimed that the beesdamage the peaches; but I have my beesright in the peach orchard, and I find thatthey never work on any except the peckedor decayed ones. I picked all of my peacheswithout a veil, and never get stung. The other illustration shows you my fam-ily of honey-eating boys. I think the useof honey in the home avoids many a doctorbill. My wife is also of the same opinion.She takes great interest in the bees, andoften hives swarms when I am not at home. Amhe

  

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Bees prefer light colors, which is why beesuits are white.

 

I removed my rings in case I got stung on a finger. I wore no leather because they don't like the smell of leather ... but the long-gauntleted gloves made specifically for beekeeping are made of goatskin. They fit snugly so you lose as little dexterity as possible. Mine could be snugger but it's bad enough I have to wear pants. The constriction of tight gloves would exacerbate my claustrophobia.

  

I bought the helmet (not a hat because it has an inner structure like a hard hat's) that looks like a pith helmet, and the netting over the top called a veil.

 

I repurposed a pair of hiking pants (that unzip into shorts) that I haven't worn in yonks (I prefer skirts) and a long-sleeved tee-shirt from the Gap from 1987. I wore it with my big denim skirt, a lot. It is worn to an exquisite softness and packed with memory. I'm glad to give it a second life as a beekeeping shirt.

The farmers let us put on bee suits and interact with the bee hives. I had to switch my camera to live mode for the first time ever and watch the screen through a veil. I usually have a phobia about bees but the combination of the farmers and the bee suit made me feel relaxed.

 

This is what a bee looks like while she's gorging. When they smoke the hive, the bees think that it's on fire and that they need to fill up on honey and leave. So they get so gorged that they can't sting you even if they wanted to.

May 25, 2011 - Beekeeping Congress

 

A veiled beekeeper participates in a hive inspection during the field visits of the 6th Caribbean Beekeeping Congress, facilitated by SGU's School of Veterinary Medicine.

 

Batihk Apiary

Golf Course, Grenada

are funny-looking.

Title: American bee journal

Identifier: americanbeejourn6061hami

Year: 1861 (1860s)

Authors:

Subjects: Bee culture; Bees

Publisher: [Hamilton, Ill. , etc. , Dadant & Sons]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

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86 AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL March may be lowered and queen-cells looked for by hand mirror between the bottom-bars of the frames. 2. In a double brood chamber, lifting the back part of the upper half and looking for the queen-cells between the bottom bars. 3. having a slot between two horizontal bars in one of the combs on which cells will be built. By treating only those colo- nies that are preparing to swarm, the loss of morale will be further re- duced and the work of treatment re- duced, and spread over a longer time. Out of eighteen colonies that were requeened at the central apiary by the system method described above, four swarmed or attempted to swarm. It was found, however, that in three of these cases there was a third queen-cell that had been missed when the cells were de- stroyed, and in the other (attempt- ed only) a drone pupa was found in a third queen-cell. When the white honey crop was removed in early August ten colonies out of the eighteen had young queens and brood on both sides, four on one side only, and four on neither side. In some cases virgins were run in in- stead of cells left or given, and in four cases the old queen was placed in the top super, with a separate en- trance. Out of these four colonies two failed to requeen on either side. It is a question whether the old queen is worth keeping unless she is a particularly good one, except for maintaining morale. Honey Produced at the Central Apiary, 1919, Spring Count Six 10-frame hives, 2 queens, win- tered in cellar, requeened by system, average yield each, 189 pounds. Eleven 10-frame hives, 1 queen, wintered in cellar, queen-cells de- stroyed weekly, average yield each, 178 pounds. Eight 10-frame hives, 1 queen, win- tered outside, queen-cells destroyed weekly, average yield each, 167 pounds. Four 12-frame hives, 2 queens, win- tered in cellar, requeened by sys- tem, average yield each, 228 pounds. It is hardly expected that outside ■wintering will be so satisfactory for hives containing two queens as cel- lar wintering, but it is being tried in some specially designed 4-colony cases. Another method of wintering that is being tried and seems more hopeful for outapiaries in the north, is to place the colonies in a building (it can be a portable honey-extract- ing house about 10 feet by 12 feet), surrounded with a thick layer of straw, the windows to be left open to prevent the sun from heating the building in early spring, and screened with cotton to keep out snow and rain. The use of the ex- tracting house as a house-apiary in winter has been found a good plan for a small apiary of regular colonies. The contention that this two- queen system may not build up the colonics strong enough for the honey flow is met by the following considerations: 1. A hive that has been requeened with two queens in July goes into winter considerably stronger in young bees than one containing only one queen. 2. The colonies in which the queen fails on one side reach full strength for win- ter and can spare bees or brood in spring to strengthen the weakest of the half colonies. 3. The half colo- nies can be united at the be- ginning of the honey flow if neces- sary. This was done in four out of the six 10-frame hives at the cen- tral apiary in 1919. 4. The evidence has shown that when the principal honey flow does not begin until about four weeks after the com- mencement of the swarming season, as at Ottawa in 1918, the half colo- nies will build up plenty strong enough for it. At present the two-queen system is recommended only for localities like Ottawa, that have the last- named condition in average years but some of its developments and modifications are expected to have a wider application. It is expected to produce particularly good results in places where the principal honey flow comes from fireweed or other July sources, and with the larger hives that are now receiving in-

 

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creased attention, the 10-frame Jum- bo and the 12-frame Langstroth. It also includes the essential features of the modern treatment of Euro- pean foulbrood. (In the April, 1919, American Bee Journal, Mr. Siaden describes this system. The bees on the two sides of the division board meet in the su- pers through queen excluders until the last super is removed in the fall. From this time on the two divisions are entirely separated.—Ed.) Bees in China Mr. Frank C. Pellett: Dear Sir: I am an amateur apiarist with a colony of 20 hives of Chinese bees. The native queen is, however, not as good as the Italian, and I have ordered six Italian queens from Cali- fornia, but they have not been deliv- ered yet. I intend to replace all my Chinese queens with Italians next year. I enclose two snapshots which may interest you. One shows 4 of my colonies housed in the English ("W. B. C") hive. The climate here is sub- tropical in summer and the ther- mometer ranges from 80 to 106 de- grees in the shade; so a shed is abso- lutely necessary. Our winters are bit- terly cold, but I do not move my hives into a cellar—they remain in the open the year around. All my colonies were purchased from Chinese farmers and I had con- siderable trouble in obtaining them, as the natives regard bees as "joss pidgin," i. e., symbols of good fortune. They think whenever they sell bees they are selling away their "good luck." They keep bees in baskets generally, suspended against a wall, and one of my pictures shows a cou- ple of these basket hives after I had transferred the colonies. Occasionally bees are housed in wooden tubs or boxes. They know nothing about modern beekeeping methods. The Chinese bee is the gentlest of its species, rarely using its sting. I never use a smoker, wear a veil or gloves when handling my colonies. The first book I ever read on bee- keeping was the one you wrote, "Pro- ductive Beekeeping," one of the Lip- pincott series. I purchased this in China. C. G. GOLDING. Chinese basket hives. Wiring Frames In the June issue of the American Bee Journal E. S. Miller gives a method of wiring frames that ap- pealed to me very much, and I found on trial, that he was on the track of a good thing. Ai'tcr a little experi- menting, I believe I have evolved an improvement of !iis method. I wire the frames in the usual man- ner, leaving slack in the third wire from the top, so that the wire can be carried up to the center of the top- liar and wound around the head of a five-eighth inch cigar box nail that is driven in at the edge of the large saw kerf or wedge pocket, as the case may be, as Mr. Miller does, and then

  

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

An old Kodak slide featuring my sister and I and bees. We both had bee veils on and my sister is trying to eat honey from the comb through the veil...cute!

It was sad to hear of Kodak's troubles, my first camera was a Kodak instamatic -not the easiest camera to use, in fact I class it as a point and hope :-)

A veiled beekeeper participates in a hive inspection during the field visits of the 6th Caribbean Beekeeping Congress.

 

Batihk Apiary

Golf Course, Grenada

I spent a day in late May with a group of beekeepers from the 6th Caribbean Beekeeping Congress. Now I'm not afraid of a bee or two, but when I realized I was surrounded by 100,000+ honey bees...

 

Batihk Apiary

Golf Course, Grenada

A beekeeper in veil at apiary among hives. Summer, sunny day. Russian Far East, Primorye.

New frames are fun! Plastic foundation Rocks!

Another little helper eager to care for the bees. This little helper is also the owner of his own hive.

Shortly after I shot this, the bees from one of the hives got all irritated and they made their way over to the truck. With Mark's door still open, there were about 20 that buzzed in, thank goodness I was fully suited and veiled. These bees lasted about 15 seconds. The other bees swooped in and fought and killed them. Guess they didn't like the new scent in their territory. Queenie was smart enough to move down where they couldn't reach her in her little cage. :-(

The Uniform Project Little Black Dress.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Bee Research Laboratory research entomologists let, from left, Brendan (3) and Owen Baynard (5) wear veiled hats and hold a beekeeping smoker tool, while next to a window box planter with flowers that help support pollinators such as bees, during the 138th White House Easter Egg Roll, Monday, March 28, 2016, in Washington, D.C. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) urged Americans of all ages to “Plant a Window Box for Pollinators” by using a new, free online tool available at the redesigned People’s Garden Initiative website (www.usda.gov/peoplesgarden).

More than 35,000 people are in attendance at the White House South Lawn for the games, stories, music, cooking demonstrations and traditional egg rolls. The official theme of the event is "Lets Celebrate” in celebration of the final Easter Egg Roll of the Obama Administration. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

 

Side view of Hive #1 monitor board. I didn't gear up to slide this out for a look-see, and even though I went gently and took all of 15 seconds to see what I could see, still a cheeky little police bee decided it was going to give me a warning about getting any closer and divebombed me right in the middle of the forehead with a big bump. I heeded the warning before it escalated into stinging and withdrew posthaste to get my suit and veil, before going any further.

Ready to go to the hives, he puts on his hat - handwoven of reeds and his veil.

However, you meet for the beekeeper's talk at a certain spot, and he (that's him) walks you down a road to an enclosure with 4 beehives in it. You go inside the fence with him and he gives a really amazing hour-long discussion of bees and beekeeping. Here, he's taken the lid off of the hive to which we're going to be introduced. Please note - no white outfit, a minimal veil on his hat, no smoke...

Nadine with honey dripping down her fly veil after Marty conned her into eating the honey through the veil

I have no idea how the veil is supposed to be bee-tight. Sew it to my shirt? Rich suggested wearing the veil inside the shirt, but that would allow bees close to the skin of the neck, which I would prefer to avoid. Probably it attaches better to an actual beesuit. Anyway, it wasn't bee-tight, and I took it off four or five times to get bees away from my face. Of the dozen or more who climbed inside the veil, only one stung me, on the neck, and if I had fully removed the veil rather than lift it, we probably could have gone our separate ways without pain.

 

Neither sting hurt much, I was glad to remember, though I didn't get the sac out of my neck quickly enough so grew an itchy welt.

Keith in his veil getting things ready to take off a super full of honey.

At the age of 80 Mr Smith can handle his bees without gloves, though he does use a veil.

At Liam's backyard apiary we get veiled and suited up to handle his bees. The backyard is comprised of a bee-friendly array of native plants and other bee nesting areas. Behind us is the chicken coop where extra drone brood are tossed for them to gobble up!

Seen from inside a beekeeping veiled hat, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Bee Research Laboratory (retired) Entomologist I. Barton Smith helps guests learn about bees and beekeeping by inviting them to wear a beekeeper’s protective net hat, during the 138th White House Easter Egg Roll, Monday, March 28, 2016, in Washington, D.C. Behind him is the White House apiary and an elevated bee colony. More than 35,000 people are in attendance at the White House South Lawn for the games, stories, music, cooking demonstrations and traditional egg rolls. The official theme of the event is "Lets Celebrate” in celebration of the final Easter Egg Roll of the Obama Administration. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

Seen from inside a beekeeping veiled hat, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Bee Research Laboratory research entomologists display the tools of beekeepers, during the 138th White House Easter Egg Roll, Monday, March 28, 2016 in Washington, D.C. On the table are a bee brush, left, to gently brush bees off honey laden honeycomb frames, center. Also displayed is a veiled hat, part of the protective clothing used by beekeepers. More than 35,000 people are in attendance at the White House South Lawn for the games, stories, music, cooking demonstrations and traditional egg rolls. The official theme of the event is "Lets Celebrate” in celebration of the final Easter Egg Roll of the Obama Administration. USDA Photo by Lance Cheung.

They were fascinated by it for some reason

This is done to hypnotize the bees into obeying her will. The slow rhythmic swooshing of the veils lulls the bees into a quiescent and suggestible state.

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