flickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged Bachiacca

Il Bachiacca. (Francesco Ubertini) 1494-1557. Florence. Marie Madeleine. Vers 1530. Florence. Palazzo Pitti. Galleria Palatina.

 

Il Bachiacca. (Francesco Ubertini) 1494-1557. Florence. Mary Magdalene. 1530. Florence. Palazzo Pitti. Palatine Gallery.

Bachiacca (Francesco d'Ubertino Verdi) (Italian, Florentine, 1494–1557)

 

Title

Madonna and Child

 

Date

possibly early 1520s

 

Medium

Oil and gold on wood

 

Dimensions

34 1/4 x 26 1/2 in. (87 x 67.3 cm)

 

Bacchiacca (Florentine, 1494-1557) - The Flagellation of Christ.

Detail.

1512-1515.

Detail.

Samuel H. Kress Collection, 1952.

National Gallery of Art, Washington DC.

 

Francesco d'Ubertino Verdi, called Bachiacca [also known as Francesco Ubertini, il Bacchiacca] (1494–1557) was an Italian painter of the Renaissance whose work is characteristic of the Florentine Mannerist style.

Bachiacca was born and baptized in Florence on March 1, 1494 [modern] and died there on October 5, 1557. He apprenticed in Perugino's Florentine studio, and by 1515 began to collaborate with Andrea del Sarto, Jacopo Pontormo and Francesco Granacci on the decoration of cassone (chest), spalliera (wainscot), and other painted furnishings for the bedroom of Pierfrancesco Borgherini and Margherita Acciauoli. In 1523, he again participated with Andrea del Sarto, Franciabigio and Pontormo in the decoration of the antechamber of Giovanni Benintendi. While he established a reputation as a painter of predellas and small cabinet pictures, he eventually expanded his output to include large altarpieces, such as the Beheading of St. John the Baptist, now in Berlin.

In 1540, Bachiacca became an artist at the court of Duke Cosimo I de' Medici (reg. 1537-1574) and Duchess Eleanor of Toledo. In this capacity, Bachiacca was a colleague and peer of the most important Florentine artists of the age, including Pontormo, Bronzino, Francesco Salviati, Tribolo, Benvenuto Cellini, Baccio Bandinelli, and his in-law Giovanni Battista del Tasso. Bachiacca's first major commission was to paint the walls and ceiling of the duke's private study with plants, animals and a landscape, which remain an important testimony of Cosimo's interest in botany and the natural sciences. Bachiacca also made cartoons for two series of tapestries, the Grotesque Spalliere (1545–49) and the Months (1550–1553), which were woven by the newly founded Medici tapestry works. Francesco signed only one known work, the decoration of a Terrace for the duchess and her children, with his abbreviated Christian name and nickname: "FRANC. BACHI. FACI." All of these works either contain carefully observed illustrations of nature or display the artist's trademark method and style, in which Bachiacca combines figures, exotic costumes and other motifs acquired from Italian artists and German and Netherlandish prints into entirely new compositions. These cosmopolitan assemblages exhibited the most praiseworthy elements of both northern and southern European Renaissance art, which appealed to their courtly clientele.

As a court painter, he created Saint Sebastian during the 1530s-1540s, illustrating the death of Saint Sebastian, a Christian nobleman condemned to death by the Roman emperor Diocletian. Originally it is theorized that the panel may have functioned as a section to an altarpiece.

Bachiacca belonged to a family of at least five, and possibly as many as eight artists. His father Ubertino di Bartolomeo (ca. 1446/7-1505) was a goldsmith, his older brother Bartolomeo d'Ubertino Verdi (aka Baccio 1484-c.1526/9) was a painter, and his younger brother Antonio d'Ubertino Verdi (1499–1572)—who also called himself Bachiacca—was both an embroiderer and painter. Francesco's son Carlo di Francesco Verdi (-1569) painted and Antonio's son Bartolomeo d'Antonio Verdi (aka Baccino -1600) worked as an embroiderer. This latter generation probably continued to produce paintings and embroideries after Bachiacca's death and until the Verdi family extinguished about the year 1600.

(Wikipedia Encyclopedia)

  

Here you find a link to the website of the National Gallery of Art::

www.nga.gov/

 

See also my list of best and worst museums in the world:

www.flickr.com/photos/menesje/4059308291/

And here you find my list of best and worst museums in Holland:

www.flickr.com/photos/menesje/4059604700/

 

Joseph Being Taken to Prison by Francesco Granacci

 

Painted around 1515, together with works by Andrea del Sarto, Pontormoand Bachiacca, for Pier Francesco Borgherini's bedroom.

 

Oil on canvas

 

Height: 95 cm (37.4 in). Width: 224 cm (88.2 in).

  

The Uffizi Gallery (Italian: Galleria degli Uffizi), is one of the main museums in Florence, and among the oldest and most famous art museums of Europe.

 

The building of Uffizi was begun by Giorgio Vasari in 1560 for Cosimo I de' Medici so as to accommodate the offices of the Florentine magistrates, hence the name uffizi, "offices". The construction was later continued by Alfonso Parigi and Bernardo Buontalenti and completed in 1581. The cortile (internal courtyard) is so long and narrow, and open to the Arno at its far end through a Doric screen that articulates the space without blocking it, that architectural historians treat it as the first regularized streetscape of Europe.

 

The building is an artwork itself, of Renaissance architecture and decoration, which walls and ceilings are painted and decorated by frescoes, its presents either magnificent views of Florence from its wide windows.

  

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uffizi

[This photograph was identify the painter (316)]

.

Francesco Granacci (Francesco di Andrea di Marco) Italian Villamagna 1469-1543 Florence

Detail from: Madonna and Child

Oil on wood

Granacci was inspired by a sculpture in low relief carved by either Donatello or Michelangelo for this composition. He knew Michelangelo as a childhood friend who likewise studied in Domenico Ghirlandaio’s workshop and in the famous sculpture garden presided over by Lorenzo de’ Medici. Granacci makes the work more painterly by placing the figures in a light-filled room against a landscape background. The same relief inspired a work by the artist Bachiacca also in the Metropolitan Museum.

Gift of Mario and Dianne Modestini, in memory of Theodore Rousseau, 2000

2000.420

 

From the placard: Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Enjoy these holidays! Identify the painter returns Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Regards and kind thoughts to all... Regan

 

Francesco Granacci (Francesco di Andrea di Marco) Italian Villamagna 1469-1543 Florence

Madonna and Child

Oil on wood

Granacci was inspired by a sculpture in low relief carved by either Donatello or Michelangelo for this composition. He knew Michelangelo as a childhood friend who likewise studied in Domenico Ghirlandaio’s workshop and in the famous sculpture garden presided over by Lorenzo de’ Medici. Granacci makes the work more painterly by placing the figures in a light-filled room against a landscape background. The same relief inspired a work by the artist Bachiacca also in the Metropolitan Museum.

Gift of Mario and Dianne Modestini, in memory of Theodore Rousseau, 2000

2000.420

 

From the placard: Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

Madonna and Child Bachiacca (Francesco d'Ubertino Verdi) and

Satyr Antico (Pier Jacopo Alari Bonacolsi)

Francesco Ubertini ( called II Bachiacca) Italian 1494-1557

The Conversion of St. Paul , 1530-1535

Oil on Panel

This painting shows the conversion of St. Paul the Apostle on the road to Damascus, one of the most important stories of the Christian faith. Paul, originally called Saul the Pharisee, was one of the great enemies and persecutors of early Christians. According to the New Testament Acts of the Apostles, Paul obtained permission from the highest court to seize Jews who had converted to Christianity in Damascus and take them back to Jerusalem, where they would be examples of the terrible fate that awaited converts. He was almost at the end of his journey when he and his men were blinded by a bright light from heaven. He heard the voice of Christ saying to him, “Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?” Saul, struck with awe, cried out, asking what he could do to repair the past. He converted to Christianity and became a minister and preacher.

In this painting, Paul and his large company of soldiers are shown traveling through a mountainous landscape on the road to Damascus. Struck by God’s blinding light at the upper right, they gaze at the sky with wonder and fear. In the center foreground, Paul remains firmly astride his horse and raises a hand to shield his eyes; the shock of the conversion, thought, forces the horse to the ground.

Marion Stratton Gould Fund 54.2

From the placard: Memorial Art Gallery

  

.

mag.rochester.edu/

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francesco_Bacchiacca

www.virtualuffizi.com/biography/Francesco-Ubertini-called...

  

From the Sotheby's Catalogue:

 

FRANCESCO UBERTINI, DETTO BACHIACCA

FIRENZE 1494-1557

 

RITRATTO DI DAMA COL LIUTO

 

CATALOGUE NOTE

 

Questo magnifico Ritratto di Dama col liuto è uno dei più alti esempi di ritrattistica rinascimentale. La tradizionale attribuzione al Bachiacca, che recava quando ancora era parte della collezione Contini - per confronto con il Suonatore di Liuto già Kress ora al New Orleans Museum of Art - non sembra più essere accettabile, ma ciò non intacca la posizione di assoluta rilevanza che il nostro quadro occupa nell'ambito dello svilupparsi del genere fra il terzo e il quarto decennio del Cinquecento.

Per quanto una forte attenzione disegnativa, specie nella definizione del volto e degli scorci perfettamente compiuti delle mani, sembrino ricondurlo all'ambito toscano, non spiccati risultano gli elementi caratteristici del primo manierismo fiorentino che possano apparentare la nostra tavola al contesto mediceo, così profondamente intriso della lezione ancora raffaellesca di Andrea del Sarto e dell'eleganza estenuata del Bronzino. Per accertarne l'autografia bisognerà perciò spostarsi leggermente verso nord e avvicinarsi al pittore lucchese Paolo Zacchia il Vecchio (Zacchia di Antonio da Vezzano, detto Zacchia il vecchio, Lucca ca 1500-Lucca post 1561), la cui formazione nella bottega di Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio non nega queste origini, ma si distingue dalla maniera di compagni quali il Puligo o Michele di Ridolfo proprio per la grafia asciutta e incisiva, quasi scultorea, del suo fare pittorico. Si approssimano, infatti, al nostro ritratto tanto il volto della Vergine nella pala della chiesa di S. Lorenzo in cappella a Lucca - firmata e datata - quanto alcuni suoi splendidi ritratti su tavola che ne testimoniano la maestria nel genere, quali il Musico siglato del Louvre, il Gentiluomo col cappello di Villa Mansi o infine la Dama coll'ermellino già Colnaghi, tutti resi noti da John Pope-Hennessy in un magistrale articolo del lontano 1938. Di Zacchia non si conoscono ritratti all'aperto e questo ci priva di un ulteriore elemento di raffronto (v. J. Pope-Hennessy, "Zacchia il Vecchio and Lorenzo Zacchia" in Burlington Magazine, n. CDXXII, Maggio 1938, pp. 213-223, plate II, A-B-C). Proprio l'accento nordico del paesaggio, infatti, come anche il copricapo alla turca indossato dalla Dama - qui ingentilito da un fiore - indussero a suo tempo il redattore della notifica ad avvicinare il nostro dipinto al contesto veneto-padano e più specificamente alla maniera dell''"Amico friulano del Dosso" coniato da Longhi, ma quest'analogia non appare calzante per l'assenza di quella vaghezza soffusa e irreale, quasi magica, che contraddistingue la natura del Dosso e più in generale di tutto il paesaggio emiliano (v. R. Longhi, "L'Amico friulano del Dosso" in Paragone, 131, 1960, pp. 3-9). Molto più calzante appare invece il confronto con il cosiddetto Ritratto di Alda Gambara di proprietà dello Stato italiano, a suo tempo attribuito dalla Gregori ad Altobello Melone, la cui autografia andrà forse rivista alla luce proprio di queste assonanze (v. M. Gregori, "Altobello, il Romanino e il '500 cremonese" in Paragone, 93, 1957, pp. 16-40, tav. 15a).

Comunque si voglia risolvere la questione attribuzionistica, la tangenza della nostra Dama col Liuto con tante componenti essenziali per lo sviluppo di una ritrattistica rinascimentale, dal giorgionismo al manierismo toscano del Bronzino, la eleva a tassello importante in questo panorama, collocandola da un punto di vista cronologico intorno agli anni Trenta del Cinquecento.

  

Il dipinto è stato dichiarato di particolare interesse storico artistico con Decreto Ministeriale in data 29 Giugno 1997 (come Amico friulano del Dosso).

 

Please note that this lot has been "notified" with a Ministerial Decree dated 29th June 1997. The Ministry has declared its importance in the context of the Italian cultural patrimony. The lot cannot be exported outside Italy.

From the Sotheby's Catalogue:

 

FRANCESCO UBERTINI, DETTO BACHIACCA

FIRENZE 1494-1557

 

RITRATTO DI DAMA COL LIUTO

 

CATALOGUE NOTE

 

Questo magnifico Ritratto di Dama col liuto è uno dei più alti esempi di ritrattistica rinascimentale. La tradizionale attribuzione al Bachiacca, che recava quando ancora era parte della collezione Contini - per confronto con il Suonatore di Liuto già Kress ora al New Orleans Museum of Art - non sembra più essere accettabile, ma ciò non intacca la posizione di assoluta rilevanza che il nostro quadro occupa nell'ambito dello svilupparsi del genere fra il terzo e il quarto decennio del Cinquecento.

Per quanto una forte attenzione disegnativa, specie nella definizione del volto e degli scorci perfettamente compiuti delle mani, sembrino ricondurlo all'ambito toscano, non spiccati risultano gli elementi caratteristici del primo manierismo fiorentino che possano apparentare la nostra tavola al contesto mediceo, così profondamente intriso della lezione ancora raffaellesca di Andrea del Sarto e dell'eleganza estenuata del Bronzino. Per accertarne l'autografia bisognerà perciò spostarsi leggermente verso nord e avvicinarsi al pittore lucchese Paolo Zacchia il Vecchio (Zacchia di Antonio da Vezzano, detto Zacchia il vecchio, Lucca ca 1500-Lucca post 1561), la cui formazione nella bottega di Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio non nega queste origini, ma si distingue dalla maniera di compagni quali il Puligo o Michele di Ridolfo proprio per la grafia asciutta e incisiva, quasi scultorea, del suo fare pittorico. Si approssimano, infatti, al nostro ritratto tanto il volto della Vergine nella pala della chiesa di S. Lorenzo in cappella a Lucca - firmata e datata - quanto alcuni suoi splendidi ritratti su tavola che ne testimoniano la maestria nel genere, quali il Musico siglato del Louvre, il Gentiluomo col cappello di Villa Mansi o infine la Dama coll'ermellino già Colnaghi, tutti resi noti da John Pope-Hennessy in un magistrale articolo del lontano 1938. Di Zacchia non si conoscono ritratti all'aperto e questo ci priva di un ulteriore elemento di raffronto (v. J. Pope-Hennessy, "Zacchia il Vecchio and Lorenzo Zacchia" in Burlington Magazine, n. CDXXII, Maggio 1938, pp. 213-223, plate II, A-B-C). Proprio l'accento nordico del paesaggio, infatti, come anche il copricapo alla turca indossato dalla Dama - qui ingentilito da un fiore - indussero a suo tempo il redattore della notifica ad avvicinare il nostro dipinto al contesto veneto-padano e più specificamente alla maniera dell''"Amico friulano del Dosso" coniato da Longhi, ma quest'analogia non appare calzante per l'assenza di quella vaghezza soffusa e irreale, quasi magica, che contraddistingue la natura del Dosso e più in generale di tutto il paesaggio emiliano (v. R. Longhi, "L'Amico friulano del Dosso" in Paragone, 131, 1960, pp. 3-9). Molto più calzante appare invece il confronto con il cosiddetto Ritratto di Alda Gambara di proprietà dello Stato italiano, a suo tempo attribuito dalla Gregori ad Altobello Melone, la cui autografia andrà forse rivista alla luce proprio di queste assonanze (v. M. Gregori, "Altobello, il Romanino e il '500 cremonese" in Paragone, 93, 1957, pp. 16-40, tav. 15a).

Comunque si voglia risolvere la questione attribuzionistica, la tangenza della nostra Dama col Liuto con tante componenti essenziali per lo sviluppo di una ritrattistica rinascimentale, dal giorgionismo al manierismo toscano del Bronzino, la eleva a tassello importante in questo panorama, collocandola da un punto di vista cronologico intorno agli anni Trenta del Cinquecento.

  

Il dipinto è stato dichiarato di particolare interesse storico artistico con Decreto Ministeriale in data 29 Giugno 1997 (come Amico friulano del Dosso).

 

Please note that this lot has been "notified" with a Ministerial Decree dated 29th June 1997. The Ministry has declared its importance in the context of the Italian cultural patrimony. The lot cannot be exported outside Italy.

Artist: Francesco d'Ubertino Verdi, called Bachiacca

Title: Agony in the Garden

Material: oil on wood

 

York Art Gallery

York, North Yorkshire, England, UK

From the Sotheby's Catalogue:

 

FRANCESCO UBERTINI, DETTO BACHIACCA

FIRENZE 1494-1557

 

RITRATTO DI DAMA COL LIUTO

 

CATALOGUE NOTE

 

Questo magnifico Ritratto di Dama col liuto è uno dei più alti esempi di ritrattistica rinascimentale. La tradizionale attribuzione al Bachiacca, che recava quando ancora era parte della collezione Contini - per confronto con il Suonatore di Liuto già Kress ora al New Orleans Museum of Art - non sembra più essere accettabile, ma ciò non intacca la posizione di assoluta rilevanza che il nostro quadro occupa nell'ambito dello svilupparsi del genere fra il terzo e il quarto decennio del Cinquecento.

Per quanto una forte attenzione disegnativa, specie nella definizione del volto e degli scorci perfettamente compiuti delle mani, sembrino ricondurlo all'ambito toscano, non spiccati risultano gli elementi caratteristici del primo manierismo fiorentino che possano apparentare la nostra tavola al contesto mediceo, così profondamente intriso della lezione ancora raffaellesca di Andrea del Sarto e dell'eleganza estenuata del Bronzino. Per accertarne l'autografia bisognerà perciò spostarsi leggermente verso nord e avvicinarsi al pittore lucchese Paolo Zacchia il Vecchio (Zacchia di Antonio da Vezzano, detto Zacchia il vecchio, Lucca ca 1500-Lucca post 1561), la cui formazione nella bottega di Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio non nega queste origini, ma si distingue dalla maniera di compagni quali il Puligo o Michele di Ridolfo proprio per la grafia asciutta e incisiva, quasi scultorea, del suo fare pittorico. Si approssimano, infatti, al nostro ritratto tanto il volto della Vergine nella pala della chiesa di S. Lorenzo in cappella a Lucca - firmata e datata - quanto alcuni suoi splendidi ritratti su tavola che ne testimoniano la maestria nel genere, quali il Musico siglato del Louvre, il Gentiluomo col cappello di Villa Mansi o infine la Dama coll'ermellino già Colnaghi, tutti resi noti da John Pope-Hennessy in un magistrale articolo del lontano 1938. Di Zacchia non si conoscono ritratti all'aperto e questo ci priva di un ulteriore elemento di raffronto (v. J. Pope-Hennessy, "Zacchia il Vecchio and Lorenzo Zacchia" in Burlington Magazine, n. CDXXII, Maggio 1938, pp. 213-223, plate II, A-B-C). Proprio l'accento nordico del paesaggio, infatti, come anche il copricapo alla turca indossato dalla Dama - qui ingentilito da un fiore - indussero a suo tempo il redattore della notifica ad avvicinare il nostro dipinto al contesto veneto-padano e più specificamente alla maniera dell''"Amico friulano del Dosso" coniato da Longhi, ma quest'analogia non appare calzante per l'assenza di quella vaghezza soffusa e irreale, quasi magica, che contraddistingue la natura del Dosso e più in generale di tutto il paesaggio emiliano (v. R. Longhi, "L'Amico friulano del Dosso" in Paragone, 131, 1960, pp. 3-9). Molto più calzante appare invece il confronto con il cosiddetto Ritratto di Alda Gambara di proprietà dello Stato italiano, a suo tempo attribuito dalla Gregori ad Altobello Melone, la cui autografia andrà forse rivista alla luce proprio di queste assonanze (v. M. Gregori, "Altobello, il Romanino e il '500 cremonese" in Paragone, 93, 1957, pp. 16-40, tav. 15a).

Comunque si voglia risolvere la questione attribuzionistica, la tangenza della nostra Dama col Liuto con tante componenti essenziali per lo sviluppo di una ritrattistica rinascimentale, dal giorgionismo al manierismo toscano del Bronzino, la eleva a tassello importante in questo panorama, collocandola da un punto di vista cronologico intorno agli anni Trenta del Cinquecento.

  

Il dipinto è stato dichiarato di particolare interesse storico artistico con Decreto Ministeriale in data 29 Giugno 1997 (come Amico friulano del Dosso).

 

Please note that this lot has been "notified" with a Ministerial Decree dated 29th June 1997. The Ministry has declared its importance in the context of the Italian cultural patrimony. The lot cannot be exported outside Italy.

Identifier: florencehertreas00vaug

Title: Florence and her treasures

Year: 1911 (1910s)

Authors: Vaughan, Herbert M. (Herbert Millingchamp), 1870-1948

Subjects: Art

Publisher: New York, The Macmillan Company

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

a fresco, in which we can discern Leonardoda Vincis influence. Note the Saviours countenance instinctwith the tenderness of Fra Bartolommeos art. No. 102. Francesco Libertini (da Bachiacca). TheMagdalen. A brilliant piece of colour by this talented pupil of Perugino,and Franciabigio, from whom he acquired the delicacy ofhis technique. Note the Magdalens spikenard, a jar still inuse in Tuscany for spices. No. 236. Filippino Lippi. Allegorical Scene. The artist has selected two passages from Ecclesiasticus toillustrate in the fanciful manner of his day the unwisdom ofmisplaced trust. Jesus, the son of Sirach, exclaims (xn.13), Who will pity a charmer that is bitten with a serpent.The inscription finds an explanation in the passage (xxv.15), There is no wrath above the wrath of an enemy. The landscape with a contemporary view of the city ofFlorence is interesting. No. 256. Fra Bartolommeo. Holy Family. This interesting work is a quasi-replica of the picture inthe Corsini Gallery at Rome,

 

Text Appearing After Image:

.MADONNA AND CHILDFrom the painting by Fra Filipfo Lippiin the Pitti Palace A 20J THE PITTI GALLERY 205 No. 345. Francesco Granacci. Holy Family. This charming composition, one of the artists best paintings,was formerly ascribed to Baldassare Peruzzi. The delicatecolour almost rivals the transparency of fresco painting. No. 341. Att. Eusebio di San Giorgio. Adoration ofthe Magi. This charming composition, formerly ascribed to Pin-turicchio and to Fiorenzo di Lorenzo, is characteristic ofUmbrian art, in the skilful grouping of brilliantly cladmultitudes within a restricted space, against a beautifullandscape. The giraffe, first seen in Italy about 1488,furnishes an approximate date, and the Vitelli coat-of-armsan indication of the ownership for this interesting work. No. 343. FlLlPPO LlPPl. The Virgin and Child. This admirable painting, almost the first example of thecircular form within which the Florentine artists contrivedthe representation of an entire life-story, dates from about1

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

1535 --- by Bachiacca --- Image by © Summerfield Press/CORBIS

Identifier: vitedepieccell08vasa

Title: Vite de' più eccellenti pittori, scultori e architetti

Year: 1791 (1790s)

Authors: Vasari, Giorgio, 1511-1574 Della Valle, Guglielmo, 1740?-1794? Carli, Pazzini

Subjects: Artists Art, Italian

Publisher: In Siena : A spese de' Pazzini Carli e Compagno

Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute

Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

ili- gema, che in quei genere non si può veder me-gio , da Marco di maestro Giovanni Kosto Fiam-miogo . Dopo le quali opeie condusse il Bachiac-ca a fresco la grotta duna fontana dacqua, cheè aPitti; e in ultmo fece i disegni per un let-to che fu fatto di ricami, tutto pieno di storie edi figare piccole, che fu la più ricca cosa di Iettoche di simile opera possa vedersi , essendo staticondotti i ricami pieni di perle e d altre cose dipregio da Antonio Bachiacca fratello di France-sco , il quae è ottimo ricaraatore: e perchè Fran-cesco morì avanti che fosse finito il detto letto,che ha servito per le felicissime none dellIllu-strissimo Sig Principe di Fiorenza Don FrancescoMedici e della Serenissima Reina Giovanna dAu-o . stria, egli fu finito in ulruno con ordine e disegno Sua morti ,. ^. c>, • x* ^ r- f> in F.rtnze. di Giorgio Vasari. Morì Francesco 1 anno 1537.in Fiorenza « VITA del Varchi in sua lode . Lopere di Jacone menziona-te qui sono smarrite. ^. dellEd. di H.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

3*5VITA DI BENVENUTO GAROFALO PITTORE FERRARESE. ]N questa parte delle vite che noi ora scriviamo,si farà brevemente un raccolto di tutti i miglio-ri e più eccellenti pittori, scultori, e architettiche sono stati a tempi nostri in Lombardia dopoil Mantegna (i) , il Costa (2) , Boccaccino (3) daCremona , ed il Francia Bolognese (4)^ non po-tendo fare la vita di ciascuno in particolare^ eparendomi abbastanza raccontare Topere loro; laqual cosa io non mi sarei messo a fare ^ né a dardi quelle giudizio, se io non lavessi prima ve-dute: e perchè dallanno 1542. insino a questopresente 1566. io non aveva, come già feci , scor-sa quasi tutta lItalia, né veduto le dette ed al-tre opere, che in questo spazio di ventiquattro an-ni sono molto cresciute, io ho voluto, essendoquasi al fine di questa mia fatica, prima che io X ij le (i) Vedi la Vita dAndrea Mantegna nel Tom. IV.a e. 22:. ;V. dell Ed di R. (2) Vedi la Vita di Lorenzo Costa nel Tom. IV.a e 87. e nel VI. a e. 221 e seg. N. delll.

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Francesco Ubertini, called Bachiacca (1494-1557) - Baptism of Christ, c1520

Week 8 Identify the Artist III

Theme: Astride a horse ( or, some such critter)

 

[This photograph was identify the painter (586)]

This artist is NOT in any set

This artist is Italian

This artist is Male

Date: 1530-1535

This painting is found in Memorial Art Gallery, Rochester NY

 

.

mag.rochester.edu/

.

  

Francesco Ubertini ( called II Bachiacca) Italian 1494-1557

The Conversion of St. Paul , 1530-1535

Oil on Panel

This painting shows the conversion of St. Paul the Apostle on the road to Damascus, one of the most important stories of the Christian faith. Paul, originally called Saul the Pharisee, was one of the great enemies and persecutors of early Christians. According to the New Testament Acts of the Apostles, Paul obtained permission from the highest court to seize Jews who had converted to Christianity in Damascus and take them back to Jerusalem, where they would be examples of the terrible fate that awaited converts. He was almost at the end of his journey when he and his men were blinded by a bright light from heaven. He heard the voice of Christ saying to him, “Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?” Saul, struck with awe, cried out, asking what he could do to repair the past. He converted to Christianity and became a minister and preacher.

In this painting, Paul and his large company of soldiers are shown traveling through a mountainous landscape on the road to Damascus. Struck by God’s blinding light at the upper right, they gaze at the sky with wonder and fear. In the center foreground, Paul remains firmly astride his horse and raises a hand to shield his eyes; the shock of the conversion, thought, forces the horse to the ground.

Marion Stratton Gould Fund 54.2

From the placard: Memorial Art Gallery

 

.

mag.rochester.edu/

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francesco_Bacchiacca

www.virtualuffizi.com/biography/Francesco-Ubertini-called...

 

PONTORMO, Jacopo.

(b. 1494, Pontormo, d. 1557, Firenze).

.

Joseph Being Sold to Potiphar.

1515-18.

Oil on wood, 58 x 50 cm.

National Gallery, London.

.

The painting belongs to the series of four entitled Scenes from the Life of Joseph the Hebrew, now in the National Gallery, London. These works, together with others by Andrea del Sarto, Francesco Granacci, Bachiacca and Franciabigio, were intended for the decoration of the nuptial chamber of Francesco Borgherini and Margherita Acciaioli, who married in 1515. The group of fourteen paintings, broken up at the end of the 16th century, was contained within a wooden decoration made by Baccio d'Agnolo..

.

In Joseph Being Sold to Potiphar, as in the Punishment of the Baker, the artist uses the arrangement of figures to guide the onlooker's gaze from the foreground towards the background of the painting. In the former the action follows a serpentine course, in the latter a zigzagging one..

.

.

.

Suggested listening (streaming mp3, 5 minutes):Étienne Nicolas Méhul: Joseph, aria.

.

.

.

.

.

.

--- Keywords: --------------.

.

Author: PONTORMO, Jacopo.

Title: Joseph Being Sold to Potiphar.

Time-line: 1501-1550.

School: Italian.

Form: painting.

Type: religious.

 

PONTORMO, Jacopo.

(b. 1494, Pontormo, d. 1557, Firenze).

.

Punishment of the Baker.

1515-18.

Oil on wood, 58 x 50 cm.

National Gallery, London.

.

The painting belongs to the series of four entitled Scenes from the Life of Joseph the Hebrew, now in the National Gallery, London. These works, together with others by Andrea del Sarto, Francesco Granacci, Bachiacca and Franciabigio, were intended for the decoration of the nuptial chamber of Francesco Borgherini and Margherita Acciaioli, who married in 1515. The group of fourteen paintings, broken up at the end of the 16th century, was contained within a wooden decoration made by Baccio d'Agnolo..

.

In the Punishment of the Baker, as in the Joseph Being Sold to Potiphar, the artist uses the arrangement of figures to guide the onlooker's gaze from the foreground towards the background of the painting. In the latter the action follows a serpentine course, in the former a zigzagging one. From the pardon of the cup-bearer, newly admitted to serving the pharaoh, the various stages of the baker's punishment are simultaneously represented..

.

.

.

.

.

.

--- Keywords: --------------.

.

Author: PONTORMO, Jacopo.

Title: Punishment of the Baker.

Time-line: 1501-1550.

School: Italian.

Form: painting.

Type: religious.

 

PONTORMO, Jacopo.

(b. 1494, Pontormo, d. 1557, Firenze).

.

Joseph in Egypt.

1515-18.

Oil on wood, 96 x 109 cm.

National Gallery, London.

.

The painting belongs to the series of four entitled Scenes from the Life of Joseph the Hebrew, now in the National Gallery, London. These works, together with others by Andrea del Sarto, Francesco Granacci, Bachiacca and Franciabigio, were intended for the decoration of the nuptial chamber of Francesco Borgherini and Margherita Acciaioli, who married in 1515. The group of fourteen paintings, broken up at the end of the 16th century, was contained within a wooden decoration made by Baccio d'Agnolo..

.

In this panel the thesis proposed by Mannerism is fully elaborated: the painter is no longer to be bound by perspective, or by the necessity of presenting his subject in a rational, objective manner. He may use light and colour, chiaroscuro and proportion as he pleases; he may borrow from any source he chooses; the only obligation upon him is to create an interesting design, expressive of the ideas inherent in the subject, and the various parts need bear no relationship to each other. The colour must be evocative and beautiful in itself..

.

This work, traditionally entitled Joseph in Egypt, depicts the most significant episodes of Joseph reuniting with his family of origin. The painting is divided into four distinct zones. In the left foreground Joseph presents his family, who he invited to move to Egypt, to the pharaoh; according to Vasari, the boy with dark cloak and brown tunic sitting on the first step of the stairs on which the figures are arranged, is a portrait of the young Bronzino. On the right, Joseph is seen sitting on a triumphal cart pulled by three putti; hoisting himself up with his left arm and clutching firmly onto a putto with the other, he bends toward a kneeling figure who is presenting him a petition or reading him a message; a fifth putto, wrapped in a piece of cloth blown by the wind, dominates the scene from the top of a column, appearing to mime the gesture of one of the two half-living statues represented in the top left and centre of the painting. A restless crowd, curious to see what is going on, throngs the adjacent space between the two buildings in the background. Other mysterious figures, resting against one of the large boulders that dominate the landscape, turn their attention toward the action in the foreground..

.

The clothes, expressions and features of all these figures are inspired by northern European painting, as is the large castle and surrounding trees depicted in the background. On the unrailed staircase of the imposing cylindrical building to the right, Joseph takes one of his children by the hand; higher up, the other is greeted affectionately by his mother. Lastly, Joseph and his sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, are portrayed inside the room at the top of the building, where Jacob, now old and near to death, imparts his paternal blessing. The curious combination of all these elements confers to the painting an anomalous and intriguing quality..

.

.

.

.

.

.

--- Keywords: --------------.

.

Author: PONTORMO, Jacopo.

Title: Joseph in Egypt.

Time-line: 1501-1550.

School: Italian.

Form: painting.

Type: religious.