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Bard, Aosta Valley, Italy

Mountain scenery on fantastic roads.

A most welcome cooling dip somewhere in the Swiss Alps

This may look idyllic but was actually a low point on our adventure. Having set off from Pontedera in Italy we rode a distance of around 300+ miles. This meant riding in the dark and this place was in the French Alps, so it was much colder. We arrived late at the sleepy town of Modane. When we got there the whole town was closed! No room at the inn. We managed to buy some wine off friendly locals and were forced to sleep rough. Oh! How we laughed! This was turning into a real adventure.

So hot here, Roy’s bike began to sink into the tarmac!

Piaggio Museum, Pontedera, Italy

This area was our ‘accomodation’ in the town of Modane in the French Alps.

Piaggio Museum, Pontedera, Italy

No GPS on this, so no idea but some little place in France with a fantastic Patisserie.

Piaggio Museum, Pontedera, Italy

Riding three bikes through France and Italy meant getting split up on occasion. Waiting for the others to catch up (Roy had a fly in the eye) on the N57/E23

Piaggio Museum, Pontedera, Italy

Specifications (King Air B200)

General characteristics

Crew: 1-2

Capacity: 13 passengers

Length: 43 ft 9 in (13.34 m)

Wingspan: 54 ft 6 in (16.61 m)

Height: 15 ft 0 in (4.57 m)

Wing area: 303 ft² (28.2 m²)

Empty weight: 7,755 lb (3,520 kg)

Max takeoff weight: 12,500 lb (5,670 kg)

Powerplant: 2× Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-42 turboprops, 850 shp (635 kW) each

Performance

 

Maximum speed: 339 mph (294 knots, 545 km/h) at 25,000 ft (7,600m)

Cruise speed: 333 mph (289 knots ,536 km/h) at 25,000 ft (max cruise)

Stall speed: 86 mph (75 knots, 139 km/h) IAS (flaps down)

Range: 2,075 mi (1,800 nm, 3,338 km) with maximum fuel and 45 minute reserve

Service ceiling: 32,800 ft (10,700 m)

Rate of climb: 2,450 ft/min (12.5 m/s)

Wing loading: 41.3 lb/ft² (201.6 kg/m²)

Power/mass: 0.14 hp/lb (220 W/kg)

 

The Beechcraft Super King Air family is part of a line of twin-turboprop aircraft produced by the Beech Aircraft Corporation (now the Beechcraft Division of Hawker Beechcraft). The King Air line comprises a number of model series that fall into two families: the Model 90 series, Model 100 series (these models comprising the King Air family), Model 200 series and Model 300 series. The latter two models were originally marketed as the "Super King Air" family, but the "Super" was dropped in 1996.

 

The Super King Air family has been in continuous production since 1974, the longest production run of any civilian turboprop aircraft in its class. It has outlasted all of its previous competitors and as of 2007 the only other aircraft in its class is the Piaggio Avanti. As of December 2008, the B200, B200GT and the larger B300 are the production models. Special mission derivative versions of these models are also available for order.

 

The Beechcraft 1900 regional airliner was derived from the Model 200 King Air.

 

Variants

Model 200

Prototypes and initial production version, 858 built (c/nos. BB-1 to BB-853 except BB-734, BB-793 and BB-829, plus BB-871 to BB-873, BB-892, BB-893, BB-895, BB-912 and BB-991) including those converted to Model 200Ts; first prototype (c/no. BB-1) converted to PD 290 jet aircraft and first three production aircraft (c/nos. BB-3 to BB-5) delivered to US Army as Model A100-1s.

Model A200

First model purpose-built for US military (Army and Air Force); 75 built (c/nos. BC-1 to BC-75).

Model 200T

Version with removable wingtip fuel tanks similar to those fitted to the competing Piper Cheyenne, optional dome-shaped side windows in the rear fuselage, and modified belly to allow aerial photography. Prototype and subsequent aircraft converted from Model 200s and re-serialled; 23 delivered (c/nos. BT-1 to BT-22 and BT-28).

Model A200C

Second military model built for US Navy and USMC with cargo door in LH rear fuselage; 90 built (c/nos. BJ-1 to BJ-66, BU-1 to BU-12 and BV-1 to BV-12).

Model 200C

Civil equivalent to A200C; 36 built (c/nos. BL-1 to BL-36).

Model A200CT

Third military model, built for US Army with cargo door and wingtip fuel tanks of Model 200T; 93 built (c/nos. BP-1 to BP-71, FC-1 to FC-3, GR-1 to GR-19).

Model 200CT

Civil equivalent to A200CT; one aircraft converted from Model 200C c/no. BL-24 and re-serialled as c/no. BN-1.

 

King Air B200Model B200

Current baseline production model; updated version of Model 200. 1,150 built[47] (c/nos. BB-734, BB-793 and BB-829, BB-854 to BB-870, BB-874 to BB-891, BB-894, BB-896 to BB-911, BB-913 to BB-990, BB-992 to BB-2008) as of December 2008, including those converted to Model B200Ts.

C/nos. BB-1296, BB-1302, BB-1305, BB-1309, BB-1314, BB-1338 to BB-1343, BB-1376, BB-1383 and BB-1384 delivered as Model 1300s.

C/nos. BB-1385 to BB-1388 were built for the Israeli Air Force and are not certified by the FAA[2].

C/nos. BB-1834, BB-1843 and after fitted with Proline 21 avionics[2].

Model B200C

Version of B200 with cargo door, available to order. 112 built[5] (c/nos. BL-37 to BL-153, except BL-113 to BL-117, which were not built) as of January 2009; 47 (c/nos. BL-72 to BL-123, except BL-113 to BL-117) to US Air Force as C-12Fs.

C/nos. BL-148 to BL-153 fitted with Proline 21 avionics[2].

A total of 65 other aircraft, similar in specification to the B200C, were built for the US military, but were not given 200 series designations by the FAA (c/nos. BW-1 to BW-29, FE-1 to FE-36).

Model B200T

Version of B200 similar to Model 200T; aircraft converted from Model B200s and re-serialled. 23 delivered (c/nos. BT-23 to BT-27 and BT-29 to BT-46).

C/nos. BT-39 to BT-46 were built for the Israeli Air Force and are not certified by the FAA[2].

Model B200CT

Version of B200C with wingtip fuel tanks; all aircraft converted from B200Cs and re-serialled. Eight delivered (c/nos. BN-2 to BN-9) to Marina de Guerra del Perú (c/nos. BN-2 to BN-4) and Israeli Air Force.

C/nos. BN-5 to BN-9, built for the Israeli Air Force, are not certified by the FAA[2].

Another two similar aircraft were built for the Israeli Air Force without a Beech designation (c/nos. FG-1 and FG-2).

Model 300

Two versions, the standard Model 300 with increased MTOW of 14,000 lb (6,300 kg) and the Model 300LW with MTOW limited to 12,500 lb (5,700 kg) to meet the aviation regulatory requirements of various countries. 247 built (c/nos. FA-1 to FA-230 and FF-1 to FF-19; FA-126 and FA-129 converted to FF-1 and FF-2), of which 35 were Model 300LWs.

C/nos. FF-1 to FF-19 were built specifically for the FAA for use in navaid calibration.

Model B300

Stretched model with two extra cabin windows each side of forward fuselage and winglets on wingtips; in production as King Air 350 and King Air 350ER. About 630 built[48] as of December 2008 (c/nos. FL-1 and after).

C/nos. FL-381, FL-383 and after fitted with Proline 21 avionics[2].

C/no. FL-424 modified as King Air 350ER prototype, c/nos. FL-546, FL-568, FL-599, FL-618, FL-623 to FL-626, FL-628 and FL-629 built as 350ERs.[9]

Model B300C

Version of B300 with cargo door; available for order. 26 built as of the end of 2008 (c/nos. FM-1 to FM-25 and FN-1).

C/nos. FN-1 built for the Swiss Air Force with modifications for aerial surveillance.

C/nos. FM-12 and after fitted with Proline 21 avionics[2].

C/nos. FM-14, FM-16 to FM-18 and FM-21 modified prior to delivery with underwing hardpoints and delivered as B300CERs.[2][9]

Model B200GT

Updated version of B200; current civil production model. About 80 built[49] as of December 2008 (c/nos BY-1 and after).

Model B200CGT

Updated version of B200C; available for order but none built as of December 2008 (c/nos BZ-1 and after).[9]

The ICAO designator, such as might be used in a PIREP or a flight plan, for the various Super King Airs are BE20 (model 200), BE30 (model 300), and B350 (model 350).

Piaggio Museum, Pontedera, Italy

Specifications (King Air B200)

General characteristics

Crew: 1-2

Capacity: 13 passengers

Length: 43 ft 9 in (13.34 m)

Wingspan: 54 ft 6 in (16.61 m)

Height: 15 ft 0 in (4.57 m)

Wing area: 303 ft² (28.2 m²)

Empty weight: 7,755 lb (3,520 kg)

Max takeoff weight: 12,500 lb (5,670 kg)

Powerplant: 2× Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-42 turboprops, 850 shp (635 kW) each

Performance

 

Maximum speed: 339 mph (294 knots, 545 km/h) at 25,000 ft (7,600m)

Cruise speed: 333 mph (289 knots ,536 km/h) at 25,000 ft (max cruise)

Stall speed: 86 mph (75 knots, 139 km/h) IAS (flaps down)

Range: 2,075 mi (1,800 nm, 3,338 km) with maximum fuel and 45 minute reserve

Service ceiling: 32,800 ft (10,700 m)

Rate of climb: 2,450 ft/min (12.5 m/s)

Wing loading: 41.3 lb/ft² (201.6 kg/m²)

Power/mass: 0.14 hp/lb (220 W/kg)

 

The Beechcraft Super King Air family is part of a line of twin-turboprop aircraft produced by the Beech Aircraft Corporation (now the Beechcraft Division of Hawker Beechcraft). The King Air line comprises a number of model series that fall into two families: the Model 90 series, Model 100 series (these models comprising the King Air family), Model 200 series and Model 300 series. The latter two models were originally marketed as the "Super King Air" family, but the "Super" was dropped in 1996.

 

The Super King Air family has been in continuous production since 1974, the longest production run of any civilian turboprop aircraft in its class. It has outlasted all of its previous competitors and as of 2007 the only other aircraft in its class is the Piaggio Avanti. As of December 2008, the B200, B200GT and the larger B300 are the production models. Special mission derivative versions of these models are also available for order.

 

The Beechcraft 1900 regional airliner was derived from the Model 200 King Air.

 

Variants

Model 200

Prototypes and initial production version, 858 built (c/nos. BB-1 to BB-853 except BB-734, BB-793 and BB-829, plus BB-871 to BB-873, BB-892, BB-893, BB-895, BB-912 and BB-991) including those converted to Model 200Ts; first prototype (c/no. BB-1) converted to PD 290 jet aircraft and first three production aircraft (c/nos. BB-3 to BB-5) delivered to US Army as Model A100-1s.

Model A200

First model purpose-built for US military (Army and Air Force); 75 built (c/nos. BC-1 to BC-75).

Model 200T

Version with removable wingtip fuel tanks similar to those fitted to the competing Piper Cheyenne, optional dome-shaped side windows in the rear fuselage, and modified belly to allow aerial photography. Prototype and subsequent aircraft converted from Model 200s and re-serialled; 23 delivered (c/nos. BT-1 to BT-22 and BT-28).

Model A200C

Second military model built for US Navy and USMC with cargo door in LH rear fuselage; 90 built (c/nos. BJ-1 to BJ-66, BU-1 to BU-12 and BV-1 to BV-12).

Model 200C

Civil equivalent to A200C; 36 built (c/nos. BL-1 to BL-36).

Model A200CT

Third military model, built for US Army with cargo door and wingtip fuel tanks of Model 200T; 93 built (c/nos. BP-1 to BP-71, FC-1 to FC-3, GR-1 to GR-19).

Model 200CT

Civil equivalent to A200CT; one aircraft converted from Model 200C c/no. BL-24 and re-serialled as c/no. BN-1.

 

King Air B200Model B200

Current baseline production model; updated version of Model 200. 1,150 built[47] (c/nos. BB-734, BB-793 and BB-829, BB-854 to BB-870, BB-874 to BB-891, BB-894, BB-896 to BB-911, BB-913 to BB-990, BB-992 to BB-2008) as of December 2008, including those converted to Model B200Ts.

C/nos. BB-1296, BB-1302, BB-1305, BB-1309, BB-1314, BB-1338 to BB-1343, BB-1376, BB-1383 and BB-1384 delivered as Model 1300s.

C/nos. BB-1385 to BB-1388 were built for the Israeli Air Force and are not certified by the FAA[2].

C/nos. BB-1834, BB-1843 and after fitted with Proline 21 avionics[2].

Model B200C

Version of B200 with cargo door, available to order. 112 built[5] (c/nos. BL-37 to BL-153, except BL-113 to BL-117, which were not built) as of January 2009; 47 (c/nos. BL-72 to BL-123, except BL-113 to BL-117) to US Air Force as C-12Fs.

C/nos. BL-148 to BL-153 fitted with Proline 21 avionics[2].

A total of 65 other aircraft, similar in specification to the B200C, were built for the US military, but were not given 200 series designations by the FAA (c/nos. BW-1 to BW-29, FE-1 to FE-36).

Model B200T

Version of B200 similar to Model 200T; aircraft converted from Model B200s and re-serialled. 23 delivered (c/nos. BT-23 to BT-27 and BT-29 to BT-46).

C/nos. BT-39 to BT-46 were built for the Israeli Air Force and are not certified by the FAA[2].

Model B200CT

Version of B200C with wingtip fuel tanks; all aircraft converted from B200Cs and re-serialled. Eight delivered (c/nos. BN-2 to BN-9) to Marina de Guerra del Perú (c/nos. BN-2 to BN-4) and Israeli Air Force.

C/nos. BN-5 to BN-9, built for the Israeli Air Force, are not certified by the FAA[2].

Another two similar aircraft were built for the Israeli Air Force without a Beech designation (c/nos. FG-1 and FG-2).

Model 300

Two versions, the standard Model 300 with increased MTOW of 14,000 lb (6,300 kg) and the Model 300LW with MTOW limited to 12,500 lb (5,700 kg) to meet the aviation regulatory requirements of various countries. 247 built (c/nos. FA-1 to FA-230 and FF-1 to FF-19; FA-126 and FA-129 converted to FF-1 and FF-2), of which 35 were Model 300LWs.

C/nos. FF-1 to FF-19 were built specifically for the FAA for use in navaid calibration.

Model B300

Stretched model with two extra cabin windows each side of forward fuselage and winglets on wingtips; in production as King Air 350 and King Air 350ER. About 630 built[48] as of December 2008 (c/nos. FL-1 and after).

C/nos. FL-381, FL-383 and after fitted with Proline 21 avionics[2].

C/no. FL-424 modified as King Air 350ER prototype, c/nos. FL-546, FL-568, FL-599, FL-618, FL-623 to FL-626, FL-628 and FL-629 built as 350ERs.[9]

Model B300C

Version of B300 with cargo door; available for order. 26 built as of the end of 2008 (c/nos. FM-1 to FM-25 and FN-1).

C/nos. FN-1 built for the Swiss Air Force with modifications for aerial surveillance.

C/nos. FM-12 and after fitted with Proline 21 avionics[2].

C/nos. FM-14, FM-16 to FM-18 and FM-21 modified prior to delivery with underwing hardpoints and delivered as B300CERs.[2][9]

Model B200GT

Updated version of B200; current civil production model. About 80 built[49] as of December 2008 (c/nos BY-1 and after).

Model B200CGT

Updated version of B200C; available for order but none built as of December 2008 (c/nos BZ-1 and after).[9]

The ICAO designator, such as might be used in a PIREP or a flight plan, for the various Super King Airs are BE20 (model 200), BE30 (model 300), and B350 (model 350).

Ristorante Amalfitana, Pisa, Italy

Our road trip was fast paced and we didn’t stay anywhere for more than one night - except for Pisa. We were able to truly relax and give the old saddles a rest. A whole day and a half off the bikes was very welcome.

Great St. Bernard Pass, Switzerland/Italy

  

'Great Saint Bernard Pass, Italian Colle del Gran San Bernardo, French Col du Grand-Saint-Bernard, one of the highest of the Alpine frontier passes, at 8,100 feet (2,469 metres). It lies on the Italian-Swiss border east of the Mont Blanc group in the southwestern Pennine Alps.'

One of the highlights of our road trip. The Great Saint Bernard Pass

Ok, well a Piaggio BV 250 and two Vespas, a GTV 250 and a GTS 300

Outside Pompaples, Switzerland

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