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View allAll Photos Tagged Autumn+table+decorations

Better on B l a c k M a g i c

Todays challenge on www.photochallenge.org/ was "Decorate"

 

This is an ornament my wife picke dup somewhere,and she has setup with a few others on a little table in our dining room, she has done a really nice job of setting it up

 

This is my 75th Day doing the Photochallenge, quite pleased with myself with making it thus far, its one of the many things I have to be thankful for today, I am fortunate to be in a position to follow up on this hobby of photography which I really enjoy, I wont bore you all with a long list of other things I am thankful for

 

For those who celebrate thanksgiving I hope you all had a lovely day, and for tose that don't celebrate it I also hope you had a lovely day

Boo has to be watched constantly, he gets into everything! He figured out how to get the decorations to 'come to him' by pulling on the table runner. Imagine how fun Christmas time will be! LOL

 

I would like to thank all of you that have taken the time to view and comment on my photos, it is very much appreciated.

  

Have a wonderful new week Flickr friends. Tina & the Puglets

* Hoy aquí es feriado y hemos salido a pasear a mi parque favorito, que es todo un capricho, si porque así se llama : El parque del Capricho!

Y que lluvia nos cogió... todos se fueron corriendo, solo nosotros nos quedamos, hasta tuve tiempo de traerme unas cuantas hojitas de recuerdo ;)

 

Website ✔ Facebook ✔ Twitter ✔ Blog ✔

 

If you wish to use any of my images for any reason/purpose please contact me via chaulafanita@photographer.net or send me a flickr mail so I'll make them available for sale.

 

As the time changed to Autumn we moved from our Beach to our new cosy Home,

i'm sure the new Season will be fun as well and looking forward for new Photo Moments or just to hangout cosy ;- )

Here i will give you a look to our new Living Room. , I really love it personaly and it's fit perfectly to our new House.

 

Decoration

 

This warm cosy Living Room is from Cheeky Pea - Country Home Set and avaible now @ FaMESHed

 

▷ CP: Country Home Sofa

▷ CP: Country Home Console

▷ CP: Country Home Art 1

▷ CP: Country Home Art 2

▷ CP: Country Home Art 3

▷ CP: Country Home Lamp

▷ CP: Country Home Pouffe

▷ CP: Country Home Coffee Table

▷ CP: Country Home Chessboard

▷ CP: Country Home Candlesticks

▷ CP: Country Home Basket

▷ CP: Country Home Rug 1

▷ CP: Country Home Candlesticks

 

Other Decorations items

 

▷ CP: Dorset Wheel Art

▷ dust bunny . fiddle leaf tree

▷ dust bunny . potted cheese plant

▷ The Loft & Aria - Linen Storage Box

▷ The Loft - Hudson Vase

▷ Revival:. rattan pillow basket

▷ DaD DESIGN - Industrial Fan Floor Lamp

▷ we're CLOSED - candle bottle M brown

▷ OSMIA - Temptation.Gacha.Kitty - Decor 2

▷ Fancy Decor: Magazine Stack 2

▷ Kunst - Wine bottle / malbec - gold cap

▷ Kunst - Malbec glass

House

▷ Apple Fall Old Manufactory

 

Happy Weekend ️ :heart: - ♫♪ listening now ♪♫</

BLOG

 

Credit @ Goose in Cosmopolitan (End date : September 24th)

GOOSE - Fall rocking chair (oak)

GOOSE - Fall rocking chair (mahogany)

GOOSE - Fall rocking chair (oak)

GOOSE - Pumpkin F

GOOSE - Pumpkin A

GOOSE - Pumpkin L

 

Credit @ Chez Moi Furniture in ULTRA (End date : October 13th)

Tree House The Nest (Adult) CHEZ MOI

Pallet Couch The Nest (Adult) CHEZ MOI

*Available in PG and in Adult

 

Credit @ Bee Design in ULTRA (End date : October 13th)

Bee Designs Romantic Tent

*Available in PG and in Adult

 

Credit @ Bee Design in SaNaRae (End date : October 18th) "Halloween Decor Gacha"

Bee Designs Halloween Decor Gacha 3 Ghosts

Bee Designs Halloween Decor Gacha Ghost Table

Bee Designs Halloween Decor Gacha Macarons

Bee Designs Halloween Decor Gacha Skulls with candles

Bee Designs Halloween Decor Gacha Table RARE

Bee Designs Halloween Decor Gacha Panel RARE

Bee Designs Halloween Decor Gacha Cats

 

Credit @ HJM Design in Perfect TEN (End date : October 15th)

Autumn Rustic Pallet Decoration

Autumn Bicycle Decor

 

Credit @ Dreamscapes Art Gallery

*Cleo* Pumpkin Duo D

*Cleo* Pumpkin Duo C

*Cleo* Pumpkin Trio D

*Cleo* Pumpkin B

*Cleo* Pumpkin C

*Cleo* Pumpkin Trio B

*Spooky Kitty* B1

*Spooky Kitty* A1

*Spooky Kitty* E2

*Spooky Kitty* D

*Cleo* Pumpkin K

*Deco Board* Pumpkins

*Raven Fence* A

*Raven Fence* B

*Raven Fence* C

Special thanks to my pops for joining me here! Love you!!

 

*FEATURED ITEMS FROM THE CHAPTER FOUR*

♥{Limerence} Emma hair

-50% off room!

♥GAIA Mia Jeggings

♥N-Uno - Sonya Outfit

♥Bleich - Mesh Sockers

♥Never Totally Dead - Chez Gaston Gacha

^^@THE CHAPTER FOUR

♥AUTHENTIC POSES: Karrueche @eBENTO & Several things @ Mainstore

 

♥LADY

{Limerence} Emma hair- All natural set @TCF

N-Uno - Sonya Vest // N 7 // Maitreya @TCF

N-Uno - Sonya Sweater // N 6 // Maitreya @TCF

GAIA - Mia Jeggings @TCF

Bleich - Mesh Sockers - Grey @TCF

POSE:: AP - Karrueche 04 @eBento

 

♥MALE

Stealthic - Rebellion

Kauna -Beard

REPRESENT - Oversized Flannel "Gianni, Black"

Kalback Original jeans M2_Dark

L&B * GIANNIfit * Swear Low Top Sneakers

POSE:: AP - Several things 01

 

♥DECOR

Chez Gaston Mulled Wine Booth @TCF

Chez Gaston Curtain @TCF

Chez Gaston - Shelve & glasses @TCF

Chez Gaston Barrels @TCF

Chez Gaston Shelve with bottles @TCF

Chez Gaston Cauldron @TCF

Chez Gaston Bretzel @TCF

Chez Gaston Pile of boxes @TCF

Chez Gaston Crates @TCF

Chez Gaston Table @TCF

Chez Gaston Curtain 6 @TCF

Chez Gaston Mug & pastries @TCF

hive // hay bale w/blanket A

hive // hay bale

Sway's [Autumn] Pumpkin decoration . trio - natural

Sway's [Autumn] Pumpkin decoration . single C - natural

*AF* Picnic 6 - Sandwich Basket

NOMAD // Scattered Leaves C // Greens

 

♥ADDITIONAL LINKS:

Limerence Mainstore

Limerence Marketplace

GAIA Mainstore

GAIA Marketplace

Authentic Poses Mainstore

Authentic Poses Marketplace

Never Totally Dead Mainstore

N-Uno Mainstore

  

I had great fun composing and executing shots of this spectacular display of ornamental gourds at the risk of some observers wondering if I might be out of my gourd!

 

As you may know, gourds are among the oldest cultivated plants in history and there are many wonderful things you can craft 'out of your gourd'! Not only do they make colorful table decorations, but once properly air-dried to cure, they may be crafted into birdhouses, musical instruments, lanterns, dippers, containers and much more.

 

This spectacular display of Cucurbita pepo (variety ovifera) was seen at the Curtis Orchard pumpkin patch in Champaign, Illinois. They grow 20 acres of pumpkins and 5000 apple trees.

 

Explore: 10/10/08 #107 (Hit at #351). Thanks for your wonderful support! I appreciate your generous comments, kind invites, and faves. A heap of thanks.

Just before dinner time, the decorations in our dinning room were done by our son, the centerpiece that includes those magnificent glass covered silver Churches, he brought those with the flowers from the city yesterday,

fortunately we have folding chairs to accommodate all our guests.

Just before Dinner my son had to do last minute preparations, his Centerpiece always is a hit with me,

Brought all of them Christmas day from NYC.

New release exclusive for Tres Chic event! The warm harvest table set, complete with decorations, lights, place settings and more. A beautiful rustic set with a warm Autumn feeling, made with love. Cheeses & fruits board also sold apart. Try it out here: maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Nika/114/145/21

Serenity Style

Serenity Style- Dean Fall Fireplace

Serenity Style- Dean Fall Metal Logs Basket

 

dust bunny

dust bunny . darling hanging plant

dust bunny . camellia potted plant

dust bunny & windsong . valentines tray

dust bunny . camellia coffee table

 

[Merak]

[Merak] - Old pumpkin

 

Deco(C)Rate

:CP: Autumn Harvest Light Posts

:CP: Autumn Harvest Pumpkins

MI Harvest Moon Fall Banner

 

Dreamscapes Decor

*Victoria* Hatboxes

 

Scarlet Creative

Scarlet Creative - Sofia Clock Neutral

Scarlet Creative - Artist Desk and Plant

Scarlet Creative Merbiel Lamp *click for on/off*

Scarlet Creative Meribel Comfort Rug - Light

Scarlet Creative - Sofia Sofa Rose

Scarlet Creative - Nerites Plant

Scarlet Creative - Sofia Chair Rose

Scarlet Creative - Sofia House RARE

Scarlet Creative - Sofia Basket

 

DIGS

DIGS - Milligan Umbrella Stand

 

+Half-Deer+

+Half-Deer+ Fairy Curtain

 

unKindness @ The Lootbox

uK - Victorian Book Stand Book Pile

uK - Victorian Book Stand Her Studies RARE

uK - Victorian Book Stand Ink Well

uK - Victorian Book Stand Her Note

uK - Victorian Book Stand Quill and Ink

uK - Victorian Book Stand Scholar Study

uK - Victorian Book Stand Scholar Stack

uK - Victorian Book Stand White Booth RARE

 

JIAN

JIAN Splendid Spaniels 19. Floor Snoozer

 

Sway's

Sway's [Guitar] Shelf . with decoration

 

[ zerkalo ] @The Epiphany

[ zerkalo ] Autumn Warmth - Marble Vases

 

[ zerkalo ]

[ zerkalo ] Shabby Chic Beanbag - Adult

[ zerkalo ] Square Perls Frame

 

..::THOR::..

..::THOR::.. Old Jug With Projects

 

Fancy Decor

Fancy Decor: Floor Globe (silver)

 

TLG

TLG - Cinderella Birdcage Music Box

Loving the mini Strobe Light!

For this picture i shoot about 80 shots, lit with flashlight in dark room from different angles and distances. Most of these shots used in processing. All shots loaded as layers and best lighted parts of them combined together with masks.

 

I wrote small post about light painting technique in blog: english / russian.

 

Prints: Artist website | RedBubble.com

 

Need my photos for commercial use? Please mail me:

chaoticmind75@gmail.com

 

The Pagodenburg was built between 1716 and 1719 by Joseph Effner to a commission from Elector Max Emanuel. Sited north of the main canal, it respects the original plan of the park. To the south of the little palace lies a garden parterre, and to the north a green where the "Mailspiel", a game similar to golf, was played. A contemporary account reports: »This Indian building is a place where the lords and ladies rest after the exertions of a round of "Mailspiel"… The lower floor houses a hall and two cabinets, and the panelling has been executed in Arab and Indian styles with all manner of Chinese figures and pagodas."

On the ground floor the colours blue and white predominate which, together with the exotic elements of the partly ornamental, partly figural ceiling painting and the Dutch tiles, allude to China and porcelain production.

 

The upper floor accommodates very small but cleverly designed rooms. The Chinese Drawing Room with Chinese wallpaper and black-grounded lacquer painting looks exotic thanks to its colour scheme. The Chinese Cabinet , by contrast, has red-based lacquerwork. Despite its European Regency-style decoration, the Boudoir also has an exotic air on account of its bizarre shape. The rooms were furnished by Johann Anton Gumpp and Johann Adam Pichler. The Pagodenburg is a prime example of eighteenth-century chinoiserie which was very much in vogue at the time.

For his interiors, Joseph Effner designed not only the permanent fixtures but also the furniture. Generally speaking, he drew on the formal vocabulary of the French Regency style. However, in particular instances, he developed new ideas of his own. Thus, in the case of the rooms in the Pagodenburg, he introduced exotic elements into the furniture, creating unique decorative items, such as candlesticks with dragons' heads. Priceless individual pieces complete the exquisite furnishings, such as a games table (Paris, c. 1720/25) and two small Japanese lacquer cabinets remodelled as commodes (Paris, c. 1715/20).

(Bayerische Schlösserverwaltung)

 

Die Pagodenburg wurde als maison de plaisance unter Leitung von Joseph Effner 1716 bis 1719 der Überlieferung nach mit Verwendung eines Grundrissentwurfs von Max Emanuel erbaut. Bereits 1767 erfolgte eine Überarbeitung durch François Cuvilliés d. Ä. in der Art des Rokoko. Das doppelgeschossige Gebäude ist ein achteckiger Bau, der durch vier sehr kurze Flügel einen kreuzförmigen, nord-südlich ausgerichteten Grundriss hat.

 

Das Erdgeschoss besteht aus einem einzigen Raum, dem ganz in blau und weiß gehaltenen Salettl. Dessen Wände bedeckten nahezu vollständig Keramikkacheln im holländischen Stil. Die Decke ist mit orientalisch anmutendem Figuraldekor bemalt. Auch die Fliesen des Fußbodens greifen die Farboptik des Raums auf. Im Salettl befinden sich ein runder Tisch mit dem Wappen des Bauherrn, mehrere Kanapees sowie ein Kronleuchter - wie alle diese Ausstattungsgegenstände in Porzellanmanier blau-weiß gefasst.

 

Im Obergeschoss ist die Pagodenburg viergeteilt. Während ein Flügel dem Treppenaufgang vorbehalten ist, beherbergen die anderen drei einen Ruheraum, den Chinesischen Salon sowie das kleinere Chinesische Kabinett. Den beiden letztgenannten hat man, dem Zeitgeschmack der Chinoiserie entsprechend, ein fernöstliches Ambiente gegeben. Wände und Türen sind in schwarzem Lack gehalten, auf dem farbenfrohes exotisches Dekor aufgebracht ist. Die Kassettenfelder der Wandvertäfelung zeigen blühende Bäume in markanter Gold-Weiß-Optik. Eine chinesische Lackkommode vervollständigt die Ausstattung. Anders als bei den Tapeten der Badenburg handelt es sich im chinesischen Kabinett der Pagodenburg aber nicht um Originalstücke aus China, sondern Nachahmungen aus Europa.

 

2003 wurde eine umfassende Restaurierung der Pagodenburg abgeschlossen.

(Wikipedia)

All the links to the events and shops in my post ☺☺☺

 

bambifoxdale.blogspot.co.il/2017/06/like-old-friend.html

 

Starting with my sponsors roughly left to right:

Boat: Chez Moi Bon Voyage Boat

Swing: Decor Junction & Shutter Field Swing Seats @ On9

Rocking Chairs Ser: What Next Palma Set

Dining Table with Chairs: Decor Junction & Shutter Field Amelia Patio Set - Rustic @ Tres Chic

Wine Bottles: [-BLUE SKY-] Toscana Dining

 

The rest:

Outside

Laundry Line: dust bunny . spring washline

Laundry Basket: dust bunny . spring laundry basket

Bicycle: Zerkalo Fall in Love - Bicycle

Fence: we're CLOSED rope fence

Grass: we're CLOSED grass field lush

Flowers: we're CLOSED white flowers

Boulders: we're CLOSED boulders light

Stringlights on Poles: we're CLOSED party lights

Stringlights on the Swing: floorplan. garden string light

Garlic Mustard: Heart - Wild Flowers - Garlic Mustard

Platesetting and Decoration on the Dining Table: dust bunny . autumns calling . plate setting

 

Inside

Stringlights: Half-Deer Cozy Stringlights

Kitchen table: Zenith Kitchen table - RARE

Kitchen Counter: ionic Vintage Kitchen counter

Dishes and Milk: Knick Knacks cena sotto le stelle

Kitchen Utilities: Zenith kitchen jar

Hanging Plant: Soy Super long Hanging Hedera

Lounger: Soy Reclining Lounger

Screen: dust bunny woodland dreams . carved wooden screen

Sofa: Fiasco - Tiffany Light Couch

House and Blinds: Vespertine - sea salt beach cabin @ Collabor88

Maple leaves on the rock at Japanese garden in autumn.

Yuliya Bahr - Hochzeitsfotograf in Berlin und Europa

:fallen_leaf: Blog :fallen_leaf:

wp.me/p1AuqN-3PT

 

:sound2:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=JthlUyCfED4

 

- - - - - - - -

Style. Yeriak

 

Hair. | tram G0823 hair @88collaborator

 

Dress. | Moon Amore Grateful Outfit @88collaborator

 

Decoration. | KITE The Garden Studio /keke autumn bell jar. moths / Soy. Pipe table wood/anc "wild garden"lawn {yellow green} / anc lavender {sunlight} / anc leaping sparks {yellow}

 

Pose. |Ana Poses All I see @Mainstore

  

Style. Jona

 

Hairbase. |Dura B&G80 Dark @TMD

 

Shirt. |BlankLIne V-NeckT White @TMD

 

Pants. | Gabriel Stripe Sweat Pants Gray

 

  

Note: A great collaboration in the decoration of @Astralia with some changes of scenery of @DuaDecor

     

Trompe Loeil - Piper Hideaway House

 

Trompe Loeil - Piper Hanging Chair Light PG

   

Serenity Style-Raven Dream in the Porch- Bench @Deco(c)rate

 

Serenity Style-Raven Dream in the Porch- Flying Leaves @Deco(c)rate

   

Fall Picnic Table (Adult) CHEZ MOI @Deco(c)rate

 

Placemat Picnic Fall CHEZ MOI @Deco(c)rate

 

Fall Leaves Ground CHEZ MOI @Deco(c)rate

   

Serenity Style- Autumn cart  @Le Six Event 

 

Serenity Style- Autumn Jar  @Le Six Event

 

Serenity Style-Babe Autumn REZ

 

Serenity Style- Autumn Pumpkins  @Le Six Event

 

Serenity Style- Autumn pile of blankets  @Le Six Event

 

Serenity Style- New autumn leaves ground

   

SAYO - Autumn Abode Gacha - Hello Fall Window Sign

 

Little Llama - Harvest Greetings - L (wood)

 

JIAN 'dorable Danes :: Cozy Family Bed (25PR)

   

*CSF* Prairie Grass {Round}

 

dust bunny . harvest . lumberjack stump

 

dust bunny . harvest . haybale

 

dust bunny . harvest . jug of sunflowers

 

The Mid-Autumn Festival is a harvest festival celebrated by ethnic Chinese and Vietnamese peoples. The festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Chinese Han calendar and Vietnamese calendar (within 15 days of the autumnal equinox), on the night of the full moon between early September to early October of the Gregorian calendar.

 

Mainland China listed the festival as an "intangible cultural heritage" in 2006 and a public holiday in 2008. It is also a public holiday in Taiwan. Among the Vietnamese, it is considered the second-most important holiday tradition.

 

The Chinese have celebrated the harvest during the autumn full moon since the Shang Dynasty (c. 16th to 10th century BCE). Morris Berkowitz, who studied the Hakka people during the 1960s, theorizes that the harvest celebration originally began with worshiping Mountain Gods after the harvest was completed. The celebration as a festival only started to gain popularity during the early Tang Dynasty (618–907 CE). One legend explains that Emperor Xuanzong of Tang started to hold formal celebrations in his palace after having explored the Moon-Palace. The term mid-autumn (中秋) first appeared in Rites of Zhou, a written collection of rituals of the Western Zhou Dynasty (1046–771 BCE).

 

Empress Dowager Cixi (late 19th century) enjoyed celebrating Mid-Autumn Festival so much that she would spend the period between the thirteenth and seventeenth day of the eighth month staging elaborate rituals.

 

For the Vietnamese, in its most ancient form, the evening commemorated the dragon who brought rain for the crops. Celebrants would observe the moon to divine the future of the people and harvests. Eventually the celebration came to symbolize a reverence for fertility, with prayers given for bountiful harvests, increase in livestock, and human babies. Over time, the prayers for children evolved into a celebration of children. Confucian scholars continued the tradition of gazing at the moon, but to sip wine and improvise poetry and song. By the early twentieth century in Hanoi, the festival had begun to assume its identity as a children's festival.

 

An important part of the festival celebration is moon worship. The ancient Chinese believed in rejuvenation being associated with the moon and water, and connected this concept to the menses of women, calling it "monthly water". The Zhuang people, for example, have an ancient fable saying the sun and moon are a couple and the stars are their children, and when the moon is pregnant, it becomes round, and then becomes crescent after giving birth to a child. These beliefs made it popular among women to worship and give offerings to the moon on this evening. In some areas of China, there are still customs in which "men don't worship the moon and the women don't offer sacrifices to the kitchen gods."

 

Offerings are also made to a more well-known lunar deity, Chang'e, known as the Moon Goddess of Immortality. The myths associated with Chang'e explain the origin of moon worship during this day. One version of the story is as follows, as described in Lihui Yang's Handbook of Chinese Mythology:

 

In the ancient past, there was a hero named [Hou] Yi who was excellent at archery. His wife was Chang'e. One year, the ten suns rose in the sky together, causing great disaster to people. Yi shot down nine of the suns and left only one to provide light. An immortal admired Yi and sent him the elixir of immortality. Yi did not want to leave Chang'e and be immortal without her, so he let Chang'e keep the elixir. But Feng Meng, one of his apprentices, knew this secret. So, on the fifteenth of August in the lunar calendar, when Yi went hunting, Feng Meng broke into Yi's house and forced Chang'e to give the elixir to him. Chang'e refused to do so. Instead, she swallowed it and flew into the sky. Since she loved her husband very much and hoped to live nearby, she chose the moon for her residence. When Yi came back and learned what had happened, he felt so sad that he displayed the fruits and cakes Chang'e liked in the yard and gave sacrifices to his wife. People soon learned about these activities, and since they also were sympathetic to Chang'e they participated in these sacrifices with Yi.

 

Yang describes another version of the tale which provides a different reason for Chang'e ascending to the moon:

 

After the hero Houyi shot down nine of the ten suns, he was pronounced king by the thankful people. However, he soon became a conceited and tyrannical ruler. In order to live long without death, he asked for the elixir from Xiwangmu. But his wife, Chang'e, stole it on the fifteenth of August because she did not want the cruel king to live long and hurt more people. She took the magic potion to prevent her husband from becoming immortal. Houyi was so angry when discovered that Chang'e took the elixir, he shot at his wife as she flew toward the moon, though he missed. Chang'e fled to the moon and became the spirit of the moon. Houyi died soon because he was overcome with great anger. Thereafter, people offer a sacrifice to Chang'e on every lunar fifteenth of August to commemorate Chang'e's action.

  

Modern celebration

 

The festival was a time to enjoy the successful reaping of rice and wheat with food offerings made in honor of the moon. Today, it is still an occasion for outdoor reunions among friends and relatives to eat mooncakes and watch the moon, a symbol of harmony and unity. The festival is celebrated with many cultural or regional customs, among them:

 

Burning incense in reverence to deities including Chang'e.

Performance of dragon and lion dances, which is mainly practiced in southern China and Vietnam.

  

Imperial dishes served on this occasion included nine-jointed lotus roots which symbolize peace, and watermelons cut in the shape of lotus petals which symbolize reunion. Teacups were placed on stone tables in the garden, where the family would pour tea and chat, waiting for the moment when the full moon's reflection appeared in the center of their cups. Owing to the timing of the plant's blossoms, cassia wine is the traditional choice for the "reunion wine" drunk on the occasion. Also, people will celebrate by eating cassia cakes and candy.

 

Food offerings made to deities are placed on an altar set up in the courtyard, including apples, pears, peaches, grapes, pomegranates, melons, oranges, and pomelos. One of the first decorations purchased for the celebration table is a clay statue of the Jade Rabbit. In Chinese folklore, the Jade Rabbit was an animal that lived on the moon and accompanied Chang'e. Offerings of yellow beans and cockscomb flowers were made to the Jade Rabbit.

 

In Vietnam, cakes and fruits are not only consumed, but elaborately prepared as food displays. For example, glutinous rice flour and rice paste are molded into familiar animals. Pomelo sections can be fashioned into unicorns, rabbits, or dogs. Villagers of Xuân La, just south of Hanoi, produce tò he, figurines made from rice paste and colored with natural food dyes. Into the early decades of the twentieth century of Vietnam, daughters of wealthy families would prepare elaborate centerpieces filled with treats for their younger siblings. Well-dressed visitors could visit to observe the daughter's handiwork as an indication of her capabilities as a wife in the future. Eventually the practice of arranging centerpieces became a tradition not just limited to wealthy families

 

from Wikipedia

 

G'day everyone! Hyped up for this 'Summer' even though it's winter & absolutely freezing to the bone! But I'm getting over my cold! - Just like the picture, I'm going to keep the post minimal too.. - A new build from Felgo, it's the MELANO Condo - It comes with or without furniture, very stylish and modern to the core, which is suitable for this home I reckon. If you were to go over board with decoration it may lose it's characteristics, that's just a personal opinion. So the items I've used additionally for this room are:

 

Credits:

 

8f8 - 6. Bombastic Cookie Dessert

Forest - Place setting B

SAYO - Autumn Abode Gacha - Bundle of Billies

Apple Fall Stoneware Vessels

LADO Paint

TERACO Plant

TCHEKO Chair

TCHEKO table

NESMA Table

 

The song I have below, gives me that vibe of dining in this particular setting, very ultra Elastic, Brazilian mix - www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkevUPEpSxE

 

Make sure if you haven't done so, to check out my Facebook, follow me for

updates on my SL life, my life in general, projects, client work, behind the scenes,

giveaway's & much more! --> www.facebook.com/ZhaoiIntaglio

 

To visit my office, click here: maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Supreme/35/130/22

Cosy decorations in the garden, I love it! If a vase, a table, a list or a chandler has no purpose anymore, I move it to the garden and find a new meaning for it. This will give them a second life, and it looks great too! When the summer is ending I move other stuff from the garden to the barn. They would not survive the Dutch wetness... But this cozy baroque-pendant, can stay in the tree. Maybe I will hang some extra items arpund it, so it is not lonely. In December of course a few christmasballs will be put in... but... first.... let it be Autumn!

In a few days, this little pumpkin will be an essential ingredient in pumpkin chili, but in the meantime, it makes a sweet table decoration.

Happy Thanksgiving - Joyeux Thanksgiving to my Canadian Flickr friends! ღ

Forgotten typewriter/Máquina de escribir olvidada

 

Copenhagen (Denmark)

 

En un lugar tan acogedor dan ganas de trabajar, quedarse para inspirarse un rato o echarse una sietecita... El hecho de que sea una ruidosa cafetería hasta lo podría pasar por alto.

 

______

 

In such a cozy place I feel like working, staying a while looking for inspiration or even taking a little nap.... I don’t even care that this is actually a noisy cafeteria.

 

getty images - society6 - website - facebook- youtube - instagram

::: Collabor 88 :::

LaGyo - Mahalia Collection

(earings gold, necklace Gold, rings gold, Ice Cream, cigarette)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

:::The Seasons Story ::: [Available from 10 Oct. SLT]

David Heather - Autumn Style Gacha

(Astone Cap, Void Watch, Void Watch Case, Sleek Camera/Decor, Antler Sunglasses/Decor)

David Heather - Bomber Boots/Mahogany

elua - Wilma B

GABRIEL - Doll bear Gacha

GATO - The Botanical Collection - Bemuda Botanical

GATO - The Botanical Collection - Comfy Jacket Cable Knit

HEART HOMES - "Fall into bliss" Autumn themed living room set

(Autumn candle, Carpet, Pumpkins)

HEART HOMES - "Hanukkah" Complete Living room set

(Couples sofa, Single couch, Coffee table, Autumn decoration)

Kirin Pose Store - Aya Pose (Pose1, Pose2, Pose7)

KITJA CHERIE - Luna Trench Coat TAN

KITJA CHIERIE - Luna Headband TAN [TSS GIFT]

La Penderie de Nicole - Bicolor Dress:Brown

Le Primtif - Bustier Blouse - Koi

Olive - the Autumn Hair

Schadenfreude - Zirnitra Boots

Tableau Vivant - Koyo hair

theSkinnery - Hazel - Pumpkin (honey)

Zenith - Halloween Bag Gacha - Saladbag (choco/ patchwork A)

Zenith - Happy Halloween Headband [TSS GIFT]

 

Tysm, all<3

Blogged : kirin01.blogspot.jp/2014/10/450.html

 

Single Small Orange Pumpkin Background Multiple Pumpkins Green Grass Outdoors Autumn Fall Seaso

New release exclusive for Tres Chic event! The warm harvest table set, complete with decorations, lights, place settings and more. A beautiful rustic set with a warm Autumn feeling, made with love. Cheeses & fruits board also sold apart. Try it out here: maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Nika/114/145/21

The Mid-Autumn Festival is a harvest festival celebrated by ethnic Chinese and Vietnamese peoples. The festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Chinese Han calendar and Vietnamese calendar (within 15 days of the autumnal equinox), on the night of the full moon between early September to early October of the Gregorian calendar.

 

Mainland China listed the festival as an "intangible cultural heritage" in 2006 and a public holiday in 2008. It is also a public holiday in Taiwan. Among the Vietnamese, it is considered the second-most important holiday tradition.

 

The Chinese have celebrated the harvest during the autumn full moon since the Shang Dynasty (c. 16th to 10th century BCE). Morris Berkowitz, who studied the Hakka people during the 1960s, theorizes that the harvest celebration originally began with worshiping Mountain Gods after the harvest was completed. The celebration as a festival only started to gain popularity during the early Tang Dynasty (618–907 CE). One legend explains that Emperor Xuanzong of Tang started to hold formal celebrations in his palace after having explored the Moon-Palace. The term mid-autumn (中秋) first appeared in Rites of Zhou, a written collection of rituals of the Western Zhou Dynasty (1046–771 BCE).

 

Empress Dowager Cixi (late 19th century) enjoyed celebrating Mid-Autumn Festival so much that she would spend the period between the thirteenth and seventeenth day of the eighth month staging elaborate rituals.

 

For the Vietnamese, in its most ancient form, the evening commemorated the dragon who brought rain for the crops. Celebrants would observe the moon to divine the future of the people and harvests. Eventually the celebration came to symbolize a reverence for fertility, with prayers given for bountiful harvests, increase in livestock, and human babies. Over time, the prayers for children evolved into a celebration of children. Confucian scholars continued the tradition of gazing at the moon, but to sip wine and improvise poetry and song. By the early twentieth century in Hanoi, the festival had begun to assume its identity as a children's festival.

 

An important part of the festival celebration is moon worship. The ancient Chinese believed in rejuvenation being associated with the moon and water, and connected this concept to the menses of women, calling it "monthly water". The Zhuang people, for example, have an ancient fable saying the sun and moon are a couple and the stars are their children, and when the moon is pregnant, it becomes round, and then becomes crescent after giving birth to a child. These beliefs made it popular among women to worship and give offerings to the moon on this evening. In some areas of China, there are still customs in which "men don't worship the moon and the women don't offer sacrifices to the kitchen gods."

 

Offerings are also made to a more well-known lunar deity, Chang'e, known as the Moon Goddess of Immortality. The myths associated with Chang'e explain the origin of moon worship during this day. One version of the story is as follows, as described in Lihui Yang's Handbook of Chinese Mythology:

 

In the ancient past, there was a hero named [Hou] Yi who was excellent at archery. His wife was Chang'e. One year, the ten suns rose in the sky together, causing great disaster to people. Yi shot down nine of the suns and left only one to provide light. An immortal admired Yi and sent him the elixir of immortality. Yi did not want to leave Chang'e and be immortal without her, so he let Chang'e keep the elixir. But Feng Meng, one of his apprentices, knew this secret. So, on the fifteenth of August in the lunar calendar, when Yi went hunting, Feng Meng broke into Yi's house and forced Chang'e to give the elixir to him. Chang'e refused to do so. Instead, she swallowed it and flew into the sky. Since she loved her husband very much and hoped to live nearby, she chose the moon for her residence. When Yi came back and learned what had happened, he felt so sad that he displayed the fruits and cakes Chang'e liked in the yard and gave sacrifices to his wife. People soon learned about these activities, and since they also were sympathetic to Chang'e they participated in these sacrifices with Yi.

 

Yang describes another version of the tale which provides a different reason for Chang'e ascending to the moon:

 

After the hero Houyi shot down nine of the ten suns, he was pronounced king by the thankful people. However, he soon became a conceited and tyrannical ruler. In order to live long without death, he asked for the elixir from Xiwangmu. But his wife, Chang'e, stole it on the fifteenth of August because she did not want the cruel king to live long and hurt more people. She took the magic potion to prevent her husband from becoming immortal. Houyi was so angry when discovered that Chang'e took the elixir, he shot at his wife as she flew toward the moon, though he missed. Chang'e fled to the moon and became the spirit of the moon. Houyi died soon because he was overcome with great anger. Thereafter, people offer a sacrifice to Chang'e on every lunar fifteenth of August to commemorate Chang'e's action.

  

Modern celebration

 

The festival was a time to enjoy the successful reaping of rice and wheat with food offerings made in honor of the moon. Today, it is still an occasion for outdoor reunions among friends and relatives to eat mooncakes and watch the moon, a symbol of harmony and unity. The festival is celebrated with many cultural or regional customs, among them:

 

Burning incense in reverence to deities including Chang'e.

Performance of dragon and lion dances, which is mainly practiced in southern China and Vietnam.

  

Imperial dishes served on this occasion included nine-jointed lotus roots which symbolize peace, and watermelons cut in the shape of lotus petals which symbolize reunion. Teacups were placed on stone tables in the garden, where the family would pour tea and chat, waiting for the moment when the full moon's reflection appeared in the center of their cups. Owing to the timing of the plant's blossoms, cassia wine is the traditional choice for the "reunion wine" drunk on the occasion. Also, people will celebrate by eating cassia cakes and candy.

 

Food offerings made to deities are placed on an altar set up in the courtyard, including apples, pears, peaches, grapes, pomegranates, melons, oranges, and pomelos. One of the first decorations purchased for the celebration table is a clay statue of the Jade Rabbit. In Chinese folklore, the Jade Rabbit was an animal that lived on the moon and accompanied Chang'e. Offerings of yellow beans and cockscomb flowers were made to the Jade Rabbit.

 

In Vietnam, cakes and fruits are not only consumed, but elaborately prepared as food displays. For example, glutinous rice flour and rice paste are molded into familiar animals. Pomelo sections can be fashioned into unicorns, rabbits, or dogs. Villagers of Xuân La, just south of Hanoi, produce tò he, figurines made from rice paste and colored with natural food dyes. Into the early decades of the twentieth century of Vietnam, daughters of wealthy families would prepare elaborate centerpieces filled with treats for their younger siblings. Well-dressed visitors could visit to observe the daughter's handiwork as an indication of her capabilities as a wife in the future. Eventually the practice of arranging centerpieces became a tradition not just limited to wealthy families

 

from Wikipedia

 

A short excerpt from an article entitled 'Royal Pains - What's in a Dame?' in the Nov. 2015 Town and Country magazine. Pages 210-211.

 

Britain's honors system, founded on more rugged battlefields, has been around since the a Middle Ages. Norman Kings bestowed knighthoods, orders of chivalry, and heraldry titles as part of England's feudal government, replacing the Anglo Saxon tradition of rewarding faithful service and gallantry in battle with grants of land, money, or weapons. Until the early 19th. century British chivalric orders were dispensed only to members of the aristocracy (heraldry dukes, earls, marquise's, and barons) and distinguished military figures.

These days Britain's system consists of six main orders of chivalry, each with its own ranks (as many as seven) and two orders of merit. They all have the statutes that dictate the size and colors of the corresponding insignia (badges, stars, ribbons, and sashes) ; how, when, and where they are worn; and post-nominal abbreviations. One of the cardinal rules of the current system is that British titles cannot be bought. Titles were blatantly sold by William the Conquerer during the 11th. century, and again in 1917, when the going rate for a knighthood was 10,000 £ and a hereditary baronetcy could be purchased for a whopping 40,000 £.

Today, in order of seniority and prestige, the chivalric orders are: the Most Noble Order of the Garter (relating to England and Wales); the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle (for Scotland); the Most Honourable Order of the Bath (for Senior Civil Servants and military officers); the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George (diplomats and colonial servants); the Royal Victorian Order (for services to the crown); the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (for miscellaneous military and civil services). For snob value no honor outranks the Most Noble of the Garter, Britain's oldest order of chivalry. Founder in 1344, it is awarded at the sovereign's pleasure, as a personal gift, and is limited to the monarch, the Prince of Wales, and 24 members, known as Knights Companions or Ladies Companions.

To some ears "Garter" is a comical name for such a coveted prize. According to the legend it was begun after "a trivial mishap" at a court ball when King Edward III was dancing with his alleged mistress Joan, Countess of Salisbury. When her garter slithered to her ankle, nearby courtiers sniggered at her humiliation. The king, in an act of chivalry, stooped to pick up the garter and affix it to his own knee, declaring in French, "Honi soit qui mal y pense. Tel qui s'en rit aujourd'hui, s'honorerea de la porter," or "Shame on him who thinks evil of it. Those who laugh at it today will be proud to wear it in the future."

The Garter has for centuries been awarded to distinguished statesmen and military figures like the dashing Earl of Moubtbatten, who was appointed to the order in 1946. By the mid-1950's, however, some knights complained that standards were slipping. "The trouble with the Order of the Garter these days," the 7th. Duke of Wellington remarked, "is that it is full of field marshals and people who do their own washing-up." To me, it was an excellent article. Unfortunately I could not locate the author's name.

 

Garter Day: www.flickr.com/photos/britishmonarchy/albums/721576447897...

 

Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense - Empire. "Shame on him who thinks ill of it".

 

www.flickr.com/photos/21728045@N08/9851675205/in/photolis...

 

A possible seal for sealing envelopes with sealing wax. I didn't look at it closely. Who knows, it may be a broken spoon fixed to a base. I'll have to return. I returned and it looks like a sealing stamp.

 

K.G. - The Most Noble Order of the Garter -

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_the_Garter

 

The Most Noble Order of the Garter is an English order of chivalry with a history stretching back to medieval times; today it is the world's oldest national order of knighthood in continuous existence and the pinnacle of the British honours system. Its membership is extremely limited, consisting of the Sovereign and not more than twenty-five full members, or Companions. Male members are known as Knights Companions, whilst female members are known as Ladies Companions (not Dames, as in most other British chivalric orders). The Order can also include certain extra members (members of the British Royal Family and foreign monarchs), known as "Supernumerary" Knights and Ladies. The Sovereign alone grants membership of the Order; the Prime Minister does not tender binding advice as to appointments, as he or she does for most other orders.

 

As the name suggests, the Order's primary emblem is a garter bearing the motto "Honi soit qui mal y pense" (which means "Shame on him who thinks ill of it") in gold letters. The Garter is an actual accessory worn by the members of the Order during ceremonial occasions; it is also depicted on several insignia.

 

Most British orders of chivalry cover the entire kingdom, but the three most exalted ones each pertain to one constituent nation only. The Order of the Garter, which pertains to England, is most senior in both age and precedence; its equivalent in Scotland is The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle. Whilst the Order of the Thistle was certainly in existence by the sixteenth century and possibly has medieval origins (or even, according to more fanciful legends, dates to the eighth century), the foundation of the institution in its modern form dates only to 1687. In 1783 an Irish equivalent, The Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick, was founded, but since the independence of the greater part of Ireland the Order has fallen dormant (its last surviving knight died in 1974).

  

History:

 

The Order was founded circa 1348 by Edward III as "a society, fellowship and college of knights." Various more precise dates ranging from 1344 to 1351 have been proposed; the wardrobe account of Edward III first shows Garter habits issued in the autumn of 1348. At any rate, the Order was most probably not constituted before 1346; the original statutes required that each member admitted to the Order already be a knight (what would today be called a knight bachelor), and several initial members of the Order were first knighted in that year.

 

Various legends have been set forth to explain the origin of the Order. The most popular one involves the "Countess of Salisbury" (it may refer to Joan of Kent, the King's future daughter-in-law, or to her then mother-in-law, whom Edward is known to have admired). Whilst she was dancing with the King at Eltham Palace, her garter is said to have slipped from her leg to the floor. When the surrounding courtiers sniggered, the King picked it up and tied it to his own leg, exclaiming "Honi soit qui mal y pense." (The French may be loosely translated as "Shame on him who thinks ill of it"; it has become the motto of the Order.) According to another myth, Richard I, whilst fighting in the Crusades, was inspired by St George to tie garters around the legs of his knights; Edward III supposedly recalled the event, which led to victory, when he founded the Order.

  

Composition:

 

Sovereign and Knights

 

Since its foundation, the Order of the Garter has included the Sovereign and Knights Companions. The Sovereign of the United Kingdom serves as Sovereign of the Order.

  

Queen Elizabeth II in Garter Robes:

 

The Prince of Wales is explicitly mentioned in the Order's statutes and is by convention created a Knight Companion; aside from him, there may be up to twenty-four other Knights Companions. In the early days of the Order, women (who could not be knighted), were sometimes associated with the Order under the name "Ladies of the Garter," but they were not full companions. Henry VII, however, ended the practice, creating no more Ladies of the Garter after his mother Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Derby (appointed in 1488).

 

Thereafter, the Order was exclusively male (except, of course, for the occasional female Sovereign) until 1901, when Edward VII created Queen Alexandra (his wife) a Lady of the Garter. Throughout the 20th century women continued to be admitted to the Order, but, except for foreign female monarchs, they were not full members of the Order until 1987, when it became possible, under a statute of Elizabeth II, to appoint "Ladies Companions."

 

In addition to the regular Knights and Ladies Companions, the Sovereign can also appoint "Supernumerary Knights". This concept was introduced in 1786 by George III so that his many sons would not count towards the limit of twenty-five companions set by the statutes; in 1805, he extended the category so that any descendant of George II could be created a Supernumerary Knight. Since 1831, the exception applies to all descendents of George I. Such companions, when appointed, are sometimes known as "Royal Knights."

 

From time to time, foreign monarchs have also been admitted to the Order; and for two centuries they also have not counted against the limit of twenty-five companions, being (like the Royal Knights aforementioned), supernumerary. Formerly, each such extra creation required the enactment of a special statute; this was first done in 1813, when Alexander I, Emperor of Russia was admitted to the Order. Many European monarchs are in fact descended from George I and can be appointed supernumerarily as such, but a statute of 1954 authorizes the regular admission of foreign Knights and Ladies without further special statutes irrespective of descent. The appellation "Stranger Knights," which dates to the middle ages, is sometimes applied to foreign monarchs in the Order of the Garter.

 

Generally, only foreign monarchs are made Stranger Knights or Ladies; when The Rt Hon. Sir Ninian Stephen (an Australian citizen) and Sir Edmund Hillary (from New Zealand) joined the Order, they did so as Knights Companions in the normal fashion. The British Sovereign is the head of state of both these countries, which were formerly British colonies.

 

Formerly, whenever vacancies arose, the Knights would conduct an "election," wherein each Knight voted for nine candidates (of which three had to be of the rank of Earl or above, three of the rank of Baron or above, and three of the rank of Knight or above). The Sovereign would then choose as many individuals as were necessary to fill the vacancies; he or she was not bound to choose the receivers of the greatest number of votes. Victoria dispensed with the procedure in 1862; thereafter, all appointments were made solely by the Sovereign. From the eighteenth century onwards, the Sovereign made his or her choices upon the advice of the Government. George VI felt that the Orders of the Garter and the Thistle had become too linked with political patronage; in 1946, with the agreement of the Prime Minister (Clement Attlee) and the Leader of the Opposition (Winston Churchill), he returned these two orders to the personal gift of the Sovereign.

 

Knights of the Garter could also be degraded by the Sovereign, who normally took such an action in response to serious crimes such as treason. The last degradation was that of James Butler, 2nd Duke of Ormonde, who had participated in the Jacobite Rebellion and had been convicted upon impeachment, in 1716. During the First World War, Knights who were monarchs of enemy nations were removed by the "annulment" of their creations; Knights Companions who fought against the United Kingdom were "struck off" the Rolls. All such annulments were made in 1915.

 

The Knights who were removed were:

Francis Joseph, Emperor of Austria

William II, Emperor of Germany

Ernst August, 3rd Duke of Cumberland

Prince Albert William Henry of Prussia

Ernest, Grand Duke of Hesse and the Rhine

William, Crown Prince of Germany

William II, King of Württemberg

The only Knight Companion to be struck off the Rolls was Prince Charles Edward, 2nd Duke of Albany.

 

Poor Knights:

 

At the original establishment of the Order, twenty-six "Poor Knights" were appointed and attached to the Order and its chapel at St. George's Chapel, Windsor. The number was not always maintained; by the seventeenth century, there were just thirteen Poor Knights. At his restoration, Charles II increased the number to eighteen. After they objected to being termed "poor", William IV renamed them the Military Knights of Windsor.

 

Poor Knights were originally impoverished military veterans. They were required to pray daily for the Sovereign and Knights Companions; in return, they received a salary, and were lodged in Windsor Castle. Today the Military Knights, who are no longer necessarily poor, but are still military pensioners, participate in the Order's processions, escorting the Knights and Ladies of the Garter, and in the daily services in St George's Chapel. They are not actually members of the Order itself, nor are they necessarily actual knights: indeed few if any have been knights.

 

Officers:

 

The Order of the Garter has six officers:

the Prelate

the Chancellor

the Registrar

the King of Arms

the Usher

the Secretary

The offices of Prelate, Registrar and Usher were created upon the Order's foundation; the offices of King of Arms and Chancellor were created during the fifteenth century, and that of Secretary during the twentieth.

 

The office of Prelate is held by the Bishop of Winchester, traditionally one of the senior bishops of the Church of England. The office of Chancellor was formerly held by the Bishop of the diocese within which Windsor fell— at one point, the Bishop of Salisbury, but after boundary changes the Bishop of Oxford. Later, the field was widened so that, for example, the Stuart courtier Sir James Palmer served as Chancellor from 1645 although he was neither a prelate nor even a companion (although he was a Knight Bachelor). Today, however, one of the companions serves as Chancellor. The Dean of Windsor is, ex officio, the Registrar.

 

Garter King of Arms is the head of the College of Arms (England's heraldic authority) and thus the "principal" herald for all England (along with Wales and Northern Ireland). As his title suggests, he also has specific duties as the heraldic officer of the Order of the Garter, attending to the companions' crests and coats of arms, which are exhibited in the Order's chapel (see below). The modern (1904) office of Secretary has also been filled by a professional herald.

 

The Order's Usher is the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod. He is also the Serjeant-at-Arms of the House of Lords (although his functions there are more often performed by his deputy, the Yeoman Usher). The title of his office comes from his staff of office, the Black Rod.

  

Vestments and accoutrements:

 

Sovereign and Knights:

 

For the Order's great occasions, such as its annual service each June in Windsor Castle, as well for coronations, the Companions wear an elaborate costume:

 

Today Knights of the Garter wear their distinctive habits over ordinary suits or military uniforms. For the coronation of George IV in 1821, this version of Jacobean dress was devised.

Most importantly (although hardly visible), the Garter is a buckled velvet strap worn around the left calf by men and on the left arm by women. Originally light blue, today the Garter is dark blue. Those presented to Stranger Knights were once set with several jewels. The Garter bears the Order's motto in gold majuscules.

The mantle is a blue velvet robe. Knights and Ladies Companions have worn mantles, or coats, since the reign of Henry VII. Once made of wool, they had come to be made of velvet by the sixteenth century. The mantle was originally purple, but varied during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries between celestial blue, pale blue, royal blue, dark blue, violet and ultramarine. Today, mantles are dark blue in colour, and are lined with white taffeta. The mantles of the Sovereign and members of the Royal Family end in trains. Sewn onto the left shoulder of the mantle is a shield bearing St George's cross, encircled by a Garter; the Sovereign's mantle is slightly different, showing instead a representation of the star of the Order (see below). Attached to the mantle over the right shoulder are a crimson velvet

hood and surcoat, which have lost all function over time and appear to the modern observer simply as a splash of colour. Today the mantle, which includes two large gold tassels, is worn over a regular suit or military uniform.

The hat is of black velvet, and bears a plume of white ostrich and black heron feathers.

Like the mantle, the collar was introduced during Henry VII's reign. Made of pure gold, it weighs 30 troy ounces (0.93 kilogram). The collar is composed of gold knots alternating with enamelled medallions showing a rose encircled by the blue garter. During Henry VII's reign, each garter surrounded two roses—one red and one white—but he later changed the design, such that each garter now encircles just one red rose. The collar is worn around the neck, over the mantle.

The George, a three-dimensional figurine of St George on horseback slaying a dragon, colourfully enamelled, is worn suspended from the collar.

 

Queen Victoria wearing the Garter around her arm.

Aside from these special occasions, however, much simpler insignia are used whenever a member of the Order attends an event at which decorations are worn.

The star, introduced by Charles I, is an eight-pointed silver badge; in its centre is an enamel depiction of the cross of St George, surrounded by the Garter. (Each of the eight points is depicted as a cluster of rays, with the four points of the cardinal directions longer than the intermediate ones.) It is worn pinned to the left breast. Formerly, the stars given to foreign monarchs were often inlaid with jewels. (Since the Order of the Garter is the UK's senior order, a member will wear its star above that of other orders to which he or she belongs; up to four orders' stars may be worn.)

 

The broad riband, introduced by Charles II, is a four inch wide sash, worn from the left shoulder to the right hip. (Depending on the other clothing worn, it either passes over the left shoulder, or is pinned beneath it.) The riband's colour has varied over the years; it was originally light blue, but was a dark shade under the Hanoverian monarchs. In 1950, the colour was fixed as "kingfisher blue". (Only one riband is worn at a time, even if a Knight or Lady belongs to several orders.)

The badge (sometimes known as the Lesser George) hangs from the riband at the right hip, suspended from a small

 

Insignia of the Order of the Garter:

gold link (formerly, before Charles II introduced the broad riband, it was around the neck). Like the George, it shows St George slaying the dragon, but it is flatter and monochromatically gold. In the fifteenth century, the Lesser George was usually worn attached to a ribbon around the neck. As this was not convenient when riding a horse, the custom of wearing it under the right arm developed.

However, on certain "collar days" designated by the Sovereign, members attending formal events may wear the Order's collar over their military uniform or eveningwear. The collar is fastened to the shoulders with silk ribbons. They will then substitute the broad riband of another order to which they belong (if any), since the Order of the Garter is represented by the collar.

 

Upon the death of a Knight or Lady, the insignia must be returned to the Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood. The badge and star are returned personally to the Sovereign by the nearest male relative of the deceased.

 

Poor Knights:

 

Poor Knights originally wore red mantles, each of which bore the cross of St George, but did not depict the Garter. Elizabeth I replaced the mantles with blue and purple gowns, but Charles I returned to the old red mantles. When the Poor Knights were renamed Military Knights, the mantles were abandoned. Instead, the Military Knights of Windsor now wear the old military uniform of an "army officer on the unattached list": black trousers, a scarlet coat, a cocked hat with a plume, and a sword on a white sash.

 

Officers:

 

The officers of the Order also have ceremonial vestments and other accoutrements that they wear and carry for the Order's annual service. The Prelate's and Chancellor's mantles are blue, like that of the knights (but since the Chancellor is now a member of the Order, he simply wears a knight's mantle), those of other officers crimson; all are embroidered with a shield bearing the Cross of St George. Garter King of Arms wears his tabard.

 

Assigned to each officer of the Order is a distinctive badge that he wears on a chain around his neck; each is surrounded by a representation of the garter. The Prelate's badge depicts St George slaying a dragon; the Garter within which it is depicted is surmounted by a bishop's mitre. The Chancellor's badge is a rose encircled by the Garter. The badge of Garter Principal King of Arms depicts the royal arms impaled (side-by-side) with the cross of St George. The Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod's badge depicts a knot within the Garter. The Registrar has a badge of a crown above two crossed quills, the Secretary two crossed quills in front of a rose.

 

The Chancellor of the Order bears a purse, embroidered with the royal arms, containing the Seal of the Order. The Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod carries his staff of office, the Black Rod. At the Order's great occasions, Garter Principal King of Arms bears his baton of office as a king of arms; he does not usually wear his crown.

  

Chapel:

 

The Chapel of the Order is St. George's Chapel, Windsor, located in the Lower Ward of Windsor Castle. It was founded for

 

At the order's annual gathering and service, the sovereign and companions — such as George VI and Queen Elizabeth, shown here — process through Windsor Castle to St. George's chapel.

the Order in 1475. The order once held frequent services at the Chapel, but they became rare in the eighteenth century. Discontinued after 1805, the ceremony was revived by George VI in 1948 and it has become an annual event. On a certain day each June, the members of the Order (wearing their ceremonial vestments and insignia) meet in the state apartments in the Upper Ward of Windsor Castle, then (preceded by the Military Knights) process on foot down through the castle to St George's Chapel for the service. If there are any new knights, they are installed on this occasion. After the service, the members of the Order return to the Upper Ward by carriage.

 

Each member of the Order, including the Sovereign, is allotted a stall in the quire of the chapel, above which his or her heraldic devices are displayed. Perched on the pinnacle of a knight's stall is his helm, decorated with a mantling and topped by his crest. Under English heraldic law, women other than monarchs do not bear helms or crests; instead, the coronet appropriate to the Lady's rank is used (see coronet). The crests of the Sovereign and Stranger Knights who are monarchs sit atop their crowns, which are themselves perched on their helms. Below each helm, a sword is displayed.

 

Above the crest or coronet, the knight's or lady's heraldic banner is hung, emblazoned with his or her coat of arms. At a considerably smaller scale, to the back of the stall is affixed a piece of brass (a "stall plate") displaying its occupant's name, arms and date of admission into the Order.

 

Upon the death of a Knight, the banner, helm, mantling, crest (or coronet or crown) and sword are taken down. No other newly admitted Knight may be assigned the stall until (after the funeral of the late Knight or Lady) a ceremony marking his or her death is observed at the chapel, during which Military Knights of Windsor carry the banner of the deceased Knight and offer it to the Dean of Windsor, who places it upon the altar. The stall plates, however, are not removed; rather, they remain permanently affixed somewhere about the stall, so the stalls of the chapel are festooned with a colourful record of the Order's Knights (and now Ladies) throughout history.

  

Precedence and privileges:

 

Knights and Ladies of the Garter are assigned positions in the order of precedence, coming before all others of knightly rank, and above baronets. (See order of precedence in England and Wales for the exact positions.) Wives, sons, daughters and

 

The arms of Knights and Ladies (as well as the Sovereign) may be encircled by the Garter.

daughters-in-law of Knights of the Garter also feature on the order of precedence; relatives of Ladies of the Garter, however, are not assigned any special precedence. (Generally, individuals can derive precedence from their fathers or husbands, but not from their mothers or wives.)

 

The Chancellor of the Order is also assigned precedence, but this is purely academic since today the Chancellor is always also a Knight Companion, with a higher position by that virtue.

 

(In fact, it is unclear whether the Chancellor's tabled precedence has ever come into effect, since under the old system the office was filled by a diocesan bishop of the Church of England, who again had higher precedence by virtue of that office than any that the Chancellorship could bestow on him.)

 

Knights Companions prefix "Sir," and Ladies Companions prefix "Lady," to their forenames. Wives of Knights Companions may prefix "Lady" to their surnames, but no equivalent privilege exists for husbands of Ladies Companions. Such forms are not used by peers and princes, except when the names of the former are written out in their fullest forms.

 

Knights and Ladies use the post-nominal letters "KG" and "LG," respectively. When an individual is entitled to use multiple post-nominal letters, KG or LG appears before all others, except "Bt" (Baronet), "VC" (Victoria Cross) and "GC" (George Cross).

 

The Sovereign, Knights and Ladies Companions and Supernumerary Knights and Ladies may encircle their arms with a representation of the Garter; and since it is Britain's highest order of knighthood, the Garter will tend to be displayed in preference to the insignia of any other order, unless there is special reason to highlight a junior one. (They may further encircle the Garter with a depiction of Order's collar, but this very elaborate version is seldom seen.) Stranger Knights, of course, do not embellish the arms they use at home with foreign decorations such as the Garter; likewise, while the UK Royal Arms as used in England are encircled by the Garter, in Scotland they are surrounded by the circlet of the Order of the Thistle instead. (In Wales and Northern Ireland, the English pattern is followed.)

 

Knights and Ladies are also entitled to receive heraldic supporters. These are relatively rare among private individuals in the UK. While some families claim supporters by ancient use and others have been granted them as a special reward, only peers, Knights and Ladies of the Garter and Thistle, and Knights and Dames Grand Cross and Knights Grand Commanders of certain junior orders are entitled to claim an automatic grant of supporters (upon payment of the appropriate fees to the College of Arms).

  

Current members and officers:

 

Sovereign: HM The Queen

Knights and Ladies Companions:

HRH The Prince of Wales KG KT GCB OM AK QSO PC ADC (1958)

His Grace The Duke of Grafton KG DL (1976)

The Rt Hon. The Lord Richardson of Duntisbourne KG MBE TD PC DL (1983)

The Rt Hon. The Lord Carrington KG GCMG CH MC PC JP DL (1985)

His Grace The Duke of Wellington KG LVO OBE MC DL (1990)

Field Marshal The Rt Hon. The Lord Bramall KG GCB OBE MC JP (1990)

The Rt Hon. The Viscount Ridley KG GCVO TD (1992)

The Rt Hon. The Lord Sainsbury of Preston Candover KG (1992)

The Rt Hon. The Lord Ashburton KG KCVO DL (1994)

The Rt Hon. The Lord Kingsdown KG PC (1994)

The Rt Hon. Sir Ninian Stephen KG AK GCMG GCVO KBE (1994)

The Rt Hon. The Baroness Thatcher LG OM PC FRS (1995)

Sir Edmund Hillary KG ONZ KBE (1995)

Sir Timothy Colman KG JP (1996)

His Grace The Duke of Abercorn Bt KG (1999)

Sir William Gladstone of Fasque and Balfour Bt KG DL (1999)

Field Marshal The Rt Hon. The Lord Inge KG GCB DL (2001)

Sir Antony Arthur Acland KG GCMG GCVO (2001)

His Grace The Duke of Westminster KG OBE TD DL (2003)

The Rt Hon. The Lord Butler of Brockwell KG GCB CVO PC (2003)

The Rt Hon. The Lord Morris of Aberavon KG PC QC (2003)

The Rt Hon. Sir John Major KG CH (2005)

The Rt Hon. The Lord Bingham of Cornhill KG PC (2005)

The Rt Hon. The Lady Soames LG DBE (2005)

(one vacancy following the death of The Rt Hon. Sir Edward Heath KG MBE)

 

Royal Knights and Ladies (supernumerary knights and ladies descended from George I):

HRH The Duke of Edinburgh KG KT OM GBE AC QSO PC (1947)

HRH The Duke of Kent KG GCMG GCVO (1985)

HRH The Princess Royal LG LT GCVO QSO (1994)

HRH The Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO (1997)

HRH Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy LG GCVO (2003)

 

Stranger Knights and Ladies:

HRH Grand Duke Jean sometime Grand Duke of Luxembourg (1972)

HM The Queen of Denmark (1979)

HM The King of Sweden (1983)

HM The King of Spain (1988)

HM The Queen of the Netherlands (1989)

HIM The Emperor of Japan (1998)

HM The King of Norway (2001)

 

Officers:

Prelate: The Rt Revd Michael Scott-Joynt (Lord Bishop of Winchester)

Chancellor: The Rt Hon. The Lord Carrington KG GCMG CH MC PC DL

Registrar: The Rt Revd David Conner (Dean of St George's Chapel, Windsor)

King of Arms: Peter Llewellyn Gwynn-Jones Esq. CVO (Garter Principal King of Arms)

Secretary: Patric Dickinson Esq. CVO (Richmond Herald)

Usher: Lt-Gen. Sir Michael Willcocks KCB (Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod).

 

Try this beam of Masonic light:

www.flickr.com/photos/21728045@N08/2128203765/

our table centerpiece for autumn, again.

 

+7 more 365 photos at the blog!

eng.tzar.ru/museums/palaces/catherine_park/regular/hermitage

 

Pavilions like this with a name taken from the French language were a common feature of regular gardens in the eighteenth century. They were intended to enable the owner of the estate to rest and dine in the company of a select few and were located in the “wild” area of the park. In order to avoid the inhibiting presence of servants, such pavilions were usually fitted with mechanisms that enabled the tables to be raised and lowered.

 

The Hermitage pavilion in the Regular Park (the Catherine Park) at Tsarskoye Selo was originally designed by Mikhail Zemtsov. The laying of the foundations began in the spring of 1744 and was completed by autumn that same year. In 1749, however, the facades of the pavilion that was by that time built were reconstructed in accordance with a new project devised by Rastrelli. The unique signature of Empress Elizabeth’s chief architect is present in the exceptionally complex aspects that the building presents to the viewer when seen from close by.

 

Two years later, in keeping with Rastrelli’s concept, the master stucco-workers Giovanni Battista Giani and G.-F. Partier installed 68 large and small capitals on the columns of the Hermitage and 28 more on the pilasters. The architect also included sculpture in the external decoration of the pavilion: eight statues stood on the pedestals of the balustrade at the base of the octagonal dome, while four others crowned the roofs of the cabinets. The central dome was topped by a sculptural group depicting The Rape of Proserpine. The building was further adorned by sixteen statues placed between the groups of columns on the facades of the cabinets. These stood on pedestals embellished with rocailles and, judging by what can be seen on drawings and engravings, they were all different. Statues of Glory on large pediments supported a magnificent cartouche containing the Empress’s monogram.

In 1753 the stuccowork was covered in gilding and the facades were painted: the white columns and architraves, the golden mouldings and sculpture were strikingly set off by the blue-green “salady” colour of the walls. The roof, originally green, was painted white in 1755 and the statues and garlands adorning it glistened with gold. The decoration of the facades of the Hermitage was completed at the same time as its interior decoration, which was begun in 1748.

 

Placed on a terrace paved with black and white marble slabs, the pavilion was encircled by an elaborately shaped moat with two small bridges. The moat was bordered by a balustrade that was also decorated with statues and vases. The moat and the wild grove were intended to inspire a mood of melancholy solitude, put people in a contemplative frame of mind and inspire recollections. In the words of Christian Hirschfeld, an expert on the theory of park design, “the mysterious gloom and darkness of a spot, deep solitude and solemn silence, the magnificent features of nature will not fail to invest the mind with a certain feeling and oblige it to serious refelction.” The moat, however, was never filled with water, of which there was a constant shortage in Tsarskoye Selo (this fact is borne out by archive documents and archaeological research carried out in 2006) and in 1777 it was filled in on the orders of Catherine II, the new mistress of the residence.

 

The Hermitage pavilion was never reconstructed after the mid-eighteenth century and so its interior decoration has come down to us practically unaltered. The rectangular central hall is connected by four galleries leading diagonally from it to four “cabinets” with square floor-plans. The décor of the Hermitage’s main hall, created by Rastrelli, is particularly interesting. Thanks to the wide windows that also served as doors to the balconies, the hall is transfused with light. Between the windows Rastrelli placed mirrors in carved and gilded frames that merge with the surrounds of the painted dessus-de-portes. Originally the hall contained dining-tables with hoists. The purpose of the hall was indicated by the subject of Giuseppe Valeriani’s ceiling painting – Jupiter and Juno invite the celestials to a table laid and set with luxurious tableware. Valeriani took the subjects for the painted panels above the mirrors in the central hall from Ovid’s Metamorphoses: Bacchus and Ariadne, Apollo Pursuing Daphne, Bacchus Crowning Daphne with a Crown of Stars and The Rape of Europa.

 

The ceiling paintings in the galleries running out to the cabinets were painted by Antonio Peresinotti. Their subjects echoed the bas-reliefs on the facades of the Hermitage and depicted cupids with allegorical attributes of the seasons.

 

I know a girl who's tough but sweet

She's so fine, she can't be beat

She's got everything that I desire

Sets the summer sun on fire

I want candy

I want candy

I want candy

I want candy

 

Lyrics from Aaron Carter

Doesn't matter what version you find of this song, it's got an awesome beat.

 

.:M.LAW:. hallloween pergola adult

:[P]:- Huna Wall Panel One

{moss&mink} Classic Sofa

[-BLUE SKY-] Potted Pumpkins

{moss&mink} Double Coffee table

R(S)W Pumpkin Candy Bowl

R(S)W Pumpkin Candy Bowl

* Mister Pumpkins * Cuddle Pumpkin with Heads RARE

* Mister Pumpkins * Blue Head Decoration

* Mister Pumpkins * Pink Head Decoration

{moss&mink} Neons - Trick or Treat

{moss&mink} Neons - I Want Candy!

MI Harvest Moon Tree Light x2

hive // basket of mini pumpkins . spilled x2

MI Harvest Moon Pumpkin Light x2

 

I'm wearing:

TRUTH / Athena

MG - Necklace - Royal Autumn Forest Acorn -Short

{me.} Skull Necklace // SILVER (spine)

[Canimal] Victoria Black

SPIRIT - Noel leggings [Maitreya Lara]

AZOURY - Laurette Heels Onyx [Maitreya]

Catwa head, Maitreya body

 

Landscape includes items by Studio Sky, Heart and DDD

... /file_thumbview/74644769/1

Today the September cycle of The Arcade opens their doors to public. This time we have a little surprise for you: 22769 presents you a second -exclusive- Gacha Set at the venue.

 

With Fall already knocking on our doors it's that time of the year where you visit all the Harvest Fest in your neighbourhood. And with this inpiration we have created the 22769 - Harvest Fest Gacha.

 

With every Pull (50L$) you will win one of the items (randomly selected) from the list below:

 

RARE:

The Little Barn - LI 36 - 15,1 x 10,1 x 8,7 meters

 

COMMONS:

Farmhouse Chair - 8 single sit animations - LI 2

Farmhouse Table* - LI 5

Autumn Dishes* - LI 2

Party Flags* - LI 5

Barn A Frame* - LI 2

Pumpkin in Jar* - LI 4

Vintage Wheelbarrow* - LI 5

Boxtree in Bucket Rust* - LI 2

Boxtree in Bucket Metal* - LI 2

Boo Sign Rust* - LI 2

Boo Sign Metal* LI 2

Bunch of Pumpkins Orange* - LI 2

Bunch of Pumpkins Pale* - LI 2

Barn Chandelier* - Light/Intensity on touch - LI 4

Distressted Rug* - LI 1

 

Items marked with Asterix are decoration only items.

 

All items are original creator mesh with materials enabeled.

 

Next Owner Permissions on all items are no-copy, mod, trans - used scripts and animations may have different permissions.

 

The 22769 - Harvest Fest will be exclusive available at The Arcade : September 2017. On October 2017 this Gacha Set will be retiered.

 

You can see a Preview of the 22769 - Harvest Fest displayed at the 22769 inworld location here: maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Wooden%20Bay/36/124/23

 

You can visit The Arcade here:

maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/The%20Arcade/138/131/32

 

** Gacha is a Game of Luck for every pull at the Gacha Machine you get a randomly selected item in return. **

Here are some of my latest creations..Th

 

This creation has been needle felted from scratch using wool fibers and a very pointy felting needle. No patterns or glue were used

 

This creation has been needle felted from scratch using wool fibers and a very pointy felting needle. No patterns or glue were used. Please check my profile for availability

 

This creation has been needle felted from scratch using wool fibers and a very pointy felting needle. No patterns or glue were used. Please check my profile for availability. Enjoy!

 

These are lovingly hand crafted using a

 

These are lovingly hand crafted using a needle felting needle and wool fleece. No glue, thread or patterns were used. Please see my profile for availability. Thank you and Enjoy!

:fallen_leaf: Blog :fallen_leaf:

wp.me/p1AuqN-3PT

 

:sound2:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=JthlUyCfED4

 

- - - - - - - -

Style. Yeriak

 

Hair. | tram G0823 hair @88collaborator

 

Dress. | Moon Amore Grateful Outfit @88collaborator

 

Decoration. | KITE The Garden Studio /keke autumn bell jar. moths / Soy. Pipe table wood/anc "wild garden"lawn {yellow green} / anc lavender {sunlight} / anc leaping sparks {yellow}

 

Pose. |Ana Poses All I see @Mainstore

  

Style. Jona

 

Hairbase. |Dura B&G80 Dark @TMD

 

Shirt. |BlankLIne V-NeckT White @TMD

 

Pants. | Gabriel Stripe Sweat Pants Gray

 

Jeero: "Lookers here, RDP! These candy corners are done! Don't they look deliciousers?"

 

RDP: "I hate to tell you guys, but these are not for eating. They are table top decorations for the Autumn season."

 

Ox: "So we can'ters eat them?"

 

RDP: "No, Ox. You may not and cannot eat them. You will ruin your teeth."

 

Ket: "These really lookers so neat! Can'ters I have a little bite?"

 

RDP: "Would you guys like it better if I got you some choco-chipper cookies?"

 

All: "Yessers!"

 

22 August 2017

I like using toys or other tangible objects with books that I read to my daughters. This little mouse is good to use with "If You Give a Mouse a Cookie" or any of the "If You Give a Mouse..." books; and the nursery rhyme "Hickory Dickory Dock."

 

There's a another little mouse I made using a lighter gray wool felt. These two make a nice pair. Please see my Flickr profile for the link to my Etsy shop.

Around the House

Phenix City, Alabama USA

 

The photo in this posting was taken by, and is © 2008 Shawn & Melissa Fowler and as such, may not be reused for any reason without prior consent.

The Mid-Autumn Festival is a harvest festival celebrated by ethnic Chinese and Vietnamese peoples. The festival is held on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Chinese Han calendar and Vietnamese calendar (within 15 days of the autumnal equinox), on the night of the full moon between early September to early October of the Gregorian calendar.

 

Mainland China listed the festival as an "intangible cultural heritage" in 2006 and a public holiday in 2008. It is also a public holiday in Taiwan. Among the Vietnamese, it is considered the second-most important holiday tradition.

 

The Chinese have celebrated the harvest during the autumn full moon since the Shang Dynasty (c. 16th to 10th century BCE). Morris Berkowitz, who studied the Hakka people during the 1960s, theorizes that the harvest celebration originally began with worshiping Mountain Gods after the harvest was completed. The celebration as a festival only started to gain popularity during the early Tang Dynasty (618–907 CE). One legend explains that Emperor Xuanzong of Tang started to hold formal celebrations in his palace after having explored the Moon-Palace. The term mid-autumn (中秋) first appeared in Rites of Zhou, a written collection of rituals of the Western Zhou Dynasty (1046–771 BCE).

 

Empress Dowager Cixi (late 19th century) enjoyed celebrating Mid-Autumn Festival so much that she would spend the period between the thirteenth and seventeenth day of the eighth month staging elaborate rituals.

 

For the Vietnamese, in its most ancient form, the evening commemorated the dragon who brought rain for the crops. Celebrants would observe the moon to divine the future of the people and harvests. Eventually the celebration came to symbolize a reverence for fertility, with prayers given for bountiful harvests, increase in livestock, and human babies. Over time, the prayers for children evolved into a celebration of children. Confucian scholars continued the tradition of gazing at the moon, but to sip wine and improvise poetry and song. By the early twentieth century in Hanoi, the festival had begun to assume its identity as a children's festival.

 

An important part of the festival celebration is moon worship. The ancient Chinese believed in rejuvenation being associated with the moon and water, and connected this concept to the menses of women, calling it "monthly water". The Zhuang people, for example, have an ancient fable saying the sun and moon are a couple and the stars are their children, and when the moon is pregnant, it becomes round, and then becomes crescent after giving birth to a child. These beliefs made it popular among women to worship and give offerings to the moon on this evening. In some areas of China, there are still customs in which "men don't worship the moon and the women don't offer sacrifices to the kitchen gods."

 

Offerings are also made to a more well-known lunar deity, Chang'e, known as the Moon Goddess of Immortality. The myths associated with Chang'e explain the origin of moon worship during this day. One version of the story is as follows, as described in Lihui Yang's Handbook of Chinese Mythology:

 

In the ancient past, there was a hero named [Hou] Yi who was excellent at archery. His wife was Chang'e. One year, the ten suns rose in the sky together, causing great disaster to people. Yi shot down nine of the suns and left only one to provide light. An immortal admired Yi and sent him the elixir of immortality. Yi did not want to leave Chang'e and be immortal without her, so he let Chang'e keep the elixir. But Feng Meng, one of his apprentices, knew this secret. So, on the fifteenth of August in the lunar calendar, when Yi went hunting, Feng Meng broke into Yi's house and forced Chang'e to give the elixir to him. Chang'e refused to do so. Instead, she swallowed it and flew into the sky. Since she loved her husband very much and hoped to live nearby, she chose the moon for her residence. When Yi came back and learned what had happened, he felt so sad that he displayed the fruits and cakes Chang'e liked in the yard and gave sacrifices to his wife. People soon learned about these activities, and since they also were sympathetic to Chang'e they participated in these sacrifices with Yi.

 

Yang describes another version of the tale which provides a different reason for Chang'e ascending to the moon:

 

After the hero Houyi shot down nine of the ten suns, he was pronounced king by the thankful people. However, he soon became a conceited and tyrannical ruler. In order to live long without death, he asked for the elixir from Xiwangmu. But his wife, Chang'e, stole it on the fifteenth of August because she did not want the cruel king to live long and hurt more people. She took the magic potion to prevent her husband from becoming immortal. Houyi was so angry when discovered that Chang'e took the elixir, he shot at his wife as she flew toward the moon, though he missed. Chang'e fled to the moon and became the spirit of the moon. Houyi died soon because he was overcome with great anger. Thereafter, people offer a sacrifice to Chang'e on every lunar fifteenth of August to commemorate Chang'e's action.

  

Modern celebration

 

The festival was a time to enjoy the successful reaping of rice and wheat with food offerings made in honor of the moon. Today, it is still an occasion for outdoor reunions among friends and relatives to eat mooncakes and watch the moon, a symbol of harmony and unity. The festival is celebrated with many cultural or regional customs, among them:

 

Burning incense in reverence to deities including Chang'e.

Performance of dragon and lion dances, which is mainly practiced in southern China and Vietnam.

  

Imperial dishes served on this occasion included nine-jointed lotus roots which symbolize peace, and watermelons cut in the shape of lotus petals which symbolize reunion. Teacups were placed on stone tables in the garden, where the family would pour tea and chat, waiting for the moment when the full moon's reflection appeared in the center of their cups. Owing to the timing of the plant's blossoms, cassia wine is the traditional choice for the "reunion wine" drunk on the occasion. Also, people will celebrate by eating cassia cakes and candy.

 

Food offerings made to deities are placed on an altar set up in the courtyard, including apples, pears, peaches, grapes, pomegranates, melons, oranges, and pomelos. One of the first decorations purchased for the celebration table is a clay statue of the Jade Rabbit. In Chinese folklore, the Jade Rabbit was an animal that lived on the moon and accompanied Chang'e. Offerings of yellow beans and cockscomb flowers were made to the Jade Rabbit.

 

In Vietnam, cakes and fruits are not only consumed, but elaborately prepared as food displays. For example, glutinous rice flour and rice paste are molded into familiar animals. Pomelo sections can be fashioned into unicorns, rabbits, or dogs. Villagers of Xuân La, just south of Hanoi, produce tò he, figurines made from rice paste and colored with natural food dyes. Into the early decades of the twentieth century of Vietnam, daughters of wealthy families would prepare elaborate centerpieces filled with treats for their younger siblings. Well-dressed visitors could visit to observe the daughter's handiwork as an indication of her capabilities as a wife in the future. Eventually the practice of arranging centerpieces became a tradition not just limited to wealthy families

 

from Wikipedia

 

YAY i won !!!! avatarstyle.net/2011/10/22/winner-of-october-photo-contest/

   

for Photo Contest - Opulent Magazine & Avatar Style

original size of this photo

 

Photographer and Models: Sway Dench

 

Credits

 

She:

Skin - Curio

Hair - Truth

Ears - Plastik

Glasses - Reek

Top - Atomic

Knit Jacket - KiiToS

Pants - mon tissu

Boots - Anexx

 

He:

Skin - Redgrave

Shirt - Reek

Cardigan - Reek

Pants - Last Call

Boots - Reek

 

Background:

Table, Stumps and Decoration - Sway's

Skydome - Turnip's

Trees - Botanical

Mushrooms - Coyura Creation

Ground Fog - Heart

Grass and Log - Zacca

 

Main Pumpkin: Sway's - Pumpkin Carving Set

 

Opulent Magazine Photo Contest

 

Sway's Blog

  

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