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Equipo Principal: ZWO ASI 1600 mm-pro + SW Explorer 200p + SW Coma Corrector 0.9x + EQ6-R-Pro + ZWO EAF

 

Equipo guía: guidescope 60/240 mm, camara guia ZWO ASI 120mm mini

 

*Gain 139, -20 º C, Ha 7nm 2" Optolong, 116x180"

*Gain 139, -20 º C, Oiii-CCD 6.5 nm 2" Optolong, 122x180"

*Gain 139, -20 º C, Sii-CCD 6.5 nm 2" Optolong, 144x180"

 

100 Darks

100 Flats por filtro

  

Polar Align: SharpCap 3.2

Adquisición: SGP 3.1

Procesado: Pixinsight 1.8.8, PS

www.astrobin.com/8flgba

 

Always a difficult object to me, so small, so dim... and always come back and I try to take something... if you've ever struggled with it, you know what I mean :D a perfect example of planetary nebula.

 

The Owl Nebula is a planetary nebula located approximately 2,030 light years away in the constellation Ursa Major. The nebula is approximately 8,000 years old.

 

In that case is a little bit more that 50 hours of integration, using only a small area of the sensor because the small size of this object, heavily cropped after a drizzle process and still at 0.34 arcsec/pixel.

 

Technical card

Imaging telescopes or lenses:Teleskop Service TS Photoline 107mm f/6.5 Super-Apo, Altair Astro RC250-TT 10" RC Truss Tube

 

Imaging cameras:ZWO ASI1600MM-Cool, ZWO ASI183MM-Cool

 

Mounts:Skywatcher EQ6R Pro, Mesu 200 Mk2

 

Guiding telescopes or lenses:Celestron OAG Deluxe, Teleskop Service TSOAG9 Off-Axis Guider

 

Guiding cameras:ZWO ASI174 Mini, ZWO ASI290 Mini

 

Focal reducers:Riccardi Reducer/Flattener 0.75x, Telescope-Service TS 2" Flattener

 

Software:Pleiades Astrophoto PixInsight , Seqence Generator Pro

 

Filters:Astrodon O-III 36mm - 5nm, Astrodon S-II 36mm - 5nm, Astrodon R Gen.2 E-series 36mm, Astrodon G Gen.2 E-series 36mm, Astrodon B Gen.2 E-series 36mm, Astrodon HA 36mm - 5nm, Astrodon L Gen.2 E-series 36mm

 

Accessories:ZWO EFW, MoonLite NiteCrawler WR30, MoonLite CSL 2.5" Focuser with High Res Stepper Motor

 

Resolution: 2604x2322

 

Dates:Jan. 14, 2020, Feb. 21, 2020, Feb. 23, 2020, Feb. 25, 2020, Feb. 26, 2020

 

Frames:

Astrodon B Gen.2 E-series 36mm: 90x30" (gain: 75.00) -20C bin 1x1

Astrodon G Gen.2 E-series 36mm: 90x30" (gain: 75.00) -20C bin 1x1

Optolong Ha 7nm 36mm: 165x600" (gain: 200.00) -20C bin 1x1

Astrodon O-III 36mm - 5nm: 163x600" (gain: 183.00) -15C bin 1x1

Astrodon R Gen.2 E-series 36mm: 90x30" (gain: 75.00) -20C bin 1x1

 

Integration: 56.9 hours

 

Avg. Moon age: 16.01 days

 

Avg. Moon phase: 19.43%

 

Astrometry.net job: 3292004

 

RA center: 11h 14' 48"

 

DEC center: +55° 1' 8"

 

Pixel scale: 0.337 arcsec/pixel

 

Orientation: 269.282 degrees

 

Field radius: 0.163

 

Locations: AAS Montsec, Àger, Lleida, Spain

 

Data source: Own remote observatory

 

Remote source: Non-commercial independent facility

Date: Nov.1, 2019 / Nov.29, 2019 / Dec. 27, 2019 / Feb.23, 2020

Location: Amagi Highland, Shizuoka Pref., Japan / Asagiri Arena, Shizuoka Pref., Japan

Optics: SIGMA 135mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art (f/2.2)

Mount: SWAT-310 V-spec(single axis autoguiding)

Autoguider: QHY5L-II, LM75JC, PHD2

Camera: Canon EOS 6D (mod)

ISO speed: 1600

Exposure: 30x180sec.x11panels

Processing: PixInsight, Astro Pixel Processor

Recently I reprocessed my data on the Horsehead nebula in Orion. The images were taken using a private amateur telescope hosted at Astrocamp in Spain and remotely operated from Groningen, The Netherlands.

 

What I believe to be interesting about this image is that it is a composite of Hydrogen Alpha emissions and Near Infrared. Normally a large amount of background stars are obscured by the interstellar dust present in the larger nebula complex. The Near Infrared (700nm long pass) allowed me to "peek through" some of that dust to reveal the stars behind it. The color scheme is somewhat psychedelic and one that I came up with myself by using a linear combination of the two channels and mapping the NIR data to Red and the Hydrogen Alpha to Green. The Blue was a synthetic channel. This pallet might not hold any real scientific value, but it does give a nice effect since it approximates the human RGB somewhat (although with less deep reds, obviously)

 

Technical details of the equipment:

 

- Imaging telescope:

Orion UK CT12L

- Imaging cameras:

ZWO ASI 1600MM Cooled Pro

- Mount:

Paramount ME

- Guiding telescope:

Starlight Xpress OAG

- Guiding camera:

Starlight Xpress Lodestar Autoguider X2

- Filters:

Chroma Bessel-i & Ha 3nm

- Accessories:

Starlight Xpress Maxi wheel, TS Optics Wynne 2,5" coma corrector, Moonlite CF 2,5" focuser

Sony a7s et un vieux canon fd 50mm f1.8

120x 6secondes de poses, empilage avec Sequator.

Traitements: lightroom, topaz denoise ai.

SUMMARY

This probable supernova was easily seen, but photometry not done as Wikisky offline.

DISCOVERY.

All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN): 2020.2.24.210; Mag 17.8 (2/24)

TECHNICAL INFORMATION / RESULTS

Total exposure 55 min (11 x 5 min, red filter; binned 2x2; scale 0.93 asec/px)

Time: 2020.2.25.473 UT

Photometry: Not done

Astrometry: RA 13 53 12.48 Dec -40 21 49.6

These data were collected remotely from New Mexico Skies Observatory, Mayhill, New Mexico, USA by Joseph Brimacombe, Coral Towers Observatory, Cairns, Far North Queensland, Australia, using a 51-cm RCOS telescope, STXL-6303 camera and PME II mount.

FITS file available on request from jbrimaco@bigpond.net.au

Further technical information in image

NOTE

Am currently only able to process and post approximately one tenth of the data I collect about supernovae. Will provide raw or reduced data upon request.

LINK

David Bishop's Latest Supernovae Website www.rochesterastronomy.org/supernova.html

Transient Name Server: wis-tns.weizmann.ac.il/

Image of my dome at New Mexico Skies: www.flickr.com/photos/43846774@N02/4178147950/

Images of Coral Towers Observatory:

www.flickr.com/photos/43846774@N02/4146338187/

www.flickr.com/photos/43846774@N02/5193027166/

www.flickr.com/photos/43846774@N02/10435690624/

Image of Savannah Skies Observatory: www.flickr.com/photos/43846774@N02/14945498139/

New Mexico Skies: www.newmexicoskies.com/

Warrumbungle Observatory: www.tenbyobservatory.com/

Savannah Skies Observatory: savannahskies.smugmug.com/Savannah-Skies-Australia/

All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN): www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~assassin/index.shtml

Info about supernovae: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernova

Sony a6000a - Samyang 135/2.0

100 x 30s

1 stack of 50 images, Canon 800D at ISO 800, Asahi Takumar 135mm f2.5 lens at f4.0, 1m exposures, Omegon Lx2 tracking mount. 45 darks, 120 biases. Processed in PixInsight as below

 

***** Integration

lightvortexastronomy tutorial (www.lightvortexastronomy.com/tutorial-pre-processing-cali...)

 

* CC defect list + master dark

* weighing: (15*(1-(FWHM-FWHMMin)/(FWHMMax-FWHMMin)) + 15*(1-(Eccentricity-EccentricityMin)/(EccentricityMax-EccentricityMin)) + 20*(SNRWeight-SNRWeightMin)/(SNRWeightMax-SNRWeightMin))+50

* img 1507 ref

 

*****Linear processing

  

*** Crop

 

*** DBE, 1.5 tolerance

 

*** Star mask creation

* star_mask_large: large scale structure 2, small scale 1, noise threshold 0.1, scale 6, binarize

* star_mask_small: noise 0.15, scale 4, small scale 3 comp 1, smoothness 8, binarize, midtones = 0.02

* star_mask_all - sum of star masks

 

*** Color calibration

* SNCR 0.5 on green, preserve lightness

* apply a trous wavelet transform to star mask all, keep residual of 4 (blurred_star_mask)

* invert image

* apply SNCR 0.9 on green, preserve lightness

* remove mask

* invert image again

* Background neutralization

* Color calibration w/background and structure detection

  

*** Deconvolution

* Created range mask - extracted luma, applied standard STF, then histogram shadow = 0.2 mids = 0.25 high = 1 and a trous wavelet transform keeping residual of 4

* Deconvolve with range mask on, 100 interations, luminance, custom PSF, dark 0.025 bright 0.004, local deringing with star_mask_large, wavelet regularization

 

*** Star reduction

* Apply, erosion operator w/star mask small, 4 iterations 0.15

 

*** Linear noise reduction

jonrista.com/the-astrophotographers-guide/pixinsights/eff...

 

*TGV - small noise

Created TGV masks - extracted luminosity, standard stretch (tgv_luma_mask), curved it with black point at ~0.2 and white at ~0.5, moved histogram point to middle (tgv_mask)

apply tgv mask inverted to the image, give luma mask as local support

TGV chroma str 7 edge protection 2E-4 smoothness 2 iterations 500

TGV luma str 5 edge protection 1E-5 smoothness 2 iterations 500

 

*MMT - larger noise and TGV artifacts

Created MMT mask - extract luminosity, standard stretch, move histogram point to 75%, apply low range -0.5. Apply inverted

MMT mask - 8 layers, threshold 10 10 7 5 5 2.5 2 2 on rgb

  

*****Nonlinear

 

***Initial stretch

* extract luminance, autostretch, apply to hist - luminance channel

* Apply masked stretch to main image, 100 iterations, HSV Value, background reference

* Extract a and b channels from masked stretch image

* Combine

 

***Gradient HDR compression, default settings

 

***Denoise

* Using luma mask, apply MLT with 4 layers, amount 0.5, 2 iterations first 2 layers and 1 iteration layers 3 and 4, thresholds 3 2 1 0.5

 

*** Clean up background

*Range mask 0.35-1, smoothness 2

*Add star_mask all for star_galaxy_mask. Apply inverted

*MLT on 8 layers on chroma, bias layers 5-8 -1

*histogram transformation, mids 0.6

  

***MLT stretch

www.stelleelettroniche.it/en/2014/09/astrophoto/m42-ngc19...

 

**Initial (fine details)

* created a new multiscale linear transform, kept 4 layers using linear interpolation

* diffed from original image to create a "blurred" version of original image

* extracted luminance from original, used as mask on blurred version

* used curves to create s shape in luminance and pump up saturation a lot

* pixelmath sum the 3, rescaled, back to original image

 

**Second (galactic colors)

* new multiscale linear transform, keep 5 layers

* diff from original

* extract luminance from blurred image, to use as a mask

* masked blurred image with its own luminance, gave it s-shaped RGB curve, big boost in saturation. Shift pinks to blues with H curve

* pixelmath sum the 3, rescaled, back to original image

 

**Third (galaxy arms shape)

* new multiscale linear transform, keep layers 6, 7, 8

* diff from original

 

** extract M31 structure only

* extract luminance from blurred image

* iif(inellipse(2400, 2200, 1250, 400), multi678_L, 0)

* clone out stars and M110

* histogram midtones to 0.2 - m31_mask

 

*masked blurred image with own luminance, gave big boost in RGB/K, some boost in saturation

* pixelmath sum the 3, rescaled, back to original image

 

***Local histogram equalization - kernel 192, contrast 1.5, blend 0.5

 

***Further galaxy adjustments (from www.lightvortexastronomy.com/tutorial-example-m31-androme...)

* Create galaxy_mask: Range mask 0.35-1, smoothness 2, iif(inellipse(2400, 2200, 1300, 450), galaxy_mask, 0), substract star_mask_all, clean edges with clone tool

* Apply

* MLT 8 layers chrominance, pump up bias on 5-8 0.025 0.025 0.05 0.05

* Color saturation raised blues a bit (widely) and reds quite a bit more (more narrowly)

* Remove mask

  

*** Darken

* DarkStructureEnhancer, 8 layers, 0.7, 3x3

* DarkStructureEnhancer, 8 layers, 0.7, 5x5

 

* Very slight s-shape on all image luminance

 

*** Sharpen

* Sharpen with multiscale linear transform, bias layers 2-6 (0.05, 0.05, 0.025, 0.012, 0.006)

 

M82 (aussi connu comme NGC 3034 et sous le nom de galaxie du Cigare) est une galaxie à sursaut d'étoiles située dans la constellation de la Grande Ourse à environ 12,7 millions d'années-lumière de la Voie lactée.

 

M82 présente une large raie HII et des régions d'hydrogène ionisé

 

M82 est environ 5 fois plus lumineuse que la Voie lactée et son centre est des centaines de fois plus lumineux que celui de notre galaxie. On pense que l'intense formation d'étoiles provient de l'interaction gravitationnelle avec sa voisine M81

 

matériel :

lunette FSQ-106ED, extender x1.6

caméra ZWO ASI 178MC-C équipée avec un filtre IDAS-LPS-D1

Monture NEQ6 pro goto

60 poses de 120s soit 2 heures d'images empilées

NGC 6992 is the eastern region of the Veil Nebula, a supernova remnant in the constellation of Cygnus. Recent measurements put the supernova remnant at around 2400 light years distant. Imaged on the night of 29th.November 2019.

NEQ6 PRO

TSAPO130Q @f/5

QHY163M Gain 325 Offset 100 -20C

Baader 2" 7nm Ha and 8.5nm OIII Narrowband filters.

Ha 40 x 90sec

OIII 40 x 90sec subs

Processed using starnet++, Pixinsight and Photoshop.

Having an exquisite symmetry, containing approximately a million Sun like stars, all tied together gravitationally, these objects are often referred to as “astronomical fossils”, because they retain chemical compositions that were found in the time of the origin of their neighbouring galaxy. This image reveals the clusters faint yellow hue, emanated by the predominant volume of older yellow stars, with a scattering of young blue stars that mostly inhabit the centre of the field. Globular clusters have a sorting process, with larger mass stars to the centre and relatively smaller stars sorted to the outer. Studies reveal that stars within the cluster have a circular, spiral orbit, moving in then out of the centre, distance out determined by their mass.

 

47 Tucanae is the second largest globular cluster in the nights sky, roughly that of a full moon in size, and is located directly adjacent to the Small Magellanic Cloud, not far from the south celestial pole.

  

Hi resolution link:

live.staticflickr.com/65535/49568536448_6b4f1a6220_o.jpg

 

Information about the image:

 

Center (RA, Dec):(6.027, -72.102)

Center (RA, hms):00h 24m 06.561s

Center (Dec, dms):-72° 06' 06.704"

Size:48.6 x 32.2 arcmin

Radius:0.486 deg

Pixel scale:0.732 arcsec/pixel

Orientation:Up is 187 degrees E of N

 

Instrument: Planewave CDK 12.5 | Focal Ratio: F8

Camera: STXL-11000 + AOX | Mount: AP900GTO

Camera Sensitivity: Lum: BIN 1x1, RGB: BIN 2x2

Exposure Details: Total: 15.9hours | Lum: 24 x 600 sec, 12 x 300 sec, 24 x 180 sec, 24 x 60 sec, 24 x 30 sec, 24 x 10 sec [6.9hr], RGB 450sec x 24 each [9.0hrs]

Viewing Location: Central Victoria, Australia.

Observatory: ScopeDome 3m

Date: June-September 2019

Software Enhancements: CCDStack2, CCDBand-Aid, PS, Pixinsight

Author: Steven Mohr

 

Designation: NGC 2070, Caldwell 103

Constellation: Dorado.

Location: Large Magellanic Cloud.

------

Visual magnitude: +5.0

Apparent size: 40 x 25 arc-minutes.

Diameter: 1833 light years.

Distance: 160,000 light years.

------

Total exposure: 106 min.

SkyWatcher Esprit 120 mm apochromatic 3-element refractor.

Camera: ZWO ASI 071 MC Pro.

Date: 2020-02-19

Made from 6 light frames by Starry Landscape Stacker 1.8.0. Algorithm: Min Horizon Noise

Constellation: Camelopardalis.

Session: 19-20 Feb 2020.

 

Follow me on:

Instagram | www.infinitalavita.com

 

Some on sale on microstocks here:

Shutterstock | Adobe Stock.

 

NGC 2403 (also known as Caldwell 7) is an intermediate spiral galaxy in the constellation Camelopardalis. It is an outlying member of the M81 Group, and is approximately 8 million light-years distant. It bears a similarity to M33, being about 50,000 light years in diameter and containing numerous star-forming H II regions. The northern spiral arm connects it to the star forming region NGC 2404. NGC 2403 can be observed using 10×50 binoculars. NGC 2404 is 2000 light-years in diameter, making it one of the largest known H II regions, even larger than Tarantula Nebula in Large Magellanic Cloud. This H II region represents striking similarity with NGC 604 in M33, both in size and location in galaxy.

 

Source: Wikipedia

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• Optics: Takahashi FSQ-85EDX super apo (quadruplet 85/450).

• Mount: Skywatcher N-EQ6 Pro (mod).

• Filters: IDAS LPS D1 (50,8mm).

• Accessories: QHYCCD QHYCFW-2-M motorized filter wheel, Primalucelab Sesto Senso, Primalucelab Eagle 3S.

• Camera: QHY163C color camera.

 

• Lights (IDAS LPS D1): 105x180s | binning 1x1 | Gain 60 | Offset 30 | cooled - 20°c.

 

• Integration: 5.25 hours.

• Correction: Darks, Flats, Bias

 

• Skies quality: Bortle 5/10, SQM 19.55.

• Setup sampling: 1,74 arcsec/pixel.

• Field of view: 2.25 ° x 1.7 °.

 

• Notes: Cropped a little bit, light polluttion, more nights.

 

• Softwares: Pixinsight, Adobe Photoshop.

 

© www.infinitalavita.com • Cristian Cestaro

Ngc2359 Casco de Thor

Objeto sacado en dos noches

03/08/19 en San Nicolas del Puerto.

15/02/20 en Hornachuelos

 

El equipo empleado fue...

 

Telescopio: ED80 Sky Watcher + 0.85X

Montura: LXD75 Meade

Cámara: QHY163m

Guiado: MiniScope 50mm Orion, CámaraGuia/QHY5 L-II c

Adquisición: APT (AstroPhotographyTool) v3.63/v3.70

Apilado y procesado: PixInsight, Photoshop

 

SQM: 21.84

 

Tomas

Ha 7nm: 18x600s

RGB: 20x180s

Expo Total: 6h

Temperatura sensor: -10°C

Distancia Focal: 510mm

F/ 6,3

 

celfoscastrofotografia.blogspot.com/2019/03/bendita-sierr...

 

celfoscastrofotografia.blogspot.com/2020/02/terminando-tr...

Wiki…

This nebula is known by numerous common names, like the Swan or Omega Nebula, with a Messier catalogue number of M17, the Swan Nebula is between 5,000 and 6,000 light-years from Earth and it spans some 15 light-years in diameter. The cloud of interstellar matter of which this nebula is a part is roughly 40 light-years in diameter and has a mass of 30,000 solar masses. The total mass of the Swan Nebula itself is an estimated 800 solar masses.

 

It is considered one of the brightest and most massive star-forming regions of our galaxy. Its local geometry is similar to the Orion Nebula except that it is viewed edge-on rather than face-on.

 

The open cluster NGC 6618 lies embedded in the nebulosity and causes the gases of the nebula to shine due to radiation from these hot, young stars; however, the actual number of stars in the nebula is much higher - up to 800, 100 of spectral type earlier than B9, and 9 of spectral type O, plus over a thousand stars in formation on its outer regions. It is also one of the youngest clusters known, with an age of just 1 million years.

 

Hi resolution link:

live.staticflickr.com/65535/49556080057_86314ae4f5_o.jpg

 

Information regarding this image:

Center (RA, Dec):(275.232, -16.073)

Center (RA, hms):18h 20m 55.675s

Center (Dec, dms):-16° 04' 23.874"

Size:48.2 x 31.8 arcmin

Radius:0.481 deg

Pixel scale:0.733 arcsec/pixel

Orientation:Up is 117 degrees E of N

 

Instrument: Planewave CDK 12.5 | Focal Ratio: F8

Camera: STXL-11000 + AOX | Mount: AP900GTO

Camera Sensitivity: Lum: BIN 1x1, RGB: BIN 2x2

Exposure Details: Total: 18.25 hours | Lum: 37 x 900 sec [9.25hr], RGB 450sec x 24 each [9.0hrs]

Viewing Location: Central Victoria, Australia.

Observatory: ScopeDome 3m

Date: April-July 2019

Software Enhancements: CCDStack2, CCDBand-Aid, PS, Pixinsight

Author: Steven Mohr

 

The Pleiades, also known as the Seven Sisters and Messier 45, are an open star cluster located in the constellation Taurus. Robert Burnham states in his Celestial Handbook, "undoubtedly the most famous galactic star cluster in the heavens, known and regarded with reverence since remote antiquity."

 

Work in progress as I would like to add several more hours if/when the weather cooperates!

 

Did you know that J.R.R. Tolkien told us in The Hobbit that the Pleiades were known in the ancient days if Middle-earth as Remmirath, or "The Netted Stars"?

 

Tech Specs: Williams Optic Redcat 51, Celestron CGEM-DX mount (pier mounted), ZWO ASI071MC-Pro running at -10C, 30 x 120 second exposures, GAIN 200, guided using a ZWO ASI290MC and Orion 60mm guide scope. Captured using SharpCap v3.2. Image date: January 29, 2020. Location: The Dark Side Observatory, Weatherly, PA, USA.

New processed Data from November/December

240 x 60 s

Sony a7 III

Skywatcher 150/750 PDS

This is an image combing 7 photographs taken by Japanese amateur astronomers. The total exposure is 27hrs. The data is modified by snct-astro.

 

See: reflexions.jp/tenref/orig/2020/01/14/10005/ (Japanese)

I could enjoy imaging of the comet through Saturday night.

 

The comet was drifting fast toward north northwest in Ursa Major. Whitish coma was round and bright. Whitish dust tail was short toward southwest. Greenish ion coma was faint, and the diameter was around 8 minutes at the night. North is up, and east is to the left.

 

The comet is expected to be bright, around magnitude 5 in May, 2020, though it comes too near to Sun, and we can not see it then.

 

Sun Distance: 2.228 AU

Earth Distance: 1.400 AU

 

equipment: Takahashi FSQ130ED and Canon EOS R-sp4II, modified by Seo-san on Vixen AXD equatorial mount, autoguided with Fujinon 1:2.8/75mm C-Mount Lens, Pentax x2 Extender, Starlight Xpress Superstar Autoguider, GPUSB, and PHD2 Guiding with comet tracking on

 

exposure: 7 times x 15 minutes, 5 x 4 min, and 5 x 1 minute at ISO 3,200 and f/5.0

 

The first exposure started at 13:30:22 February 15, 2020UTC. Shorter exposure frames were taken after moonrise.

 

site: 1,549m above sea level at lat. 35 48 51 North and long. 138 39 16 East in Yanagidaiwa Makioka Yamanasi 山梨県牧丘柳平

 

SQM-L was 21.42 toward the imaging field at the night.

The region around the Horsehead Nebula (IC 434) and the Flame nebula in constellation Orion is dominatred by dramatic hydrogen alpha emission colors and blue reflection colors of bright stars. This color version is a combination of hydrogen-alpha data shot with a Baader 7nm filter and RGB data.

 

69 x 240s gain 139 h-alpha

18 x 120s gain 76 red

18 x 120s gain 76 green

18 x 120s gain 76 blue

 

ASI1600mmpro at TS 130/910 mm apo with 0.79x reducer.

"Head Shot" of the Fish Head Nebula, IC 1795. (2020-02-03 & 2020-02-14)

The Fish Head Nebula (IC1795) features glowing gas and dust in a star forming area in Cassiopeia. It s part of the Heart Nebula (IC1805) complex that is located at about 6000 light years away.

Equipment & Image Details:

Celestron 8" EdgeHD scope, Celestron CGEM II mount (hypertuned), ZWOASI1600MM Pro camera. Narrowband subs: 4*1,200 sec Ha filter, 6*1,200 sec OIII filter, 3*1,200 sec SII filter.

Processed with PixInsight and Photoshop.

 

spacepaparazzi.com/

Constellation: Ursa Major.

Session: 22-23 Jan 2020 / 14 Feb 2020.

 

Follow me on:

Instagram | www.infinitalavita.com

 

Some on sale on microstocks here:

Shutterstock | Adobe Stock.

 

Messier 82 (also known as NGC 3034, Cigar Galaxy or M82) is a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. A member of the M81 Group, it is about five times more luminous than the whole Milky Way and has a center one hundred times more luminous than our galaxy's center. The starburst activity is thought to have been triggered by interaction with neighboring galaxy M81. As the closest starburst galaxy to Earth, M82 is the prototypical example of this galaxy type. SN 2014J, a type Ia supernova, was discovered in the galaxy on 21 January 2014. In 2014, in studying M82, scientists discovered the brightest pulsar yet known, designated M82 X-2.

 

Source: Wikipedia

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Messier 81 (also known as NGC 3031 or Bode's Galaxy) is a spiral galaxy about 12 million light-years away, in the constellation Ursa Major. Due to its proximity to Earth, large size, and active galactic nucleus (which harbors a 70 million M☉ supermassive black hole), Messier 81 has been studied extensively by professional astronomers. The galaxy's large size and relatively high brightness also make it a popular target for amateur astronomers.

 

Source: Wikipedia

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• Optics: Takahashi FSQ-85EDX super apo (quadruplet 85/450).

• Mount: Skywatcher N-EQ6 Pro (mod).

• Filters: IDAS LPS D1 (50,8mm).

• Accessories: QHYCCD QHYCFW-2-M motorized filter wheel, Primalucelab Sesto Senso, Primalucelab Eagle 3S.

• Camera: QHY163C color camera.

 

• Lights (IDAS LPS D1): 178x120s | binning 1x1 | Gain 60/120 | Offset 30/80 | cooled - 20°c.

 

• Integration: 5.93 hours.

• Correction: Darks, Flats, Bias

 

• Skies quality: Bortle 5/10, SQM 19.55.

• Setup sampling: 1,74 arcsec/pixel.

• Field of view: 2.25 ° x 1.7 °.

 

• Notes: Cropped a little bit, light polluttion, more nights.

 

• Softwares: Pixinsight, Adobe Photoshop.

 

© www.infinitalavita.com • Cristian Cestaro

----------------------------------------

Designation: Caldwell 92, NGC 3372.

Constellation: Carina.

Visual magnitude: +1.0.

Apparent size: 120′ x 120′.

Diameter: 349 light years.

Distance 10,000 light years.

----------------------------------------

Date: 2020-02-14

Exposure: 68×106.6 sec = 120 min.

Camera: ZWO ASI 071 MC Pro

Telescope: Skywatcher Esprit 120

Mount: Skywatcher EQ6R

----------------------------------------

I deleted this image unintentionally, so here it is again.

  

Equipo Principal: ZWO ASI 1600 mm-pro + SW Explorer 200p + SW Coma Corrector 0.9x + EQ6-R-Pro + ZWO EAF

 

Equipo guía: guidescope 60/240 mm, camara guia ZWO ASI 120mm mini

 

*Gain 139, -15 º C, Ha 7nm 2" Optolong, 121 Lights x 180"

*Gain 139, -20 º C, Oii-CCD 6.5 nm 2" Optolong, 147 Lights x 180"

 

100 Darks

100 Flats por filtro

  

Polar Align: SharpCap 3.2

Adquisición: SGP 3.1

Procesado: Pixinsight 1.8.8, PS

Taken in back garden with pick up and go portable rig, which I just love, as can be up and running in less than 2 minutes.

Ioptron skyguider pro,

astro modded canon,

samyang 85mm F1/4 @F2.8

astronomic cls-ccd clip in filter,

astronomic Ha 12 nm clip in filter

The Great Nebula in Orion. Lots of gaseous goodness can be seen here. The Hubble Space Telescope has spotted new planets being formed around some of the stars in this image, the stars themselves being quite new, relatively speaking. This nebula lies around 1300 light years away.

 

Another attempt with the new ZWO ASI183MC camera, this time with a UV/IR Blocking filter attached

  

Image Details:

Imaging Scope: Astrotelescopes ED 80mm Refractor

Imaging Camera: ZWO ASI183MC Color

Guiding Scope: William Optics 66mm Petzval

Guiding Camera: Orion Starshoot Auto Guider

Acquisition Software: Sharpcap

Guiding Software: PHD2

Light Frames: 18*5 mins

Stacked in Deep Sky Stacker

Processed in Photomatix Pro HDR and Adobe Lightroom

Object: NGC1491 (Fossil Footprint Nebula) HST Palette

NGC1491 (SH2-206 and LBN 704) is a bright emission nebula and HII region, located about 10,700 light-years away in the Perseus arm of the Milky Way Galaxy in the constellation Perseus.

 

Acquisition Date: 12/19/2019 – 12/24/2019

 

Location: Western Massachusetts

 

- Camera: FLI ML1620 @ -25°C

- Telescope: Astro-TECH AT130 with APM Riccardi APO -Flattener 1.0x

- Mount: Astro-Physics AP1100

- Guide scope: Celestron Off Axis Guider

- Guide Camera: ASI174 mini

 

Filters:

-Chroma 3nm Hydrogen Alpha (Ha): 12 x 30min. (360 min) bin 1x1

-Chroma 3nm Oxygen III (OIII):15 x 30min. (450 min.) bin 1x1

-Astrodon 3nm Sulfur II (SII):16 x 30min. (480 min) bin 1x1

Total Exposure:1290 min. (21.5hr)

 

Limiting Magnitude: 5.1

The beautiful and majestic barred spiral galaxy, NGC1365, lays in the depth of space some 56 million light-years away in the constellation of Fornax. But NGC1365 is not alone, as it forms part of the enormous Fornax galaxy cluster which is said to be the second most richest galaxy cluster within 100 million light years from earth [with the Virgo cluster of galaxies being largest].

 

This galaxy shows intense star forming regions, defined by the pinkish, magenta tones surrounding the galaxy core and out into and along its arms. The nature of this barred typed spiral galaxy resides in the shape of its core, and how it extends to its arms. With highly defined dust lanes that etch across this bar section, the barred shape is easily confirmed. Astronomical studies reveal the gravitational nature of this bar structure serves as a perfect funnelling mechanism, channelling stellar material, such as stars, dust and gas, towards the centre that ultimately feed a discrete, super-massive black hole.

 

Matter of interest: To the right of NGC1365, and between what seems to be a distant elliptical galaxy, are a number of very faint and possibly fine galaxy arm extensions, or tidal tails that may be associated to NGC1365. Their positions extend out far and wide of that of the main structure. This observation may only be that of coincidentally aligned structures.

 

This image was captured over the months of October to November 2019, with the top 23 hours of sub-exposures taken with Luminance, Red, Green and Blue filters. These sub-exposures were individually calibrated and then medium combined to create a master filter set. This master set was then combined and edited to create this final image.

 

Hi resolution version:

 

live.staticflickr.com/65535/49524185918_fdb66a3aeb_o.jpg

  

Position | Size | Orientation:

 

Center (RA, Dec):(53.400, -36.140)

Center (RA, hms):03h 33m 35.968s

Center (Dec, dms):-36° 08' 23.127"

Size:26.7 x 18.3 arcmin

Radius:0.270 deg

Pixel scale:0.733 arcsec/pixel

Orientation:Up is 305 degrees E of N

  

Information about the image:

 

Instrument: Planewave CDK 12.5 | Focal Ratio: F8

Camera: STXL-11002 + AOX | Mount: AP900GTO

Camera Sensitivity: Lum: Bin 1x1, RGB: Bin 2x2

Exposure Details: Total Hours: 23, Lum: 68 x 900 sec [17hrs], RGB 450sec x 16 each [6.0hrs]

Viewing Location: Central Victoria, Australia.

Observatory: ScopeDome 3m

Date: October - November 2019

Software Enhancements: CCDStack2, CCDBand-Aid, PS, Pixinsight

Author: Steven Mohr

 

M51 galaxy and NGC 5198

 

Very bad sky : some clouds and a lot of light

 

Full view (Scale 100%), click on the photo to zoom in, depending on your screen resolution you may have to click 1 time or more to see it at full resolution as it is a 4k photo.

  

From Paris

Sony A7S

Tamron 150-600

Star adventurer EQ mount

ISO 4000

30s

F6.3

 

81 photos

Stacking with DSS

Denoise with Topaze AI Denoise

PP with GIMP and Lightroom

  

(M51-81-v003-denoise305040test3+-denoise204020+crb+hu+-4240+stars+B300+16+X - v2+)

 

Bi color process Ha, O3.

42 x 300s - O3 (3 nm) subs

170 x 300s - Ha (5 nm) subs

Processed in PixInsight and PS.

ES ED80mm CF 0.8x FF FR

Losmandy GM811G

ASI1600 MM

L: 25x600"

R: 11x600"

G: 10x600"

B: 12x600"

 

Date: 2019/10/21

Telescope: ASA 500:3,8

Camera: FLI Proline 16803

Mount: ASA DDM 85

Exposure: LRGB total 9.6 hours

 

Procesado por Ariel Cappelletti

Processing: Pixinsight 1.8.8 and PS

 

www.chilescope.com/image-gallery/40/

del 28-01-20 al 01-02-20

 

Equipo Principal: ZWO ASI 1600 mm-pro + SW Explorer 200p + SW Coma Corrector 0.9x + EQ6-R-Pro + ZWO EAF

 

Equipo guía: guidescope 60/240 mm, camara guia ZWO ASI 120mm mini

 

*Gain 139, -20º C, Ha 7nm 2" Optolong, 52 Lights x 180"

*Gain 139, -15º C, Ha 7nm 2" Optolong, 108 Lights x 180"

*Gain 139, -18º C, Oiii-CCD 6.5 nm 2" Optolong, 98 Lights x 180"

*Gain 139, -185º C, Sii-CCD 6.5 nm 2" Optolong, 81 Lights x 180"

 

100 Darks

100 Flats por filtro

  

Polar Align: SharpCap 3.2

Adquisición: SGP 3.1

Procesado: Pixinsight 1.8.8, PS

22x 240s RGB

50 Dark

50 Bias

40 Flat

 

OTA: TS-Photon 154/600 f/4 Newton

GPU Komacorrector

IDAS LPS-D2

ZWO Asi071 MC Pro

Gain/Offset: 0/8

Temp -20°C

Guider:

ZWO Asi120mm Mini

60/240 Guidescope

Kstars/INDI/EKOS

 

Processing:

Siril v0.99.0:

Processing: Photometric CC

Processing: Mirror X

Processing: SCNR (type=0, amount=1.00, preserve=true)

Processing: Asinh Transformation: (stretch= 29.9, bp=0.00136)

Processing: Histogram Transf. (mid=0.007, lo=0.001, hi=1.000)

Gimp:

Stretch, Denoise, Sharpening, Curves

Darktable:

Denoise, Sharpening, Colors, Local Contrast

 

astrophoto.lionbit.com/fotos/12-m45

Constellation: Ursa Major.

Session: 04 Feb 2020.

 

Follow me on:

Instagram | www.infinitalavita.com

 

Some on sale on microstocks here:

Shutterstock | Adobe Stock | Alamy | Pond5.

 

Messier 97

 

The Owl Nebula (also known as Messier 97, M97 or NGC 3587) is a planetary nebula located approximately 2,030 light years away in the constellation Ursa Major. It was discovered by French astronomer Pierre Méchain on February 16, 1781. When William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, observed the nebula in 1848, his hand-drawn illustration resembled an owl's head. It has been known as the Owl Nebula ever since.

 

Messier 108

 

Messier 108 (also known as NGC 3556) is a barred spiral galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1781 or 1782. From the perspective of the Earth, this galaxy is seen almost edge-on.

 

This galaxy is an isolated member of the Ursa Major Cluster of galaxies in the Virgo supercluster. It has a morphological classification of type SBbc in the de Vaucouleurs system, which means it is a barred spiral galaxy with somewhat loosely wound arms. The maximum angular size of the galaxy in the optical band is 11′.1 × 4′.6, and it is inclined 75° to the line of sight.

 

Source: Messier 97 Wikipedia | Messier 108 Wikipedia

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

• Optics: Takahashi FSQ-85EDX super apo (quadruplet 85/450).

• Mount: Skywatcher N-EQ6 Pro (mod).

• Filters: IDAS LPS D1 (50,8mm).

• Accessories: QHYCCD QHYCFW-2-M motorized filter wheel, Primalucelab Sesto Senso, Primalucelab Eagle 3S.

• Camera: QHY163C color camera.

 

Lights (IDAS LPS D1): 160x60s | binning 1x1 | Gain 60 | Offset 30 | cooled - 20°c.

 

Integration: 2.63 hours.

Correction: Darks, Flats, Bias

 

Skies quality: Bortle 5/10, SQM 19.55.

Setup sampling: 1,74 arcsec/pixel.

Field of view: 2.25° x 1.7°.

 

Notes: Cropped a little bit, light polluttion, moon at 75%.

 

Softwares: Pixinsight, Adobe Photoshop.

 

© www.infinitalavita.com • Cristian Cestaro

The Grus Trio of galaxies is located in the Constellation of Grus, some 60 million lights years distant of Earth. Whilst the group are often referred to as The Grus Quartet, this rendition only shows the three group members who are in close proximity, with NGC7552 laying far out of this field of view.

 

The smallest of the three NGC7590 [right top], with its visibly close companion NGC7599 [top right]. NGC 7582 is a type 2 Seyfert galaxy, such a classification is due to the fact that the galaxy has an extremely bright supermassive central black hole very similar to a quasar (most energetic objects in the universe). The black hole of NGC7582 is about 10 million times the mass of our sun.

[Courtesy S&T]

 

Hi resolution link:

live.staticflickr.com/65535/49478910313_86fd28db43_o.jpg

 

Information regarding this image:

Center (RA, Dec):(349.576, -42.178)

Center (RA, hms):23h 18m 18.336s

Center (Dec, dms):-42° 10' 40.248"

Size:39.6 x 29.7 arcmin

Radius:0.413 deg

Pixel scale:0.733 arcsec/pixel

Orientation:Up is 326 degrees E of N

 

Instrument: Planewave CDK 12.5 | Focal Ratio: F8

Camera: STXL-11000 + AOX | Mount: AP900GTO

Camera Sensitivity: Lum/Ha: BIN 1x1, RGB: BIN 2x2

Exposure Details: Total: 17.6 hours | Lum: 48 x 900 sec [12.0hr], RGB 450sec x 16 each [5.6hrs]

Viewing Location: Central Victoria, Australia.

Observatory: ScopeDome 3m

Date: August-October 2019

Software Enhancements: CCDStack2, CCDBand-Aid, PS, Pixinsight

 

In late summer 2019, I got a STC Duo-Narrowband filter which allows only light from 2 very narrow bands of the EM spectrum - Hα and OIII. I've shot some pretty cool stuff with it, but always processed the image as a RGB image, since that's what the camera produced. And I've been pretty happy with doing things that way.

 

Then I discovered that you could extract Hα and OIII components of that RGB image separately to monochrome images while stacking with AstroPixel Processor. This results in images much like what you would get using a monochrome camera plus either an Hα and OIII filter separately.

 

This is the result of the Hα component.

  

-= Tech Data =-

 

-Equipment-

Imaging Scope: Sky-Watcher Quattro 250P

Mount: Celestron CGX

Imaging Camera: ZWO ASI 1600MC-Pro

Filter: SCT Duo Narrowband

Focus: Pegasus Astro Dual Motor Focuser

Guide Camera: Orion SSAG

Guide Scope: Starfield 60mm guide scope

Dew Control: Kendrick

Power: Pegasus Astro Pocket Power Box

 

- Acquisition -

∙ 37 x 5 minute exposures (185 mins total)

 

Calibration:

∙ Darks: Master dark from my dark library (2H of 120s darks)

- Bias: Master bias from my bias library (stack of 100 exposures)

 

- Software -

Acquisition / Rig Control: Sequence Generator Pro

Stacking: Astro Pixel Processor

Processing: PixInsight

Post Processing: Photoshop CC

 

Shot at the Camden Lake Provincial Wildlike Area near Moscow, Ontario.

The Triangulum Galaxy, Messier 33 or NGC 598, is a spiral galaxy 2.73 million light-years distant and located in the constellation of Triangulum. It is the third-largest member of the Local Group of galaxies, behind the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy. It is one of the most distant permanent objects that can be viewed with the naked eye. This was one I wasn't going to post because it had the biggest donut which stuck out a mile but it was a heck of a lot of data to dump. Hopefully I have picked up a way of removing donuts in Pixinsight. Imaged over 2 nights the 7th and 21st September 2019.

EQ6-R-PRO

190mm MN DS-PRO

QHY183M Gain11 Offset76 -20C

Baader 2" LRGB filter set

Luminance: 90 x 180sec subs

RGB: 12 x 240sec subs each channel

Total acquisition time 6hrs54mins

Processed using Pixinsight and Photoshop.

The aim was to work out the trapezium stars in the Grand Nebula in Orion. Image was shot with an ASI1600mmp and a TS 130/910 mm apo in wind and under a cloudy sky. Sequence was

 

180 x 1s L at gain 0

100 x 3 s R/G/B at gain 76

 

APP and PS CC2020

1 stack of 45 images, Canon 800D at ISO 800, Samyang 16mm f2 lens at f2.8, 1m exposures, Omegon Lx2 tracking mount. 45 darks, 120 biases. Processed in PixInsight as below

 

***** Integration

lightvortexastronomy tutorial (www.lightvortexastronomy.com/tutorial-pre-processing-cali...)

 

* CC defect list + master dark

* weighing: (15*(1-(FWHM-FWHMMin)/(FWHMMax-FWHMMin)) + 15*(1-(Eccentricity-EccentricityMin)/(EccentricityMax-EccentricityMin)) + 20*(SNRWeight-SNRWeightMin)/(SNRWeightMax-SNRWeightMin))+50

* img 1311 ref

 

*****Linear processing

  

*** Crop

 

*** Background extraction:

DBE tolerance 3, no points placed on the Milky Way

  

*** Color calibration

SNCR 0.5

Background neutralization

Color calibration

 

***Deconvolution

Created star mask for larger stars - large scale structure 2, small scale 1, noise threshold 0.1, scale 6,

Extracted luminance, STF autostretched, histoed peak in middle to get a range mask

Deconvolve with range mask on, 80 interations, custom PSF, dark 0.01 bright 0.004, local deringing with star mask, wavelet regularization

 

*** Star reduction (for small and mid stars)

Small star mask - noise 0.15, scale 4, small scale 3 comp 1, smoothness 8, binarize, midtones = 0.02

Range mask from that, 0.05-1

Apply, erosion operator 4 iterations 0.15

 

*** Linear noise reduction

jonrista.com/the-astrophotographers-guide/pixinsights/eff...

 

*TGV - small noise

Created TGV masks - extracted luminosity, standard stretch (tgv_luma_mask), curved it with black point at ~0.2 and white at ~0.5, moved histogram point to middle (tgv_mask)

apply tgv mask inverted to the image, give luma mask as local support

TGV chroma str 7 edge protection 2E-4 smoothness 2 iterations 500

TGV luma str 5 edge protection 1E-5 smoothness 2 iterations 500

 

*MMT - larger noise and TGV artifacts

Created MMT mask - extract luminosity, standard stretch, move histogram point to 75%, apply low range -0.5. Apply inverted

MMT mask - 8 layers, threshold 10 10 7 5 5 2.5 2 2 on rgb

  

***MLT stretch

www.stelleelettroniche.it/en/2014/09/astrophoto/m42-ngc19...

 

**Initial

* created a new multiscale linear transform, kept 4 layers using linear interpolation

* diffed from original image to create a "blurred" version of original image

* extracted luminance from original, used as mask on blurred version

* used curves to create s shape in luminance and saturation, inflection 3/4 up

* pixelmath sum the 3, rescaled, back to original image

 

**Second

* new multiscale linear transform, keep 5 layers

* diff from original

* extract luminance from blurred image, to use as a mask

* masked blurred image with its own luminance, gave it s-shaped RGB curve, slight boost in luminosity, big boost in saturation

* pixelmath sum the 3, rescaled, back to original image

 

**Third

* new multiscale linear transform, keep 8 layers

* diff from original

* extract luminance from blurred image, to use as a mask, hist stretch it (multi_8_substracted_L)

* luminosity increase (1 curve), saturation (even more)

* pixelmath sum the 3, rescaled, back to original image

  

*** Darken

* DarkStructureEnhancer, 8 layers, 0.7, 3x3

* DarkStructureEnhancer, 8 layers, 0.7, 5x5

  

*** Color saturation

* truncated star mask with pixelmath, iif(star_mask_total > 0.5, 0.4, 0)

* applied a troux wavelet transform 4 layers, extracted residuals

* applied mask inverted

* bumped reds strongly, green-blues less strong

 

*** Sharpen

* Sharpen with multiscale linear transform, bias layers 2-6 (0.05, 0.05, 0.025, 0.012, 0.006)

Grande Nébuleuse d'Orion (M42) série de 60s (21 photos, 10 darks), 90s (20 photos, 10darks) et 120s (16 photos, 10 darks). 23 offsets et 17 flats. 650mm (800mm en 24x36), F/3.5, ISO 200. Compilée dans IRIS.Traitée dans Photoshop CS4(HDR, niveaux et courbes).

 

Nikon D5300 modifié astro par Eos for Astro, Skywatcher Quattro 200p 800mm F/4 avec réducteur de focale, filtre Astronomik CLS-CCD, télécommande Twin1 ISR2 + Monture Skywatcher EQ6-R Pro.

 

Il reste un méchant artefact en bas à droite (derrière le "M42"), dont je ne comprends pas l'origine.

 

A weak aurora, photographed from Hopeman Beach.

First light for my new lens

 

1 stack of 19 images, Canon 800D at ISO 800, Takumar 135mm f2.5 lens at f4, 30s exposures, Omegon Lx2 tracking mount. 45 darks, 120 biases. Processed in PixInsight as below

 

***** Integration

lightvortexastronomy tutorial (www.lightvortexastronomy.com/tutorial-pre-processing-cali...)

 

* CC defect list + master dark

* weighing: (15*(1-(FWHM-FWHMMin)/(FWHMMax-FWHMMin)) + 15*(1-(Eccentricity-EccentricityMin)/(EccentricityMax-EccentricityMin)) + 20*(SNRWeight-SNRWeightMin)/(SNRWeightMax-SNRWeightMin))+50

* img 1135 reference

* star align - distortion relaxed to 0.3

* integration - winsorized sigma clipping

 

***** Linear processing

 

*** Crop

 

*** DBE, 0.5 tolerance

 

*** Color calibration

* SNCR 0.5

* Background neutralization (using small area under middle star as sample background - hard to find true neutrality in Orion flickr.com/photos/deepskycolors/16774216742/in/faves-1833...)

* Color calibration w/background and structure detection

  

*** Deconvolution

* Created star_mask_large - large scale structure 2, small scale 1, noise threshold 0.1, scale 8

* Created range mask - extracted luma, applied standard STF, then histogram shadow = 0.25 mids = 0.3 high = 1

* Deconvolve with range mask on, 100 interations, custom PSF, dark 0.01 bright 0.004, local deringing with star mask, wavelet regularization

 

*** Star reduction

Small star mask - noise 0.15, scale 4, small scale 3 comp 1, smoothness 8, binarize, midtones = 0.02

Range mask from that, 0.05-1

Apply, erosion operator 2 iterations 0.6 with shape oval

  

*** Linear noise reduction

jonrista.com/the-astrophotographers-guide/pixinsights/eff...

 

*TGV - small noise

Created TGV masks - extracted luminosity, standard stretch (luminance_mask), curved it with black point at ~0.2 and white at ~0.5, moved histogram point to middle (tgv_mask)

apply tgv mask inverted to the image, give luma mask as local support

TGV chroma str 7 edge protection 2E-4 smoothness 2 iterations 500

TGV luma str 5 edge protection 1E-5 smoothness 2 iterations 500

 

*MMT - larger noise and TGV artifacts

Created MMT mask - extract luminosity, standard stretch, move histogram point to 75%, apply low range -0.5. Apply inverted

MMT mask - 8 layers, threshold 10 10 7 5 5 2.5 2 2 on rgb

  

*****Nonlinear

 

***Initial stretch

*Autostretch, apply to hist

*Create full star mask, max(star_mask_large, star_mask_small)

* HDR transform, 8 layers, B3 spline, star mask applied inverted, preserve hue, lightness mask

  

***MLT stretch

www.stelleelettroniche.it/en/2014/09/astrophoto/m42-ngc19...

 

**Initial

* created a new multiscale linear transform, kept 4 layers using linear interpolation

* diffed from original image to create a "blurred" version of original image

* extracted luminance from original, used as mask on blurred version

* used curves to create s shape in luminance, inflection 3/4 up, and pump up saturation a lot

* pixelmath sum the 3, rescaled, back to original image

 

**Second

* new multiscale linear transform, keep 5 layers

* diff from original

* extract luminance from blurred image, to use as a mask

* masked blurred image with its own luminance, gave it s-shaped RGB curve, big boost in saturation

* pixelmath sum the 3, rescaled, back to original image

 

***Star and nebula mask:

Range select to catch nebulas, blur with 3 a troux wavelet iterations (removing first 5 layers), add to star mask to obtain star and nebula mask

 

***Local histogram equalization

kernel 32 contrast 1.5 amount 0.35, with star and nebula mask on

 

***Nonlinear NR

*Luminance mask, clipped shadows

*ACDNR stdev 4 chroma 2 luma, amount 0.9 chroma 0.7 luma

 

***Dark structure enhance

* 5x5, 3 iterations, amount 0.25

 

*** Sharpen

* Sharpen with multiscale linear transform, bias layers 2-6 (0.05, 0.05, 0.025, 0.012, 0.006)

   

An unfinished work. Only 53 minutes and 30 seconds of exposure.

107x30 ISO 800

Nikon D5000

CEM25P

Long Perng S400-G 66/400 F6 Apo Doublet

No autoguiding this time.

Comet C/2017 T2 (PANSTARRS).

10 poses de 180s avec l'ZWO ASI 1600 MC et Megrez 72.

Traitement SIRIL et PHOTOSHOP.

This came out better than expected!

 

I had a difficult time with clouds and only managed to capture 72 minutes worth of M42 images - The Great Orion Nebula. Not all images were great.

 

Taken under mostly cloudy skies, this was the only clear area I could find in the sky (and happily stayed that way for a little over an hour).

 

Taken with a Celestron RASA 8, matched with a ZWO 071 mcP camera. June Lake Ca, USA

Ngc5907 detta anche Galassia Lama di coltello è una galassia a spirale situata nella costellazione del Dragone. Dista dalla Terra circa 50 milioni di anni luce.

Possiede un'insolita scarsa metallicità e un'anomala carenza di stelle giganti, essendo composta per la maggior parte da giovani stelle nane (fonte wiki). Fa parte del Gruppo di NGC 5866, un piccolo gruppo di galassie contenente la Galassia Fuso.

Composizione LRGB circa 13.5 ore di integrazione a bin2

Strumentazione:

RC12GSO su EQ8

CCD G24000-Astrodon Filter LRGB

Elaborazione tramite Pixinsight/Photoshop

 

Autori: Paolo Zampolini e Giorgio Mazzacurati @3zObservatory

Picture saved with settings embedded.

www.astrobin.com/995c30/F/

Another object from this nice catalogue of faint nebula.

Long integration of 53 hours using two narrow band filters mainly, searching the limits of the equipment and my own process skills.

It's not a popular target probably because is difficult and usually is not showing so much detail due to the high dynamic range, the core is bright, really bright compare with the faint surroundings.

 

Sh2-235 is the most central and brightest nebula of an H II region known as G174+2.5; it is observed in the direction of the northern part of the Aur OB1 association and includes the nebulae catalogued as Sh2-231, Sh2-232, Sh2-233 and Sh2-235, identified as individual nebulae in the 1959 census of H II regions. Although in the optical images they appear as distinct nebulae, in reality they all belong to a single giant molecular cloud, of which some parts appear illuminated by young and hot stars. This cloud is located in Perseus' Arm at a galactic latitude that places it slightly off-center with respect to the center of the galactic disk; the distance measurements indicate a range between 1600 and 2000 parsec, so it is normally indicated as about 1800 parsec (5870 light years).

 

(descri. credits to wiki.it it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sh2-235)

 

Technical card

Imaging telescope or lens:Altair Astro RC250-TT 10" RC Truss Tube

 

Imaging camera:ZWO ASI1600MM-Cool

 

Mounts:Mesu 200 Mk2, Astro-Physics Mach-1 GTO CP4

 

Guiding telescope or lens:Celestron OAG Deluxe

 

Guiding camera:ZWO ASI174 Mini

 

Focal reducer:Riccardi Reducer/Flattener 0.75x

 

Software:Pleiades Astrophoto PixInsight , Seqence Generator Pro

 

Filters:Astrodon O-III 36mm - 5nm, Astrodon S-II 36mm - 5nm, Astrodon R Gen.2 E-series 36mm, Astrodon G Gen.2 E-series 36mm, Astrodon B Gen.2 E-series 36mm, Astrodon HA 36mm - 5nm, Astrodon L Gen.2 E-series 36mm

 

Accessories:ZWO EFW, MoonLite NiteCrawler WR30

 

Resolution: 2328x1760

 

Dates:Dec. 25, 2019, Jan. 3, 2020, Jan. 12, 2020, Jan. 15, 2020

 

Frames:

Astrodon B Gen.2 E-series 36mm: 90x30" (gain: 75.00) -20C bin 1x1

Astrodon G Gen.2 E-series 36mm: 90x30" (gain: 75.00) -20C bin 1x1

Astrodon HA 36mm - 5nm: 186x600" (gain: 200.00) -20C bin 1x1

Astrodon R Gen.2 E-series 36mm: 90x30" (gain: 75.00) -20C bin 1x1

Optolong SII 6.5nm 36mm: 121x600" (gain: 113.00) -20C bin 1x1

 

Integration: 53.4 hours

 

Avg. Moon age: 18.25 days

 

Avg. Moon phase: 55.61%

 

Astrometry.net job: 3224550

 

RA center: 5h 41' 5"

 

DEC center: +35° 49' 58"

 

Pixel scale: 1.007 arcsec/pixel

 

Orientation: 90.283 degrees

 

Field radius: 0.408

 

Locations: AAS Montsec, Àger, Lleida, Spain

 

Data source: Own remote observatory

 

Remote source: Non-commercial independent facility

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