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Lovin' Covers: www.lovlivlifereviews.com/2011/03/lovin-covers-3511.html

  

Sent away to college in America, Evangeline swore she would never return to England. Anger loses its value when tragedy forces her home to assume ownership of the family's beloved Greco-Roman museum.

 

Placing a foolish, drunken kiss on a Greek statue in the museum's basement, Evangeline unknowingly frees a Spartan prince from an evil oracle's curse. Suddenly, her lonely life is invaded by the rakish man with knowing emerald green eyes who never eats or sleeps, and seems to know her every thought and feeling.

 

Falling in love is dangerous, especially when it's with a man who has already been claimed by the bitter oracle, Demona. From the moment of her kiss, Evangeline is swept into Dorien's world of mystery, danger, and passion. The oracle's fury only mounts as they unravel Demona's darkest secrets, but not before Demona finds out about their unborn half-breed immortal twins.

 

Demona uses her knowledge of the future to manipulate and destroy, but sometimes love has a will, and a heart, of its own.

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

This painting depicts the birth of Marie de' Medici's first son, Louis XIII. Rubens designed the scene around the theme of political peace. The birth of the first male heir brings a sense of security to the royal family that they will continue to rule. In those times an heir was of the utmost importance, especially if Henri wanted to showcase his masculinity and discontinue with the pattern of the royal reproductive failure. The word dauphin is French for dolphin, a term associated with princely royalty. Henri's promiscuity made difficult the production of a legitimate heir, and rumors circulated to the extent that Henri's court artists began to employ strategies to convince the country otherwise. One of these strategies was to personify Marie as Juno or Minerva. By representing Marie as Juno, implying Henri as Jupiter, the king is seen domesticated by marriage. The queen's personification as Minerva would facilitate Henri's military prowess and her own. As a Flemish painter Rubens includes a dog in the painting, alluding to fidelity in marriage. In addition to the idea of political peace Rubens also includes the personification of Justice, Astraea. The return of Astraea to earth is symbolic of the embodiment of continuing Justice with the birth of the future king. Louis is nursed by Themis, the goddess of divine order, referring to Louis XIII birthright to one day become king. The baby is quite close to a serpent, which is a representation of Health. Rubens incorporates the traditional allegory of the cornucopia, which symbolizes abundance, to enhance the meaning of the painting by including the heads of Marie de' Medici's children who have yet to be born among the fruit. While Marie gazes adoringly at her son, Fecundity presses the cornucopia to her arm, representing the complete and bountiful family to come.

 

As a Touch-Know, Genevieve has never been required to steal more than a few paltry coins. But when a powerful stranger requires their help, her family of street-wise thieves sends her to get the most important thing they’ve ever decided to liberate. It was supposed to be a simple overnight job. Instead, Genevieve is required to appear attached to her mark, the curator of the British Museum. For Genevieve it becomes more than an act, and her problems are far more significant than the possibility of her lies being discovered.

When her family betrays her, she must make an important choice – turn to the man who has destroyed everything she holds dear, or strike out on her own.

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Identifier: adolfostahllectu00astruoft

Title: The Adolfo Stahl lectures in astronomy, delivered in San Francisco, California, in 1916-17 and 1917-18, under the auspices of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific

Year: 1919 (1910s)

Authors: Astronomical Society of the Pacific Aitken, Robert Grant, 1864-1951

Subjects: Astronomy

Publisher: San Francisco Stanford University Press

Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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of the sun-spots, or that of the companion to Siriiis,may be assigned as a direct result of the use of new orimproved apparatus; the first stellar parallax was primarilydue to Bessels manipulative skill; fifteen years of patientsearch was involved in the discovery of the asteroid Astraea;Keelers work on Saturns rings may well be regarded as pureinspiration combined with great technical skill; the discoveryof Uranus was largely chance. . . . the only safe con-clusion seems to be that there are no general rules of conductfor discovery. (Turner) It would be quite possible, then, to limit our treatment ofthe subject exclusively to instruments, the purely mechanicaladjuncts of discovery, and to describe the improvements in ourtelescopes, meridian circles, zenith telescopes, micrometers,cameras, spectrographs, and photometers. Such a view-point,though partial and inadequate, would be a legitimate one, forcertainly, in the final analysis, all astronomical discovery 1 Delivered April 6, 1917.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

PLATE XXV. The 36-Inch Refractor, Lick Observatory. Astronomical Discovery 111 depends upon such tools. Without the telescope, astronomycould have advanced but little beyond the pre-Galilean epoch.Science, like civilization itself, is a matter of tools. It would be equally permissible to approach the subjectfrom the standpoint of processes, emphasizing the astronomersmethods of handUng his tools, rather than the tools themselves.In such a treatment there would be involved a discussion ofthe accuracy necessary in astronomical processes, the searchfor minute sources of error, the methods of measuring exceed-ingly small quantities, and the patient accumulation of details.This course would lead directly to a consideration of the natureof an astronomers work, as an element in discovery. Theobjection may perhaps be raised that the routine of astronom-ical work has little to do with discovery. The objection isnot a valid one. As a matter of fact, the work of the scientistis discovery, as clo

  

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Identifier: emblemsdivinemora00qua

Title: Emblems, divine and moral

Year: 1818 (1810s)

Authors: Quarles, Francis, 1592-1644 Whittingham, Charles, 1767-1840, printer Jennings, Robert, bookseller Chiswick Press, printer

Subjects: Emblems Emblem books, English

Publisher: Chiswick : Printed at the Chiswick Press, by C. Whittingham London : Sold by R. Jennings, Poultry

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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About This Book: Catalog Entry

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Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

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glorious eyes ;Or give me faith ; and, by the eye of grace,I shall behold thee, though not face to face. 304 EMBLEMS. BOOK 5. S. AvGVST. in Psal. xxxix.Who created all things, is better than all things:who beautified all things, is more beautiful than allthings: who made strength, is stronger than allthings: who made great things, is greater than allthings: Avhatsoever thou lovest, he is that to thee:learn to love the workman in his work, the Creatorin his creature: let not that which was made byhim possess thee, lest thou lose him by whom thyselfwas made. S. AvGVST. Med, Cap. xxxvii.O thou most sweet, most gracious, most amiable,most fair, when shall I see thee? when shall I besatisfied with thy beauty? when wilt thou lead mefrom this dark dungeon, that I may confess thyname ? Epig. 12.How art thou shaded, in this veil of night,Behind thy curtain flesh ? thou seest no light,But what thy pride doth challenge as her own ;Thy flesh is high : Soul, take this curtain down. ROOK 5. S03 13.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Ps VI.M I.V. 6. 0 that I had mngs like a clove^ for then icould I Jlif aii-ay.) and be at rest! And am I sworn a dun^liill-slave for everTo earths base dnidgry ? Shall I never find A night of rest ? Shall my indentures neverBe cancelld ? Did injurious nature bind=^ u 306 EMBLEiMS. BOOK O, My soul earths prentice, with no clause to leaveher ?No day of freedom? Must I ever grind ?O that I had the pinions of a dove,That I might quit my bands, and soar above,And pour my just complaints before, the greatJehove! How happy are the doves, that have the powr ■Wheneer they please, to spread their airy wings!Or cloud-dividing eagles, that can towr Above the scent of these inferior things !How happy is the lark, that evry hour Leaves earth, and then for joy mounts up andsings!Had my dull soul but wings as well as thej,How I would spring from e,arth,and clip away,As wise Astraea did, and scorn this ball of clay! O how my soul would spurn this ball of claj. And loathe the dainties of earths painf

  

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Cheyenne Loveless was just a boring sixteen-year-old girl. Then Denver Collins bit her and everything changed. Her plants start talking to her, she finds out she’s a Nymph, and a witch and the angel of death show up at her doorstep to take her away to the prestigious Vala School and Seminary. Oh, and she has no choice in the matter.

 

All she wants to do is blend in and return to being invisible, but the more time that passes, the harder that becomes. Plus she’s a daughter of the Divine, an exclusive secret society which rules the world of myth, and discovers she is a key ingredient to an ancient covenant created before she was born. A covenant that will reshape the order of the world.

 

Adjusting to a new school is difficult enough, but adding on everyone else’s hidden agendas is the icing on the cake. Cheyenne must learn to see through the lies in order to find her place — and possibly even love — in this new world.

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Cathy Tully writes Sweet Romance, Contemporary Romance and Women’s Fiction. Prior to romance, she wrote a children’s non-fiction book titled, NEBRASKA for Kidhaven Press in 2004. Her first Sweet Romance, ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE, is available through Astraea Press, and her first novella, MARRYING MR. RIGHT is available through, The Wild Rose Press. Her next release, TRAINING TRAVIS, a contemporary romance, available through The Wild Rose Press will be a summer 2013 release. A Member of Romance Writers Of America, and The Liberty States Fiction Writers, Cathy is a firm believer in continually honing her craft. A yellow belt in Isshinryu Karate, she loves the feeling of strength and independence it allows her. Cathy can be found on Facebook, and at www.cathytully.com. A born and bred Jersey girl, Cathy lives in central New Jersey with her husband, Joe, and their two daughters.

Lovin' Covers: www.lovlivlifereviews.com/2011/03/lovin-covers-3511.html

 

Darien Oceina is the youngest son of the Great Dragon Lord of the Water. For years he's loved and cherished Tai Dawson from afar. Tai is a simple, ordinary girl who doesn't even know Darien exists. On his eighteenth birthday, he chooses her as his wife. But there’s one problem: She thinks his choice means she's going to be offered as a sacrifice to the Dragon Lord, but instead, she’s forced to move to his home, far away, to give up her life and be his bride.

 

When she first sees Darien after the ceremony, she doesn’t expect to feel anything but hatred toward him. The two are struggling with the complications of a new marriage when their nation is attacked by a rival dragon species. Together they learn to love one another while they struggle to stay one step ahead in a game where the prize is their survival.

 

Buy this book: www.astraeapress.com/#ecwid:category=662250&mode=prod...

 

Blog: jfjenkinswrites.wordpress.com/

 

Twitter: twitter.com/#!/jfjenkinstweets

 

Goodreads Page: www.goodreads.com/book/show/10676662-the-dragons-saga

Sixteen year old Ima Berry (pronounced I’m a) leads anything but a normal life. For starters, the ridiculous name her eccentric dad gave her is always the opening for a good joke. Not to mention the fact he makes his living as a supernatural investigator, which has them moving around every few months. It’s hard to hang out with new friends when she spends all her time trying to prove the existence of Bigfoot, ghosts, fairies and any other number of paranormal creatures. Unfortunately, the cases always end in disaster. That is until now.

 

On a whim, Ima’s father decides to move them to Point Hope, Alaska. Here, he plans to investigate the possibility of shifters amongst the Inuit tribes. Ima isn't thrilled with the move, until she meets an Inuit guy named Carsen. Not only is he hot, but he’s also a star basketball player, and he’s interested in her. Too bad his best friend, Talon, doesn't like her and takes every opportunity he can to discourage the relationship. Ima has no idea what she’s done to make him mad, but there’s no denying the strange connection between them.

 

As things grow more serious with Carsen, Ima uncovers a secret about him and some of the residents of Point Hope. A secret that will force her to choose between her father’s already dwindling career and her new found love. And with the knowledge of this secret comes danger…a danger that could cost them their lives.

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Featured in Blog Lovin' covers post: www.lovlivlifereviews.com/2011/03/lovin-covers-on-my-hit-...

   

Ebook Short Description

Zanna Seoul accidentally causes the death of a fellow spirit guide’s charge while trying to save the life of the man she loves. She is stripped of her position and banished to Earth to die. With Zanna no longer guiding him and his memory of her erased, Owen Nash is left wide open as the target of the vengeful spirit guide who feels he's been wronged.

 

Extended Description

When Zanna Seoul accidentally causes the death of a fellow spirit guide’s charge while trying to save the life of the man she loves, she is stripped of her position and banished to Earth to die. In the spirit world, one doesn’t mess with what’s written. With Zanna no longer guiding him and his memory of her erased, Owen Nash is left wide open as the target of the vengeful spirit guide who feels he’s been wronged. A guide who also happens to be a werewolf. Once on Earth, Zanna refuses to stand by and watch Owen die, so she intervenes again, setting off a chain of events that could mean death for all of them if she doesn’t go back and undo the mess she’s made. Can Zanna succeed before the werewolf does?

  

www.smashwords.com/books/view/42490

Reading | Samiya Bashir collaborates with Cumbersome Multiples

 

Samiya Bashir and Cumbersome Multiples share a mutual admiration for folk hero John Henry. In a sense, he introduced them. Bashir’s Pushcart Prize nominated poem, Coronagraphy, delivers on its promise to illuminate the interior voices of Polly Ann and her husband John Henry. The text move from the page into the dimension of performance. And yet, it is a compelling, intimate poem that requires reading and rereading.

 

Cumbersome Multiples will engage with the text in two distinct ways: first, through a real-time print response to the poem’s call during a performance held here in the Lab; and second, by continuing to produce limited-edition broadsides throughout the month of January as part of an accompanying Gallery Storefront Residency in MoCC’s Gallery Store. The two print elements will develop alongside the Coronagraphy performance — taking into account the rhythm of the text through typography.

 

Samiya Bashir is a poet and educator based in Portand, Oregon. She is the author of Gospel, finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award and the 2009 Lambda Literary Award, and Where the Apple Falls, a Poetry Foundation bestseller and finalist for the 2005 Lambda Literary Award. Bashir is editor of Black Women’s Erotica 2 and co-editor, with Tony Medina and Quraysh Ali Lansana, of Role Call: A Generational Anthology of Social & Political Black Literature & Art.

 

Bashir’s poetry, stories, articles and editorial work have been featured in numerous publications including, most recently and forthcoming, in POETRY, Poet Lore, Michigan Quarterly Review, Crab Orchard Review, Cura, The Rumpus, Hubbub, Callaloo, and Encyclopedia Vol. 2 F-K.

 

She is the recipient of two Hopwood Awards from the University of Michigan, as well as awards, grants, fellowships, and residencies from the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, where she was a recent NEA writer-in-residence, the University of California, where she served as Poet Laureate, the Astraea Foundation, the National Association of Pen Women, Community of Writers at Squaw Valley, Soul Mountain Writers Colony, The Austin Project, Alma de Mujer, the James Dick Foundation for the Performing Arts, and Cave Canem, among others. Her long poem, Coronagraphy, was nominated for a 2013 Pushcart Prize.

 

A long-time communications professional focused on editorial, arts, and social justice movement building, Bashir is a founding organizer of Fire & Ink, an advocacy organization and writer’s festival for LGBT writers of African descent and a recipient of the 2011 Aquarius Press Legacy Award, given annually in recognition of women writers of color who actively provide creative opportunities for other writers. Currently, Bashir is on the faculty of Reed College.

 

Photographs by Mario Gallucci

Identifier: emblemsdivinemor00quarl

Title: Emblems, divine and moral

Year: 1812 (1810s)

Authors: Quarles, Francis, 1592-1644

Subjects: Emblems Emblem books, English

Publisher: London : Printed at the Chiswick Press by C. Whittingham

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

eyes;Or give me faith; and, by the eye of grace,I shall behold thee, though not face to face. o08 ETWBLEMS. BOOK 3. S. AvGvsT. in Psal. xxxix.Who created all things, is better than all things:who beautified all things, is more beautiful thanall things: who made strength, is stronger thanall things: who made great things, is greater thanall things: whatsoever thou lovest, he is that tothee: learn to love the workman in his work, theCreator in his creature: let not that which wasmade by him possess thee, lest thou lose him bywhom thyself was made. S, August. Med. Cap. xxxvii.O thou most sweet, most gracious, most ami-able, most fair, when shall I see thee? when shallI be satisfied with thy beauty? when wilt thoulead me from this dark dungeon, that I may con-fess thy name? Epig. 12.How art thou shaded, in this veil of night,Behind thy curtain flesh? Thou seest no light,But what thy pride doth challenge as her own;Thy flesh is high: Soul, take this curtain down. BOOK 5. EMBLEMS. :jo9 13.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

PSALM LV. 6. O that I hud wings like a dove, for then wouldfly aioay, and be at rest! And am I sworn a dunghill-slave for everTo earths base drudgry? Shall I never find A night of rest? Shall my indentures neverHe eancelld? Did injurious nature bind «D 310 EMBLEMS. BOOK 5. My soul earths prentice, with no clause to leaveher?No day of freedom? Must I ever grind?O that I had the pinions of a dove,That I might quit my bands, and soar above,And pour my just complaints before the greatJehove! How happy are the doves, that have the powr, Wheneer they please, to spread their airy wings!Or cloud-dividing eagles, that can towr Above the scent of these inferior things!How happy is the lark, that evry hourLeaves earth, and then for joy mounts up andsings!Had my duH soul but wings as well as they.How I would spring from earth, and clip away,As wise Astraea did, and scorn this ball of clay! O how my soul would spurn this ball of clay,And loathe the dainties of earths painful plea-sure!O how Id la

  

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Identifier: proceedingsofuni661926unit

Title: Proceedings of the United States National Museum

Year: 1878 (1870s)

Authors: United States National Museum Smithsonian Institution United States. Dept. of the Interior

Subjects: Science

Publisher: Washington : Smithsonian Institution Press, [etc.]

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

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NS OF TYPES OF SHELLS DALL 41 Page Fig. 4. Astraea persica Dall, profile, diam. 22 mm 5 5. Strombina lilacina Dall, alt. 23.5 mm 27 6. Astraea persica Dall, top view, diam. 22 mm 5 7. Turris? simplicissirna Dall, alt. 25 mm 30 8. Chrysodomus {Sulcosipho?) adelphicus Dall, alt. 56 mm 9 9. Buccinum nipponense Dall, alt. 57 mm 7 10. Ancistrolepis decora Dall, alt. 5S mm 3 Plate 36 Fig. 1. Turbo asteriola DaW, alt. 13.5 mm 28 2. Microgaza fulgens Dall, profile, diam. 10.5 mm 20 3. Liotia lurida DaW, diam. 15 mm 19 4. Margarites beringensis E. A. Smith, basal view, diam. 11.6 mm 19 5. Coralliophila spinosa Dall, alt. 37 mm 14 6. Margarites beringensis E. A. Smith, profile, diam. 11.6 mm 19 7. Turbo asteriola Dall, basal view, diam. 20 mm 28 8. Coralliophila spinosa Dall, apical view, diam. 25 mm 14 9. Bolma bartschi Dall, alt. 30 mm 6 10. Microgaza fulgens Dall, basal view, diam. 14 mm 20 11. Turcicula japonica Dall, alt. 23 mm 29 o U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM PROCEEDINGS, VOL. 66, ART. 17 PL. I

 

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Illustrations of Types For explanation of plate see page 35 U. S. NATIONAL MUSEUM PROCEEDINGS, VOL. 66, ART. 17 PL. 2

  

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.