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On the history of women's studies at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna

1897

Conservative journalist A.F. Seligmann founded the art school for women and girls and taught there as a single teacher 16 students in the "Curs for head and act". 1898 expands the school: Tina Blau, a former teacher of the Munich artists association conducts 1.1.1898 a "Curs for landscape and still-life", which she held until 1915. Richard Kauffungen was nominated for sculpture, Ludwig Michalek led the "Curs for head and act" as well as an Radierkurs (etching course), Adolf Böhm the course for decorative and applied arts, Fabiani teaches ornamentation and style of teaching as well as "Modern home furnishings", Georg Klimt taught metalwork, Friedrich King wood cutting art and Hans Tichy from 1900 the drawing and painting from the living model. In all these teachers are moderate modern artists from the area of the Secession. The theoretical lectures are held in the company founded by Emil Zuckerkandl and Julius Tandler 1900 "Association of Austrian university lecturers Athenaeum", which had the task to be "an educational institution for members of the female sex". The first school year was completed with 64 students, the school is rapidly expanding, so that it forms 200-300 students annually within a few years. The steady growth is due to the restrictive attitude of the public schools of art (especially the academy) towards women, but also from the indiscriminate admission of which have been blamed all the private schools also on the part of women harshly, and just by women.

1904

The Academy of Fine Arts Vienna is one of the many requests for opening the Academy for students once again putting the old arguments against that women are rarely equipped with creative spirit in the field of great art and the other a "proliferation of dilettantism and a pushing back of male members" is to be feared. Just the idea of a joint education had "abhorred" the College. The Academy therefore advocates for the financial support of the art school for women and girls, and rejects the application for opening the academy for women unanimously. The main argument for the impossibility of the joint Aktzeichnens (nude drawing) and the need for a second Aktsaales (nude hall) is increasingly mentioned, which cannot be realized because lack of space and lack of money. Henni Lehmann (Artistic studies of women, Darmstadt 1913) countered the same argument in Germany: "The common nude studies of women and men can not be described as impossible as it is done in many places, without having shown any grievances". The objection of the Quorum of the Berlin University professors that no teacher could be forced to teach women at all in such delicate subjects is countered that the problem was easily solved by entrusting a lady the Aktunterricht (nude drawing) in ladies. Suitable artists were plentiful present. That the life drawing for a long time (until 1937) remained problematic, shows the application of the renowned sculptor Teresa F. Ries of 1931, in which she was offering the Academy her services for the purpose of the management of a yet to be affiliated department, where young girls separated from the young men could work under the direction of a woman. The application was not even put to a vote.

1912

The rector of the Munich Academy also does not believe in the inclusion of students (female ones): "... it is impossible, even with regard to the space conditions, apart from that that the aspirations of the artists who devote themselves to the arts especially are usually others than that of women..."

1913

No significant change in attitude can be found between the opinions of the Academies from 1904 and those of 1913.

1919

In the report from the College's meeting of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna to the State Office of Internal Affairs and Teaching is communicated that against the requested admission there were no fundamental objections, but that the Academy is so limited in spatial relationship, that after the experiences of the last entrance exams not even the majority of gifted young artists, capable of studying, could be included, and therefore, in case of the admission of women to the study initially had to be made ​​a considerable expansion. The State Office counters that a further delay in the admission of women to the academic study could not be justified and that approval is to allow at least temporarily in a narrow frame.

1920

The State Office for the Interior and Education officially approved the admission of women to study at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna (since 1919 women were admitted to all faculties of the University of Vienna, with the exception of the Catholic and Protestant Theological Faculty).

A committee consisting of the professors Bacher, Delug, Schmutzer, and Jettmar Muellner claims that the Academy has never pronounced in principle against women's studies but have always only expressed reservations because of the cramped space and financial situation. As a complete novelty proves that no more concerns are raised with regard to coeducation. Men and women should compete in the entrance examination. In the winter semester 1920/21 will be included 14 women, of course, representing only a small minority in relation to the 250 male students.

1926/1927

In the new study regulations are for the first time mentioned Schüler (M) and Schülerinnen (F).

March 1927

Report of the Academy of Fine and Applied Arts about the experiences regarding the access of women to universities: ..."in past years it was thought for the education of women and girls by the Academy of Women for Liberal and Applied Art, which is also equipped with academic classes and by the State subsidized, sufficiently having taken precautions: during a period of almost seven years of study, it was probably possible to get a clear picture about the access applications of women, and about the degree course ... Of course, the number of female candidates in the painting is strongest, weaker in sculpture, and very low in the architecture. As much already now can be said, that in no way in terms of education in the new admissions the women are left behind the male candidates. During the study period, the female students are not in diligence and seriousness of studying behind their male colleagues. Particularly gratifying can be emphasized that because of the co-education of both sexes in common rooms in the individual schools a win-win situation for everybody was. In the master schools the College was repeatedly able also honouring women with academic prices. Subsuming, it should be emphasized that our experiences with the study of women in the Academy of Fine Arts were quite favorable."

The number of students (Studentinnen) increased from 5 % in the winter semester 1920/1921 till 1939/1940 to about 25 %. After the annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany, the number of students (Studentinnen) decreased. The proportion of female students rose after 1940 naturally, reached during the war years up to 70 % and amounted 1945/1946 to 65%. From 1946/1947 the number of students (Studentinnen) fell sharply again, so 1952/1953 only 20% of the students at the Academy were women. 1963/1964 there were, however, already 41% (278).

2002

Students (Studentinnen): 570 of 936 students

University professors (Universitätsprofessorinnen): 9 out of 29

Ao Univ. (extraordinary female professors) 2 of 12

Univ.Ass. (female university assistant) 18 of 41

Contract teachers (Vertragslehrerinnen): 3 of 7

Lecturer (Lehrbeautragte): 32 of 46

 

Almut Krapf

www.akbild.ac.at/Portal/akademie/uber-uns/Organisation/ar...

Model: Valeria

Everything else: me

 

Scattata per: I rassegna Arti Visive Artisti Locali a cura di dotzero - 7/8 dic. 2009 Gibellina

 

Foto vincitrice del contest 5° Contest di Fine Anno "L'ultimo dell'Anno" su Collettivo Flickr

 

Available on Getty Images

 

This long cold winter set

 

Scattata per: I rassegna Arti Visive Artisti Locali a cura di dotzero - 7/8 dic. 2009 Gibellina

Unknow photographer

Portrait Theophil Hansen, about 1880

Reproduction of a historical photograph, size 6 x 10 cm

Archives of the Künstlerhaus Vienna

 

Unbekannter Fotograf

Porträt Theophil Hansen, um 1880

Reproduktion einer historischen Fotografie, Originalgröße 6 x 10 cm

Archiv des Künstlerhauses Wien

 

On the history of women's studies at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna

1897

Conservative journalist A.F. Seligmann founded the art school for women and girls and taught there as a single teacher 16 students in the "Curs for head and act". 1898 expands the school: Tina Blau, a former teacher of the Munich artists association conducts 1.1.1898 a "Curs for landscape and still-life", which she held until 1915. Richard Kauffungen was nominated for sculpture, Ludwig Michalek led the "Curs for head and act" as well as an Radierkurs (etching course), Adolf Böhm the course for decorative and applied arts, Fabiani teaches ornamentation and style of teaching as well as "Modern home furnishings", Georg Klimt taught metalwork, Friedrich King wood cutting art and Hans Tichy from 1900 the drawing and painting from the living model. In all these teachers are moderate modern artists from the area of the Secession. The theoretical lectures are held in the company founded by Emil Zuckerkandl and Julius Tandler 1900 "Association of Austrian university lecturers Athenaeum", which had the task to be "an educational institution for members of the female sex". The first school year was completed with 64 students, the school is rapidly expanding, so that it forms 200-300 students annually within a few years. The steady growth is due to the restrictive attitude of the public schools of art (especially the academy) towards women, but also from the indiscriminate admission of which have been blamed all the private schools also on the part of women harshly, and just by women.

1904

The Academy of Fine Arts Vienna is one of the many requests for opening the Academy for students once again putting the old arguments against that women are rarely equipped with creative spirit in the field of great art and the other a "proliferation of dilettantism and a pushing back of male members" is to be feared. Just the idea of a joint education had "abhorred" the College. The Academy therefore advocates for the financial support of the art school for women and girls, and rejects the application for opening the academy for women unanimously. The main argument for the impossibility of the joint Aktzeichnens (nude drawing) and the need for a second Aktsaales (nude hall) is increasingly mentioned, which cannot be realized because lack of space and lack of money. Henni Lehmann (Artistic studies of women, Darmstadt 1913) countered the same argument in Germany: "The common nude studies of women and men can not be described as impossible as it is done in many places, without having shown any grievances". The objection of the Quorum of the Berlin University professors that no teacher could be forced to teach women at all in such delicate subjects is countered that the problem was easily solved by entrusting a lady the Aktunterricht (nude drawing) in ladies. Suitable artists were plentiful present. That the life drawing for a long time (until 1937) remained problematic, shows the application of the renowned sculptor Teresa F. Ries of 1931, in which she was offering the Academy her services for the purpose of the management of a yet to be affiliated department, where young girls separated from the young men could work under the direction of a woman. The application was not even put to a vote.

1912

The rector of the Munich Academy also does not believe in the inclusion of students (female ones): "... it is impossible, even with regard to the space conditions, apart from that that the aspirations of the artists who devote themselves to the arts especially are usually others than that of women..."

1913

No significant change in attitude can be found between the opinions of the Academies from 1904 and those of 1913.

1919

In the report from the College's meeting of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna to the State Office of Internal Affairs and Teaching is communicated that against the requested admission there were no fundamental objections, but that the Academy is so limited in spatial relationship, that after the experiences of the last entrance exams not even the majority of gifted young artists, capable of studying, could be included, and therefore, in case of the admission of women to the study initially had to be made ​​a considerable expansion. The State Office counters that a further delay in the admission of women to the academic study could not be justified and that approval is to allow at least temporarily in a narrow frame.

1920

The State Office for the Interior and Education officially approved the admission of women to study at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna (since 1919 women were admitted to all faculties of the University of Vienna, with the exception of the Catholic and Protestant Theological Faculty).

A committee consisting of the professors Bacher, Delug, Schmutzer, and Jettmar Muellner claims that the Academy has never pronounced in principle against women's studies but have always only expressed reservations because of the cramped space and financial situation. As a complete novelty proves that no more concerns are raised with regard to coeducation. Men and women should compete in the entrance examination. In the winter semester 1920/21 will be included 14 women, of course, representing only a small minority in relation to the 250 male students.

1926/1927

In the new study regulations are for the first time mentioned Schüler (M) and Schülerinnen (F).

March 1927

Report of the Academy of Fine and Applied Arts about the experiences regarding the access of women to universities: ..."in past years it was thought for the education of women and girls by the Academy of Women for Liberal and Applied Art, which is also equipped with academic classes and by the State subsidized, sufficiently having taken precautions: during a period of almost seven years of study, it was probably possible to get a clear picture about the access applications of women, and about the degree course ... Of course, the number of female candidates in the painting is strongest, weaker in sculpture, and very low in the architecture. As much already now can be said, that in no way in terms of education in the new admissions the women are left behind the male candidates. During the study period, the female students are not in diligence and seriousness of studying behind their male colleagues. Particularly gratifying can be emphasized that because of the co-education of both sexes in common rooms in the individual schools a win-win situation for everybody was. In the master schools the College was repeatedly able also honouring women with academic prices. Subsuming, it should be emphasized that our experiences with the study of women in the Academy of Fine Arts were quite favorable."

The number of students (Studentinnen) increased from 5 % in the winter semester 1920/1921 till 1939/1940 to about 25 %. After the annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany, the number of students (Studentinnen) decreased. The proportion of female students rose after 1940 naturally, reached during the war years up to 70 % and amounted 1945/1946 to 65%. From 1946/1947 the number of students (Studentinnen) fell sharply again, so 1952/1953 only 20% of the students at the Academy were women. 1963/1964 there were, however, already 41% (278).

2002

Students (Studentinnen): 570 of 936 students

University professors (Universitätsprofessorinnen): 9 out of 29

Ao Univ. (extraordinary female professors) 2 of 12

Univ.Ass. (female university assistant) 18 of 41

Contract teachers (Vertragslehrerinnen): 3 of 7

Lecturer (Lehrbeautragte): 32 of 46

 

Almut Krapf

www.akbild.ac.at/Portal/akademie/uber-uns/Organisation/ar...

On the history of women's studies at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna

1897

Conservative journalist A.F. Seligmann founded the art school for women and girls and taught there as a single teacher 16 students in the "Curs for head and act". 1898 expands the school: Tina Blau, a former teacher of the Munich artists association conducts 1.1.1898 a "Curs for landscape and still-life", which she held until 1915. Richard Kauffungen was nominated for sculpture, Ludwig Michalek led the "Curs for head and act" as well as an Radierkurs (etching course), Adolf Böhm the course for decorative and applied arts, Fabiani teaches ornamentation and style of teaching as well as "Modern home furnishings", Georg Klimt taught metalwork, Friedrich King wood cutting art and Hans Tichy from 1900 the drawing and painting from the living model. In all these teachers are moderate modern artists from the area of the Secession. The theoretical lectures are held in the company founded by Emil Zuckerkandl and Julius Tandler 1900 "Association of Austrian university lecturers Athenaeum", which had the task to be "an educational institution for members of the female sex". The first school year was completed with 64 students, the school is rapidly expanding, so that it forms 200-300 students annually within a few years. The steady growth is due to the restrictive attitude of the public schools of art (especially the academy) towards women, but also from the indiscriminate admission of which have been blamed all the private schools also on the part of women harshly, and just by women.

1904

The Academy of Fine Arts Vienna is one of the many requests for opening the Academy for students once again putting the old arguments against that women are rarely equipped with creative spirit in the field of great art and the other a "proliferation of dilettantism and a pushing back of male members" is to be feared. Just the idea of a joint education had "abhorred" the College. The Academy therefore advocates for the financial support of the art school for women and girls, and rejects the application for opening the academy for women unanimously. The main argument for the impossibility of the joint Aktzeichnens (nude drawing) and the need for a second Aktsaales (nude hall) is increasingly mentioned, which cannot be realized because lack of space and lack of money. Henni Lehmann (Artistic studies of women, Darmstadt 1913) countered the same argument in Germany: "The common nude studies of women and men can not be described as impossible as it is done in many places, without having shown any grievances". The objection of the Quorum of the Berlin University professors that no teacher could be forced to teach women at all in such delicate subjects is countered that the problem was easily solved by entrusting a lady the Aktunterricht (nude drawing) in ladies. Suitable artists were plentiful present. That the life drawing for a long time (until 1937) remained problematic, shows the application of the renowned sculptor Teresa F. Ries of 1931, in which she was offering the Academy her services for the purpose of the management of a yet to be affiliated department, where young girls separated from the young men could work under the direction of a woman. The application was not even put to a vote.

1912

The rector of the Munich Academy also does not believe in the inclusion of students (female ones): "... it is impossible, even with regard to the space conditions, apart from that that the aspirations of the artists who devote themselves to the arts especially are usually others than that of women..."

1913

No significant change in attitude can be found between the opinions of the Academies from 1904 and those of 1913.

1919

In the report from the College's meeting of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna to the State Office of Internal Affairs and Teaching is communicated that against the requested admission there were no fundamental objections, but that the Academy is so limited in spatial relationship, that after the experiences of the last entrance exams not even the majority of gifted young artists, capable of studying, could be included, and therefore, in case of the admission of women to the study initially had to be made ​​a considerable expansion. The State Office counters that a further delay in the admission of women to the academic study could not be justified and that approval is to allow at least temporarily in a narrow frame.

1920

The State Office for the Interior and Education officially approved the admission of women to study at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna (since 1919 women were admitted to all faculties of the University of Vienna, with the exception of the Catholic and Protestant Theological Faculty).

A committee consisting of the professors Bacher, Delug, Schmutzer, and Jettmar Muellner claims that the Academy has never pronounced in principle against women's studies but have always only expressed reservations because of the cramped space and financial situation. As a complete novelty proves that no more concerns are raised with regard to coeducation. Men and women should compete in the entrance examination. In the winter semester 1920/21 will be included 14 women, of course, representing only a small minority in relation to the 250 male students.

1926/1927

In the new study regulations are for the first time mentioned Schüler (M) and Schülerinnen (F).

March 1927

Report of the Academy of Fine and Applied Arts about the experiences regarding the access of women to universities: ..."in past years it was thought for the education of women and girls by the Academy of Women for Liberal and Applied Art, which is also equipped with academic classes and by the State subsidized, sufficiently having taken precautions: during a period of almost seven years of study, it was probably possible to get a clear picture about the access applications of women, and about the degree course ... Of course, the number of female candidates in the painting is strongest, weaker in sculpture, and very low in the architecture. As much already now can be said, that in no way in terms of education in the new admissions the women are left behind the male candidates. During the study period, the female students are not in diligence and seriousness of studying behind their male colleagues. Particularly gratifying can be emphasized that because of the co-education of both sexes in common rooms in the individual schools a win-win situation for everybody was. In the master schools the College was repeatedly able also honouring women with academic prices. Subsuming, it should be emphasized that our experiences with the study of women in the Academy of Fine Arts were quite favorable."

The number of students (Studentinnen) increased from 5 % in the winter semester 1920/1921 till 1939/1940 to about 25 %. After the annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany, the number of students (Studentinnen) decreased. The proportion of female students rose after 1940 naturally, reached during the war years up to 70 % and amounted 1945/1946 to 65%. From 1946/1947 the number of students (Studentinnen) fell sharply again, so 1952/1953 only 20% of the students at the Academy were women. 1963/1964 there were, however, already 41% (278).

2002

Students (Studentinnen): 570 of 936 students

University professors (Universitätsprofessorinnen): 9 out of 29

Ao Univ. (extraordinary female professors) 2 of 12

Univ.Ass. (female university assistant) 18 of 41

Contract teachers (Vertragslehrerinnen): 3 of 7

Lecturer (Lehrbeautragte): 32 of 46

 

Almut Krapf

www.akbild.ac.at/Portal/akademie/uber-uns/Organisation/ar...

On the history of women's studies at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna

1897

Conservative journalist A.F. Seligmann founded the art school for women and girls and taught there as a single teacher 16 students in the "Curs for head and act". 1898 expands the school: Tina Blau, a former teacher of the Munich artists association conducts 1.1.1898 a "Curs for landscape and still-life", which she held until 1915. Richard Kauffungen was nominated for sculpture, Ludwig Michalek led the "Curs for head and act" as well as an Radierkurs (etching course), Adolf Böhm the course for decorative and applied arts, Fabiani teaches ornamentation and style of teaching as well as "Modern home furnishings", Georg Klimt taught metalwork, Friedrich King wood cutting art and Hans Tichy from 1900 the drawing and painting from the living model. In all these teachers are moderate modern artists from the area of the Secession. The theoretical lectures are held in the company founded by Emil Zuckerkandl and Julius Tandler 1900 "Association of Austrian university lecturers Athenaeum", which had the task to be "an educational institution for members of the female sex". The first school year was completed with 64 students, the school is rapidly expanding, so that it forms 200-300 students annually within a few years. The steady growth is due to the restrictive attitude of the public schools of art (especially the academy) towards women, but also from the indiscriminate admission of which have been blamed all the private schools also on the part of women harshly, and just by women.

1904

The Academy of Fine Arts Vienna is one of the many requests for opening the Academy for students once again putting the old arguments against that women are rarely equipped with creative spirit in the field of great art and the other a "proliferation of dilettantism and a pushing back of male members" is to be feared. Just the idea of a joint education had "abhorred" the College. The Academy therefore advocates for the financial support of the art school for women and girls, and rejects the application for opening the academy for women unanimously. The main argument for the impossibility of the joint Aktzeichnens (nude drawing) and the need for a second Aktsaales (nude hall) is increasingly mentioned, which cannot be realized because lack of space and lack of money. Henni Lehmann (Artistic studies of women, Darmstadt 1913) countered the same argument in Germany: "The common nude studies of women and men can not be described as impossible as it is done in many places, without having shown any grievances". The objection of the Quorum of the Berlin University professors that no teacher could be forced to teach women at all in such delicate subjects is countered that the problem was easily solved by entrusting a lady the Aktunterricht (nude drawing) in ladies. Suitable artists were plentiful present. That the life drawing for a long time (until 1937) remained problematic, shows the application of the renowned sculptor Teresa F. Ries of 1931, in which she was offering the Academy her services for the purpose of the management of a yet to be affiliated department, where young girls separated from the young men could work under the direction of a woman. The application was not even put to a vote.

1912

The rector of the Munich Academy also does not believe in the inclusion of students (female ones): "... it is impossible, even with regard to the space conditions, apart from that that the aspirations of the artists who devote themselves to the arts especially are usually others than that of women..."

1913

No significant change in attitude can be found between the opinions of the Academies from 1904 and those of 1913.

1919

In the report from the College's meeting of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna to the State Office of Internal Affairs and Teaching is communicated that against the requested admission there were no fundamental objections, but that the Academy is so limited in spatial relationship, that after the experiences of the last entrance exams not even the majority of gifted young artists, capable of studying, could be included, and therefore, in case of the admission of women to the study initially had to be made ​​a considerable expansion. The State Office counters that a further delay in the admission of women to the academic study could not be justified and that approval is to allow at least temporarily in a narrow frame.

1920

The State Office for the Interior and Education officially approved the admission of women to study at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna (since 1919 women were admitted to all faculties of the University of Vienna, with the exception of the Catholic and Protestant Theological Faculty).

A committee consisting of the professors Bacher, Delug, Schmutzer, and Jettmar Muellner claims that the Academy has never pronounced in principle against women's studies but have always only expressed reservations because of the cramped space and financial situation. As a complete novelty proves that no more concerns are raised with regard to coeducation. Men and women should compete in the entrance examination. In the winter semester 1920/21 will be included 14 women, of course, representing only a small minority in relation to the 250 male students.

1926/1927

In the new study regulations are for the first time mentioned Schüler (M) and Schülerinnen (F).

March 1927

Report of the Academy of Fine and Applied Arts about the experiences regarding the access of women to universities: ..."in past years it was thought for the education of women and girls by the Academy of Women for Liberal and Applied Art, which is also equipped with academic classes and by the State subsidized, sufficiently having taken precautions: during a period of almost seven years of study, it was probably possible to get a clear picture about the access applications of women, and about the degree course ... Of course, the number of female candidates in the painting is strongest, weaker in sculpture, and very low in the architecture. As much already now can be said, that in no way in terms of education in the new admissions the women are left behind the male candidates. During the study period, the female students are not in diligence and seriousness of studying behind their male colleagues. Particularly gratifying can be emphasized that because of the co-education of both sexes in common rooms in the individual schools a win-win situation for everybody was. In the master schools the College was repeatedly able also honouring women with academic prices. Subsuming, it should be emphasized that our experiences with the study of women in the Academy of Fine Arts were quite favorable."

The number of students (Studentinnen) increased from 5 % in the winter semester 1920/1921 till 1939/1940 to about 25 %. After the annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany, the number of students (Studentinnen) decreased. The proportion of female students rose after 1940 naturally, reached during the war years up to 70 % and amounted 1945/1946 to 65%. From 1946/1947 the number of students (Studentinnen) fell sharply again, so 1952/1953 only 20% of the students at the Academy were women. 1963/1964 there were, however, already 41% (278).

2002

Students (Studentinnen): 570 of 936 students

University professors (Universitätsprofessorinnen): 9 out of 29

Ao Univ. (extraordinary female professors) 2 of 12

Univ.Ass. (female university assistant) 18 of 41

Contract teachers (Vertragslehrerinnen): 3 of 7

Lecturer (Lehrbeautragte): 32 of 46

 

Almut Krapf

www.akbild.ac.at/Portal/akademie/uber-uns/Organisation/ar...

On the history of women's studies at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna

1897

Conservative journalist A.F. Seligmann founded the art school for women and girls and taught there as a single teacher 16 students in the "Curs for head and act". 1898 expands the school: Tina Blau, a former teacher of the Munich artists association conducts 1.1.1898 a "Curs for landscape and still-life", which she held until 1915. Richard Kauffungen was nominated for sculpture, Ludwig Michalek led the "Curs for head and act" as well as an Radierkurs (etching course), Adolf Böhm the course for decorative and applied arts, Fabiani teaches ornamentation and style of teaching as well as "Modern home furnishings", Georg Klimt taught metalwork, Friedrich King wood cutting art and Hans Tichy from 1900 the drawing and painting from the living model. In all these teachers are moderate modern artists from the area of the Secession. The theoretical lectures are held in the company founded by Emil Zuckerkandl and Julius Tandler 1900 "Association of Austrian university lecturers Athenaeum", which had the task to be "an educational institution for members of the female sex". The first school year was completed with 64 students, the school is rapidly expanding, so that it forms 200-300 students annually within a few years. The steady growth is due to the restrictive attitude of the public schools of art (especially the academy) towards women, but also from the indiscriminate admission of which have been blamed all the private schools also on the part of women harshly, and just by women.

1904

The Academy of Fine Arts Vienna is one of the many requests for opening the Academy for students once again putting the old arguments against that women are rarely equipped with creative spirit in the field of great art and the other a "proliferation of dilettantism and a pushing back of male members" is to be feared. Just the idea of a joint education had "abhorred" the College. The Academy therefore advocates for the financial support of the art school for women and girls, and rejects the application for opening the academy for women unanimously. The main argument for the impossibility of the joint Aktzeichnens (nude drawing) and the need for a second Aktsaales (nude hall) is increasingly mentioned, which cannot be realized because lack of space and lack of money. Henni Lehmann (Artistic studies of women, Darmstadt 1913) countered the same argument in Germany: "The common nude studies of women and men can not be described as impossible as it is done in many places, without having shown any grievances". The objection of the Quorum of the Berlin University professors that no teacher could be forced to teach women at all in such delicate subjects is countered that the problem was easily solved by entrusting a lady the Aktunterricht (nude drawing) in ladies. Suitable artists were plentiful present. That the life drawing for a long time (until 1937) remained problematic, shows the application of the renowned sculptor Teresa F. Ries of 1931, in which she was offering the Academy her services for the purpose of the management of a yet to be affiliated department, where young girls separated from the young men could work under the direction of a woman. The application was not even put to a vote.

1912

The rector of the Munich Academy also does not believe in the inclusion of students (female ones): "... it is impossible, even with regard to the space conditions, apart from that that the aspirations of the artists who devote themselves to the arts especially are usually others than that of women..."

1913

No significant change in attitude can be found between the opinions of the Academies from 1904 and those of 1913.

1919

In the report from the College's meeting of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna to the State Office of Internal Affairs and Teaching is communicated that against the requested admission there were no fundamental objections, but that the Academy is so limited in spatial relationship, that after the experiences of the last entrance exams not even the majority of gifted young artists, capable of studying, could be included, and therefore, in case of the admission of women to the study initially had to be made ​​a considerable expansion. The State Office counters that a further delay in the admission of women to the academic study could not be justified and that approval is to allow at least temporarily in a narrow frame.

1920

The State Office for the Interior and Education officially approved the admission of women to study at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna (since 1919 women were admitted to all faculties of the University of Vienna, with the exception of the Catholic and Protestant Theological Faculty).

A committee consisting of the professors Bacher, Delug, Schmutzer, and Jettmar Muellner claims that the Academy has never pronounced in principle against women's studies but have always only expressed reservations because of the cramped space and financial situation. As a complete novelty proves that no more concerns are raised with regard to coeducation. Men and women should compete in the entrance examination. In the winter semester 1920/21 will be included 14 women, of course, representing only a small minority in relation to the 250 male students.

1926/1927

In the new study regulations are for the first time mentioned Schüler (M) and Schülerinnen (F).

March 1927

Report of the Academy of Fine and Applied Arts about the experiences regarding the access of women to universities: ..."in past years it was thought for the education of women and girls by the Academy of Women for Liberal and Applied Art, which is also equipped with academic classes and by the State subsidized, sufficiently having taken precautions: during a period of almost seven years of study, it was probably possible to get a clear picture about the access applications of women, and about the degree course ... Of course, the number of female candidates in the painting is strongest, weaker in sculpture, and very low in the architecture. As much already now can be said, that in no way in terms of education in the new admissions the women are left behind the male candidates. During the study period, the female students are not in diligence and seriousness of studying behind their male colleagues. Particularly gratifying can be emphasized that because of the co-education of both sexes in common rooms in the individual schools a win-win situation for everybody was. In the master schools the College was repeatedly able also honouring women with academic prices. Subsuming, it should be emphasized that our experiences with the study of women in the Academy of Fine Arts were quite favorable."

The number of students (Studentinnen) increased from 5 % in the winter semester 1920/1921 till 1939/1940 to about 25 %. After the annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany, the number of students (Studentinnen) decreased. The proportion of female students rose after 1940 naturally, reached during the war years up to 70 % and amounted 1945/1946 to 65%. From 1946/1947 the number of students (Studentinnen) fell sharply again, so 1952/1953 only 20% of the students at the Academy were women. 1963/1964 there were, however, already 41% (278).

2002

Students (Studentinnen): 570 of 936 students

University professors (Universitätsprofessorinnen): 9 out of 29

Ao Univ. (extraordinary female professors) 2 of 12

Univ.Ass. (female university assistant) 18 of 41

Contract teachers (Vertragslehrerinnen): 3 of 7

Lecturer (Lehrbeautragte): 32 of 46

 

Almut Krapf

www.akbild.ac.at/Portal/akademie/uber-uns/Organisation/ar...

On the history of women's studies at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna

1897

Conservative journalist A.F. Seligmann founded the art school for women and girls and taught there as a single teacher 16 students in the "Curs for head and act". 1898 expands the school: Tina Blau, a former teacher of the Munich artists association conducts 1.1.1898 a "Curs for landscape and still-life", which she held until 1915. Richard Kauffungen was nominated for sculpture, Ludwig Michalek led the "Curs for head and act" as well as an Radierkurs (etching course), Adolf Böhm the course for decorative and applied arts, Fabiani teaches ornamentation and style of teaching as well as "Modern home furnishings", Georg Klimt taught metalwork, Friedrich King wood cutting art and Hans Tichy from 1900 the drawing and painting from the living model. In all these teachers are moderate modern artists from the area of the Secession. The theoretical lectures are held in the company founded by Emil Zuckerkandl and Julius Tandler 1900 "Association of Austrian university lecturers Athenaeum", which had the task to be "an educational institution for members of the female sex". The first school year was completed with 64 students, the school is rapidly expanding, so that it forms 200-300 students annually within a few years. The steady growth is due to the restrictive attitude of the public schools of art (especially the academy) towards women, but also from the indiscriminate admission of which have been blamed all the private schools also on the part of women harshly, and just by women.

1904

The Academy of Fine Arts Vienna is one of the many requests for opening the Academy for students once again putting the old arguments against that women are rarely equipped with creative spirit in the field of great art and the other a "proliferation of dilettantism and a pushing back of male members" is to be feared. Just the idea of a joint education had "abhorred" the College. The Academy therefore advocates for the financial support of the art school for women and girls, and rejects the application for opening the academy for women unanimously. The main argument for the impossibility of the joint Aktzeichnens (nude drawing) and the need for a second Aktsaales (nude hall) is increasingly mentioned, which cannot be realized because lack of space and lack of money. Henni Lehmann (Artistic studies of women, Darmstadt 1913) countered the same argument in Germany: "The common nude studies of women and men can not be described as impossible as it is done in many places, without having shown any grievances". The objection of the Quorum of the Berlin University professors that no teacher could be forced to teach women at all in such delicate subjects is countered that the problem was easily solved by entrusting a lady the Aktunterricht (nude drawing) in ladies. Suitable artists were plentiful present. That the life drawing for a long time (until 1937) remained problematic, shows the application of the renowned sculptor Teresa F. Ries of 1931, in which she was offering the Academy her services for the purpose of the management of a yet to be affiliated department, where young girls separated from the young men could work under the direction of a woman. The application was not even put to a vote.

1912

The rector of the Munich Academy also does not believe in the inclusion of students (female ones): "... it is impossible, even with regard to the space conditions, apart from that that the aspirations of the artists who devote themselves to the arts especially are usually others than that of women..."

1913

No significant change in attitude can be found between the opinions of the Academies from 1904 and those of 1913.

1919

In the report from the College's meeting of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna to the State Office of Internal Affairs and Teaching is communicated that against the requested admission there were no fundamental objections, but that the Academy is so limited in spatial relationship, that after the experiences of the last entrance exams not even the majority of gifted young artists, capable of studying, could be included, and therefore, in case of the admission of women to the study initially had to be made ​​a considerable expansion. The State Office counters that a further delay in the admission of women to the academic study could not be justified and that approval is to allow at least temporarily in a narrow frame.

1920

The State Office for the Interior and Education officially approved the admission of women to study at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna (since 1919 women were admitted to all faculties of the University of Vienna, with the exception of the Catholic and Protestant Theological Faculty).

A committee consisting of the professors Bacher, Delug, Schmutzer, and Jettmar Muellner claims that the Academy has never pronounced in principle against women's studies but have always only expressed reservations because of the cramped space and financial situation. As a complete novelty proves that no more concerns are raised with regard to coeducation. Men and women should compete in the entrance examination. In the winter semester 1920/21 will be included 14 women, of course, representing only a small minority in relation to the 250 male students.

1926/1927

In the new study regulations are for the first time mentioned Schüler (M) and Schülerinnen (F).

March 1927

Report of the Academy of Fine and Applied Arts about the experiences regarding the access of women to universities: ..."in past years it was thought for the education of women and girls by the Academy of Women for Liberal and Applied Art, which is also equipped with academic classes and by the State subsidized, sufficiently having taken precautions: during a period of almost seven years of study, it was probably possible to get a clear picture about the access applications of women, and about the degree course ... Of course, the number of female candidates in the painting is strongest, weaker in sculpture, and very low in the architecture. As much already now can be said, that in no way in terms of education in the new admissions the women are left behind the male candidates. During the study period, the female students are not in diligence and seriousness of studying behind their male colleagues. Particularly gratifying can be emphasized that because of the co-education of both sexes in common rooms in the individual schools a win-win situation for everybody was. In the master schools the College was repeatedly able also honouring women with academic prices. Subsuming, it should be emphasized that our experiences with the study of women in the Academy of Fine Arts were quite favorable."

The number of students (Studentinnen) increased from 5 % in the winter semester 1920/1921 till 1939/1940 to about 25 %. After the annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany, the number of students (Studentinnen) decreased. The proportion of female students rose after 1940 naturally, reached during the war years up to 70 % and amounted 1945/1946 to 65%. From 1946/1947 the number of students (Studentinnen) fell sharply again, so 1952/1953 only 20% of the students at the Academy were women. 1963/1964 there were, however, already 41% (278).

2002

Students (Studentinnen): 570 of 936 students

University professors (Universitätsprofessorinnen): 9 out of 29

Ao Univ. (extraordinary female professors) 2 of 12

Univ.Ass. (female university assistant) 18 of 41

Contract teachers (Vertragslehrerinnen): 3 of 7

Lecturer (Lehrbeautragte): 32 of 46

 

Almut Krapf

www.akbild.ac.at/Portal/akademie/uber-uns/Organisation/ar...

This long cold winter set

 

Scattata per: I rassegna Arti Visive Artisti Locali a cura di dotzero - 7/8 dic. 2009 Gibellina

Heinrich Friedrich Füger (1751 Heilbronn - 1818 Vienna)

Portrait of the son of the artist at the age of four years

1795 datatable

Oil on canvas

Donation Heinrich Füger 1878 GG-1022

 

Heinrich Friedrich Füger (1751 Heilbronn - 1818 Wien)

Bildnis des Sohnes des Künstlers im Alter von vier Jahren

1795 datierbar

Öl auf Leinwand

Schenkung Heinrich Füger 1878 GG-1022

 

On the history of women's studies at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna

1897

Conservative journalist A.F. Seligmann founded the art school for women and girls and taught there as a single teacher 16 students in the "Curs for head and act". 1898 expands the school: Tina Blau, a former teacher of the Munich artists association conducts 1.1.1898 a "Curs for landscape and still-life", which she held until 1915. Richard Kauffungen was nominated for sculpture, Ludwig Michalek led the "Curs for head and act" as well as an Radierkurs (etching course), Adolf Böhm the course for decorative and applied arts, Fabiani teaches ornamentation and style of teaching as well as "Modern home furnishings", Georg Klimt taught metalwork, Friedrich King wood cutting art and Hans Tichy from 1900 the drawing and painting from the living model. In all these teachers are moderate modern artists from the area of the Secession. The theoretical lectures are held in the company founded by Emil Zuckerkandl and Julius Tandler 1900 "Association of Austrian university lecturers Athenaeum", which had the task to be "an educational institution for members of the female sex". The first school year was completed with 64 students, the school is rapidly expanding, so that it forms 200-300 students annually within a few years. The steady growth is due to the restrictive attitude of the public schools of art (especially the academy) towards women, but also from the indiscriminate admission of which have been blamed all the private schools also on the part of women harshly, and just by women.

1904

The Academy of Fine Arts Vienna is one of the many requests for opening the Academy for students once again putting the old arguments against that women are rarely equipped with creative spirit in the field of great art and the other a "proliferation of dilettantism and a pushing back of male members" is to be feared. Just the idea of a joint education had "abhorred" the College. The Academy therefore advocates for the financial support of the art school for women and girls, and rejects the application for opening the academy for women unanimously. The main argument for the impossibility of the joint Aktzeichnens (nude drawing) and the need for a second Aktsaales (nude hall) is increasingly mentioned, which cannot be realized because lack of space and lack of money. Henni Lehmann (Artistic studies of women, Darmstadt 1913) countered the same argument in Germany: "The common nude studies of women and men can not be described as impossible as it is done in many places, without having shown any grievances". The objection of the Quorum of the Berlin University professors that no teacher could be forced to teach women at all in such delicate subjects is countered that the problem was easily solved by entrusting a lady the Aktunterricht (nude drawing) in ladies. Suitable artists were plentiful present. That the life drawing for a long time (until 1937) remained problematic, shows the application of the renowned sculptor Teresa F. Ries of 1931, in which she was offering the Academy her services for the purpose of the management of a yet to be affiliated department, where young girls separated from the young men could work under the direction of a woman. The application was not even put to a vote.

1912

The rector of the Munich Academy also does not believe in the inclusion of students (female ones): "... it is impossible, even with regard to the space conditions, apart from that that the aspirations of the artists who devote themselves to the arts especially are usually others than that of women..."

1913

No significant change in attitude can be found between the opinions of the Academies from 1904 and those of 1913.

1919

In the report from the College's meeting of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna to the State Office of Internal Affairs and Teaching is communicated that against the requested admission there were no fundamental objections, but that the Academy is so limited in spatial relationship, that after the experiences of the last entrance exams not even the majority of gifted young artists, capable of studying, could be included, and therefore, in case of the admission of women to the study initially had to be made ​​a considerable expansion. The State Office counters that a further delay in the admission of women to the academic study could not be justified and that approval is to allow at least temporarily in a narrow frame.

1920

The State Office for the Interior and Education officially approved the admission of women to study at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna (since 1919 women were admitted to all faculties of the University of Vienna, with the exception of the Catholic and Protestant Theological Faculty).

A committee consisting of the professors Bacher, Delug, Schmutzer, and Jettmar Muellner claims that the Academy has never pronounced in principle against women's studies but have always only expressed reservations because of the cramped space and financial situation. As a complete novelty proves that no more concerns are raised with regard to coeducation. Men and women should compete in the entrance examination. In the winter semester 1920/21 will be included 14 women, of course, representing only a small minority in relation to the 250 male students.

1926/1927

In the new study regulations are for the first time mentioned Schüler (M) and Schülerinnen (F).

March 1927

Report of the Academy of Fine and Applied Arts about the experiences regarding the access of women to universities: ..."in past years it was thought for the education of women and girls by the Academy of Women for Liberal and Applied Art, which is also equipped with academic classes and by the State subsidized, sufficiently having taken precautions: during a period of almost seven years of study, it was probably possible to get a clear picture about the access applications of women, and about the degree course ... Of course, the number of female candidates in the painting is strongest, weaker in sculpture, and very low in the architecture. As much already now can be said, that in no way in terms of education in the new admissions the women are left behind the male candidates. During the study period, the female students are not in diligence and seriousness of studying behind their male colleagues. Particularly gratifying can be emphasized that because of the co-education of both sexes in common rooms in the individual schools a win-win situation for everybody was. In the master schools the College was repeatedly able also honouring women with academic prices. Subsuming, it should be emphasized that our experiences with the study of women in the Academy of Fine Arts were quite favorable."

The number of students (Studentinnen) increased from 5 % in the winter semester 1920/1921 till 1939/1940 to about 25 %. After the annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany, the number of students (Studentinnen) decreased. The proportion of female students rose after 1940 naturally, reached during the war years up to 70 % and amounted 1945/1946 to 65%. From 1946/1947 the number of students (Studentinnen) fell sharply again, so 1952/1953 only 20% of the students at the Academy were women. 1963/1964 there were, however, already 41% (278).

2002

Students (Studentinnen): 570 of 936 students

University professors (Universitätsprofessorinnen): 9 out of 29

Ao Univ. (extraordinary female professors) 2 of 12

Univ.Ass. (female university assistant) 18 of 41

Contract teachers (Vertragslehrerinnen): 3 of 7

Lecturer (Lehrbeautragte): 32 of 46

 

Almut Krapf

www.akbild.ac.at/Portal/organisation/uber-uns/Organisatio...

Gregorio di Ferrari (1647 Porto Maurizio - 1726 Genoa) - the Sacrifice of Isaak. Around 1700 datable, oil on canvas.

Donation of Oswald Kutschera 1922. GG-1352

 

Gregorio di Ferrari (1647 Porto Maurizio - 1726 Genua), Die Opferung Isaaks. Um 1700 datierbar, Öl auf Leinwand. Schenkung Oswald Kutschera 1922. GG-1352

 

On the history of women's studies at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna

1897

Conservative journalist A.F. Seligmann founded the art school for women and girls and taught there as a single teacher 16 students in the "Curs for head and act". 1898 expands the school: Tina Blau, a former teacher of the Munich artists association conducts 1 January 1898 a "Curs for landscape and still-life", which she held until 1915. Richard Kauffungen was nominated for sculpture, Ludwig Michalek led the "Curs for head and act" as well as an Radierkurs (etching course), Adolf Böhm the course for decorative and applied arts, Fabiani teaches ornamentation and style of teaching as well as "Modern home furnishings", Georg Klimt taught metalwork, Friedrich King wood cutting art and Hans Tichy from 1900 the drawing and painting from the living model. In all these teachers are moderate modern artists from the area of the Secession. The theoretical lectures are held in the company founded by Emil Zuckerkandl and Julius Tandler 1900 "Association of Austrian university lecturers Athenaeum", which had the task to be "an educational institution for members of the female sex". The first school year was completed with 64 students, the school is rapidly expanding, so that it forms 200-300 students annually within a few years. The steady growth is due to the restrictive attitude of the public schools of art (especially the academy) towards women, but also from the indiscriminate admission of which have been blamed all the private schools also on the part of women harshly, and just by women.

1904

The Academy of Fine Arts Vienna one of the many requests for opening the Academy for female students once again is putting the old arguments against that women are rarely equipped with creative spirit in the field of great art and that on the other hand a "proliferation of dilettantism and a pushing back of male members" is to be feared. Just the idea of a joint education had "abhorred" the College. The Academy therefore advocates for the financial support of the art school for women and girls, and rejects the application for opening the academy for women unanimously. The main argument for the impossibility of the joint Aktzeichnens (nude drawing) and the need for a second Aktsaales (nude hall) is increasingly mentioned, which cannot be realized because lack of space and lack of money. Henni Lehmann (Artistic studies of women, Darmstadt 1913) counters the same argument in Germany: "The common nude studies of women and men can not be described as impossible as it is done in many places, without having shown any grievances". The objection of the Quorum of the Berlin University professors that no teacher could be forced to teach women at all in such delicate subjects is countered that the problem was easily solved by entrusting a lady the Aktunterricht (nude drawing) in ladies. Suitable artists were plentiful present. That the life drawing for a long time (until 1937) remained problematic, shows the application of the renowned sculptor Teresa F. Ries of 1931, in which she was offering the Academy her services for the purpose of the management of a yet to be affiliated department, where young girls separated from the young men could work under the direction of a woman. The application was not even put to a vote.

1912

The rector of the Munich Academy also does not believe in the inclusion of students (female ones): "... it is impossible, even with regard to the space conditions, besides the fact that the aspirations of the artists who devote themselves to the arts especially are usually others than that of women..."

1913

No significant change in attitude can be found between the opinions of the Academies from 1904 and those of 1913.

1919

In the report from the College's meeting of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna to the State Office of Internal Affairs and Teaching is communicated that against the requested admission there were no fundamental objections, but that the Academy is so limited in spatial relationship, that after the experiences of the last entrance exams not even the majority of gifted young artists, capable of studying, could be included, and therefore, in case of the admission of women to the study initially had to be made ​​a considerable expansion. The State Office counters that a further delay in the admission of women to the academic study could not be justified and that approval is to allow at least temporarily in a narrow frame.

1920

The State Office for the Interior and Education officially approved the admission of women to study at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna (since 1919 women were admitted to all faculties of the University of Vienna, with the exception of the Catholic and Protestant Theological Faculty).

A committee consisting of the professors Bacher, Delug, Schmutzer, Jettmar and Müllner claims that the Academy has never pronounced in principle against women's studies but have always only expressed reservations because of the cramped space and financial situation. As a complete novelty proves that no more concerns are raised with regard to coeducation. Men and women should compete in the entrance examination. In the winter semester 1920/21 will be included 14 women, of course, representing only a small minority in relation to the 250 male students.

1926/1927

In the new study regulations are for the first time mentioned Schüler (M) and Schülerinnen (F).

March 1927

Report of the Academy of Fine and Applied Arts about the experiences regarding the access of women to universities: ..."in past years it was thought for the education of women and girls by the Academy of Women for Liberal and Applied Art, which is also equipped with academic classes and by the State subsidized, sufficiently having taken precautions: during a period of almost seven years of study, it was probably possible to get a clear picture about the access applications of women, and about the degree course ... Of course, the number of female candidates in the painting is strongest, weaker in sculpture, and very low in the architecture. As much already now can be said, that in no way in terms of education in the new admissions the women are left behind the male candidates. During the study period, the female students are not in diligence and seriousness of studying behind their male colleagues. Particularly gratifying can be emphasized that because of the co-education of both sexes in common rooms in the individual schools a win-win situation for everybody was. In the master schools the College was repeatedly able also honouring women with academic prices. Subsuming, it should be emphasized that our experiences with the study of women in the Academy of Fine Arts were quite favorable."

The number of students (Studentinnen) increased from 5 % in the winter semester 1920/1921 till 1939/1940 to about 25 %. After the annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany, the number of students (Studentinnen) decreased. The proportion of female students rose after 1940 naturally, reached during the war years up to 70 % and amounted 1945/1946 to 65%. From 1946/1947 the number of students (Studentinnen) fell sharply again, so 1952/1953 only 20% of the students at the Academy were women. 1963/1964 there were, however, already 41% (278).

2002

Students (Studentinnen): 570 of 936 students

University professors (Universitätsprofessorinnen): 9 out of 29

Ao Univ. (extraordinary female professors) 2 of 12

Univ.Ass. (female university assistant) 18 of 41

Contract teachers (Vertragslehrerinnen): 3 of 7

Lecturer (Lehrbeautragte): 32 of 46

 

Almut Krapf

www.akbild.ac.at/Portal/organisation/uber-uns/Organisatio...

Josef Dorfmeister (1764 Sopron - 1814?), Phidias chiselling on the bust of Zeus, signed, dated 1802. Oil on canvas. Piece of art that was handed in when Dorfmeister was applying for a job at the Academy 1804, GG 127

 

Josef Dorfmeister (1764 Ödenburg - 1814?), Phidias an der Büste des Zeus meißelnd, signiert, 1802 datiert. Öl auf Leinwand. Aufnahmewerk 1804

 

On the history of women's studies at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna

1897

Conservative journalist A.F. Seligmann founded the art school for women and girls and taught there as a single teacher 16 students in the "Curs for head and act". 1898 expands the school: Tina Blau, a former teacher of the Munich artists association conducts 1.1.1898 a "Curs for landscape and still-life", which she held until 1915. Richard Kauffungen was nominated for sculpture, Ludwig Michalek led the "Curs for head and act" as well as an Radierkurs (etching course), Adolf Böhm the course for decorative and applied arts, Fabiani teaches ornamentation and style of teaching as well as "Modern home furnishings", Georg Klimt taught metalwork, Friedrich King wood cutting art and Hans Tichy from 1900 the drawing and painting from the living model. In all these teachers are moderate modern artists from the area of the Secession. The theoretical lectures are held in the company founded by Emil Zuckerkandl and Julius Tandler 1900 "Association of Austrian university lecturers Athenaeum", which had the task to be "an educational institution for members of the female sex". The first school year was completed with 64 students, the school is rapidly expanding, so that it forms 200-300 students annually within a few years. The steady growth is due to the restrictive attitude of the public schools of art (especially the academy) towards women, but also from the indiscriminate admission of which have been blamed all the private schools also on the part of women harshly, and just by women.

1904

The Academy of Fine Arts Vienna is one of the many requests for opening the Academy for students once again putting the old arguments against that women are rarely equipped with creative spirit in the field of great art and the other a "proliferation of dilettantism and a pushing back of male members" is to be feared. Just the idea of a joint education had "abhorred" the College. The Academy therefore advocates for the financial support of the art school for women and girls, and rejects the application for opening the academy for women unanimously. The main argument for the impossibility of the joint Aktzeichnens (nude drawing) and the need for a second Aktsaales (nude hall) is increasingly mentioned, which cannot be realized because lack of space and lack of money. Henni Lehmann (Artistic studies of women, Darmstadt 1913) countered the same argument in Germany: "The common nude studies of women and men can not be described as impossible as it is done in many places, without having shown any grievances". The objection of the Quorum of the Berlin University professors that no teacher could be forced to teach women at all in such delicate subjects is countered that the problem was easily solved by entrusting a lady the Aktunterricht (nude drawing) in ladies. Suitable artists were plentiful present. That the life drawing for a long time (until 1937) remained problematic, shows the application of the renowned sculptor Teresa F. Ries of 1931, in which she was offering the Academy her services for the purpose of the management of a yet to be affiliated department, where young girls separated from the young men could work under the direction of a woman. The application was not even put to a vote.

1912

The rector of the Munich Academy also does not believe in the inclusion of students (female ones): "... it is impossible, even with regard to the space conditions, apart from that that the aspirations of the artists who devote themselves to the arts especially are usually others than that of women..."

1913

No significant change in attitude can be found between the opinions of the Academies from 1904 and those of 1913.

1919

In the report from the College's meeting of the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna to the State Office of Internal Affairs and Teaching is communicated that against the requested admission there were no fundamental objections, but that the Academy is so limited in spatial relationship, that after the experiences of the last entrance exams not even the majority of gifted young artists, capable of studying, could be included, and therefore, in case of the admission of women to the study initially had to be made ​​a considerable expansion. The State Office counters that a further delay in the admission of women to the academic study could not be justified and that approval is to allow at least temporarily in a narrow frame.

1920

The State Office for the Interior and Education officially approved the admission of women to study at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna (since 1919 women were admitted to all faculties of the University of Vienna, with the exception of the Catholic and Protestant Theological Faculty).

A committee consisting of the professors Bacher, Delug, Schmutzer, and Jettmar Muellner claims that the Academy has never pronounced in principle against women's studies but have always only expressed reservations because of the cramped space and financial situation. As a complete novelty proves that no more concerns are raised with regard to coeducation. Men and women should compete in the entrance examination. In the winter semester 1920/21 will be included 14 women, of course, representing only a small minority in relation to the 250 male students.

1926/1927

In the new study regulations are for the first time mentioned Schüler (M) and Schülerinnen (F).

March 1927

Report of the Academy of Fine and Applied Arts about the experiences regarding the access of women to universities: ..."in past years it was thought for the education of women and girls by the Academy of Women for Liberal and Applied Art, which is also equipped with academic classes and by the State subsidized, sufficiently having taken precautions: during a period of almost seven years of study, it was probably possible to get a clear picture about the access applications of women, and about the degree course ... Of course, the number of female candidates in the painting is strongest, weaker in sculpture, and very low in the architecture. As much already now can be said, that in no way in terms of education in the new admissions the women are left behind the male candidates. During the study period, the female students are not in diligence and seriousness of studying behind their male colleagues. Particularly gratifying can be emphasized that because of the co-education of both sexes in common rooms in the individual schools a win-win situation for everybody was. In the master schools the College was repeatedly able also honouring women with academic prices. Subsuming, it should be emphasized that our experiences with the study of women in the Academy of Fine Arts were quite favorable."

The number of students (Studentinnen) increased from 5 % in the winter semester 1920/1921 till 1939/1940 to about 25 %. After the annexation of Austria to Nazi Germany, the number of students (Studentinnen) decreased. The proportion of female students rose after 1940 naturally, reached during the war years up to 70 % and amounted 1945/1946 to 65%. From 1946/1947 the number of students (Studentinnen) fell sharply again, so 1952/1953 only 20% of the students at the Academy were women. 1963/1964 there were, however, already 41% (278).

2002

Students (Studentinnen): 570 of 936 students

University professors (Universitätsprofessorinnen): 9 out of 29

Ao Univ. (extraordinary female professors) 2 of 12

Univ.Ass. (female university assistant) 18 of 41

Contract teachers (Vertragslehrerinnen): 3 of 7

Lecturer (Lehrbeautragte): 32 of 46

 

Almut Krapf

www.akbild.ac.at/Portal/organisation/uber-uns/Organisatio...

[noheadphoneson]

 

che poi va vista accanto a questa

Progetto Fotografico indirizzato al Bando Arti Visive festival Resistente 2010

nuke.festivalresistente.it/

 

© ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PLEASE DO NOT USE THIS PICTURE.

  

listen

&

View On White

Progetto Fotografico indirizzato al Bando Arti Visive festival Resistente 2010

nuke.festivalresistente.it/

 

© ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PLEASE DO NOT USE THIS PICTURE.

   

Bronze detail of a statue group at

" L' Isola che c'è ", Arts Festival

in Palermo

 

For Crazy Tuesday theme :

" Sculptures or statues ( outdoor ) "

Anna Omniars sul lago -

 

Anna Omniars sul #lago, a #photo by #annaomniars on #Flickr - www.omniars.blogspot.com/2014/03/anna-omniars-sul-lago.html - www.omniars.blogspot.com - OMNIARS | arti visive | - - Omniars - Arti sonoro-visive ed eventi -

52

18/1 55/1 0/0 0/0

Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II

00003494ab

0/1

Firmware Version 1.0.2

113063069845

2014-03-07T15:44:55

2014-03-07T15:44:55

0

2014-03-07T15:44:55 ok Anna Omniars sul lago 3 _Fotor logo soft

Performance di musica, danza e arti visive “Music for your Eyes” (11 novembre 2012)

Anguillara Sabazia (Roma)

 

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