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Leucanthemum vulgare, commonly known as the ox-eye daisy, oxeye daisy, dog daisy, Vilallonga de Ter, Ulldeter, Ripollès, Girona, Catalonia.

 

CATALÀ

La margarida de prat o margaridot (Leucanthemum vulgare, Sinònim Chrysanthemum leucanthemum), és un tipus de margarida molt estesa originària d'Europa i de les regions asiàtiques de clima temperat. Ha estat introduïda a Amèrica del Nord, Austràlia i Nova Zelanda on s'ha tornat una mala herba comuna i també és plantada a la vora de les carreteres.

Planta perenne que fa de 6 a 100 cm d'alçada, erecta glabra o pubescent i que presenta nombroses formes. Les fulles són verd fosques a les dues bandes, les fulles mitjanes de la tija i també les superiors oblongues o rarament linears, de més de 2 mm d'ample i regularment dentades. Capítols solitaris o en grups, lígules blanques. No produeix papus. Floreix de maig a setembre.

VIQUIPÈDIA

 

ENGLISH

Leucanthemum vulgare, commonly known as the ox-eye daisy, oxeye daisy, dog daisy and other common names, is a widespread flowering plant native to Europe and the temperate regions of Asia, and an introduced plant to North America, Australia and New Zealand.

Leucanthemum vulgare is a perennial herb that grows to a height of 60 cm (24 in) or more and has a creeping underground rhizome. The lower parts of the stem are hairy, sometimes densely hairy but more or less glabrous in the upper parts. The largest leaves are at the base of the plant and are 4–15 cm (1.6–5.9 in) long, about 5 cm (2.0 in) wide and have a petiole. These leaves have up to 15 teeth, or lobes or both on the edges. The leaves decrease in size up the stem, the upper leaves up to 7.5 cm (3.0 in) long, lack a petiole and are deeply toothed.

The plant bears up to three "flowers" like those of a typical daisy. Each is a "head" or capitulum 2–6 cm (0.79–2.36 in) wide. Each head has between fifteen and forty white "petals" (ray florets) 10–20 cm (3.9–7.9 in) long surrounding the yellow disc florets. Below the head is an involucre of glabrous green bracts 7–10 mm (0.28–0.39 in) long with brownish edges. Flowering mostly occurs from late spring to early summer. The seed-like achenes are 1–3 mm (0.039–0.118 in) long and have ten "ribs" along their edges but lack a pappus.

Ox-eye daisy is similar to shasta daisy (Leucanthemum × superbum) which has larger flower-heads (5–12 cm (2.0–4.7 in) wide) and to stinking chamomile (Anthemis cotula which has smaller heads (1.5–3 cm (0.59–1.18 in) wide). Leucanthemum vulgare was first formally described in 1778 by Jean-Baptiste Lamarck who published the description in Flore françoise.It is also known by the common names ox-eye daisy, dog daisy, field daisy, Marguerite, moon daisy, moon-penny, poor-land penny, poverty daisy and white daisy.

Ox-eye daisy is native to Europe, and to Turkey and Georgia in Western Asia. It is a typical grassland perennial wildflower, growing in a variety of plant communities including meadows and fields, under scrub and open-canopy forests, and in disturbed areas. The species is widely naturalised in many parts of the world and is considered to be an invasive species in more than forty countries. It grows in temperate regions where average annual rainfall exceeds 750 mm (30 in), and often where soils are heavy and damp. It is often a weed of degraded pastures and roadsides.

Ox-eye daisy spreads by seeds and by shallow, creeping rhizomes. A mature plant can produce up to 26,000 seeds that are spread by animals, vehicles, water and contaminated agricultural produce, and some seeds remain viable for up to nearly forty years. It is not palatable to cattle and reduces the amount of quality pasture available for grazing. In native landscapes such as the Kosciuszko National Park in Australia, dense infestation can exclude native plants, causing soil erosion and loss of soil organic matter.

This plant was top-ranked for pollen production per floral unit sampled at the level of the entire capitulum, with a value of 15.9 ± 2 μL, in a UK study of meadow flowers.

Leucanthemum vulgare is one of the most widespread weeds in the Anthemideae. It became an introduced species via gardens into natural areas in parts of Canada, the United States,[14] Australia,[3] and New Zealand.[15] In some habitats it forms dense colonies displacing native plants and modifying existing communities.

Ox-eye daisy commonly invades lawns, and is difficult to control or eradicate, since a new plant can regenerate from rhizome fragments[9] and is a problem in pastures where beef and dairy cattle graze, as usually they will not eat it, thus enabling it to spread; cows who do eat it produce milk with an undesirable flavor. It has been shown to carry several crop diseases.

This species has been declared an environmental weed in New South Wales and Victoria. In New South Wales it grows from Glen Innes on the Northern Tablelands to Bombala in the far southeast of the state, and there are significant populations in the Kosciuszko National Park where it has invaded subalpine grassland, snowgum (Eucalyptus pauciflora) woodland and wetlands. In Victoria it is a prohibited species and must be eradicated or controlled.

VIKIPEDIA

  

blooming very early near Cloverdale, California

A relatively uncommon plant that I never tire of finding, Leather-flower (Clematis viorna), hanging above blooms from a species of the Aster family, possibly Mayweed(?) (Anthemis cotula).

Dogs are well represented in the plant kingdom. There is Bitter Dogbane, Dogwood, Dogweed, Waxy Dogbane, Dogtooth Grass, Dogstail Grass, Poodle-dog Bush, Dog Mustard, Dog Rose, Dog Violet and now, Dog Fennel. This doesn't include all the plants with Hound in their names. Trout Creek Trail, Nevada Co, California on 24 July 2017.

Anthemis cotula

1- Scientific name = Anthemis sp.

2- English name = chamomile

3- Family = Asteraceae

4- Arabic name = أربيان

  

There are several Anthemis species in Lebanon:

 

Anthemis breviradiata

Anthemis chia

Anthemis cotula

Anthemis cretica

Anthemis cretica subsp. cassia var. discoidea

Anthemis didymaea

Anthemis haussknechtii

Anthemis hebronica

Anthemis hermonsis

Anthemis hyalina

Anthemis palestina

Anthemis patentissima

Anthemis pauciloba

Anthemis pseudocotula

Anthemis rascheyana

Anthemis scariosa

Anthemis secundiramea

Anthemis tripolitana

  

Anthemis cotula, Sparta, Monroe County Wisconsin, 1 July 2020.

Anthemis cotula, Sparta, Monroe County Wisconsin, 1 July 2020.

Anthemis cotula, Sparta, Monroe County Wisconsin, 1 July 2020.

Anthemis cotula, Sparta, Monroe County Wisconsin, 1 July 2020.

I thnk this is Stinking Chamomile (Anthemis cotula), because it did smell and it doesn't look like Scented Mayweed (which is originally what I thought it was). Ellenbrook Fields, near Hatfield, Hertfordshire, 31 August 2013.

 

To see my collections, go here: www.flickr.com/photos/anemoneprojectors/collections/.

One corner of a potato field had been neglected, and all sorts of native plants had moved in. I think this is stinking chamomile (Anthemis cotula), but in any case the area was a lovely change from monotonous maize, grass, and wheat fields.

 

Canon EOS 5D mark III, Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM, Canon EF Extender 1.4x III (handheld).

700mm, f/5.6, 1/640, ISO 400.

San Luis Obispo Co., CA

 

Native to Europe

Edible Parts: Leaves,

Edible Uses: Tea,

 

The herb is used as a flavoring in Peru. It is aromatic. Caution is advised, there are some reports of toxicity. A herb tea is made from the flowers in a similar way to chamomile tea and it has a similar though weaker effect medicinally. The odor is not very pleasant and so it is not commonly used.

 

CAUTION: The whole plant is penetrated by an acrid juice, touching or ingesting the plant can cause allergies in some people.

 

MEDICINAL USES: Antispasmodic, Astringent, Diaphoretic, Diuretic; Emetic, Emmenagogue, Stings, Tonic,

  

Mayweed is closely related to chamomile, but is far less effective as a medicine. It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus. It is rarely used in contemporary herbal medicine. The whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue and tonic. It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant, though the flowers are less unpleasant and so are more commonly used. An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers. Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water. The leaves are rubbed onto insect stings. Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters. This herb is contraindicated for pregnant women or nursing mothers.

 

OTHER USES: Dye, Gold, Repellent,

 

The growing and the dried plant is said to repel mice and fleas, it can also be used as an insecticide. A gold dye is obtained from the whole plant.

 

pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Anthemis+cotula

Title: Flowers of the field

Identifier: cu31924000605935

Year: 1908 (1900s)

Authors: Johns, C. A. (Charles Alexander), 1811-1874

Subjects: Botany

Publisher: London, G. Routledge

Contributing Library: Cornell University Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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174

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Chrysanthemum Leucan- THEMUM {While Ox-eye) and Chrysanthemum Segetum (Yellow Ox-eye) COROLLIFLOR^ fair imitation of the feather formerly worn by soldiers. It is said to be de- structive to fleas. Meadows; abun- dant.—Fl. June, July. Perennial. 2. C. segetum ,(Yellow Ox-eye, Corn Marigold).—Florets of the ray yellow; leaves clasping the stem, oblong, acute, toothed, glabrous, glaucous. The whole plant is remarkably smooth and glau- cous ; the flowers arc large, of a brilliant yellow, and contrast beautifully with Poppies and Bluebottles. Cornfields ; abundant, but local.—Fl. June, July ; and, in summer, ploughed fields ; again in October and November. Annual. 42. Matricaria {Wild Chamomile, Feverfew) 1. M. Parthenium (Common Feverfew).—1-2 feet high. Leaves stalked, pinnate; leaflets pinnatifid and deeply cut; stem erect; flowers corymbose. Well marked by its repeatedly cut, curled, delicate green leaves and its numerous small heads of flowers, of which the ray florets are white. The leaves are conspicuous in mid winter, and the whole plant has a powerful and not unpleasant odour, which is said to be particularly offensive to bees. The English name is a corruption of Febrifuge, from its tonic properties. Hedges and waste ground; common.—Fl. July, August. Per- ennial. 2. M. inodora (Corn Feverfew, Scentless May-weed).—Leaves sessile, repeatedly cut into numerous hair-like segments ; stem branched, spreading, 12-18 inches high ; flowers solitary. Of a very different habit from the last, but resembling it in the colour of the flowers, which are, however, much larger, and remarkable for their very convex disk. Cornfields ; common.—Fl. July to October. Annual. A seaside form, perennial, with fleshy leaves, is by some con- sidered a species, under the name M. maritima (Sea Feverfew). 3. M. Chamomilla (Wild Chamomile).—Flower-heads about \ inch across ; disk yellow ; ray florets white. Oflen confused with M- inodora and Anthemis Cotula, but may be distinguished by the scales of the involucre being not chaffy at the margin, and by the receptacle of the florets being hollow. Not uncommon in corn- fields.—Fl. June to August. Annual.

  

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Wildflowers were still on display at Grant. There was a greater variety than shown here, but... These 17 are, from top to bottom, left column (such as it is) first:

 

Wild Teasel (dipsacus fullonum) - Invasive non-native

Curly Dock (rumex crispus) - Invasive non-native

Texas Paintbrush (castilleja foliolosa)

 

Ithuriel's Spear (triteleia laxa)

Poison Hemlock (conium maculatum) - Invasive non-native

Blow Wives (achyrachaena mollis) - seeds

Yarrow (achillea millefolium)

 

Common Mustard (brassica rapa) - Invasive non-native

Jointed Charlock (raphanus sativus) - Invasive non-native

Maybe - Dog Fennel (anthemis cotula) - non-native

California Poppy (eschscholzia californica)

California Wild Rose (rosa californica)

 

California Buttercup (ranunculus californicus)

Owl's Clover (castilleja exserta)

Purple Clarkia (clarkia purpurea ssp. quadrivulnera)

Harvest Brodiaea (brodiaea elegans)

Vervain (verbena lasiostachys var. lasiostachys)

Title: Aus der Heimath

Identifier: ausderheimath63ross

Year: (s)

Authors: Rossmssler, E. A. (Emil Adolf), 1806-1867

Subjects: Natural history; Natural history -- Germany

Publisher: Glogau : C. Flemming

Contributing Library: New York Botanical Garden, LuEsther T. Mertz Library

Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

  

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Stttl)regi(lcr. Abdomen. 249. Slbbtänte. 159. Slberglauben. 399. Acanthocephalen. 747. Accipitrinae. 5U6. «tfetfläAnec. 2ül, Acidalia brumata. 119. Actinocrinus longirostris Hall & Whit- ney. 761. aetoffop. 319. afterfiügel. 478. Agaricus Gardneri. 752. Agaricus igneus. 752. Agaricus noctilucens. 752. Agaricus olearius. 752. Agave americana. 24. 688 Agave geminiflora. 30. atajie, 734. Alae. 473. Alnus glutinosa L. 142. Alnus incana L. 142. Alulae. 478. Ambulatores. 10. Amentaceen. 263. Amygdalaceen. 213. Slmplutn. 667. 91mBlumftäb(l)en. 667. JInbDCrit. 40 41. fflnfttid) für ©roljtatbtge. 624. Antennae. 248. Anthemis cotula. 63. Anthcridien. 636. SlntljrppO'iErigonomcltie. 507. Antlia pneumatica. 197. Vlppretut auäSBaumreotUngcwcben entfftntn 432. ffltfen, rnttalWäiei. 159. Slvfenif, gdbcr. 158. Sltfenit, fltauet. 160. SIrfenif. rotbet. 157. Slrl'cnit, weiter. 158 Slcffiütfieä. 158. Asclepias Cornuti Decaisne. 95. Slffimilatiün ifümotpl;« ©ubflanjtn. 591. Sluaen. 248. Slutipignifut. 158. Sluäcingeniafdjine für naffe SBäfcfee. 192. ?luft. 597. Sluättocfiun «on *Iifiiinjenf^ctUn 493. Avena sativa. 716. *öad)fteljenpärd)en , mit Cem Olcfie teifenb. 383. 93a9iicimafcl)iiu, felbfltbätigc. 575. ©aiicgraä. 348. ©tintilt. 777. '.öantnuirmcr. 747. g3anDn)urni. 745. Savomctfr. 198. ÖaumiBcigling. 9. !8auml»ellfafcr, Stagfäbigfeit Der. 446. »erfite, tünftlid)e. 143. Sefvuchtuiig, tünftlidje, von SJAumen uiil ©etreibe.' 752. öergtalt. 41. S8etf)eUiriren, iei ^cljeä. 397. SBienenbonig. 527. ©ienenftid) al« Jpeilmiftel. 415. ©inteftürf. 296. ölaumeifc. 9 SJliii'emvürnier. 747. 93lattgniii. 701. SSIattnafen. 620. aSiattftielnaibe. 734. 93leiglanjtrl)ftalle, tün|llid)e. 591. Scdjnia. 38. 93oud)enftcen, be« J&cilje«. 398. «raunellc, Smige ter. 296. SBreccie. 375. SBciefbeföcbcruiig turcfe gnloanifdjen ©trcm. 235. Srtolette. 584. 93ri(lant. 582. Siillantine. 255. Stronic^eitaltec. 275. Süffelfleifd). 431. Surnettiftren, beä ^olje«. 396. S3uttctmafd)ine. 719. Byssus pliosphorea L. 751. i'alendula officinalis. 781. Calosoma Inquisitor. 780. Calosoma sycophanta L. 777. Calycanthen. 213. Canis lupus L. 645. Capsella bursa pastoris L. 629. Caprimulgus europaeus L. 615. Caput. 247. Carabicinen. 777. Carabus auratus L 777. Carabus cancellatus. 777. Satbcna. 38. Caryophyllaceen. 407. Ceratophyllum. 590. Cestoden. 747. ßbamnleonbcije. 735. Chamaerops humilis. 688. Clienopodium vulvaria. 320. Cliiroptera. 615. (ShlocopbvU. 7Ü1. Clamatorcs. 10. Coca 15 (Sopaifitni^, fetter. 143. Copula. 296. Corvinae. 11. Coxa. 250. Crataegus o.xyacantha L. 213. Cysticercus cellulosae L. 745. Cystici. 747. Cystopus candidus Leveille. 634. "entirostres. 11. T)c«infection. 542. Sidflein. 585. 5)üIbengeU'äd)fe. 565. S)otn. 233.' (Sdjiniten. 169. Echinites L. 169.

  

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The english name is Dog Fennel, rather less charming than the flower itself. A Potterton garden, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Taken from a slightly unusual perspective.

Title: A manual of poisonous plants, chiefly of eastern North America, with brief notes on economic and medicinal plants, and numerous illustrations

Identifier: cu31924001232150

Year: 1911 (1910s)

Authors: Pammel, L. H. (Louis Hermann), 1862-1931

Subjects: Poisonous plants

Publisher: Cedar Rapids, Ia. , The Torch Press

Contributing Library: Cornell University Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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IMPORTANT POISONOUS PLANTS 139 and we may well in the absence of evidence suspicion this one." The aster is confined to Gumbo clay soil intermixed with gravel and soil that contains more or less alkali and other salts. Dr. O. L. Prien is investigating the disease.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Fig. 19m. Fetid Marigold (.Dysodia chrysanthlemoides). Pungent odor said to be injuri- ous. (Charlotte M. King). Fig. 19n. Dog Fennel (Anthemis cotula). Contains a pimgent principle. Rudbeckia lacinata L. Cone-flower. In moist grounds throughout the north. Dr. Schaffner says it is supposed to be poisonous to sheep. Bidens frondosa L. Black Beggar-ticks. Common in the north. The downwardly barbed awns are irritating. Coreopsis discoidea T. & G. Small Beggar-ticks. Very common in the east. It is a local irritant. Helenium autumnale L. Sneezeweed. It is common in low grounds throughout Iowa and is used by the Indians to produce sneezing. The whole plant and flowers are poisonous to cattle and sheep. Helenium tenuifolium Nutt. Sneezeweed.

  

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A hike without flower photos? Hah. Not this time. These eleven are, from top to bottom, left column first:

 

Unidentified

Yellow Mariposa (calochortus superbus)

Large Flowered Star Tulip (calochortus uniflorus) - Rare 4.2*

 

Black Sage (salvia mellifera)

Dog Fennel (anthemis cotula) - Invasive non-native

 

Pacific False Bindweed (calystegia purpurata ssp. purpurata)

Golden Yarrow (eriophyllum confertiflorum var. confertiflorum)

Owl's Clover (castilleja exserta)

 

Smooth Vetch (vicia villosa ssp. varia) - non-native

Purple Clarkia (clarkia purpurea)

Deerweed (acmispon glaber)

 

* www.rareplants.cnps.org/detail/3394.html

Edible Parts: Leaves,

Edible Uses: Tea,

 

The herb is used as a flavoring in Peru. It is aromatic. Caution is advised, there are some reports of toxicity. A herb tea is made from the flowers in a similar way to chamomile tea and it has a similar though weaker effect medicinally. The odor is not very pleasant and so it is not commonly used.

 

CAUTION: The whole plant is penetrated by an acrid juice, touching or ingesting the plant can cause allergies in some people.

 

MEDICINAL USES: Antispasmodic, Astringent, Diaphoretic, Diuretic; Emetic, Emmenagogue, Stings, Tonic,

  

Mayweed is closely related to chamomile, but is far less effective as a medicine. It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus. It is rarely used in contemporary herbal medicine. The whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue and tonic. It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant, though the flowers are less unpleasant and so are more commonly used. An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers. Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water. The leaves are rubbed onto insect stings. Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters. This herb is contraindicated for pregnant women or nursing mothers.

 

OTHER USES: Dye, Gold, Repellent,

 

The growing and the dried plant is said to repel mice and fleas, it can also be used as an insecticide. A gold dye is obtained from the whole plant.

 

pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Anthemis+cotula

The english name is Dog Fennel, rather less charming than the flower itself. A Potterton garden, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Taken from a slightly unusual perspective.

Edible Parts: Leaves, Flowers,

Edible Uses: Tea,

 

The herb is used as a flavoring in Peru. It is aromatic. Caution is advised, there are some reports of toxicity. A herb tea is made from the flowers in a similar way to chamomile tea and it has a similar though weaker effect medicinally. The odor is not very pleasant and so it is not commonly used.

 

CAUTION: The whole plant is penetrated by an acrid juice, touching or ingesting the plant can cause allergies in some people.

 

MEDICINAL USES: Antispasmodic, Astringent, Diaphoretic, Diuretic, Emetic, Emmenagogue, Stings, Tonic,

  

Mayweed is closely related to chamomile, but is far less effective as a medicine. It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus. It is rarely used in contemporary herbal medicine. The whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue and tonic. It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant, though the flowers are less unpleasant and so are more commonly used. An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers. Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water. The leaves are rubbed onto insect stings. Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters. This herb is contraindicated for pregnant women or nursing mothers.

 

OTHER USES: Dye, Gold, Repellent,

 

The growing and the dried plant is said to repel mice and fleas, it can also be used as an insecticide. A gold dye is obtained from the whole plant.

 

pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Anthemis+cotula

Edible Parts: Leaves,

Edible Uses: Tea,

 

The herb is used as a flavoring in Peru. It is aromatic. Caution is advised, there are some reports of toxicity. A herb tea is made from the flowers in a similar way to chamomile tea and it has a similar though weaker effect medicinally. The odor is not very pleasant and so it is not commonly used.

 

CAUTION: The whole plant is penetrated by an acrid juice, touching or ingesting the plant can cause allergies in some people.

 

MEDICINAL USES: Antispasmodic, Astringent, Diaphoretic, Diuretic; Emetic, Emmenagogue, Stings, Tonic,

  

Mayweed is closely related to chamomile, but is far less effective as a medicine. It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus. It is rarely used in contemporary herbal medicine. The whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue and tonic. It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant, though the flowers are less unpleasant and so are more commonly used. An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers. Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water. The leaves are rubbed onto insect stings. Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters. This herb is contraindicated for pregnant women or nursing mothers.

 

OTHER USES: Dye, Gold, Repellent,

 

The growing and the dried plant is said to repel mice and fleas, it can also be used as an insecticide. A gold dye is obtained from the whole plant.

 

pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Anthemis+cotula

Identifier: farmweedsofcana00clar

Title: Farm weeds of Canada

Year: 1906 (1900s)

Authors: Clark, George Harold, 1872- Fletcher, James, 1852-1908 Criddle, Norman Canada. Dept. of Agriculture

Subjects: Weeds Weeds Botany

Publisher: Ottawa : Published by direction of the Minister of Agriculture

Contributing Library: ASC - York University Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Ontario Council of University Libraries and Member Libraries

  

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COMMON RAGWE-EDlAmbrosia arfemisi^folia,/, Plate 25

 

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STINKING MAYWE-EDlAnrhemis Cotula./. i PLATE 25.STINKING MAYWEED, Anthemis Cotula. L. Other English names: Mayweed, Dogs Chamomile, Dog-fennel.Other Latin name : Maruta Cotula, DC. Introduced. Annual and winter annual. Stems 12 to 18 inches, muchbranched from the root up, forming a flat topped bunch of white, yellow-eyed, daisy-like flowers, 1 inch across, on slender naked stems. Leaves twicedivided, with the secondary leaflets cut into linear segments. Whole plantdull green, slightly hairy and with a strong unpleasant odour. Seeds [Plate53, fig. 19—natural size and enlarged 8 times] dirty yellow, small. jV of aninch long, ovate-oblong or oblong, truncate at the upper end with a smallknob in the center, abruptly pointed below, 10-ribbed with rows of coarsetubercles, sometimes however, according to Prof. Hillman, nearly smooth. Time of Flowering: Summer to autumn; seed ripe by July, and youngplants sometimes abundant in September. Propagation : By seeds. Occurrence : A common weed in

  

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

These visitors added their color to the bloomfest along the trails. Clockwise from top left, they are:

 

Shortfruit Stork's Bill (erodium brachycarpum) - Non-native

Coastal Heron's Bill (erodium cicutarium) - Non-native

Rose Clover (trifolium hirtum) - Invasive non-native

Hairy Vetch (vicia villosa) - Non-native

English Plantain (plantago lanceolata) - Non-native weed

Shepherd's needle, Venus' needle (scandix pecten-veneris) - Non-native - Thanks Willie!

Beaked Hawksbeard (crepis vesicaria) - Non-native

Mayweed, Dog Fennel, Stinking Chamomile (anthemis cotula) - Non-native

Scarlet Pimpernel (anagallis arvensis) - Non-native

NO:Tappgåseblom LAT:Anthemis cotula ENG:Stinking Chamomile SP:Manzanilla hedionda

Sted/Place:Estepona (Malaga) Dato/Date:03 2010 Str:15-90 cm Blomstring/Flowering:Mars-juli (3-7) Habitat:Åkerland, beitemarker,avfallsplasser.

 

En av mange kurvplanter ned hvite kronblader og gul krone. Etterhvert begynner de hvite kronbladene å henge (som hos kamille) og den gule kronen blir stående oppreist som en tapp som har gitt planten navnet tappgåseblom.

Sterk duft. Fjæraktig bladverk. Vokser ofte i store tepper i landskapet.

Mayweed, Weches Outcrop, San Augustine County, May 2006

Title: Common weeds of Canada [microform] : a pocket guide

Identifier: cihm_85461

Year: 1910 (1910s)

Authors: Hamilton, D. Wiley (David Wiley), 1878-1935

Subjects: Weeds; Mauvaises herbes, Lutte contre les; Weeds; Mauvaises herbes

Publisher: Toronto : Macmillan

Contributing Library: www.flickr.com/search/?tags=bookcontributorCanadiana_org

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Alberta Libraries

  

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(L). COMMON WEEDS OF CANADA 99 shoots. Dispersal.—Seeds carried by winds; als.. by creenine rootstocks. Eradication.—Pull or plow, and cultivate. Tanacetum means undying. The platit was so named because*? the flowers of Tansy arc durable. Common Tansy is naturalized throughout the coun- try, and is much used for medicinal purposes. It is found in patches in old fields, along roadsides, and in lanes near dwellings. CHAMOMILE. OR MAY- WEED. Anthemis Cotula, (L). Root.—I'iljfous. Stem.—Low, <i-12 inches, acrid, strong-scented. Leaves.—Thrice pin^atelv-divided into slender leaflets o'r lobes, smooth, with fetid smell. Flowers. —White, '4 inch, in heads which terminate the brandies; white rays and yellow centre, scaly leaves among Mowers. Fruit.—Head of achenes. Seeds.—About ^\ of an inch long, tajjcring, light t'r- dark- brown in color; surface roughened iiy distinct tubercles. Duration.— .Vnnual. Flowering.—June—Aug- ust. Seeding.—July—.September. Propagation.—Iiy seeds. Dispersal. .Seeds carried l)y winds; in hav and grass seeds. Eradication. .Mow; seed down, follow l)y hoe-crop. May-weec» is naturalized _..„ „ ^„„, ^ roadsides, in meadows and waste places, and along the streets of towns and villages. The white-rayed llowers closely resemble daisies; but its finely-cut leaves and smrll fi -r heads with vellow centres in high relief are s .lent for its recognition bv bruisinjr the flowers and leaves a strong odor of chamomile proves the identitv of the plant. One may blew ''chamomile" tea from the leaves- or ihroug'i. their agency raise effective blisters in an emergency.

 

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Chamomile, or Mav wkkij Anlhemis Cotula. (L) and abundant along

  

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Title: Bergens Museums skrifter

Identifier: bergensmuseumssk1190914berg

Year: 1878 (1870s)

Authors: Bergens Museum

Subjects: Science

Publisher: [Bergen, Norway : s. n. ]

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

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268 Remarks on the most Important Plant-Societies of the Island. low thorny shrubs Prosopis Stephaniana, Paliurus avstralis and Sangidsorha spmosa, of which the steppe- societies of the island are rarely destitute; moreover a series of different plants with subterranean tubers, bulbs or the like, as 7//*' Sisyrhichiiim, various Liliaceae, among- which is the high white-flowered Asphodehts ;Y/mos«<.s'subsp. microcarjms, Mandraqora offichiantm. Leontodon tidierosinn subsp. OUvieri and others. From my diary some notes will here be quoted from the steppe-lands near Vatili, in the middle of the large plain of Messaria. At the time of my visit, in the first days of April 1905, StijM tortilis and Asphodelus ramnsus subsp. mierocarpus were the most prominent species of these steppes. A very great part of the plain is here cultivated, and is occupied by large, rich fields. The original character of steppe is chiefly preserved only in the most shallow places, where the soil over the hard conglomerate- and sandstone-flats, which cover the marl-strata underneath, only has a depth of up to ca. '/i meter, and sometimes merely a few centimeters. This especially applies to the most elevated tracts of the plain, where the lock rises scutiformly, forming low, more or less salient convexities. In such a steppe not far west of the village I found the following vegetation. Stipa tortilis, Hurdeum miirinum, Drachypodhim d'lstarhyum. Bronius squarrosutt, Lagurus ovatufi, Psilurus ari- status, Triticum ovatttm. Koehleria phleoides and Arena harhata subsp. Wiestii form large grass-mats, which cannot, however, be said to be very dense. Especially Stipa plays a predomi- nant part here, its soft panicles with the long and glossy awns are waving at the lightest wind. There are only a few low shrubs. Indeed Sanguism-ha spinosa is found, but it is of quite inferior importance; some scarce specimens of Thymus capitatux, however, were seen, having as yet neither flowers nor buds. Of tuberous oi' bulbiferous plants Asphodelus ramosas subsp. mierocarpus was predominant; it is of very frequent occurrence wherever the depth of the soil is at least 15 — 20 centimeters. Ornithogalum tenuifoJium, subsp. trichophi/Uum, which is also very frequent, requires much less soil. Several other bulbous plants were also noticed, their florescence, how- ever, had passed a long while ago, and I was not able to identify the half withered parts, which were still to be seen. Furthermore I observed the following herbs: Scorpiums sub- rillosa (numerous, in fruit), Ert/thraea pulchella (scarce). Alsine picta (in great quantities), Sali-ia viridis subsp. Horminum (numerous), Alkanna tindoria (numerous), Trifolium prociim- bens (numerous), Sherardia arvensis (in great quantities), Medicago minima (in great quantities), M. coronafa (scarce), Liniim strictum subsp. spicatum (scarce), Hippocrepis ciliatn (scarce), Galium setaceum (rather scarce), Lagoseris bifida (in abundance), Leontodon tuberosum subsp. OUvieri (in abundance), Trifolium angustifolium (sparse), Plantago Psyllium (numerous), Anthemis Cotula (in abundance), Lagoecia cuminoides (numerous), Malva aegyptica (rather scarce), Galium murule (very scarce), Trigonella monsjÆaca (scarce), Linum angustifolium (rather scarce), Parentucellin tofi/b?ja (numerous). Tunica velutina, Ranunculus asiaticus (with lemon-coloured flowers numerous, with deep-red ones scarce), Anagallis arvensis subsp. coerulea

 

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Fig. 104, Psilnru.'i aristatus Duv.-.Iouve. (Vi).

  

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Identifier: illustratedflor03brit

Title: An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Canada and the British possessions : from Newfoundland to the parallel of the southern boundary of Virginia and from the Atlantic Ocean westward to the 102nd meridian

Year: 1913 (1910s)

Authors: Britton, Nathaniel Lord, 1859-1934 Brown, Addison, 1830-1913

Subjects: Botany

Publisher: New York : Scribner

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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lhveed. Fig. 4556. Anthemis Cotula L. Sp. PI. 894. 1753- Mariita Co ula DC. Prodr. 6: 13. 1837. Annual, glabrous, or sometimes pubescentabove, glandular and with a fetid odor andacrid taste, much branched, i°-2° high. Leavesmostly sessile, i-2 long, finely 1-3-pinnatelydissected into narrow, or almost filiform, acutelobes; heads commonly numerous, about ibroad; bracts of the involucre oblong, obtuseor obtusish, usually somewhat tomentose; rays10-18, white, at length reflexed. neutral, orrarely with abortive pistils, mostly 3-toothed;receptacle convex, becoming oblong, its chaffbristly, subtending the central flowers; acheneslo-ribbed, rugose or glandular-tuberculate;pappus none. In fields, waste places and along roadsides, allover North America except the extreme north.Naturalized from Europe, and widely distributedas a weed in Asia, Africa and Australia. Othernames are mather, dog- or hogs-fennel, dog-finkle,morgan. Dog-daisy. Pig-sty-daisy. Maise. Chig-ger-weed. Balders. June-Nov.

 

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^ Genus 90. THISTLE FAMILY. 517

  

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Identifier: standardcycloped01bail

Title: The standard cyclopedia of horticulture; a discussion, for the amateur, and the professional and commercial grower, of the kinds, characteristics and methods of cultivation of the species of plants grown in the regions of the United States and Canada for ornament, for fancy, for fruit and for vegetables; with keys to the natural families and genera, descriptions of the horticultural capabilities of the states and provinces and dependent islands, and sketches of eminent horticulturists

Year: 1916 (1910s)

Authors: Bailey, L. H. (Liberty Hyde), 1858-1954

Subjects: Gardening

Publisher: New York, The Macmillan Co. [etc., etc.]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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oses, theheads (the single pre-ferred ) are cut as soonas fully expanded,and dried. Cult, alsoas a hardy borderplant; often double. BB. Biennial or an-nual; weeds.arvensis, Linn.Pubescent, not iU-scented: Ivs. rathercoarsely 1-2 pin-nately parted: pap- Eus a minute border:eads 1 in. or moreacross; the involucrewith broad, bluntscarious marginaledges; rays pistillate,spreading, 2-toothed.—Not common andrather coarse. Cotula, DC. May-weed. Dog Fennel.Fig. 219. A commonweed along roadsides, ill-scented, growing 1-2 ft. high,with finely dissected Ivs., neutral rays and many aster-like fls. 1 in. across. A. Aizdon, Griseb.=.\chillea ageratifolia. Gn. 24:342.—A.ardkiai, Linn.=Cladanfhus.—A. corondria, Hort.=Chrysanthe-znum coronarium.—A. flaribunda, Hort. Dwarf: Ivs. much dis-sected: fl.-head.s pure white. — A. BieberaUiniana, Koch, iafound in some catalogues. It is an alpine plant with pinnatelv8., which are silvery, and yellow fls. Can be cult, only in thealpine ttnrAfn. T TT Tl

 

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219. Anthemis Cotula. (XM) ANTHER: FUnrer. N. TAYLOH.t ANTHERICUM (Greek, flower hedge). Includes fAa-langium. Liliaces-. \on-bulbous liliaceous plants grownin borders and cool greenhouses. Herbs, w^ith tuber-like rhizomes, and racemes ofrather small, w^hite, deep-cut fls.: perianth rotate;anthers attached between their basal lobes, and thelocules many-o\Tjlcd—in these characters differingfrom Paradisea.—Home 50 species, mostly African, buta few in the western hemisphere. The anthericums are useful for lawn vases, for bordersthat are protected in winter at the North, for green-hou.ses and also for growing under benches. Propaga-tion naturally by stolons; increased also by divisionand seeds. Of easiest culture. Give plenty of waterwhen in bloom. Liliago, Linn. St. Bernards Lily. Figs. 220, 221.St. simple, 2-.3 ft. high, bearing an open raceme of opcm-sprearJing fls. 1 in. or le.ss across, the segms. linear-oblong: Ivs. long and narrow. S. Eu. and N. Afr. U.M.914. Var. mAjor, Sims,

  

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Anthemis cotula, common name: "stinking chamomile". Large size.

Stinking Chamomile (Asteraceae) - Ashley Warren Area, Whitchurch, Hants

Title: A manual of poisonous plants, chiefly of eastern North America, with brief notes on economic and medicinal plants, and numerous illustrations

Identifier: cu31924001232168

Year: 1911 (1910s)

Authors: Pammel, L. H. (Louis Hermann), 1862-1931

Subjects: Poisonous plants

Publisher: Cedar Rapids, Ia. , The Torch Press

Contributing Library: Cornell University Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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COMPOSITAE —THISTLE FAMILY — YARROW 787

 

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Fig. 451a. Yarrow (.Achillea Millefolium). 1, plant with leaf and flowers. 2, A single head; a, ray flowers; b, a single flower. (Charlotte M. King). European name. Nosebleed, was given from the fact that the early writers claimed hemorrhage of the nose followed placing its leaves in the nostrils; this may have been either due to its direct irritation, or the use of Achillea Ptarmica, its leaves being very sharply serrate and appressed-toothed. Mille- folium causes burning and raw sensations of the membranes with which it comes in contact, considerable pain in the gastric and abdominal regions, with diarrhoea and enuresis. An alkaloid having the same formula as achillein has been isolated in A. moschata; a second alkaloid, moschatin, C^^H^^NO^ is said to occur in the same plant. In Europe sometimes regarded as a forage plant. 20. Anthemis (Mich.) L. Mayweed Annual or perennial herbs with finely dissected leaves and a strong scent; heads peduncled; involucre hemispherical; bracts imbricated in several series; ray flowers white or yellow, 2-3 toothed; pistillate and fertile; style branches of the disk flowers truncate; achenes oblong angled, ribbed; pappus none or short crown. There are about 60 species in the Old World. They are strong scented or aromatic herbs. Anthemis Cotula. h. Mayweed. Dog Fennel An acrid branching scented annual from 1-2 feet high; leaves thrice pin-

  

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Identifier: artificialkeytow00gant

Title: Artificial key to the weed seeds found in commercial seeds in Illinois and adjoining states

Year: 1918 (1910s)

Authors: Gantz, Richard Alonzo

Subjects: Weeds Grain Theses

Publisher:

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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Plate HIRow l. Erigeron annuus.Row 2. Cichorium Intybus.Row 3. Ambrosia art ami si if o iia • Plate 17 Bow 1. Silene antirrhina. Ro- ?. Stellaria media. Row 3. Anthemis Cotula. Row 4. Lactuca gcariola. Row 5. Salsoli Kali. Row 6. Cir3ium lanceolatum. Plate HI

 

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Plate IV I 1 MM m # <+ & # •f «

  

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–manzanilla hedionda, manzanilla fétida–

 

Ruderal y arvense, 50–1600 m.a. Europea y mediterránea, hasta el O de Asia. Presente en gran parte del territorio.

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