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This image is based on a striking self-portrait by Cinnamon Girl that she made inspired by a portrait of Salma Hayek by Cass Bird*. Cinnamon Girl's portrait evoked something of Weimer era Germany for me so I moved the image in that direction.

   

*It turns out Cass Bird's image is itself (perhaps) indebted to 2003 image by Josphine Meckseper which itself may have drawn from a 1975 portait of Jack Nicholson by Douglas Kirkland and all of which point to a 1960 photograph by Melvin Sokolsky. Or so a blog post by Amy Stein notes.

  

photography - Cinnamon Girl © 2011

processing - tim lowly

  

Amy Stein

Domesticated

Blue Sky Gallery

July 2 - August 2, 2009

Portland, OR

www.blueskygallery.org/

www.amysteinphoto.com

Sent from my phone... I love the future.

|||| www.stevenfrost.com ||||

Name_Description

 

3- Japanese Dolls (Sakura Dolls) Mulan

Disney's Imperial Beauty Mulan -

Set of 4- Bamboo Plates- Made in Taiwan - Non Breakable- Historical painting

4- Wizard of Oz Munchkins

Disney Collector Doll-Enchanted Seasons collection - Spring Blossom Mulan 2001

Rose- Titanic Motion Picture Collector Doll - 1997 w/COA

Disney- Glitter Princess- Ariel

Disney- Glitter Princess - Snow White

Disney- Glitter Princess- Belle 2005

Cocoa-Cola Nascar Car Tin

Disneys Collector Dolls - Film Premier Edition- Imperial Beauty- Mulan 1998

Boyds Ltd. Bears and Hears "Miss Appleton- Story Time" figurine - PC# 2E/4077

Commemorative "Vanna" Limited Edition 1996

"Vanna" Silver- Limited Edition 1995

 

Barbie and Ken - USA Olympic Skater -Wind them up and they spin on their skates

1966 Fashion and Doll Reproduction - Fashion Luncheon Barbie -Collectible 1996

1966 Doll and Fashion Reproduction-Limited Edition- 30th Anniversary-Francie/ Barbie Doll's Modern Cousin with lifelike eyelashes, and bendable legs.

Shoppin Fun-Barbie & Kelly playset - Kelly really bounces, and magically picks up cereal and cookies

1996 Midnight Waltz Barbie-Ballroom Beauties Collection-

1996 Holiday Caroler Barbie- Porcelain

1996 Twirling Ballerina Barbie- Spin her crown and she magically twirls on her toes

Ocean Friends Kira-and her seal friend - Magical wet suit disappears and reappears in water

Jewel Hair Mermaid - Teresa- The longest hair ever! 1995

Coca Cola Picnic Barbie 1997

Fashion Fever Barbie

1999 Golden Allure Barbie - Special Edition

Fashion Fever Barbie 2004

Fashion Fever Kayla 2004

Fashion Savvy Collection - Tangerine Twist Barbie (African American)

Costume ball Barbie

1965 Fashion and Doll reproduction - Poodle Parade Barbie

Winter Reflection Barbie

 

Barbie - Hair Magic, with Hair extensions that change colors

My First Barbie Princess 1994

Walmart Special Edition- Country Bride Barbie - 1994

Jewel Hair Mermaid - Barbie 1995

Great Date - Ken - 1995

Spring Petals Barbie - 1995

Happy Meal Stacie

Emerald Elegance Barbie 1994

Original 1960 Fashion & Doll Special Edition Reproduction- Solo in the Spotlight - Barbie 1994

Walmart Special Edition- Sweet Magnolia Barbie 1996

Bubble Angel Barbie- magic wings make real bubbles

George (Washington)- Limited Edition Barbie 1996

Twinkle lights Barbie, she really lights up, White, Blue, Pink 1993

Calvin Klein Jeans, Bloomingdale's - Barbie 1996

Ken as Henry Higgins in My Fair Lady 1995 Hollywood Legends Collection- Limited Edition

Barbie as Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady - 1995 Hollywood Legends Collection- Limited Edition (Pink Dress)

Barbie as Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady - 1995 Hollywood Legends Collection- Limited Edition (White and Black Dress)

 

Medieval Lady - Barbie (Great Eras collection)

Teresa - Sun Jewel Barbie - 1993

Sapphire Dream Barbie 1995 - Society Style Collection - Limited Edition

Timeless Silhouette Barbie - 2000

Sunflower Barbie - Inspired by the Paintings of Vincent Van Gogh-Limited Edition 1998

Barbie Evening Flame 1991- 1 of 3 of the same doll

1960 Fashion and Doll Reproduction - Collector Edition - Enchanted Evening Barbie 1995

Flower Surprise Barbie 2002

Midge and Baby - Happy Family 2002

American Stories collection - special edition - Colonial Barbie

" " " - Pilgrim Barbie

" " " - Civil War Nurse Barbie

" " " - Pioneer Barbie

" " " - Pioneer Barbie

Barbie Pet Doctor / Adorable pets magically wiggle-waggle when you pet them

Barbie Evening Flame 1991- 2 of 3 of the same doll

 

Troll Barbie, mix and match troll hair for Barbie. With cool troll necklace for child to wear.1994

Pizza Party Skipper, everything for a complete pizza party. 1994

Collector Edition- Exotic Intrigue Barbie 2003

Pretty in Purple Barbie 1992

An Avon exclusive -Special Edition, Spring blossom Barbie 1995

Shaving fun Ken - Shave his magic color- change beard again and again 1994

Butterfly art - Ken - cool decorations for Ken and child to wear! 1998

Teresa - Spots n Dots Barbie, lookin cool at the hottest spots in town! 1993

An Avon exclusive -Special Edition, Spring Tea Party - Barbie 1997

Travel Train Fun - Barbie, Conductor and Hostess 2001

Sparkle Beach Barbie - Skipper 1995

Kelly- Love N Care - Make her chickenpox disappear

Skating Star Barbie 1995

Teresa - Twilight Gala- Barbie

Stars N Stripes - Army Barbie - Rendezvous with Destiny 1992

Barbie Fab - Fashions - 2002

Baywatch - Ken - Lifeguard races to the rescue on his waverunner! 1994

Glitter Hair Barbie - Colorful glittery gel for styling her hair 1993

My Graduation 2004 - Barbie

City Style- Barbie 2003

Special Edition - Air Force Barbie - Thunderbirds 1993

Barbie Collector Doll 1992

 

Ginnny & Friends Collection - Vogue Dolls 1993- 8" Mary had a little lamb - Collectable posable doll

Design Debut-Johnny- 17" Tall w/ golf bag and clubs, has COA piece no. 1192 of 2500

Collectors Dolls by Bradley- Cindy Lee - COA

1994 Pittsburgh Originals- At The Tea Party Collection- Kristea COA # 526 of 1000 w/complete tea set

1996- George Burns (born 1896) - An American Legend- by Effanbee Doll Co. - Limited to George Burns Centennial Year - includes video tape "The Sunshine Boys"

Lissi Doll - Limited Edition

Ashton Drake Galleries - "It's Time for Bed Pooh" - COA# 4306FD

Design Debut "Hannah" 1992

Lissi Doll - Limited Edition - " Jeena" 1992 Cert # 75 of 1000

 

1992 Design Debut- "Heather"

Ashton Drake Galleries- "Amy" COA # 1034FD

1992 - design Debut - "Tracy Tears"

Treasury Collection - "Shannon the Shamrock Fairy" - Paradise Galleries - Premier Edition

Paradise Galleries "Shannon" of the Emerald Isle - Premier Edition COA## F553

Bradley Dolls - "Val" Item# SD561

Edward M. Knowles- Heroines from the Fairy Tale Forest- "Snow White" COA# 4373C

Geppeddo Fairy Tale Series - "Goldilocks"

New Attitude Porcelain Boy Baseball player Doll w/baseball bat charm

 

Undercover Kids - animated collectable "Derek" Boy w/wreath

House of Lloyds 1990 Christmas Dreams

Genuine Porcelain Doll- Holiday Elegance - stand included

Dynasty Doll Collection - We Wish You a Merry X-Mas - Frances

Victorian Bows Collection - Genuine Porcelain doll by Melissa Jane - dressed in Red and white w/strips - 1997 The Brass Key COA incl.,

Vanna - Happy Holidays

Little Girl dressed in Red - about 6 " tall

box with 4 Snowman mugs, 4 mini Santa mugs, 1 Frosty the snowman mug, 1 Santa mug, cntr. Of tree ornaments

 

Shirley Temple - "Little Princess" Collectors Porcelain doll

1992 Hollywood Walk of Fame- Lucille Ball COA# 1865 of 3,000

The Hamilton Collection (Baby doll) "Wendy" COA # 1600A sculpted by Virginia Ehrlich Turner

The Hamilton Collection (Baby doll) "Danielle" COA # 4228A sculpted by Virginia Ehrlich Turner

9" Doll - Designer Guild collection - "Patty" COA# 0034 of 2000 worldwide- Artist Thelma Resch

Design Debut - Consuela COA# 0301 of 3360

 

Collector Edition - Barbie 2000

American Indian Barbie w/baby

Barbie- Evening Flame 1992 - 3 of 3 of the same dolll

Barbie - Star Steeper with horse / 2 pairs of reebock hi-tops for Barbie

Talk with me Barbie- w/ CD Rom -program her to talk / her mouth really moves

Teen Talk - Barbie- she says 4 different phrases 1991

Hollywood Legends Collection - Ken as The Scarecrow from wizard of oz

School Cool Barbie- W/ backpack, chalk board, and keychain

Toothfairy Barbie - w/ pouch 1994

Special Edition-Fun Barbie - 1994

Walt disney world 25th Anniversary Barbie

Fun to dress Barbie

Skipper - Sun Jewel

 

Brass Button Bears - 20th Century Collectables (1900-1990) 10 Bears in set-each dressed for a decade

"Vanna" Platinum Limited Edition 1995

"Vanna Gold Limited Edition 1996

Treasure Trolls - w/wishstone (set of 5)

Hip Hop Kids - "Girlfriend" soft filled doll w/eyes that open and close

"Cher" from the hit TV series clueless w/ cool ring for you inside Cher's animal backpack.

Classic Edition- Star Wars- 1999 Portrait edition Princess Leia

First in a Series - Elizabeth Taylor in Cleopatra (The Elizabeth Taylor Collection)

First in a Series - Frank Sinatra "The Recording Years"

Collection Edition- 1997- Lucy Does a TV Commercial" Episode 30

3 Kellogs beanbag breakfast bunch dolls- Snap, Crackle, and Pop

Marilyn Monroe - Emerald Evening Marilyn 1 of 2 of the same doll

 

Tiffany collection 1998 - "Tiffany Pacini" COA sewn on dolls back

Ashton Drake Galleries - "Little Women Collection" Artist Wendy Lawton "Meg" COA# 3235D -she sits on her satin stool, with embroidery in hand

Circus Parade- Clown Collection - 1990

Ltd Edition 2005 - Vanessa - by Vanessa Ricardi - COA sewn on dolls back

Beautiful Expressions Collectable - 1947 attire w/ purse and feather shawl

Collector's Edition - Kirsten Model# 14180

 

Shopping Time - Barbie 1997

"Teresa" , Barbies girlfriend - Spot Scene w/keychain frame and dalmation

Graduation Barbie Class of 1997 -

Graduation Barbie Class of 1998 -

Cut and Style Barbie, cut her hair and magically make it long again 1994

Wonder Woman Barbie

Teresa-Diamond Dazzle Barbie

 

Coca Cola Picnic Barbie

Winter Splender Barbie

Glamorous Gala - Barbie

Ken- Flower Surprise

Sea Holiday Barbie w/camera

City Seasons- Fall Collection - Autumn in Paris Barbie 1998

1962 Fashion and Doll Reproductions-Collector Edition- Silken Flame Barbie 1997

Sixties Fun Barbie 1997

Barbie for President 1991

The Great Eras Collection-Egyptian Queen Barbie 1994

Barbie as the Swan Lake Queen in Swan Lake 1997 (African American)

Limited Edition- Spiegel - Summer Sophisticate Barbie 1995

The Great Eras Collection - 1920's Flapper Barbie

Collection Edition - Barbie 2001

 

Bob Mackie " Queen of Hearts" Barbie

Bob Mackie " Moon Goddess" Barbie

Dolls of the world collection - Dutch Barbie 1993

Dolls of the world collection - German Barbie 1994

Dolls of the world collection - Native American Barbie 1994

Dolls of the world collection - Kenyan Barbie 1993

Dolls of the world collection - Puerta Rican Barbie 1996

Dolls of the world collection - French Barbie 1996

Dolls of the world collection - Indian Barbie 1995

Dolls of the world collection - Irish Barbie 1994

Dolls of the world collection - Native American Barbie 1992

Dolls of the world collection - Russian Barbie 1996

Dolls of the world collection - Polynesian Barbie 1994

Dolls of the world collection - Norwegian Barbie 1995

Dolls of the world collection - Arctic Barbie 1996

Dolls of the world collection - Mexican Barbie 1995

Dolls of the world collection - Japanese Barbie 1995

Dolls of the world collection - Moroccan Barbie 1998

Dolls of the world collection - Chilean Barbie 1997

 

Design Debut "Olivia" 1992 COA# 571 of 2280

Throughout the Years " A walk in the park" includes Mom, baby, carriage, and umbrella

Ashton Drake "Jo" from Little Women COA # 2070D 1994

Ashton Drake "Laura" from Little Women COA# 2178H 1992

Ashton Drake "Marmee" from Little Women COA# 10408A 1995

Royal Heirloom Collection by Tomich Inc. COA# 0487 of 3000

Porcelain Doll "Jessica" in red velvet dress and hat

Moments Treasured Collection "Dusty" COA# 2424 of 3000 Boy

Moments Treasured Collection "Lucy" COA# 640 of 2000

 

Design Debut Amy & Her Wagon COA# 1288/2000

Ashton Drake "Nellie" from Little House on the Praire- 1993 COA# 3736ZB

Design Debut "Stephanie" COA

Design Debut "Tracey" Baseball Player w/mit and ball COA

Design Debut "Elizabeth" 1992 COA

American Sweetheart Collection "Brianna" Itm# 25560

Designer Guild Collection "Pat" Boy doll COA#0913/2000 Limited Edition original artist doll

Morgan Brittany Collector Doll - "Earth Angel Kids w/hope. "Seth"

A Connoisseur Collection - By Seymour Mann - Shaka 16 " Ethnic Doll w/COA

 

Marilyn Monroe " Evening Emerald Marilyn" 1993

Marilyn Monroe "Silver Sizzle Marilyn" 1993

"Vanna" in Spain Limited Edition

A portrait of Vanna "Happy Mothers Day"

"The original" Mommy Doll 19" soft body - arms bend to hug and feed baby (Baby included)

Mattel's Chatty Cathy / The Talking Doll - Reproduction of original 1960 doll

Walt Disney for Burger King edition - Hunchback of Notre Dame - " Quasimodo

"Vanna" with Vanna White original fashions

Classic Creations-Hand crafted Porcelain Doll "WEI" 6" doll

Classic Creations-Hand crafted Porcelain Doll "HON" 6" doll

Walt Disney Co - Snow White and The seven Dwarfs- 6 1/2" Dolls - "Bashful"

"Dopey"

"Doc"

"Happy"

"Sneezy"

"Grumpy"

"Sleepy"

Disney's Beauty and the Beast - The Wedding" Prince"

 

Lissi Doll- World-Wide Collection 17" Doll - Bonita Itm# 76100

Lissi Doll- World Wide Collection 17" Doll Itm# 75812

Vanna Limited Edition - HSN - W/ Vanna White original fashions (Gray jump suit)

Special Edition - Holiday Magic- "Hollyberry" Sky Dancers

"Kelly" from TV's 90210 Beverly Hills

"Braondon" from TV's 90210 Beverly Hills

"Donna" from TV's 90210 Beverly Hills

Soldiers of the World "1776 American Patriot" and "1776 British Redcoat"

70th Anniversary Miss America Doll - "Blair" by Kenner

Exclusively Distributed by Presents, Turner Enterprises - "Scarecrow"

50th Anniversary "The Wizard of Oz" Glinda

"Scarecrow" The Wizard of Oz

"Wizard" The Wizard of Oz

"Astromaut" by Dakin

"John Smith" Disney's Pocahontas

"Kelly" from Saved by the Bell 1990 NBC series

 

"Melinda" The Tooth Fairy - by Gorhman - Imaginary People Dolls

18" "Canterbury Bell" Doll - by Bill O'Connor, Artist- Duck House, Inc. Ontario Canada COA# 699/1500 Worldwide

Ashton Drake "Mary" Little House on the Prairie- COA# KC238

Abraham (Abe) Lincoln - COA# 209- Authorized by the United States Historical Society

by Seymour Mann - "Sister Mary" COA

Princess Diana"The Queen of Hearts" 1997- COA by The Society for the Preservation of History, Inc. - Origianal First Memorial Doll Ever Issued.

 

Lissi Doll - "Jennifer"

Pittsburgh Originals - From the Heart "Tina" by Chris Miller- COA# 148 of 1,000 worldwide

Roosevelt Bear - Dressed as Magician - COA- The Wonderful World of Jane Withers Collectibles

Build A Bear- Black w/silver speckles - dressed as Pumpkin

Fine Pewter Figure - Star Trek "Spock" from The Motion Picure 1979

Disney "Belle" Beauty and the Beast - Enchanted Christmas

Warner Bros. - 1996 McDonalds Collectible - from Space Jam- Lola Bunny - Made for Denny's

Precious Moments Bear

 

Misc. stuffed animals, dolls, and mini figures- Loose

 

Barbie Christmas Tree, skirt

Picture in frame

Picture Puzzle in frame

 

Cntr. Of misc. Barbie furniture

Halloween Star "Estrella de halloween"

Halloween Enchantress "Hechicera Noche de Brujas"

Enchanted Halloween

Boo-tiful Halloween (glow in the dark dress!)

XXXOOO Barbie - Valentine Barbie

Valentine Romance

Valentine Style Barbie

Valentine Fun Barbie

With Love Barbie

Valentine Romance

Holiday Sisters "Barbie, Kelly, and Stacie"

Holiday Excitement

Special Edition - Holiday Season Barbie

Holiday Surprise

Festive Season Barbie

Santas Helper

Holiday Treats Barbie

Holiday Joy

Pinstripe Power - Limited Edition 1997

Ballroom Beauties Collection "Moonlight Waltz" Barbie 1997

Midnight Princess Barbie 1997

 

Barbie furniture

Misc. Barbie Clothes - at least 100 outfits

Chest with Barbie accessories

Lamp

Barbie Night Light

Several Barbie Containers

3- Barbie beanie rabbits (Easter)

Phone Book

Diary

Kelly/Nikki miniature Easter 1. Rabbit 1. Chick

Empress of Emeralds - Barbie Resin Egg

 

Christmas tree decorations

Wardrobe full of shoes/boots/skates (about 30 pairs)

Two new Barbie Outfits - Pkgs unopened

 

Bag of Misc. mini figures (dolls)

Giggling Pillsbury Dough Boy

Mini Pillsbury Dough Boy beanie

Praying little girl doll

Grand Ole Opry Bear

Circus Circus Bear

Little Girl with her first teeth, sticking her tongue out (very cute)

Bag of 3 pairs of doll shoes

12 Collector Series - Glasses - Disney Characters - 1 extra Pocahontas

Idaho Potatoe Stuffed Doll w/legs

Budweiser Label Stein - Giftware Mug

Misc. Figures

 

Plate "Fun in the Sun" (Frankie & Annette) COA

6- McDonalds Collector plates

Owl wooden plaque 1996

Angelique Doll

Mini plate and cup set - Raggedy Ann

4 pc. Traven set-Toothbrush Holder, Soap Holder, Cream Jar, Hair Comb

Peanuts - Christmas Ornament

AM/FM Backphone Radio unique behind the head design

Floral stationery, picture frame, and pen

Harmonica

Silver mouse, 2 baskets, figurine

Barbie case w/mini Barbie dolls

Pokemon 23K Gold Plated Trading Card - in Globe

Pkg. Of 10 stencils (plastic)

Mini chest for jewelry

1955 Chevrolet "Belair" - collector mini car

Sugar Town - Dr. Sugar's Office Porcelain Hanging Ornament

2 Mini Holloween globes

Humingbird ceramic night light

2 misc. platic containers

Boyz- Sun Kissed Summer

 

 

Good day collectors! It's Sara again. Today Jen's wrapping things up at NEXT in Chicago and is finally on her way back home. The next month or so looks relatively low-key and travel-free so you can look forward to your usual dose of JB art goodness in your inbox. But for today, you're stuck with me as I introduce two new works from Jeff Lewis: Contact High and Organic Oval.

 

Moments after we released Jeff's first edition, Inloveness Revisited, press inquiries started streaming in. Everyone wanted a little Inloveness. But after seeing how quickly the prints were disappearing, a couple of the requests fell through — editors realized they should feature works that would be around for their readers to acquire once their pages came to print. Lewis' print was featured in amNY and we figured the best thing to do was not let anyone else be disappointed. So, we got to work selecting new paintings for Jeff's next editions.

 

Jeff's website features mostly newer work but he's been fixated on ovals for at least the last decade, yielding the shape plenty of time to dictate his work. Given the scale of his canvases, it's easy to see how they might, in their monolithic presence, overtake the artist, allowing him to work intuitively and spontaneously, much like his predecessors from the New York School. Peek at Jeff's pic; he's a small but dedicated presence in front of his paintings.

 

As we were oohing and ahhing over all of Jeff's ovals and their gorgeous palettes, Jen and I were joined by Jane Mount who mentioned something along the lines of, "my brain certainly does not work the way his does!" which is really a great comment, not only in the context of Jeff vs. Jane's differing approaches to making art, but also in recognition of all the work we've featured on 20x200. Browse the archives and you'll see, we've been able to work with an incredible range of artists with diverse interests and approaches. Consider Beth Dow's work next to Donald Weber's, for example. And often, as in the case of Weber in particular, we have the opportunity to present work that might otherwise have a hard time finding its way into the hands of collectors, despite receiving some of the most prestigious awards for artists.

 

A lot of the artists we work with are featured in major collections; Ann Toebbe is a West Prize finalist, along with Hot Shot Georg Parthen (we have 20x200 editions with Georg in the works too!), putting 20x200 in good company. Since the West Collection brought the work of the finalists to NEXT, Ann and Georg were in attendance and paid visit to Jen and Jeffrey. Midwesterner Kevin Miyazaki also stopped by, along with Sarah McKenzie, of course, making team JBG feel right at home in the Windy City with 20x200 friends and family.

 

Jen is making one last stop in Chicago to meet and greet a few new friends at the Museum of Contemporary Photography. We're all fans of their print program which gives collectors the opportunity to acquire some incredible photography and support MoCP. I know Jen's already snagged Amy Stein's Hillside from her series Domesticated.

 

For today, we'll leave you with MoCP's photography as our own Hey, Hot Shot! is, unfortunately, offline and unavailable due to some very mysterious and poorly-timed hosting snafus. If you've tried to visit the site and/or apply for the Hey, Hot Shot! competition in the last 24 hours and have been denied access with the unfriendly "forbidden" notice, do not fear, we'll extend the competition deadline once the site is back up. Nobody who's tried to submit images will miss their chance. And we'll be featuring the best of the best contenders on the blog again in no time. More on that later! Tomorrow Youngna Park will tide you over with a sweet photography edition from a brand-new-to-20x200 artist. Until then!

 

Good day collectors! It's Sara again. Today Jen's wrapping things up at NEXT in Chicago and is finally on her way back home. The next month or so looks relatively low-key and travel-free so you can look forward to your usual dose of JB art goodness in your inbox. But for today, you're stuck with me as I introduce two new works from Jeff Lewis: Contact High and Organic Oval.

 

Moments after we released Jeff's first edition, Inloveness Revisited, press inquiries started streaming in. Everyone wanted a little Inloveness. But after seeing how quickly the prints were disappearing, a couple of the requests fell through — editors realized they should feature works that would be around for their readers to acquire once their pages came to print. Lewis' print was featured in amNY and we figured the best thing to do was not let anyone else be disappointed. So, we got to work selecting new paintings for Jeff's next editions.

 

Jeff's website features mostly newer work but he's been fixated on ovals for at least the last decade, yielding the shape plenty of time to dictate his work. Given the scale of his canvases, it's easy to see how they might, in their monolithic presence, overtake the artist, allowing him to work intuitively and spontaneously, much like his predecessors from the New York School. Peek at Jeff's pic; he's a small but dedicated presence in front of his paintings.

 

As we were oohing and ahhing over all of Jeff's ovals and their gorgeous palettes, Jen and I were joined by Jane Mount who mentioned something along the lines of, "my brain certainly does not work the way his does!" which is really a great comment, not only in the context of Jeff vs. Jane's differing approaches to making art, but also in recognition of all the work we've featured on 20x200. Browse the archives and you'll see, we've been able to work with an incredible range of artists with diverse interests and approaches. Consider Beth Dow's work next to Donald Weber's, for example. And often, as in the case of Weber in particular, we have the opportunity to present work that might otherwise have a hard time finding its way into the hands of collectors, despite receiving some of the most prestigious awards for artists.

 

A lot of the artists we work with are featured in major collections; Ann Toebbe is a West Prize finalist, along with Hot Shot Georg Parthen (we have 20x200 editions with Georg in the works too!), putting 20x200 in good company. Since the West Collection brought the work of the finalists to NEXT, Ann and Georg were in attendance and paid visit to Jen and Jeffrey. Midwesterner Kevin Miyazaki also stopped by, along with Sarah McKenzie, of course, making team JBG feel right at home in the Windy City with 20x200 friends and family.

 

Jen is making one last stop in Chicago to meet and greet a few new friends at the Museum of Contemporary Photography. We're all fans of their print program which gives collectors the opportunity to acquire some incredible photography and support MoCP. I know Jen's already snagged Amy Stein's Hillside from her series Domesticated.

 

For today, we'll leave you with MoCP's photography as our own Hey, Hot Shot! is, unfortunately, offline and unavailable due to some very mysterious and poorly-timed hosting snafus. If you've tried to visit the site and/or apply for the Hey, Hot Shot! competition in the last 24 hours and have been denied access with the unfriendly "forbidden" notice, do not fear, we'll extend the competition deadline once the site is back up. Nobody who's tried to submit images will miss their chance. And we'll be featuring the best of the best contenders on the blog again in no time. More on that later! Tomorrow Youngna Park will tide you over with a sweet photography edition from a brand-new-to-20x200 artist. Until then!

Image taken from:

 

Title: "Joys and Sorrows: where to find, and how to exchange them: comprising Agnes; or, a Word for woman ... and other poems. By the authoress of “Amy of the Peak” [Jane M. Bingham]. [With a frontispiece designed by the authoress.]"

Contributor: BINGHAM, Jane M.

Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 11645.c.22."

Page: 8

Place of Publishing: London

Date of Publishing: 1847

Publisher: C. Gilpin

Issuance: monographic

Identifier: 001908865

 

Explore:

Find this item in the British Library catalogue, 'Explore'.

Download the PDF for this book (volume: 0) Image found on book scan 8 (NB not necessarily a page number)

Download the OCR-derived text for this volume: (plain text) or (json)

 

Click here to see all the illustrations in this book and click here to browse other illustrations published in books in the same year.

 

Order a higher quality version from here.

  

Identifier: cyclopediaofamer05bail

Title: Cyclopedia of American horticulture, comprising suggestions for cultivation of horticultural plants, descriptions of the species of fruits, vegetables, flowers and ornamental plants sold in the United States and Canada, together with geographical and biographical sketches, and a synopsis of the vegetable kingdom

Year: 1906 (1900s)

Authors: Bailey, L. H. (Liberty Hyde), 1858-1954, ed Miller, Wilhelm, 1869- joint ed

Subjects: Gardening -- Dictionaries Plants -- North America encyclopedias

Publisher: New York, Doubleday, Page & Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

M. Camm, SuzanneMarie Rodocanachi, Ulrich Brunner, Xavier Olibo. Hybrid Tea.—Augustine Guinoiseau, Captain Christy,Caroline Testout, Gloire Lyonnaise, Kaiserin AugustaVictoria, Madame Joseph Combet, Miss Ethel Richard-son, Souvenir du President Carnot, Souvenir de MadameEugenie Verdier, Viscountess Folkestone. Mr. Alexander B. Scott recommends the followingadditional H. T. varieties: Antoine Rivoire, Baldwin,Bessie Brown, Gruss an Teplitz, Killarney, Lady Clan-morris, Madame Jules Grolez. Tea-scented Boses. — A\\iho-aiie Karr, Comtesse Riza duPare, Duchesse de Brabant, Etoile de Lyon, FranciscaKruger, Innocente Pirola, Isabella Sprunt, MadameLambard, Madame Moreau, Maman Cochet, MadameJoseph Schwartz, Marie van Houtte, Papa Gontier, Sa-frano. Souvenir dun Ami, The Queen, White MamanCochet. Moss Bases. —Comtesse deMurinais, Blanche Moreau,Crimson Globe, Laneii, Princess Adelaide. Climbing i?oses. —Crimson Rambler, Cheshunt Hy-brid, Gloire de Dijon, Celine Forestier, Reine Marie

 

Text Appearing After Image:

2180. The old-fashioned yellow upright Rose (X K). Henriette, Pink Microphylla,White Microphylla, MadameAlfred Curriere. Hybrid Siveetbriers. —Amy Rohsart, Annie of Geier-stein, Brenda, Catherine Seyton, Edith Bellenden, FloraMclvor, Green Mantle, Jeannie Deans, Julie Mannering, Lady Penzance, Lord Penzance, Lucy Ashton, LucyBertram, Meg Merrilies, Minna, Rose Bradwardine. The Hybrid Wichuraianas look promising, but havenot been tested by the writer. It is not intended that this list is by any means com-plete. There must be many good Roses that will do wellunder favorable conditions of which the writer has nopersonal knowledge. The collection is sufficiently large.

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Wanted to see the Amy Stein exhibition but Pool Gallery was closed on Monday.

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New issue of the photo zine Tell mum everything is ok published by Éditions FP&CF.

 

Check the website !

 

www.editionsfpcf.com

  

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I came back from SPX 2013 with a TON of comics (as well as two great podcast recordings). This is one of the problems of staying in the show hotel; if you bring your catch up to your room to drop it off, you may not realize how much you're buying. A couple of things were gifts, or I got a discount because people like me. And I didn't include the page of original art I bought, because it might be a gift and I don't want the potential recipient to see it. Here's the whole shebang, in no particular order:

 

Pompeii, by Frank Santoro

 

Lost Cat, by Jason

 

Palookaville #21, by Seth

 

Good Dog, by Graham Chaffee

 

Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story, by Peter Bagge

 

A 1980 issue of Comical Funnies, featuring comics by Peter Bagge

 

Reset, by Peter Bagge

 

Love And Rockets: New Stories No. 6, by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez

 

Nurse Nurse, by Katie Skelly

 

Margarine, a mini comic by Katie Skelly

 

Today is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life, by Ulli Lust

 

Eye Of The Majestic Creature Vol. 2, by Leslie Stein

 

SNARKED: Forks and Hope, by Roger Langridge

 

SNARKED: Ships and Sealing Wax, by Roger Langridge

 

SNARKED: Cabbages and Kings, by Roger Langridge

 

The Fez, mini comics by Roger Langridge

 

Grand Gestures and SMOO #7, by Simon Moreton

 

Photo by Amy Roth.

 

Listen to The Virtual Memories Show!

Look out

Copyright 2007 Ron Diorio

 

We'll be up at the Griffin Musuem for the juried show opening. Looking forward to meeting Brian Clamp and Amy Stein.

Amy Stein

Domesticated

Blue Sky Gallery

July 2 - August 2, 2009

Portland, OR

www.blueskygallery.org/

www.amysteinphoto.com

「飽食終日不是我們的錯,至少我不這麼想,生在這種逸樂的時代也不是我們的錯,

也許您不同意,但是要過這種生活不只辛苦也要忍耐。」

 

「安詳很好,只是我不想美化這種安詳,我們就是活的夠好了,所以代價也夠大,

既然您要談藝術,您一定也知道,文藝復興就是發生在最貧乏的時代裡,

浪漫主義發生在最動亂的時代裡,數百年安詳的瑞士產生了什麼?巧克力和咕咕鐘。」

 

朱少麟_燕子(1999)

______________________________

如果你現在要說我們無病呻吟

彷彿也沒多大關係了,我們只是,有了動作,有人同意,更多人不同意

但我們真正在乎嗎,我們才他媽的不在乎

我們要承受的字眼,變成我們的名字

受過教育又怎樣,生病進醫院晃一趟就會好嗎

你是精英,誰稱你的,那個誰又是誰,誰獲准格認可誰阿

你這些無謂的所謂,不就是因為頹廢才形成與建造出你這副人格

扭曲又世俗,清高自命,你肯定被年歲壓榨,小心的交易過什麼

我不同情你,我心餘我自己

Amy Stein

Domesticated

Blue Sky Gallery

July 2 - August 2, 2009

Portland, OR

www.blueskygallery.org/

www.amysteinphoto.com

Name_Description

 

3- Japanese Dolls (Sakura Dolls) Mulan

Disney's Imperial Beauty Mulan -

Set of 4- Bamboo Plates- Made in Taiwan - Non Breakable- Historical painting

4- Wizard of Oz Munchkins

Disney Collector Doll-Enchanted Seasons collection - Spring Blossom Mulan 2001

Rose- Titanic Motion Picture Collector Doll - 1997 w/COA

Disney- Glitter Princess- Ariel

Disney- Glitter Princess - Snow White

Disney- Glitter Princess- Belle 2005

Cocoa-Cola Nascar Car Tin

Disneys Collector Dolls - Film Premier Edition- Imperial Beauty- Mulan 1998

Boyds Ltd. Bears and Hears "Miss Appleton- Story Time" figurine - PC# 2E/4077

Commemorative "Vanna" Limited Edition 1996

"Vanna" Silver- Limited Edition 1995

 

Barbie and Ken - USA Olympic Skater -Wind them up and they spin on their skates

1966 Fashion and Doll Reproduction - Fashion Luncheon Barbie -Collectible 1996

1966 Doll and Fashion Reproduction-Limited Edition- 30th Anniversary-Francie/ Barbie Doll's Modern Cousin with lifelike eyelashes, and bendable legs.

Shoppin Fun-Barbie & Kelly playset - Kelly really bounces, and magically picks up cereal and cookies

1996 Midnight Waltz Barbie-Ballroom Beauties Collection-

1996 Holiday Caroler Barbie- Porcelain

1996 Twirling Ballerina Barbie- Spin her crown and she magically twirls on her toes

Ocean Friends Kira-and her seal friend - Magical wet suit disappears and reappears in water

Jewel Hair Mermaid - Teresa- The longest hair ever! 1995

Coca Cola Picnic Barbie 1997

Fashion Fever Barbie

1999 Golden Allure Barbie - Special Edition

Fashion Fever Barbie 2004

Fashion Fever Kayla 2004

Fashion Savvy Collection - Tangerine Twist Barbie (African American)

Costume ball Barbie

1965 Fashion and Doll reproduction - Poodle Parade Barbie

Winter Reflection Barbie

 

Barbie - Hair Magic, with Hair extensions that change colors

My First Barbie Princess 1994

Walmart Special Edition- Country Bride Barbie - 1994

Jewel Hair Mermaid - Barbie 1995

Great Date - Ken - 1995

Spring Petals Barbie - 1995

Happy Meal Stacie

Emerald Elegance Barbie 1994

Original 1960 Fashion & Doll Special Edition Reproduction- Solo in the Spotlight - Barbie 1994

Walmart Special Edition- Sweet Magnolia Barbie 1996

Bubble Angel Barbie- magic wings make real bubbles

George (Washington)- Limited Edition Barbie 1996

Twinkle lights Barbie, she really lights up, White, Blue, Pink 1993

Calvin Klein Jeans, Bloomingdale's - Barbie 1996

Ken as Henry Higgins in My Fair Lady 1995 Hollywood Legends Collection- Limited Edition

Barbie as Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady - 1995 Hollywood Legends Collection- Limited Edition (Pink Dress)

Barbie as Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady - 1995 Hollywood Legends Collection- Limited Edition (White and Black Dress)

 

Medieval Lady - Barbie (Great Eras collection)

Teresa - Sun Jewel Barbie - 1993

Sapphire Dream Barbie 1995 - Society Style Collection - Limited Edition

Timeless Silhouette Barbie - 2000

Sunflower Barbie - Inspired by the Paintings of Vincent Van Gogh-Limited Edition 1998

Barbie Evening Flame 1991- 1 of 3 of the same doll

1960 Fashion and Doll Reproduction - Collector Edition - Enchanted Evening Barbie 1995

Flower Surprise Barbie 2002

Midge and Baby - Happy Family 2002

American Stories collection - special edition - Colonial Barbie

" " " - Pilgrim Barbie

" " " - Civil War Nurse Barbie

" " " - Pioneer Barbie

" " " - Pioneer Barbie

Barbie Pet Doctor / Adorable pets magically wiggle-waggle when you pet them

Barbie Evening Flame 1991- 2 of 3 of the same doll

 

Troll Barbie, mix and match troll hair for Barbie. With cool troll necklace for child to wear.1994

Pizza Party Skipper, everything for a complete pizza party. 1994

Collector Edition- Exotic Intrigue Barbie 2003

Pretty in Purple Barbie 1992

An Avon exclusive -Special Edition, Spring blossom Barbie 1995

Shaving fun Ken - Shave his magic color- change beard again and again 1994

Butterfly art - Ken - cool decorations for Ken and child to wear! 1998

Teresa - Spots n Dots Barbie, lookin cool at the hottest spots in town! 1993

An Avon exclusive -Special Edition, Spring Tea Party - Barbie 1997

Travel Train Fun - Barbie, Conductor and Hostess 2001

Sparkle Beach Barbie - Skipper 1995

Kelly- Love N Care - Make her chickenpox disappear

Skating Star Barbie 1995

Teresa - Twilight Gala- Barbie

Stars N Stripes - Army Barbie - Rendezvous with Destiny 1992

Barbie Fab - Fashions - 2002

Baywatch - Ken - Lifeguard races to the rescue on his waverunner! 1994

Glitter Hair Barbie - Colorful glittery gel for styling her hair 1993

My Graduation 2004 - Barbie

City Style- Barbie 2003

Special Edition - Air Force Barbie - Thunderbirds 1993

Barbie Collector Doll 1992

 

Ginnny & Friends Collection - Vogue Dolls 1993- 8" Mary had a little lamb - Collectable posable doll

Design Debut-Johnny- 17" Tall w/ golf bag and clubs, has COA piece no. 1192 of 2500

Collectors Dolls by Bradley- Cindy Lee - COA

1994 Pittsburgh Originals- At The Tea Party Collection- Kristea COA # 526 of 1000 w/complete tea set

1996- George Burns (born 1896) - An American Legend- by Effanbee Doll Co. - Limited to George Burns Centennial Year - includes video tape "The Sunshine Boys"

Lissi Doll - Limited Edition

Ashton Drake Galleries - "It's Time for Bed Pooh" - COA# 4306FD

Design Debut "Hannah" 1992

Lissi Doll - Limited Edition - " Jeena" 1992 Cert # 75 of 1000

 

1992 Design Debut- "Heather"

Ashton Drake Galleries- "Amy" COA # 1034FD

1992 - design Debut - "Tracy Tears"

Treasury Collection - "Shannon the Shamrock Fairy" - Paradise Galleries - Premier Edition

Paradise Galleries "Shannon" of the Emerald Isle - Premier Edition COA## F553

Bradley Dolls - "Val" Item# SD561

Edward M. Knowles- Heroines from the Fairy Tale Forest- "Snow White" COA# 4373C

Geppeddo Fairy Tale Series - "Goldilocks"

New Attitude Porcelain Boy Baseball player Doll w/baseball bat charm

 

Undercover Kids - animated collectable "Derek" Boy w/wreath

House of Lloyds 1990 Christmas Dreams

Genuine Porcelain Doll- Holiday Elegance - stand included

Dynasty Doll Collection - We Wish You a Merry X-Mas - Frances

Victorian Bows Collection - Genuine Porcelain doll by Melissa Jane - dressed in Red and white w/strips - 1997 The Brass Key COA incl.,

Vanna - Happy Holidays

Little Girl dressed in Red - about 6 " tall

box with 4 Snowman mugs, 4 mini Santa mugs, 1 Frosty the snowman mug, 1 Santa mug, cntr. Of tree ornaments

 

Shirley Temple - "Little Princess" Collectors Porcelain doll

1992 Hollywood Walk of Fame- Lucille Ball COA# 1865 of 3,000

The Hamilton Collection (Baby doll) "Wendy" COA # 1600A sculpted by Virginia Ehrlich Turner

The Hamilton Collection (Baby doll) "Danielle" COA # 4228A sculpted by Virginia Ehrlich Turner

9" Doll - Designer Guild collection - "Patty" COA# 0034 of 2000 worldwide- Artist Thelma Resch

Design Debut - Consuela COA# 0301 of 3360

 

Collector Edition - Barbie 2000

American Indian Barbie w/baby

Barbie- Evening Flame 1992 - 3 of 3 of the same dolll

Barbie - Star Steeper with horse / 2 pairs of reebock hi-tops for Barbie

Talk with me Barbie- w/ CD Rom -program her to talk / her mouth really moves

Teen Talk - Barbie- she says 4 different phrases 1991

Hollywood Legends Collection - Ken as The Scarecrow from wizard of oz

School Cool Barbie- W/ backpack, chalk board, and keychain

Toothfairy Barbie - w/ pouch 1994

Special Edition-Fun Barbie - 1994

Walt disney world 25th Anniversary Barbie

Fun to dress Barbie

Skipper - Sun Jewel

 

Brass Button Bears - 20th Century Collectables (1900-1990) 10 Bears in set-each dressed for a decade

"Vanna" Platinum Limited Edition 1995

"Vanna Gold Limited Edition 1996

Treasure Trolls - w/wishstone (set of 5)

Hip Hop Kids - "Girlfriend" soft filled doll w/eyes that open and close

"Cher" from the hit TV series clueless w/ cool ring for you inside Cher's animal backpack.

Classic Edition- Star Wars- 1999 Portrait edition Princess Leia

First in a Series - Elizabeth Taylor in Cleopatra (The Elizabeth Taylor Collection)

First in a Series - Frank Sinatra "The Recording Years"

Collection Edition- 1997- Lucy Does a TV Commercial" Episode 30

3 Kellogs beanbag breakfast bunch dolls- Snap, Crackle, and Pop

Marilyn Monroe - Emerald Evening Marilyn 1 of 2 of the same doll

 

Tiffany collection 1998 - "Tiffany Pacini" COA sewn on dolls back

Ashton Drake Galleries - "Little Women Collection" Artist Wendy Lawton "Meg" COA# 3235D -she sits on her satin stool, with embroidery in hand

Circus Parade- Clown Collection - 1990

Ltd Edition 2005 - Vanessa - by Vanessa Ricardi - COA sewn on dolls back

Beautiful Expressions Collectable - 1947 attire w/ purse and feather shawl

Collector's Edition - Kirsten Model# 14180

 

Shopping Time - Barbie 1997

"Teresa" , Barbies girlfriend - Spot Scene w/keychain frame and dalmation

Graduation Barbie Class of 1997 -

Graduation Barbie Class of 1998 -

Cut and Style Barbie, cut her hair and magically make it long again 1994

Wonder Woman Barbie

Teresa-Diamond Dazzle Barbie

 

Coca Cola Picnic Barbie

Winter Splender Barbie

Glamorous Gala - Barbie

Ken- Flower Surprise

Sea Holiday Barbie w/camera

City Seasons- Fall Collection - Autumn in Paris Barbie 1998

1962 Fashion and Doll Reproductions-Collector Edition- Silken Flame Barbie 1997

Sixties Fun Barbie 1997

Barbie for President 1991

The Great Eras Collection-Egyptian Queen Barbie 1994

Barbie as the Swan Lake Queen in Swan Lake 1997 (African American)

Limited Edition- Spiegel - Summer Sophisticate Barbie 1995

The Great Eras Collection - 1920's Flapper Barbie

Collection Edition - Barbie 2001

 

Bob Mackie " Queen of Hearts" Barbie

Bob Mackie " Moon Goddess" Barbie

Dolls of the world collection - Dutch Barbie 1993

Dolls of the world collection - German Barbie 1994

Dolls of the world collection - Native American Barbie 1994

Dolls of the world collection - Kenyan Barbie 1993

Dolls of the world collection - Puerta Rican Barbie 1996

Dolls of the world collection - French Barbie 1996

Dolls of the world collection - Indian Barbie 1995

Dolls of the world collection - Irish Barbie 1994

Dolls of the world collection - Native American Barbie 1992

Dolls of the world collection - Russian Barbie 1996

Dolls of the world collection - Polynesian Barbie 1994

Dolls of the world collection - Norwegian Barbie 1995

Dolls of the world collection - Arctic Barbie 1996

Dolls of the world collection - Mexican Barbie 1995

Dolls of the world collection - Japanese Barbie 1995

Dolls of the world collection - Moroccan Barbie 1998

Dolls of the world collection - Chilean Barbie 1997

 

Design Debut "Olivia" 1992 COA# 571 of 2280

Throughout the Years " A walk in the park" includes Mom, baby, carriage, and umbrella

Ashton Drake "Jo" from Little Women COA # 2070D 1994

Ashton Drake "Laura" from Little Women COA# 2178H 1992

Ashton Drake "Marmee" from Little Women COA# 10408A 1995

Royal Heirloom Collection by Tomich Inc. COA# 0487 of 3000

Porcelain Doll "Jessica" in red velvet dress and hat

Moments Treasured Collection "Dusty" COA# 2424 of 3000 Boy

Moments Treasured Collection "Lucy" COA# 640 of 2000

 

Design Debut Amy & Her Wagon COA# 1288/2000

Ashton Drake "Nellie" from Little House on the Praire- 1993 COA# 3736ZB

Design Debut "Stephanie" COA

Design Debut "Tracey" Baseball Player w/mit and ball COA

Design Debut "Elizabeth" 1992 COA

American Sweetheart Collection "Brianna" Itm# 25560

Designer Guild Collection "Pat" Boy doll COA#0913/2000 Limited Edition original artist doll

Morgan Brittany Collector Doll - "Earth Angel Kids w/hope. "Seth"

A Connoisseur Collection - By Seymour Mann - Shaka 16 " Ethnic Doll w/COA

 

Marilyn Monroe " Evening Emerald Marilyn" 1993

Marilyn Monroe "Silver Sizzle Marilyn" 1993

"Vanna" in Spain Limited Edition

A portrait of Vanna "Happy Mothers Day"

"The original" Mommy Doll 19" soft body - arms bend to hug and feed baby (Baby included)

Mattel's Chatty Cathy / The Talking Doll - Reproduction of original 1960 doll

Walt Disney for Burger King edition - Hunchback of Notre Dame - " Quasimodo

"Vanna" with Vanna White original fashions

Classic Creations-Hand crafted Porcelain Doll "WEI" 6" doll

Classic Creations-Hand crafted Porcelain Doll "HON" 6" doll

Walt Disney Co - Snow White and The seven Dwarfs- 6 1/2" Dolls - "Bashful"

"Dopey"

"Doc"

"Happy"

"Sneezy"

"Grumpy"

"Sleepy"

Disney's Beauty and the Beast - The Wedding" Prince"

 

Lissi Doll- World-Wide Collection 17" Doll - Bonita Itm# 76100

Lissi Doll- World Wide Collection 17" Doll Itm# 75812

Vanna Limited Edition - HSN - W/ Vanna White original fashions (Gray jump suit)

Special Edition - Holiday Magic- "Hollyberry" Sky Dancers

"Kelly" from TV's 90210 Beverly Hills

"Braondon" from TV's 90210 Beverly Hills

"Donna" from TV's 90210 Beverly Hills

Soldiers of the World "1776 American Patriot" and "1776 British Redcoat"

70th Anniversary Miss America Doll - "Blair" by Kenner

Exclusively Distributed by Presents, Turner Enterprises - "Scarecrow"

50th Anniversary "The Wizard of Oz" Glinda

"Scarecrow" The Wizard of Oz

"Wizard" The Wizard of Oz

"Astromaut" by Dakin

"John Smith" Disney's Pocahontas

"Kelly" from Saved by the Bell 1990 NBC series

 

"Melinda" The Tooth Fairy - by Gorhman - Imaginary People Dolls

18" "Canterbury Bell" Doll - by Bill O'Connor, Artist- Duck House, Inc. Ontario Canada COA# 699/1500 Worldwide

Ashton Drake "Mary" Little House on the Prairie- COA# KC238

Abraham (Abe) Lincoln - COA# 209- Authorized by the United States Historical Society

by Seymour Mann - "Sister Mary" COA

Princess Diana"The Queen of Hearts" 1997- COA by The Society for the Preservation of History, Inc. - Origianal First Memorial Doll Ever Issued.

 

Lissi Doll - "Jennifer"

Pittsburgh Originals - From the Heart "Tina" by Chris Miller- COA# 148 of 1,000 worldwide

Roosevelt Bear - Dressed as Magician - COA- The Wonderful World of Jane Withers Collectibles

Build A Bear- Black w/silver speckles - dressed as Pumpkin

Fine Pewter Figure - Star Trek "Spock" from The Motion Picure 1979

Disney "Belle" Beauty and the Beast - Enchanted Christmas

Warner Bros. - 1996 McDonalds Collectible - from Space Jam- Lola Bunny - Made for Denny's

Precious Moments Bear

 

Misc. stuffed animals, dolls, and mini figures- Loose

 

Barbie Christmas Tree, skirt

Picture in frame

Picture Puzzle in frame

 

Cntr. Of misc. Barbie furniture

Halloween Star "Estrella de halloween"

Halloween Enchantress "Hechicera Noche de Brujas"

Enchanted Halloween

Boo-tiful Halloween (glow in the dark dress!)

XXXOOO Barbie - Valentine Barbie

Valentine Romance

Valentine Style Barbie

Valentine Fun Barbie

With Love Barbie

Valentine Romance

Holiday Sisters "Barbie, Kelly, and Stacie"

Holiday Excitement

Special Edition - Holiday Season Barbie

Holiday Surprise

Festive Season Barbie

Santas Helper

Holiday Treats Barbie

Holiday Joy

Pinstripe Power - Limited Edition 1997

Ballroom Beauties Collection "Moonlight Waltz" Barbie 1997

Midnight Princess Barbie 1997

 

Barbie furniture

Misc. Barbie Clothes - at least 100 outfits

Chest with Barbie accessories

Lamp

Barbie Night Light

Several Barbie Containers

3- Barbie beanie rabbits (Easter)

Phone Book

Diary

Kelly/Nikki miniature Easter 1. Rabbit 1. Chick

Empress of Emeralds - Barbie Resin Egg

 

Christmas tree decorations

Wardrobe full of shoes/boots/skates (about 30 pairs)

Two new Barbie Outfits - Pkgs unopened

 

Bag of Misc. mini figures (dolls)

Giggling Pillsbury Dough Boy

Mini Pillsbury Dough Boy beanie

Praying little girl doll

Grand Ole Opry Bear

Circus Circus Bear

Little Girl with her first teeth, sticking her tongue out (very cute)

Bag of 3 pairs of doll shoes

12 Collector Series - Glasses - Disney Characters - 1 extra Pocahontas

Idaho Potatoe Stuffed Doll w/legs

Budweiser Label Stein - Giftware Mug

Misc. Figures

 

Plate "Fun in the Sun" (Frankie & Annette) COA

6- McDonalds Collector plates

Owl wooden plaque 1996

Angelique Doll

Mini plate and cup set - Raggedy Ann

4 pc. Traven set-Toothbrush Holder, Soap Holder, Cream Jar, Hair Comb

Peanuts - Christmas Ornament

AM/FM Backphone Radio unique behind the head design

Floral stationery, picture frame, and pen

Harmonica

Silver mouse, 2 baskets, figurine

Barbie case w/mini Barbie dolls

Pokemon 23K Gold Plated Trading Card - in Globe

Pkg. Of 10 stencils (plastic)

Mini chest for jewelry

1955 Chevrolet "Belair" - collector mini car

Sugar Town - Dr. Sugar's Office Porcelain Hanging Ornament

2 Mini Holloween globes

Humingbird ceramic night light

2 misc. platic containers

Boyz- Sun Kissed Summer

 

Finished copies of Will Steacy's collection of essays, "The Photographs Not Taken" bound with a three hole pamphlet stitch using kitchen twine.

With his previous three films, "L.A. Confidential," "Wonder Boys" and "8 Mile," Curtis Hanson delivered a bracing surprise each time out, each one posing so distinctive and different a challenge. "In Her Shoes" is different, too, but the surprise this time is that he has made such a conventional picture, one that advances no out-of-the-ordinary ideas or feelings. While the director's avid fans may be disappointed, however, upscalish mainstream auds, particularly women, will eat up this well-acted, emotionally focused adaptation of Jennifer Weiner's popular novel about the falling-out and eventual reconciliation of two diametrically opposed sisters, auguring well for peppy B.O. through the fall upon Oct. 7 release.

The "chick lit" label has been derided both for feminist/political reasons and because such pigeon-holing has the appearance of ghettoizing the genre commercially and critically. But there's no escaping that a work centering upon young women who think about little other than their looks, weight and clothes and take hourly seismographic readings of the status of their relationships is going to be put in this category. Add to that a large cast of cute dogs and an acutely embarrassing bridal shower and "In Her Shoes" qualifies on all fronts.

 

So while for many guys it will take a woman they're really, really interested in to drag them to this sort of high class soap opera, women and more emotionally flexible men should have little trouble becoming involved in this tale of sisterly love/hate, at least once the initial half-hour of almost painfully direct exposition in Susannah Grant's screenplay is dispensed with.

 

Intercut opening scene of parallel sexcapades pointedly illustrates the differences between the Feller sisters. Rose (Toni Collette), a successful big-firm Philadelphia lawyer, sleeps with her boss and fantasizes the best possible result romantically and professionally. Sexier younger sis Maggie (Cameron Diaz) attends her 10th high school reunion and drunkenly throws up in a bathroom while getting it on with one of her old classmates.

 

Schematically, then, Rose is a bright, responsible, somewhat overweight woman who has so subordinated her personal life to her career that she can't imagine any man would be attracted to her, while Maggie is a full-time party girl who's always gotten by on her looks and utter availability.

 

When Maggie's latest round of ridiculous behavior gets her kicked out of the house by step-mother Sydelle (Candice Azzara), she has nowhere to crash but on Rose's couch. It's a stretch to accept that a nice, upper-middle-class Jewish girl would not only be such a social cretin but would be functionally illiterate to boot (Maggie's inability to read prevents her from getting an MTV DJ job), but Maggie has leeched off others all her life.

 

Despite the fact that she and Rose have been ultra-close since they lost their mother as little girls, Maggie thinks nothing of trashing her sister's apartment, rummaging through her personal effects and screwing her would-be boyfriend.

 

This last understandably gets her bounced out on the street, but not before she has discovered a cache of years-old holiday cards (with money enclosed) from a grandmother she long thought dead. So with nowhere else to turn, Maggie heads for Florida, where she finds the widowed Ella (Shirley MacLaine) living in a pleasant retirement community.

 

Pic takes a turn for the better at this point, as the two women gingerly feel one another out against the backdrop of a lively group of oldsters endowed with wry humor and only intermittently irritating levels of "Cocoon"-like cutes. Maggie and Ella are mutually incriminating at first, with the former issuing charges of abandonment and the latter explaining that she was pushed away from her granddaughters by their resentful father after his wife's death. Guilt piles up, truths are gradually revealed and the old men at the facility greatly enjoy the lissome, if uncommunicative, Maggie around the pool.

 

When Ella catches Maggie rifling through her valuables, Ella generously proposes to match her salary if Maggie will take a job at the assisted living center. It's there that Maggie is induced to practice reading with a courtly, now-blind professor (the inimitable Norman Lloyd), receiving from him the kind of personal interest and praise she evidently never received before.

 

Meanwhile, up in Philly, Rose's life has also improved. For sanity's sake, she's quit her high-powered job, getting great joy out her new profession of walking dogs, and having finally given in to persistent suitor Simon Stein (Mark Feuerstein) and become engaged. However, her inability to address the painful subject of her sister becomes so pronounced as to create a rift with Simon, finally inducing her to make a trip to Florida herself.

 

For better or worse, depending upon your point of view, it's the type of film in which an Elizabeth Bishop poem is used to illuminate and transform a character. For a Hanson film, it is notable both for its relatively lax sense of narrative momentum and its only modest degree of rigor. Helmer's customary smarts are mostly to be found in the scenes with MacLaine, whose performance unerringly conveys a lifetime's worth of emotional wisdom leavened by a healthy propensity for looking on the bright side. Pic gains a spine whenever she's around.

 

Collette also has a strong grasp of her character, and while Rose's dismayed reactions to the misfortunes that befall her is understandable, she tosses off her job rather easily, which begs some further clarification of her deepest motives.

 

Diaz is completely credible as a hot number in danger of becoming, in her sister's words, "a middle-aged tramp," but Maggie is a character completely lacking in self-awareness and Diaz provides no subtext for this. In the end, the Feller sisters are women defined by primary traits and remain unfleshed out by scripted subtleties and actorly grace notes.

 

Supporting turns, especially by the jovial bunch in Florida, are colorful, and craft contributions are sharp without being unduly polished. Mark Isham's score is too cloyingly cutesy by half.

 

A 20th Century Fox release of a Fox 2000 Pictures presentation of a Scott Free/Deuce Three production. Produced by Ridley Scott, Carol Fenelon, Lisa Ellzey, Curtis Hanson. Executive producer, Tony Scott. Co-producers, Mari Jo Winkler-Ioffreda, Erin Upson. Directed by Curtis Hanson. Screenplay, Susannah Grant, based on the novel by Jennifer Weiner.

 

Maggie Feller - Cameron Diaz

Rose Feller - Toni Collette

Ella Hirsch - Shirley MacLaine

Simon Stein - Mark Feuerstein

Michael Feller - Ken Howard

Sydelle Felle - Candice Azzara

Mrs. Lefkowitz - Francine Beers

The Professor - Norman Lloyd

Lewis Feldman - Jerry Adler

Amy - Brooke Smith

Jim Danvers - Richard Burgi

 

TODD MCCARTHY Variety 14 September 2005

Carol Stein's camera, probably John Fischer taking the picture.

Help us to identify the missing names!

Unlabeled version up here:

www.flickr.com/photos/ken_mayer/3360843770/

 

From left to right, kinda

John McIsaac

Mardah Cohen

Bill Appleton

Ilona Barcza

Jasmine Goldstein

Karen McQuaid

Kathleen Mullandey

Jim Cavanaugh

Liane Houghtalin

Melanie Vest

Amy Duncan

Jill Goldsmith

Sallie Goetsch

Helen Dizikes

Kathy Wyer

Andrew Goldman

Joy Somma

Nolis Arkoulakis

Sarah Greenberg

Ken Mayer

Carol Stein

Bill Barney

Carol Gerber

Jeremy Ari Day

Peter Heslin

Rob Marais

Katherine Klubock (cowering behind Rob, we believe)

Matteo Wilcox

Ruth Rothaus

Charlie Johnston

Linda Sizemore

Meg

Toril

Ann Spellman

Claudia Ocello

Luisa Boncompagni

Nick Roth

Pasquale Pesce

Young Curators, New Ideas

 

Organized by amani olu

 

Curated by Alana Celii & Grant Willing, Michael Bühler-Rose, Jon Feinstein, Laurel Ptak, Amy Stein, and Lumi Tan

 

Opening Reception: Wednesday, August 13, 2008

RSVP: rsvp@bondstreetgallery.com

Press Review: 4 -- 6 pm | Public Reception: 6 -- 9 pm

On View: Wednesday, August 13 -- Saturday, September 6, 2008

 

Exhibition Artists:

 

Charles Benton, Alison Brady, Brian Bess, Victor Boullet, Mikaylah Bowman, Olga Cafiero, Talia Chetrit, Tyler Coburn, Petra Cortright, C. Coy, Gerald Edwards III, Daniel Everett, Thobias Fäldt & Per Englund, Martin Fengel, Jason Fulford, Nicolas Grider, Pierre Hourquet, Konst & Teknik, Eke Kriek, Emily Larned, Bryan Lear, Miranda Lehman, Seth Lower, Matt MacFarland, Katja Mater, Kelci McIntosh, Mark McKnight, Erin Jane Nelson, Ilia Ovechkin, Robert Overweg, Alex Prager, M. River, Noel Rodo-Vankeulen, Asha Schechter, Trevor Shimizu, Alix Smith, Jo-ey Tang, Jesper Ulvelius, Anne De Vries, Hannah Whitaker, Karly Wildenhaus, Ofer Wolberger, Ann Woo and Damon Zucconi

 

bondstreetgallery.com

 

Bond Street Gallery

297 Bond Street, Brooklyn NY

F/G To Carroll St. / R to Union St.

Amy Stein

Domesticated

Blue Sky Gallery

July 2 - August 2, 2009

Portland, OR

www.blueskygallery.org/

www.amysteinphoto.com

26 West 56th Street. Midtown, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

 

Remodeled in 1907-08 by the noted architect Harry Allan Jacobs for investment banker Isaac Seligman and long occupied by banker E. Hayward Ferry and his wife Amelia Parsons Ferry, this highly intact former townhouse is an exceptionally fine example of the restrained Neo-French Classic variant of the Beaux Arts style and forms part of “Bankers Row,” a group of five residences built for bankers on West 56 Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. Originally constructed in 1871 by the well-known New York architects D. & J. Jardine, this house was occupied from 1880 to 1907 by the family of George Spencer Hart, a leading wholesaler of dairy products and president of three streetcar lines, who also served as the director of several banks. In 1907-08, Jacobs extended the house at the front and rear and relocated the entrance to the ground story in response to the then current fashion for American basement plans. Reflecting a growing mode for individuated rowhouses, he created a new limestone façade and copper roof.

 

His façade design is distinguished by its use of unadorned planar wall surfaces, nuanced arrangement of solids and voids, carefully balanced proportions, and crisp refined detailing. The building’s rusticated base focuses on a large central entry with an elegantly carved lion’s head and garlands surmounting a pair of original iron-and-glass doors. The smooth limestone mid-section of the façade is framed by two colossal pilasters set off by narrow bands of waterleaf-anddart molding. The tripartite windows at the center of the façade retain their historic paired wood casements and transoms and are accented by a stone balcony at the third story. A heavy cornice and balustrade caps the third story, balancing the strong verticals created by the piers. Because of Jacobs’ concern with reducing the apparent height of this tall, narrow building and differentiating the bedroom stories, the fourth and fifth stories set back to the original building line and are articulated as a two-story attic crowned by a mansard roof with dormers. At the same time the mansard roofs enhances the French character of the design. Jacobs, who trained at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, won critical acclaim in the early decades of the twentieth century for his restrained and elegant residences, of which this house is an outstanding example.

 

E. Hayward Ferry was a prominent businessman, who served as first vice president of Hanover Bank from 1910 to 1929. He and his wife occupied this house from 1908 to 1935. In 1935, it became the headquarters of the distinguished publishing firm of Albert & Charles Boni. It was here that Albert Boni founded the Readex Corporation and began his first experiments with microform technology. After the Boni firm left the building in 1945, it served various uses. From May 1959 to early 1964, it was the salon, workshop, and home of the noted fashion designer Arnold Scaasi. In 1965, it became the headquarters of the Martin Foundation, a charitable trust established by textile magnate Lester Martin, and was dedicated to Eleanor Roosevelt. In addition to the offices of the Martin Foundation, the building housed the Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Foundation and Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Cancer Fund as well as other non-profit cultural organizations such as the newly established American Film Institute . In 1972 the building was conveyed to the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities. It subsequently served as the offices of an importing firm and in 1988 became the New York City headquarters and studios of the Spanish Broadcasting System. In an area today characterized by tall office buildings, this five-story townhouse forms part of a unique small-scale streetscape that was once typical of the neighborhood and is now rare in Midtown.

 

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

 

Midtown and the Development of Vanderbilt Row

 

Far removed from the center of population at the tip of the Manhattan, the area surrounding Fifth Avenue between 42 Street and the southern end of Central Park remained rural in character well into the first half of the nineteenth century. Most of the territory was originally owned by the City of New York, which had been granted “all the waste, vacant, unpatented, and unappropriated lands” under the Dongan Charter of 1686. The city maintained possession of these common lands— which once totaled over one-seventh of the acreage on Manhattan—for over a century, only occasionally selling off small parcels to raise funds for the municipality. The city’s policy changed after the American War of Independence.

 

In 1785 the Common Council commissioned surveyor Casimir Theodore Goerck to map out five-acre lots to be sold at auction. A new street called Middle Road, now known as Fifth Avenue, was laid out to provide access to the parcels. A second survey of additional lots was undertaken by Goerck in 1796 and two new roads, now Park and Sixth Avenues were created. Under the city’s plan, half of the lots were to be sold outright while the other half were made available under long-term leases of 21 years. Many of the parcels were acquired by wealthy New Yorkers as speculative investments in anticipation of future growth in the area. John Mason, one-time president of the Chemical National Bank, for example, acquired most of the lots on the east side of Middle Road in the East 50s in 1825. A number of public and charitable institutions also purchased or were granted large plots along the avenue; the Colored Orphan Asylum was located between 43 and 44 Streets, the Deaf and Dumb Asylum on 50 Street just east of Fifth Avenue, the Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum between 51 and 52 Streets, and St. Luke’s Hospital between 54 and 55 Streets. The rough character of the neighborhood—other tenants at this time included Waltemeir’s cattle yard at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 54 Street—persisted into the 1860s, when development pressures finally began to transform the area into a fashionable residential district.

 

The northward movement of population and commerce along Manhattan Island picked up momentum during the building boom that followed the Civil War. Four-story brick- and brownstone-faced row houses were constructed on many of the side streets in the area, while larger mansions were erected along Fifth Avenue itself. Pioneers in this development were the sisters Mary Mason Jones and Rebecca Colford Jones, heirs of early Fifth Avenue speculator John Mason and both widows of established Knickerbocker families. In 1867, Mary Mason Jones commissioned a block-long row of houses, later known as the “Marble Row,” on the east side of the avenue between 57 and 58 Streets. Two years later in 1869, her sister hired architect Detlef Lienau to design her own set of lavish residences one block to the south. Having established the area as an acceptable neighborhood for the city’s elite, other wealthy New Yorkers soon followed the Jones sisters northward up Fifth Avenue. The gentrification of the area was furthered by a number of important civic and institutional building projects initiated in the mid nineteenth century. Most notable was the planning and construction of Central Park in the late 1850s and 1860s; the preeminence of Fifth Avenue as the fashionable approach to the park was later solidified in 1870 when the city created a monumental new entrance at Grand Army Plaza. A number of ecclesiastical organizations also opened impressive new buildings on the avenue at this time; St. Thomas Episcopal Church at 53Street in 1870 , the Collegiate Reformed Protestant Dutch Church at 48 Street in 1872 , the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church at 55Street in 1875, and the Roman Catholic St. Patrick’s Cathedral between 50 and 51 Streets in 1879 .

 

The status of the area as the city’s most prestigious residential neighborhood was firmly cemented in 1879 when the Vanderbilt family began a monumental house-building campaign on Fifth Avenue. William Henry Vanderbilt—the family patriarch since the death of his father Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt in 1877—built his own palatial residence on the western block front between 51 and 52 Streets, while his two eldest sons each erected mansions just to the north. The scope of the work was so impressive and the influence of the family on the neighborhood so great that the ten blocks of Fifth Avenue south of Central Park came to be known as “Vanderbilt Row, “one of the most prestigious districts in late-nineteenth-century New York.

 

West 56 Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues and the Early History of 26 West 56 Street

 

Three blocks south of Central Park, West 56 Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues followed the trend of other blocks in the area as it became a fashionable location for many of the city’s most affluent citizens. By 1879 the entire blockfront on the north side of the street and all but four of the lots on the south side of the street had been developed with single family houses. Among the early occupants were Robert Bonner, editor of the New York Ledger, at No. 8; Union Bank president, Robert Schell, at No. 33; Rev. Thomas E. Vermilye, pastor of the Collegiate Reformed Church, at No. 15; and Rev. John Hall, pastor of the nearby Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, at No. 3. The block was also home to a number of prominent German-Jewish merchants including Adolph Lewisohn at No. 53; David L. Einstein, president of the Raritan Woolen Mill, at No. 55; Emanuel Lauer, a clothing manufacture and later an investment banker, at No. 53; and then crockery merchant, later department store founder, Nathan Straus, at No. 47. This house was one of a group of five brownstones extending from 22 to 30 West 56 Street erected by builder-developer, later architect, George W. DaCunha to the designs of architects David and John Jardine in 1871-72. In April 1872, while the houses were under construction, DaCunha conveyed the buildings to Jacob Tallman, a builder and real estate speculator whose construction business was located on West 53Street between Sixth and Seventh Avenues and who was involved with a number of development projects in the West Fifties. For several years the houses at 22, 24, and 28 West 56 Street were occupied by members of Tallman’s family. This house and 30 West 56 Street were leased to tenants. In 1877 Jacob Tallman sold his five West 56 Street houses. This house was acquired by Henry E. Sprague, a wholesale produce merchant with a business on Pearl Street. Henry Sprague and his wife Harriet resided in this house until 1880 when they sold it to Anna Dudley Hart, wife of dairy merchant George S. Hart.

 

George Spencer Hart was born in Cornwall, Connecticut, in 1837. In 1862, he moved to New York City and established George C. Hart & Co., wholesale dealers in butter and cheese. Headquartered on Pearl Street in Lower Manhattan, the firm grew to include branches on Warren Street in Manhattan, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and Liverpool, England. In 1871, Hart married Anna Dudley, daughter of Charles H. Dudley and Anna Eliza [Fairchild Dudley] Grant. Mrs. Grant’s second husband Henry L. Grant was a broker and financer of city railway [streetcar] stocks and bonds and under his aegis, Hart acquired “an important interest in the Central Crosstown Railroad Company” in 1874 and served as the company’s president from 1885-97. He eventually gained control of two other streetcar lines, the Second Avenue Railway Company and the Christopher and Tenth Street Railroad Company, which he managed until all three of the railroads under his direction were consolidated with the Metropolitan Traction Company. Hart also served on the boards of several banks.

 

The Harts and the Grants resided together in this house until about 1890. Anna Hart died in 1893. Her sister and mother, who were the executors of her estate, subsequently conveyed this house to George S. Hart. In 1894 Hart married Frances Wheeler, daughter of George M. Wheeler of Scarsdale. In 1905 the Harts began a series of extensive trips and by 1907 they had decided to sell this house.

 

On July 22, 1907 the Harts sold 26 West 56 Street to real estate speculator Wesley Thorn.

 

The following day Thorn conveyed the house, subject to a mortgage he had obtained from the Title Guarantee & Trust Bank for $55,000, to investment banker Henry Seligman, who had recently built a mansion for himself at 30 West 56 Street . Thus, Thorn made a handsome profit and Seligman protected his interests by gaining control over a potential development site only two doors away from his house. Less than two weeks after he acquired this house, Seligman had architect Harry Allan Jacobs file plans with the Department of Buildings for extensive alterations including four-story front and rear extensions, upgrades to the plumbing, new bathrooms, new stairs, floors, and partitions, and a new limestone front. Construction began in mid-August 1907 and was completed in June 1908. In November 1908 Seligman sold the house to banker E. Hayward Ferry , subject to a restrictive covenant that stipulated that as long as Henry Seligman owned 30 West 56 Street, 26 West 56Street was to be “used and occupied as a private residence [by] one family only.” In choosing to make his home on West 56 Street, Ferry contributed to the long-standing association of this block with bankers and brokers which led to its being known as “Bankers’ Row.” In addition to Seligman, Ferry’s neighbors included Seligman’s banker brother-in-law Edward Wasserman at No. 33 , Arthur Lehman of Lehman Brothers at No. 31 , banker-broker Harry B. Hollins at No. 12-14 , and Frederick C. Edey at No. 10 .

 

E. Hayward and Amelia Parsons Ferry

 

Ebenezer Hayward Ferry , born in Peterborough, New Hampshire, was the son of the Rev. Charles Brace Ferry, a Unitarian minister, and Ellen Hayward Ferry, a descendant of the Haywards who settled in Massachusetts in the 1640s. E. Hayward Ferry graduated from Harvard in 1886. Soon after graduation, he began his banking career with the National Bank of Redemption in Boston. The following year he took a job with the Bay State Trust Company of Boston. He remained with Bay State until 1900, in later years serving as the company’s secretary. In 1900, he became a vice-president of the Shawmut bank and was instrumental in developing the bank’s credit department. Shawmut merged with the National Exchange Bank early in 1907 and during this period of reorganization E. Ferry Hayward accepted a position as vice president of the Hanover National Bank in New York City. He became first vice-president of Hanover in 1910 and served in that position until 1929 when Hanover merged with the Central Union Trust Company. Although he relinquished his vice-presidency, Ferry remained on the board of the newly formed Central Hanover Bank and Trust Company.

 

Ferry also served on the boards of a number of major corporations including Bankers Trust, the Phelps Dodge Corporation, the Northern Pacific Railway, the Home Life Insurance Company, and the Old Dominion Company. He was involved in a number of philanthropic organizations. In the 1890s and early 1900s he served as secretary of the Ramabai Association, which supported the work of Pundita Ramabai, aimed at improving the lives of women in India and eliminating the practice of Sati . Later he was involved in fund raising for hospitals and was a member of the executive committee of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary.

 

Amelia Parsons Ferry , daughter of Sydenham C. and Harriet E. Parsons was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, where her father was a merchant and a founder of the New England branch of the YMCA. Amelia Parsons graduated Smith College and married E. Hayward Ferry in 1889. They had one daughter, Harriet, born in 1891.

 

In 1890, Amelia Ferry’s sister Harriet Eddy Parsons married Arthur Curtiss James, the only child of the Ellen Curtiss and Daniel Willis James , one of the richest men in the United States, who controlled Phelps, Dodge & Company, as well as other mining and railroad interests in the west. The Ferrys and the Jameses had extremely close business and personal relationships. E. Hayward Ferry sat on the boards of the many mining and transportation companies in which Arthur C. James had inherited a controlling interest and James was on the board of Hanover Bank. According to newspaper accounts Amelia Ferry and Hetty James were active in the same charities, attended the same parties, and vacationed together with their husbands. This tradition solidified after 1911 when Arthur James purchased “Edgehill Farm,” the property adjoining his estate, “Beacon Hill,” in Newport and the Ferrys began spending their summers at “Edgehill” while continuing to reside at 26 West 56 Street during the winter months. In 1930, when the census was taken, the Ferrys were occupying No. 26 with three women servants: Alice Smith, Elizabeth McTieh, and Louise Condliff. By 1930 many of the single family townhouses on this block of West 56 Street had become boarding houses or had been subdivided into apartments and ground floor commercial space. Henry and Adelaide Seligman continued to reside at No. 30 in grand style with eleven live-in servants, but both were in their seventies and died within a few months of one another in 1933. This freed E. Hayward Ferry with regard to 26 West 56 Street and in 1935 he arranged to lease the house to Albert Boni as offices for the Albert and Charles Boni’s publishing firm. E. Hayward Ferry died in 1940; Hetty and Arthur James passed away in 1941; Harriet Ferry died in July 1945.

 

Harry Allan Jacobs

 

Harry Allan Jacobs was born and educated in New York City, and began his architectural training at the Columbia School of Mines. After graduating in 1894 he continued his studies in Paris at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and was awarded the Prix de Rome by the American Academy in Rome. Following his return to this country, he joined the Society of Beaux-Arts Architects and began his own architectural practice in New York in 1900. His earliest known commission, dating from 1900, is a brick-and-limestone store-and-loft building at 133 Mercer Street within the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District. Early on he established a reputation as a designer of hotels with the Seville Hotel at Madison Avenue and East 29 Street and the Hotel Marseilles, 2689-2693 Broadway at West 103 Street , both exuberant Beaux Arts buildings clad in brick, with limestone, wrought iron, and terra-cotta trim.

 

Jacobs’ practice also focused on the design of elegant residences. An important early example is the Charles Guggenheimer residence at 129 East 73 Street in the Upper East Side Historic District. This neo-Italian Renaissance style townhouse, faced in limestone, served as a model for many of his later commissions. Other commissions earned Jacobs wide recognition, including a new façade design in the neo-Italian Renaissance style for the house of philanthropist R. Fulton Cutting at 22 East 67 Street , the Regency-inspired James J. Van Alen House, now the Kosciuszko Foundation, at 15 East 65 Street , and a residence for theater producer Martin Beck at 13 East 67 Street , all in the Upper East Side Historic District. His country houses included “Meadow Farm,” the estate of financer, later governor, Herbert Lehman in Purchase, New York, and “Mountain View Farms,” the estate of movie producer Adolph Zukor in Nyack, New York. Jacobs also designed two major institutional residences ?the Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society Administration Building and Cottages in Pleasantville, New York and the neo-Italian Renaissance style Andrew Freedman Home at 1125 Grand Concourse in the Bronx , the latter in collaboration with architect Joseph

 

H. Freedlander, a specialist in institutional design. Jacobs returned to hotel design in 1927 with the neo-Renaissance style Hotel Elysee located at 54-60 East 54 Street.

 

Jacobs was a member of the Mayor Walker’s Committee on Plans and Survey, a predecessor to the New York City Planning Commission. He was a fellow of the American Institute of Architects and the American Academy in Rome and served as the president of Academy’s Alumni Association. He was very active in the Society of Beaux Arts Architects and the Architectural League of New York. He wrote extensively on real estate, planning, and architectural issues for newspapers and magazines. He also was the author of a number of one-act plays, including one written in collaboration with George S. Kaufman.

 

The Design of the E. Hayward and Amelia Parson Ferry House

 

In 1903 architectural critic Herbert Croly observed that high-stoop brownstone dwellings had become “extremely unfashionable, both in design and plan” and described a new movement “gradually gathering momentum toward the substitution of reconstructed American basement dwellings for old brownstone fronts.”

 

In some cases the reconstruction has gone no further than the destruction of the stoop, the placing of the entrance on the ground floor, and the rearrangement of the interior, but for the most part people demand that the old houses shall be utterly destroyed or subjected to such a drastic process of purging that every trace of brownstone is removed. And the process of reconstruction is covering ground with utmost rapidity.

 

The American basement plan was first introduced around 1880 and gained widespread popularity during the 1890s and first few years of the 1900s. In traditional rowhouses, visitors to the house would enter on the parlor level using a tall flight of stairs, the stoop, from the Dutch for “step,” set to one side of the façade. The main reception hall shared the first floor with the parlor, beyond which was another parlor, usually used for formal dining. The family dining room was located in the front of the basement with the kitchen at the rear. In the 1880s it became fashionable to have the dining room and parlor on the same floor, with a small butler’s pantry equipped with a dumbwaiter connecting to the basement kitchen. Once the ground floor dining room had been eliminated, the main entrance could be lowered to street level and the front basement space could be given over to a generous foyer leading to a grand staircase. Moving the main stair to the center of the house made it possible to have a larger, better lit parlor, extending across the entire building frontage. The parlor was treated en suite with the stair hall, which functioned as a secondary reception hall, and the rear dining room.

 

The introduction of this new rowhouse type, known as the American basement plan, coincided with an increasing desire for individualized designs. Reacting against “the monotony of the once fashionable … brown-stone front, in blocks of a dozen or more houses exactly alike,”architects and developers entered into “a persistent and deliberate striving after individuality” using a variety of different styles, designs, and materials to create distinctive façades that would be readily marketable as private, upper-class residences. This trend was reflected not only in the treatment of reconstructed rowhouses but also in new rows erected by speculative builders “three or four at a time, each house [having] the distinction of an individual design.” The result, in the view of most designers and critics was entirely positive. Summing up recent architectural trends in 1903, Columbia University architecture professor A.D. F. Hamlin observed “our residence streets have begun to be interesting, our houses to possess individuality of style and design; and the gain to the city is great.”

 

For his design for the Ferry house Harry Allan Jacobs chose to work in the Neo-French Classic variant of the Beaux Arts style just coming into vogue in the early 1900s. Inspired by the French Classical Baroque, principally the works of Jules Hardouin Mansard, and the French Neo-Classical designs of Louis XVI period, this variant was characterized by its emphasis on planar wall surfaces and simple classical details. Among the notable early examples were Hunt & Hunt’s twin houses at 645-647 Fifth Avenue and Warren & Wetmore’s James A. Burden House at 7 East 91 Street . With the Ferry House design, Jacobs moved even beyond those works in the abstraction and simplification of his design, exhibiting an interest in unadorned planar wall surface, nuanced arrangements of solids and voids, carefully balanced proportions, and crisp, refined detailing that characterizes his work from this period.

 

The most overtly historic element of the Ferry House design is the treatment of the main entry with its concave segmental-arched surround framing a simple trabeated doorway surmounted by a carved lion’s head draped with a wreath and swags. It seems almost certain that this treatment was modeled after the doorway of the eighteenth-century house at 25 Rue Charlemagne in Paris, which had been illustrated in the Architectural Record in 1906. At the Ferry House the stylized, almost vulpine, lion’s head, wreath, and naturalistic garlands are handled with unusual fluidity and grace, suggestive of the Art Nouveau. The wreath motif is echoed in the design of the handsome paired wrought-iron-and-glass doors at the main entry. The entry is flanked by unusual Rococo-inspired curved wrought-iron scrolls that were perhaps intended to serve as hand grips for the front stoop. Less elaborate wrought ironwork is employed for the service entry to the east of main entry and the window gate in the west bay. The base is also enhanced by banded rustication and is capped by a stone cyma molding and frieze enriched with a Vitruvian scroll motif and paterae in low relief.

 

In the mid-section of the façade, the windows are grouped together in a tripartite arrangement at the center of the façade. This compositional device, which Jacobs also employed at the contemporaneous Guggenheimer house allowed him to leave “a large plain border of stone” around the windows. Here, through simple projections and moldings Jacobs articulated the framing stonework as giant pilasters, profiling the flat moldings framing the window bays with narrow bands of waterleaf-and-dart molding, which are echoed by the narrow moldings capping his abstracted pilasters. Jacobs balanced the strong verticals created by the giant pilasters and window surrounds with the heavy cornice and balustrade crowning the third story and the balcony beneath the third story windows. In the upper portion of his façade, Jacobs reduced the number of window openings, both to introduce variety in his design and to differentiate these bedroom stories from the public reception rooms on the second and third floors. Concerned with reducing the apparent height of this tall narrow building, Jacobs retained the original setback building line at the fourth story simply refacing the façade wall with the same rusticated limestone banding as the ground story base to create a strong horizontal emphasis. As was common with many of the renovations during this period, the original fifth story façade was taken down and rebuilt as a sloping pseudo-mansard faced with standing seam copper and lit by a pair of segmental arched dormers. This articulation of the fifth story as a mansard also serves to reduce the height of the building and enhances the French character of the design.

 

In addition to the Guggenheimer house, Jacobs produced a number of townhouse designs and one design for a brownstone converted to commercial use, the Hardman Peck piano company at 433 Fifth Avenue , that can be related to the Ferry House because they share similar compositions [partis] ? the Guggenheimer house; the John W. Herbert, later Mrs. Frederick Lewisohn House, 835 Fifth Avenue ; the Andrew Miller Residence ? or similar “signature” decorative details ? the balcony at the Guggenheimer House; the cornices and balustrades at the R. Fulton Cutting house and Hardman Peck Store. All these buildings, as noted by a critic writing in the New York Architect in 1911, were characterized by a “purity of style and detail,” the “same feeling of restraint and good taste;” however, the Ferry House stands out as the simplest and least historicizing of Jacobs’ designs from this period, pointing the way for his works of the late 1910s and 1920s, such as the houses at 6, 8, and 10 East 68 Street he designed for Otto Kahn in 1919, where with the exception of sills and shallow ornament in the tympana of the three central windows, there was no ornament on the façades .

 

Albert & Charles Boni, Inc.

 

Albert Boni and Charles Boni , the sons of insurance executive Charles Boni and Bertha Saslavlasky Boni, were raised in New Jersey. Albert attended Cornell and Harvard and Charles enrolled at Harvard, but both withdrew from college with the intention of going into publishing. To gain experience in the field, they opened the Washington Square bookshop in Greenwich Village in 1913, which soon became a gathering place for Villagers with literary and leftist leanings. The shop’s back room was converted into an impromptu theater for the Washington Square Players , an amateur group that developed into the Theater Guild. In 1914, the brothers launched their first publishing venture, The Glebe, a poetry magazine, which featured the work of still relatively unknown Imagist poets, Ezra Pound, Amy Lowell, H.D. [Hilda Doolittle], Ford Madox Ford, William Carlos Williams, as well as James Joyce. In 1915, the Bonis sold the shop to devote their full time to publishing. At the suggestion of Albert Boni, they began producing the Little Leather Library, miniature editions of classic books, which were mass-marketed through dime store sales and mail order and sold over a million volumes in their first year of operation. In 1917, Horace Liveright joined the firm, which incorporated as Boni & Liveright, and began publishing reprint editions of worthy recent works under the imprint of the Modern Library. Within six months, the partners quarreled and Liveright bought out the Bonis, although their name remained associated with the firm until 1928.

 

In 1923 Albert and Charles Boni again established a publishing house, Albert and Charles Boni, Inc. Among the important books published by their firm during the 1920s were Ford Madox Ford’s No More Parades , Gertrude Stein’s The Making of Americans , Upton Sinclair’s Oil! , and Thornton Wilder’s The Bridge of San Luis Rey. In 1926 the brothers acquired the publishing house of their uncle Thomas Seltzer and with it the American rights to the novels of Marcel Proust. Throughout the late 1920s and early 1930s Albert and Charles Boni continued to publish English translations of the seven volumes of Remembrance of Things Past. Other notable works included Colette’s Claudine at School and Max Eastman’s translation of Leon Trotsky’s The History of the Russian Revolution . Charles Boni tried to establish a paperback book club in the late 1920s, but the venture failed and he left the firm in 1930.

 

During the 1930s Albert Boni concentrated on publishing nonfiction and reprints. Telephone directory listings indicate that the business had five or six employees including Albert Boni and his wife Nell. In 1939, Boni began experimenting with microform printing techniques and established the Readex Microprint Corporation. He continued to experiment with reduction techniques and microfilming through the early 1940s, suspending operations in 1942. In 1945, when Amelia Ferry’s executors sold this house, Boni relocated to Chester, Vermont, where he resumed working on the technical difficulties involved in the microform process. By 1950 he was ready to begin publishing and began assembling orders from libraries and universities. Within fifteen years, Readex had more than 500,000 titles on film. Microform revolutionized historic scholarship and information processing. The company remained in the ownership of the Boni family for some time and is now a division of the NEWSBANK Corporation.

 

Subsequent History

 

In 1945 Amelia Ferry’s estate sold 26 West 56 Street to Della V. Lederer who acquired it on behalf of her husband Ludwig G. Lederer for his firm Lederer de Paris, manufacturer and importer of handbags and accessories. Two months after purchasing the building Della Lederer transferred ownership to the 26 West 56 Street Corporation, controlled by Ludwig Lederer. The Lederer firm remained in this building for a little over two years, sharing space in early 1947 with the Rumanian Legation, which took over the entire building in June.

 

In July 1950, the 26 West 56 Street Corporation leased the entire building to the Gold Key Club, which began interior renovations in the building. Purportedly a membership club, the Gold Key Club was actually an after-hours bottle club. The club operated until it was raided for violations of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law in February 1956. Sixty patrons in evening dress and seventeen club employees, including club president John R. Durante, who lived in an apartment in the building, were apprehended at the site. Vincent Mauro, an ex-convict with underworld connections, “said to have been a behind-the-scenes figure in the club’s operation,” was also arrested. Durante and Mauro pled guilty in 1957 and received suspended sentences.

 

Seven months after the police raid, the 26 West 56 Street Corporation sold this building to Abbate Associates, an interior decoration and industrial design firm headed by John Abbate.Abbate used a portion of the building as a residence and design studios and leased space to tenants including an advertising agency and portrait painter.

 

In May 1959, the building was purchased by Martinall Industries, Inc., a textile processor, “engaged largely in dyeing, finishing and printing textile fabrics,” which was part of the vast textile manufacturing empire of Lester Martin, who had died in April 1959. Martinall Industries began leasing space in the building to the fashion designer Arnold Scaasi for his design studio, showrooms, and residence. Scaasi, still in his twenties, had won the Coty award in 1958 and was considered one of America’s leading designers. He began showing his influential collections at 26 West 56 Street in June 1959 in lavishly redecorated rooms, styled by the fashionable interior designer Valerian Rybar. There, he made a practice of presenting his fashions at night, having the press and buyers dress up in formal attire, and providing his guests with champagne, sipped to the strains of violin music.

 

In February 1964, Martinall Industries conveyed the building to the Martin Foundation, a charitable trust established by Lester Martin in 1946 to aid educational and social services, which had inherited half of his estate. Soon after, alterations began to convert the building to offices for the foundation. In October 1965 the foundation dedicated its new building to Eleanor Roosevelt.Besides housing the foundation’s offices, 26 West 56 Street also contained the offices of the Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Foundation and Eleanor Roosevelt Cancer Fund, the renowned Dessoff Choirs, then under the direction of Maestro Paul Boepple, and the offices of Sidney Glazier, the Hollywood actor-producer, who had just completed an award winning documentary on the life of Eleanor Roosevelt. By 1968, the newly formed American Film Institute also had its New York City offices in the building. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Bennington College Council of Greater New York also had its offices in the building, where it hosted such events as “Three Evenings of and About Literature.” The Federal Bar Association of New York and New Jersey was also briefly quartered here in the early 1970s. In 1972, the Martin Foundation conveyed the building to the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities, an educational association representing virtually all New York’s regionally accredited nonprofit colleges and universities.” The Commission in turn leased office space to the Vassar College Capital Campaign and the Colgate University Campaign. The Commission retained ownership of the building until 1980 when it was sold to the Sepulveda Realty Corporation, a Netherlands Antilles Corporation. In 1981, it passed to British Crown Imports, Inc.

 

In 1988 the building was acquired by the Alarcon Holdings, Inc., which leases the building to the Spanish Broadcasting System , “the largest publicly traded Hispanic-controlled media and entertainment company in the United States,” founded by Pablo Raúl Alarcón . It is currently home to WSKQ-FM, La Mega/Mega Clásicos and WPAT-FM.

 

In an area today characterized by tall office buildings, this five-story townhouse forms part of a unique small-scale streetscape that was once typical of the neighborhood and is now rare in Midtown.

 

Description

 

Located near the center of block on the south side of West 56 Street, the E. Hayward and Amelia Parsons Ferry House is five stories tall and occupies almost all of its 20-feet-wide, 100-feetdeep lot, save for an L-shaped rear yard. The present Beaux Arts style façade dates from a 1907-08 alteration when the front stoop was removed, the lower three stories were extended forward to the lot line, the fifth story façade was taken down and rebuilt as a sloping roof with dormers, and the lower stories were faced with limestone and the roof covered with standing seam copper. Because the upper stories of neighboring brownstone at No. 24 remain unaltered and therefore set back from the Ferry house, a small portion of the Ferry house’s brick eastern sidewall is also visible.

 

West 56 Street Façade The façade is divided into a one-story base, two-story mid-section, and two-story set back attic. Base Above a high granite plinth, the base is clad with rusticated limestone and is divided into three bays with the wide main entry at the center of the façade. The center entry is approached by wide stone step, which in place of conventional railings has original decorative curved wrought-iron scrolled handgrips at either side of the entry. The recessed doorway is topped by concave tympanum enriched with an elegantly carved wreath and swags looped over a central lion’s head. The narrower side bays are set off by splayed lintels and keystones.

 

The western bay contains a paneled stone bulkhead and a window installed after 1940, replacing an original service entrance. The eastern bay remains a service entrance. The center entry retains its original paired wrought-iron-and-glass doors; however, a non-historic hand bar has been installed on the western door. Non-historic metal address numbers “26” are affixed to the lintel above the entrance and the stone piers at either side of the entry. Beneath the numbers on the piers, are non-historic metal plaques with the logo of SBS, the Spanish Broadcasting System, on the eastern pier and a sign reading “Mega 97.9 FM, AMOR 93.1,WSKQ-FM/WPAT FM” on the western pier.

 

Above the numbers there are non-historic metal torcheres installed c. 2008. These replace similarly designed torcheres that were installed sometime after 1940. A non-historic metal fire sprinkler sign and a non-historic round metal cap have been installed on the base of the eastern plinth flanking the entrance. The eastern bay retains its original wrought-iron-and-glass door which has been slightly modified by the installation of a non-historic lock and door knob. A non-historic security camera is attached to the eastern corner of the façade just above the doorway. In the western bay, the window is protected by a wrought-iron-grille. A non-historic sprinkler head and a non-historic security alarm box have been installed on the bulkhead. A non-historic sprinkler sign is affixed to the window sill. There is a non-historic metal water tap with a wire leading to a non-historic metal capped outlet near the base of the western pier. A non-historic fire alarm with a metal conduit leading to the base of the building is located near the western end of the facade. The base is capped by a stone cyma molding and frieze ornamented with Vitruvian scroll motif and paterae.

 

The smooth limestone middle section is laid with stones laid in alternating wide and narrow bands. The façade is framed by colossal pilasters and features a central two-story tripartite window set off by a molded surround enriched with a waterleaf-and-dart molding. The center window at the second story contains a historic fixed twenty-four light wood window. The narrower openings in the eastern and western bays retain their historic paired six-light wood casements. A stone balcony supported by brackets extends along the base of the third story windows. The center opening retains its historic wood six-light French doors surmounted by a six-light transom. The side openings also retain their historic wood windows. These have hoppers topped by four-light paired casements crowned by four-light transoms. This section of the façade is crowned by a full entablature featuring a fillet articulated with a water leaf-and-dart molding, a plain frieze and a denticulated and modillioned cornice which supports two non-historic metal lights.

 

The fourth and fifth floors are set back to the line of the original rowhouse. The fourth story façade is rusticated and has two flat arched windows with splayed lintels and keystones. The windows are partially screened from view by a stone and terra-cotta balustrade that rests on the third story cornice. The windows retain their original molded wood casings but have non-historic sash probably replacing paired six-light casements topped by six light transoms. The eastern window has a non-historic iron security gates. A molded cornice enriched with a bead and reel motif caps the fourth story.

 

The party walls framing the mansard roof are faced with limestone. The mansard is covered with standing-seam copper sheathing and has copper covered dormers with segmental arched window openings capped by molded segmental cornices. The windows originally contained paired four-light wood casements with arched upper lights. These have been replaced with non-historic single-pane windows.

 

Eastern Side Wall The small section of the eastern side wall visible above the second story is faced with painted brick with the side profile of the stone main façade visible at the north end of the wall and stone coping capping the sidewalls of the sloping roof.

Amy Stein

Domesticated

Blue Sky Gallery

July 2 - August 2, 2009

Portland, OR

www.blueskygallery.org/

www.amysteinphoto.com

Here's a list of artists whose music is currently in my mobile sanctuary - my iPod / iTunes. As you can see, I'm all over the map when it comes to music. I listen to everything from classical to black metal to music from Nepal.

 

No, I didn't hand-type this list. And no, this list doesn't reflect my entire music collection.

 

** Updated as of 03.09.2009

 

A-Ha

A-House

ABC

Abruptum

Absu

Abysmal Fall

AC/DC

Acheron

Acid Bath

Acid Mothers Temple & The Melting Paraiso U.F.O.

Advent Call

Adventures

Aerosmith

Afflicted

Afghan Whigs

After Image

Agathocles

Agoraphobic Nosebleed

Ah Cama-Sotz

Air

Al Cohn & Zoot Sims

Alamid

Alanis

Alarum

Alastis

Alberto Cereijo

Aleister Crowley

Algaion

Ali Farka Touré with Ry Cooder

Alice In Chains

Alien Sex Fiend

All Time Low

Alphaville

Alvin Jett & The Phat noIZ Band

Amon Düül II

Amon Tobin

Amorphis

Amos Lee

Amy Seeley

Ana Laan

Anal Cunt

Anathema

Ancient

Ancient Wisdom

The Ancients Rebirth

Ang Tunay Na Amo

Anggun

Ankhara

Anti-Flag

Antipop Consortium

Antoine Roney

Antonio Cora

Arcade Fire

Arcana

Arcanta

Archon Satani

Arckanum

Arcturus

Ars Moriendi

As Divine Grace

Ashes

Asin

ASP

Asphyx

Atheist

Atmosphere

Atomic

Atrium Carceri

Atrocity

Attrition

Aube

Audioslave

Audun Kleive

Aural Torture Mechanism

The Aurora

Autour de Lucie

Averse Sefira

Avulsion

Azrael

Bachman-Turner Overdrive

Backdraft

Bad Religion

Balahibumpooza

Bamboo

Basil Valdez

Bastard Noise

Basti Artadi

Bathory

Bauhaus

Beady Belle

The Beatles

Beck

Beethoven, Ludwig Van

Beherit

Behold...the Arctopus

Beirut

Belial

Benediction

Benumb

Beth Gibbons & Rustin Man

Better Than Ezra

Bic Runga

Big Country

Billie Holiday

Billy Idol & Generation X

Biomechanical

The Black Crowes

Black Sabbath

Black Tape For A Blue Girl

Black Widow

Bleak

Bleak (Philippines)

The Bled

Blind Faith

Blind Guardian

Blind Melon

Blitz

Blöod Düster

Bloodshed Divine

Bloodstains & Bulletholes

Bloodstorm

Blue Cheer

Bob Dylan

Bob Marley & the Wailers

Bobby Hutcherson

Boikot

Bombay S. Jayashri

Bone Thugs-N-Harmony

Bonehead

Borknagar

Boston

Brad Mehldau Trio

Brighter Death Now

Brix Ferraris

Broken Social Scene

Brown Eyes

Brown-Eyed Soul

Brutality

Buena Vista Social Club

Bugge Wesseltoft

Burzum

Bush

Byzantine

Cacophony

Cadaver

Cake

The Calling

Camel

Camouflage

Can

Candiria

Candlebox

Carcass

Carla Bruni

Carole King

Carpathian Forest

The Cars

Caspar Brötzmann Massaker

Cat Power

Cathedral

Cause & Effect

Celtic Frost

Cephalic Carnage

Charles Mingus

Charlie Parker

Cheap Trick

Cheese

Chemical Brothers

Children of Bodom

Children On Stun

China Crisis

Chopin, Frederic

Chris Letcher

Christian Death

Chthonic

Cintecele Diavolui

Circus

Cirith Ungol

Clairdee

The Clash

Cocteau Twins

The Cold Beyond

Cold War Kids

Collective Soul

Color It Red

Comus

Contagious Orgasm

Continuo

Control Machete

Copeland

Coritha

Corrosion of Conformity

Corvus Corax

Count Basie

Counting Crows

Cradle of Filth

Cranes

Cream

The Creatures

Creed

Creedence Clearwater Revival

Crematory

Crowded House

Cruel Face

Cryptic Winds

Cryptopsy

Cuartero Esperanza

Cueshe

The Cult

Cult of Luna

The Cure

Curve

The Cutting Crew

Cynic

D'Nigma

Da'ville

Dahmer

Dahong Palay

Damien Rice

Dan Bern

Danny Heines

Danzig

Dark Half

Dark Skies Fallen

Dark Tranquility

Darkmoon

Darkthrone

Das Schreckenskabinett

Dashboard Confessional

Daughtry

Dave Koz

Dave's True Story

David Fathead Newman

David Harper

The Dawn

Dawn

Dawn Upshaw; Atlanta Symphony Orchestra; Robert Spano

Daybreak

Dead Can Dance

Dead Kennedys

Dead Voices On Air

Deadguy

Death

Death Angel

A Death Between Seasons

Death Cab for Cutie

Death SS

Deathwitch

Debussy: Peter Frankl

December Wolves

The Decemberists

Deerhunter

Def Leppard

Default

Deftones

Delerium

Demonic

Depeche Mode

Depressor

Desiderii Marginis

Destruction

Deutsch Nepal

Devendra Banhart

Dhafer Youssef

Dicta License

Dikers

The Dillinger Escape Plan

Dinah Washington

Dio

Dirty Three

Disastrous Murmur

Disharmonic Orchestra

Dishwalla

Dissection

Disturbed

Dizzy Gillepie Y Machito

DKF

Do As Infinity

Dolorian

Doom Snake Cult

The Doors

Down

The Dream Academy

Dream Theater

Drip

Drop Dead, Gorgeous

Dub Pistols

Duo C&C

Duo Serra

Duran Duran

Dusk

Dvorak: Zinman, Neumann, SWR Symphony Orchestra

Dying Fetus

Dysrhythmia

Earth

Earth Crisis

Eddie Palmieri

The Edgar Winter Group

Edge of Sanity

Einherjer

Eivind Aarset

Ellis Paul

Emery

Emperor

Enslaved

Entombed

Ephel Duath

Eraserheads

Esbjörn Svensson Trio

Eternal Suffering

Eucharist

Eva O Halo Experience

Evanescence

Eve 6

Excalibur

Excruciating Pain

Exhumed

Explosions In the Sky

Extreme

Eyehategod

Face Down

Fahrenheit 451

Faith No More

Falsies

Fantômas

Faust

Fiction Factory

Fields of the Nephilim

Final Edit

Flammable Child

Flesh for Lulu

Flesh Parade

A Flock Of Seagulls

Florante

Foo Fighters

Fra Lippo Lippi

Francism

Françoise Hardy

Frank London

The Frank London Big Band

Frank Sinatra

Freddie Aguilar

Freestyle

Frente!

Front Line Assembly

Frozen Faces

Fuel

Fugazi

The Fugees

Funeral Frost

Gary Numan

The Gaslight Anthem

The Gathering

Gazebo

Gene Loves Jezebel

Genesis

Gigatron

Gimme Gimmees

Gin Blossoms

Glass Tiger

Global Holocaust

Goatlord

God Dethroned

Godkiller

Godsmack

Godspeed You Black Emperor!

Goo Goo Dolls

Gorgoroth

Grass

Gregor Samsa

Grieg, Edvard

Grin Department

Grip Inc.

The Guggenheim Grotto

Guns N' Roses

H2O

Hagibis

Hale

Hamlet

HammerFall

Harem Scarem

Håvard Wiik Trio

Hawkwind

Hazard

(hed) Planet Earth

Heidi Igualada

Hellhammer

Helloween

HighFly

Hoobastank

Horace Andy

Horse Feathers

Houston Person

Human League

Hungry Young Poets

The Hush Sound

Hybryds

Hypnoskull

Hypocrisy

Ibrahim Ferrer

Ildfrost

Imago

Immaculate

Imminent Starvation

Impaled Nazarene

Imperial

In Flames

In Slaughter Natives

In the Woods...

Incantation

Incubus

Incubus (Death Metal)

Industry

Information Society

Integrity

Interpol

Into Eternity

Introvoys

Irina Mikhailova & Ira Stein

Iron & Wine

Iron Maiden

Isis

It Dies Today

Itchyworms

Jaco Pastorius

Jakob Martin

James

James Morrison

Jane Weidlin

Janis Joplin

Japan

Jason Wade

Jaze

Jeff Loomis

Jello Biafra with the Melvins

The Jesus & Mary Chain

Jewel

Jimi Hendrix

Joan Baez

John Bender

John Coltrane

John Legend

Johnny Alegre

Johnny Hates Jazz

Johnny Mathis

Join The Club

Jong-dan

Jose Aquiles

Joshua Redman

Journey

Joy Division

Juan Dela Cruz Band

Judas Iscariot

Judy Collins

Julia Clarete

K-Øs

Kalapana

Kamikazee

Kataklysm

Katastrofiatus

Keane

Keep of Kalessin

Kenny Burrell

Khaled

Khanate

The Killers

Killing Joke

King Crimson

Kitaan

Kitchie Nadal

The Klezmatics

Koma

Korn

Kornstad Trio

Kreator

Krieg

Kristy Kruger

Kronos

Kronos Quartet

Kult of Azazel

Laibach

The Last Day

Le-eyla

Led Zeppelin

Life of Agony

Lifehouse

Lighthouse Family

The Lightning Seeds

Lily Chou-Chou

Liquid Tension Experiment

Lisa Gerrard

Live

Lola Ray

Los Natas

Los Suaves

Lou Reed

Louis Armstrong

Louis Bellson Just Jazz All Stars

Love Spirals Downwards

Loveliescrushing

Lucha Villa

Luciana Souza (vocals), Los Angeles Guitar Quartet, Robert Spano, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, Gwinnett Young SingersGwinnett Young Singers; Atlanta Symphony Orchestra And Chorus; Robert Spano

Lujuria

Lycia

Lydia Lunch

Lynyrd Skynyrd

Macabre

Machine Head

Macronympha

Magma

Mägo de Oz

Mahavishnu Orchestra

Mai Kuraki

Malicious Onslaught

Maná

Manowar

March Violets

Marcus Miller

Maria Kannegaard

Marie-Julie Chaput

Marilyn Manson

Mark Brubeck

Mark Dann & Robin Russell

Maroon 5

The Mars Volta

Marvin Gaye

Masacre

Matchbox 20

Matisyahu

Mayhem

MC Sniper

Meg & Dia

Megadeth

Megaptera

Meiko Kaji

Melt-Banana

Mephisto Walz

Merauder

Merzbow

Meshuggah

Metallica

Metheny Mehldau Quartet

Michael Bublé

Michael White

Midnight Configuration

Mike Francis

Miles Davis

Miseries A.D.

Misery Signals

The Mission

Mitzuko

MJ Project

Moata Omen

Mogwai

Mondblut

Mono

Moonspell

Moonstar88

Morbid Angel

Morgenstern

Morrissey

Mortician

Mortiis

Mortuary

Mötley Crüe

Mr. Big

Mr. Bungle

Mr. Mister

Muse

Musiq Soulchild

My Dying Bride

Mysticum

Mz 412

Nacht

Naked City

Napalm Death

Nasum

Nat King Cole

Nature's Rhythms

Naul (Brown-Eyed Soul)

Ne-Yo

Nebiras

Nektar

Neocolours

Neshama

Neurosis

Nevermore

New Order

Nexxus

Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds

Nick Drake

Niden Div. 187

Nifelheim

Nightmare Lodge

Nightwish

Nikki Hassman

Nile

Nina

Nine Inch Nails

Nirvana

No Trigger

No Use For A Name

No-Man

Noctuary

Noisex

Nokturnel

None of Your Fucking Business

Norah Jones

Nosferatu

Nox

O.M.D.

Oasis

The Obsessed

October Tide

Offspring

Old Man's Child

Omara Portuondo

On/Off

Operation Ivy

Opeth

Ophthalamia

Orange & Lemons

Ordo Equilibrio

Oren Ambarchi and Robbie Avenaim

Orient Pearl

Origin

Ornette Coleman

Oz

Ozomatli

Ozzy Osbourne

P.O.T.

P·A·L

Pachelbel, Johann

Paganini, Nicolo

Pantera

Paolo Nutini

Papa Roach

Paradise Lost

Paramore

Parokya Ni Edgar

Pat Boone

Pat Martino

Paul McCartney

Pearl Jam

Pelican

Penal Colony

Perf De Castro

Pessimist

Pet Shop Boys

Peter Himmelman

PIA

Pig Destroyer

Pineal Gland Zirbeldrüse

Pink Floyd

Pink Martini

The Platters

Poison

Polly Paulusma

Polysics

Popol Vuh

Porcupine Tree

Porretas

Primal Fear

Primus

Prodigy

Profanatica

Prophetess

The Protagonist

Public Image Ltd.

Puissance

Puncture Wound

Pusher (Guatemala)

Queen

Queensryche

Quicksilver Messenger Service

Radiohead

Rage Against the Machine

Raison d'etre

The Ramones

Rascal Flatts

Raventhrone

Ray Charles

Razorback

The Real Tuesday Weld

Red Flag

Red Garland Trio

Red Hot Chili Peppers

Red Lorry Yellow Lorry

Refused

Reincidentes

Reinette L'Oranaise

Renacer

Righteous Pigs

Rise Against

Rivermaya

Rizal Underground

Rocco DeLuca & the Burden

Roger Eno - Harmonia Ensemble

The Roots

Rosetta Stone

Rosetta Stone vs Marilyn Monroe

Rostok Vampires

Rotting Christ

RPOD

Rush

Russell Gunn

Sadistic Intent

Sadus

Sage Francis

Saigon Kick

Saint Vitus

Salt

Samael

Sampaguita

Samsa´ra

Samus

Sanctum

Santana

Sasha & Digweed

Sasquatch

Satanic Slaughter

Satyricon

Savatage

Scary Kids, Scaring Kids

Screams For Tina

Sea of Rains

Second Wind

Seed & Root

Segismundo Toxicomano

Semisonic

Senses Fail

Sentenced

Seona Dancing

Sephiroth

Sepultura

Session Road

Sex Pistols

Shining

The Shins

Sia

Siakol

Side A

Sidsel & Bugge

Sidsel Endresen

Sierra Leone's Refugee Allstars

Sigh

Sigillum S

Sigur Rós

Silje Nergaard

A Silver Mt. Zion

Silvio Rodriguez

Simple Minds

Simply Red

Sinister

Six Part Invention

Skid Row

Skin

Skinny Puppy

Skunk Anansie

Sky Church

Slayer

The Sleep Of Reason

Slipknot

Smashing Pumpkins

The Smiths

Snow Patrol

Sodom

Soilent Green

Solefald

SolHadToShootHim

Solitude Aeturnus

Somnus

Sonar

Sonny Stitt

Soul Asylum

Soul Whirling Somewhere

Sound

Sound Tribe Sector 9

Soundgarden

South Border

Soziedad Alkoholika

Spandau Ballet

The Speaks

Spencer Davis Group

Spill Canvas

Spirit

Spitfire

Spokane

Sponge Cola

Staind

A Static Lullaby

Stephen Speaks

Steve Roach & Vidna Obmana

Steve Vai

Stigma

Sting & The Police

Stone Glass Steel

Stone Temple Pilots

Stratovarius

Stravinsky, Igor

Strawberry Switchblade

Strife

Strike Anywhere

Stromlinie

Strong Intention

Stuck Mojo

Styx

Suede

Sugar Hiccup

Sugarfree

Sun Kil Moon

The Sundays

Sundown

Sunn 0)))

Susana Baca

Swans

Switchblade Sympony

Switchfoot

Synapscape

System of A Down

T.G.V.T.

Taake

Talk Talk

Tchaikovski, Piotr

Tchaikovsky: Israel Philharmonic/Zuben Mehta; Pinchas Zuckerman, Violin

Tchaikovsky: New York Philharmonic/Zuben Mehta; Emil Gilels, Piano

Teeth

Telepherique

Tempest

Testament

Thanatos

Thelonious Monk

Therion

They Might Be Giants

This Mortal Coil

This World Fair

The Thompson Twins

Thor

Thorns

Thornspawn

The Three O'Clock

Tiamat

Tierra Santa

Tinariwen

Today Is the Day

Tomahawk

Tomoyasu Hotei

Tones On Tail

Tony Bennett

Tony Perez

Tony Perez y Leo Vera

Tool

Tord Gustavsen Trio

Tortoise

Torun Eriksen

Toy

Tracy Chapman

A Tragedy Unveiled

Trash

Travis

Trees

Tribes of Neurot

Trio Enserie

Tropical Depression

Trouble

True Faith

Twisted Sister

Two Minds Crack

Two Witches

Type O Negative

Tyr

U2

Ugly Kid Joe

Ulrich Schnauss

Ulver

Unfound

Unholy

Unholy Grave

Unknown

Unleashed

Urbandub & Dicta License

Urge Overkill

Usherhouse

Usurper

Valley of Chrome

Vampire Weekend

Various Artists

Vasaria

Venom

The Verve Pipe

Vicious Circle

Vidna Obmana

Vietnam

Virgin Black

Vital Remains

Vondur

Vromb

The Wake

The Walkmen

Wallace Roney

The Wallflowers

War

Warrant

Warren G

Wayne Horvitz

Wayne Shorter

Weather Report

Weezer

When In Rome

Whitfield

Wibutee

Wilco

The Wild Swans

William Basinski

Winter

Witchery

With Passion

Wolfgang

www.freeplaymusic.com

Xiu Xiu

Xymox

Yano

Yes

Youme

The Youth

Zero 7

Zero Nine

Zola

성시경

시월애

자화상

하동균

アジアン・カンフー・ジェネレーション

ブルーハーツ

元ちとせ

張惠妹

2Pac

3 Doors Down

4 Non Blondes

10,000 Maniacs

13th Scene

30 Seconds to Mars

311

 

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New issue of the photo zine Tell mum everything is ok published by Éditions FP&CF.

 

Check the website !

 

www.editionsfpcf.com

  

.

Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

   

Remodeled in 1907-08 by the noted architect Harry Allan Jacobs for investment banker Isaac Seligman and long occupied by banker E. Hayward Ferry and his wife Amelia Parsons Ferry, this highly intact former townhouse is an exceptionally fine example of the restrained Neo-French Classic variant of the Beaux Arts style and forms part of “Bankers Row,” a group of five residences built for bankers on West 56 Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. Originally constructed in 1871 by the well-known New York architects D. & J. Jardine, this house was occupied from 1880 to 1907 by the family of George Spencer Hart, a leading wholesaler of dairy products and president of three streetcar lines, who also served as the director of several banks. In 1907-08, Jacobs extended the house at the front and rear and relocated the entrance to the ground story in response to the then current fashion for American basement plans. Reflecting a growing mode for individuated rowhouses, he created a new limestone façade and copper roof.

   

His façade design is distinguished by its use of unadorned planar wall surfaces, nuanced arrangement of solids and voids, carefully balanced proportions, and crisp refined detailing. The building’s rusticated base focuses on a large central entry with an elegantly carved lion’s head and garlands surmounting a pair of original iron-and-glass doors. The smooth limestone mid-section of the façade is framed by two colossal pilasters set off by narrow bands of waterleaf-anddart molding. The tripartite windows at the center of the façade retain their historic paired wood casements and transoms and are accented by a stone balcony at the third story. A heavy cornice and balustrade caps the third story, balancing the strong verticals created by the piers. Because of Jacobs’ concern with reducing the apparent height of this tall, narrow building and differentiating the bedroom stories, the fourth and fifth stories set back to the original building line and are articulated as a two-story attic crowned by a mansard roof with dormers. At the same time the mansard roofs enhances the French character of the design. Jacobs, who trained at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, won critical acclaim in the early decades of the twentieth century for his restrained and elegant residences, of which this house is an outstanding example.

       

E. Hayward Ferry was a prominent businessman, who served as first vice president of Hanover Bank from 1910 to 1929. He and his wife occupied this house from 1908 to 1935. In 1935, it became the headquarters of the distinguished publishing firm of Albert & Charles Boni. It was here that Albert Boni founded the Readex Corporation and began his first experiments with microform technology. After the Boni firm left the building in 1945, it served various uses. From May 1959 to early 1964, it was the salon, workshop, and home of the noted fashion designer Arnold Scaasi. In 1965, it became the headquarters of the Martin Foundation, a charitable trust established by textile magnate Lester Martin, and was dedicated to Eleanor Roosevelt. In addition to the offices of the Martin Foundation, the building housed the Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Foundation and Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Cancer Fund as well as other non-profit cultural organizations such as the newly established American Film Institute (c.1967-72). In 1972 the building was conveyed to the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities. It subsequently served as the offices of an importing firm and in 1988 became the New York City headquarters and studios of the Spanish Broadcasting System. In an area today characterized by tall office buildings, this five-story townhouse forms part of a unique small-scale streetscape that was once typical of the neighborhood and is now rare in Midtown.

   

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

   

Midtown and the Development of Vanderbilt Row

   

Far removed from the center of population at the tip of the Manhattan, the area surrounding Fifth Avenue between 42 Street and the southern end of Central Park remained rural in character well into the first half of the nineteenth century. Most of the territory was originally owned by the City of New York, which had been granted “all the waste, vacant, unpatented, and unappropriated lands” under the Dongan Charter of 1686. The city maintained possession of these common lands— which once totaled over one-seventh of the acreage on Manhattan—for over a century, only occasionally selling off small parcels to raise funds for the municipality. The city’s policy changed after the American War of Independence. In 1785 the Common Council commissioned surveyor Casimir Theodore Goerck to map out five-acre lots to be sold at auction. A new street called Middle Road, now known as Fifth Avenue, was laid out to provide access to the parcels. A second survey of additional lots was undertaken by Goerck in 1796 and two new roads, now Park and Sixth Avenues were created. Under the city’s plan, half of the lots were to be sold outright while the other half were made available under long-term leases of 21 years. Many of the parcels were acquired by wealthy New Yorkers as speculative investments in anticipation of future growth in the area. John Mason, one-time president of the Chemical National Bank, for example, acquired most of the lots on the east side of Middle Road in the East 50s in 1825. A number of public and charitable institutions also purchased or were granted large plots along the avenue; the Colored Orphan Asylum was located between 43 and 44 Streets, the Deaf and Dumb Asylum on 50 Street just east of Fifth Avenue, the Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum between 51 and 52 Streets, and St. Luke’s Hospital between 54 and 55 Streets. The rough character of the neighborhood—other tenants at this time included Waltemeir’s cattle yard at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 54 Street—persisted into the 1860s, when development pressures finally began to transform the area into a fashionable residential district.

   

The northward movement of population and commerce along Manhattan Island picked up momentum during the building boom that followed the Civil War. Four-story brick- and brownstone-faced row houses were constructed on many of the side streets in the area, while larger mansions were erected along Fifth Avenue itself. Pioneers in this development were the sisters Mary Mason Jones and Rebecca Colford Jones, heirs of early Fifth Avenue speculator John Mason and both widows of established Knickerbocker families. In 1867, Mary Mason Jones commissioned a block-long row of houses, later known as the “Marble Row,” on the east side of the avenue between 57 and 58 Streets. Two years later in 1869, her sister hired architect Detlef Lienau to design her own set of lavish residences one block to the south. Having established the area as an acceptable neighborhood for the city’s elite, other wealthy New Yorkers soon followed the Jones sisters northward up Fifth Avenue. The gentrification of the area was furthered by a number of important civic and institutional building projects initiated in the mid nineteenth century. Most notable was the planning and construction of Central Park in the late 1850s and 1860s; the preeminence of Fifth Avenue as the fashionable approach to the park was later solidified in 1870 when the city created a monumental new entrance at Grand Army Plaza. A number of ecclesiastical organizations also opened impressive new buildings on the avenue at this time; St. Thomas Episcopal Church at 53Street in 1870 (replaced by the present church by in 1906-13), the Collegiate Reformed Protestant Dutch Church at 48 Street in 1872 (demolished), the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church at 55Street in 1875, and the Roman Catholic St. Patrick’s Cathedral between 50 and 51 Streets in 1879 (James Renwick, Jr., a designated New York City Landmark).

   

The status of the area as the city’s most prestigious residential neighborhood was firmly cemented in 1879 when the Vanderbilt family began a monumental house-building campaign on Fifth Avenue. William Henry Vanderbilt—the family patriarch since the death of his father Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt in 1877—built his own palatial residence on the western block front between 51 and 52 Streets, while his two eldest sons each erected mansions just to the north. The scope of the work was so impressive and the influence of the family on the neighborhood so great that the ten blocks of Fifth Avenue south of Central Park came to be known as “Vanderbilt Row, “one of the most prestigious districts in late-nineteenth-century New York.

   

West 56 Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues and the Early History of 26 West 56 Street

   

Three blocks south of Central Park, West 56 Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues followed the trend of other blocks in the area as it became a fashionable location for many of the city’s most affluent citizens. By 1879 the entire blockfront on the north side of the street and all but four of the lots on the south side of the street had been developed with single family houses. Among the early occupants were Robert Bonner, editor of the New York Ledger, at No. 8; Union Bank president, Robert Schell, at No. 33; Rev. Thomas E. Vermilye, pastor of the Collegiate Reformed Church, at No. 15; and Rev. John Hall, pastor of the nearby Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, at No. 3. The block was also home to a number of prominent German-Jewish merchants including Adolph Lewisohn at No. 53; David L. Einstein, president of the Raritan Woolen Mill, at No. 55; Emanuel Lauer, a clothing manufacture and later an investment banker, at No. 53; and then crockery merchant, later department store founder, Nathan Straus, at No. 47. This house was one of a group of five brownstones extending from 22 to 30 West 56 Street erected by builder-developer, later architect, George W. DaCunha to the designs of architects David and John Jardine in 1871-72. In April 1872, while the houses were under construction, DaCunha conveyed the buildings to Jacob Tallman, a builder and real estate speculator whose construction business was located on West 53Street between Sixth and Seventh Avenues and who was involved with a number of development projects in the West Fifties. For several years the houses at 22, 24, and 28 West 56 Street were occupied by members of Tallman’s family. This house and 30 West 56 Street were leased to tenants. In 1877 Jacob Tallman sold his five West 56 Street houses. This house was acquired by Henry E. Sprague, a wholesale produce merchant with a business on Pearl Street. Henry Sprague and his wife Harriet resided in this house until 1880 when they sold it to Anna Dudley Hart, wife of dairy merchant George S. Hart.

   

George Spencer Hart was born in Cornwall, Connecticut, in 1837. In 1862, he moved to New York City and established George C. Hart & Co., wholesale dealers in butter and cheese. Headquartered on Pearl Street in Lower Manhattan, the firm grew to include branches on Warren Street in Manhattan, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and Liverpool, England. In 1871, Hart married Anna Dudley, daughter of Charles H. Dudley and Anna Eliza [Fairchild Dudley] Grant. Mrs. Grant’s second husband Henry (Harry) L. Grant was a broker and financer of city railway [streetcar] stocks and bonds and under his aegis, Hart acquired “an important interest in the Central Crosstown Railroad Company” in 1874 and served as the company’s president from 1885-97. He eventually gained control of two other streetcar lines, the Second Avenue Railway Company and the Christopher and Tenth Street Railroad Company, which he managed until all three of the railroads under his direction were consolidated with the Metropolitan Traction Company. Hart also served on the boards of several banks.

   

The Harts and the Grants resided together in this house until about 1890. Anna Hart died in 1893. Her sister and mother, who were the executors of her estate, subsequently conveyed this house to George S. Hart. In 1894 Hart married Frances Wheeler, daughter of George M. Wheeler of Scarsdale. In 1905 the Harts began a series of extensive trips and by 1907 they had decided to sell this house.

   

On July 22, 1907 the Harts sold 26 West 56 Street to real estate speculator Wesley Thorn.

   

The following day Thorn conveyed the house, subject to a mortgage he had obtained from the Title Guarantee & Trust Bank for $55,000, to investment banker Henry Seligman, who had recently built a mansion for himself at 30 West 56 Street (C.P.H. Gilbert, 1899-1901, a designated New York City Landmark). Thus, Thorn made a handsome profit and Seligman protected his interests by gaining control over a potential development site only two doors away from his house. Less than two weeks after he acquired this house, Seligman had architect Harry Allan Jacobs file plans with the Department of Buildings for extensive alterations including four-story front and rear extensions, upgrades to the plumbing, new bathrooms, new stairs, floors, and partitions, and a new limestone front. Construction began in mid-August 1907 and was completed in June 1908. In November 1908 Seligman sold the house to banker E. Hayward Ferry (1864-1940), subject to a restrictive covenant that stipulated that as long as Henry Seligman owned 30 West 56 Street, 26 West 56Street was to be “used and occupied as a private residence [by] one family only.” In choosing to make his home on West 56 Street, Ferry contributed to the long-standing association of this block with bankers and brokers which led to its being known as “Bankers’ Row.” In addition to Seligman, Ferry’s neighbors included Seligman’s banker brother-in-law Edward Wasserman at No. 33 (C.P.H. Gilbert, 1901-02, demolished), Arthur Lehman of Lehman Brothers at No. 31 (John Duncan, 1903-04, demolished?), banker-broker Harry B. Hollins at No. 12-14 (McKim, Mead & White, 1899-1901, a designated New York City Landmark), and Frederick C. Edey at No. 10 (Warren & Wetmore, 1901-03, a designated New York City Landmark).

   

E. Hayward and Amelia Parsons Ferry

   

Ebenezer Hayward Ferry (1864-1940), born in Peterborough, New Hampshire, was the son of the Rev. Charles Brace Ferry, a Unitarian minister, and Ellen Hayward Ferry, a descendant of the Haywards who settled in Massachusetts in the 1640s. E. Hayward Ferry graduated from Harvard in 1886. Soon after graduation, he began his banking career with the National Bank of Redemption in Boston. The following year he took a job with the Bay State Trust Company of Boston. He remained with Bay State until 1900, in later years serving as the company’s secretary. In 1900, he became a vice-president of the Shawmut bank and was instrumental in developing the bank’s credit department. Shawmut merged with the National Exchange Bank early in 1907 and during this period of reorganization E. Ferry Hayward accepted a position as vice president of the Hanover National Bank in New York City. He became first vice-president of Hanover in 1910 and served in that position until 1929 when Hanover merged with the Central Union Trust Company. Although he relinquished his vice-presidency, Ferry remained on the board of the newly formed Central Hanover Bank and Trust Company. Ferry also served on the boards of a number of major corporations including Bankers Trust, the Phelps Dodge Corporation, the Northern Pacific Railway, the Home Life Insurance Company, and the Old Dominion Company. He was involved in a number of philanthropic organizations. In the 1890s and early 1900s he served as secretary of the Ramabai Association, which supported the work of Pundita Ramabai, aimed at improving the lives of women in India and eliminating the practice of Sati (aka suttee). Later he was involved in fund raising for hospitals and was a member of the executive committee of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary.

   

Amelia Parsons Ferry (1863-1945), daughter of Sydenham C. and Harriet E. (Morton) Parsons was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, where her father was a merchant and a founder of the New England branch of the YMCA. Amelia Parsons graduated Smith College and married E. Hayward Ferry in 1889. They had one daughter, Harriet, born in 1891.

   

In 1890, Amelia Ferry’s sister Harriet (Hetty) Eddy Parsons married Arthur Curtiss James, the only child of the Ellen Curtiss and Daniel Willis James (1832-1907), one of the richest men in the United States, who controlled Phelps, Dodge & Company, as well as other mining and railroad interests in the west. The Ferrys and the Jameses had extremely close business and personal relationships. E. Hayward Ferry sat on the boards of the many mining and transportation companies in which Arthur C. James had inherited a controlling interest and James was on the board of Hanover Bank. According to newspaper accounts Amelia Ferry and Hetty James were active in the same charities, attended the same parties, and vacationed together with their husbands. This tradition solidified after 1911 when Arthur James purchased “Edgehill Farm,” the property adjoining his estate, “Beacon Hill,” in Newport and the Ferrys began spending their summers at “Edgehill” while continuing to reside at 26 West 56 Street during the winter months. In 1930, when the census was taken, the Ferrys were occupying No. 26 with three women servants: Alice Smith, Elizabeth McTieh, and Louise Condliff. By 1930 many of the single family townhouses on this block of West 56 Street had become boarding houses or had been subdivided into apartments and ground floor commercial space. Henry and Adelaide Seligman continued to reside at No. 30 in grand style with eleven live-in servants, but both were in their seventies and died within a few months of one another in 1933. This freed E. Hayward Ferry with regard to 26 West 56 Street and in 1935 he arranged to lease the house to Albert Boni as offices for the Albert and Charles Boni’s publishing firm. E. Hayward Ferry died in 1940; Hetty and Arthur James passed away in 1941; Harriet Ferry died in July 1945.

   

Harry Allan Jacobs

   

Harry Allan Jacobs (1872-1932) was born and educated in New York City, and began his architectural training at the Columbia School of Mines. After graduating in 1894 he continued his studies in Paris at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and was awarded the Prix de Rome by the American Academy in Rome. Following his return to this country, he joined the Society of Beaux-Arts Architects and began his own architectural practice in New York in 1900. His earliest known commission, dating from 1900, is a brick-and-limestone store-and-loft building at 133 Mercer Street within the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District. Early on he established a reputation as a designer of hotels with the Seville Hotel at Madison Avenue and East 29 Street (1901-02) and the Hotel Marseilles, 2689-2693 Broadway at West 103 Street (1902-05, a designated New York City Landmark), both exuberant Beaux Arts buildings clad in brick, with limestone, wrought iron, and terra-cotta trim.

   

Jacobs’ practice also focused on the design of elegant residences. An important early example is the Charles Guggenheimer residence at 129 East 73 Street (1907) in the Upper East Side Historic District. This neo-Italian Renaissance style townhouse, faced in limestone, served as a model for many of his later commissions. Other commissions earned Jacobs wide recognition, including a new façade design in the neo-Italian Renaissance style for the house of philanthropist R. Fulton Cutting at 22 East 67 Street (1908), the Regency-inspired James J. Van Alen House, now the Kosciuszko Foundation, at 15 East 65 Street (1917), and a residence for theater producer Martin Beck at 13 East 67 Street (1921), all in the Upper East Side Historic District. His country houses included “Meadow Farm,” the estate of financer, later governor, Herbert Lehman in Purchase, New York, and “Mountain View Farms,” the estate of movie producer Adolph Zukor in Nyack, New York. Jacobs also designed two major institutional residences ?the Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society Administration Building and Cottages in Pleasantville, New York (1908-12) and the neo-Italian Renaissance style Andrew Freedman Home at 1125 Grand Concourse in the Bronx (1924-25, a designated New York City Landmark), the latter in collaboration with architect Joseph

   

H. Freedlander, a specialist in institutional design. Jacobs returned to hotel design in 1927 with the neo-Renaissance style Hotel Elysee located at 54-60 East 54 Street.

   

Jacobs was a member of the Mayor Walker’s Committee on Plans and Survey, a predecessor to the New York City Planning Commission. He was a fellow of the American Institute of Architects and the American Academy in Rome and served as the president of Academy’s Alumni Association. He was very active in the Society of Beaux Arts Architects and the Architectural League of New York. He wrote extensively on real estate, planning, and architectural issues for newspapers and magazines. He also was the author of a number of one-act plays, including one written in collaboration with George S. Kaufman.

   

The Design of the E. Hayward and Amelia Parson Ferry House

   

In 1903 architectural critic Herbert Croly observed that high-stoop brownstone dwellings had become “extremely unfashionable, both in design and plan” and described a new movement “gradually gathering momentum toward the substitution of reconstructed American basement dwellings for old brownstone fronts.”

   

In some cases the reconstruction has gone no further than the destruction of the stoop, the placing of the entrance on the ground floor, and the rearrangement of the interior, but for the most part people demand that the old houses shall be utterly destroyed or subjected to such a drastic process of purging that every trace of brownstone is removed. And the process of reconstruction is covering ground with utmost rapidity.

   

The American basement plan was first introduced around 1880 and gained widespread popularity during the 1890s and first few years of the 1900s. In traditional rowhouses, visitors to the house would enter on the parlor level using a tall flight of stairs, the stoop, from the Dutch for “step,” set to one side of the façade. The main reception hall shared the first floor with the parlor, beyond which was another parlor, usually used for formal dining. The family dining room was located in the front of the basement with the kitchen at the rear. In the 1880s it became fashionable to have the dining room and parlor on the same floor, with a small butler’s pantry equipped with a dumbwaiter connecting to the basement kitchen. Once the ground floor dining room had been eliminated, the main entrance could be lowered to street level and the front basement space could be given over to a generous foyer leading to a grand staircase. Moving the main stair to the center of the house made it possible to have a larger, better lit parlor, extending across the entire building frontage. The parlor was treated en suite with the stair hall, which functioned as a secondary reception hall, and the rear dining room.

   

The introduction of this new rowhouse type, known as the American basement plan, coincided with an increasing desire for individualized designs. Reacting against “the monotony of the once fashionable … brown-stone front, in blocks of a dozen or more houses exactly alike,”architects and developers entered into “a persistent and deliberate striving after individuality” using a variety of different styles, designs, and materials to create distinctive façades that would be readily marketable as private, upper-class residences. This trend was reflected not only in the treatment of reconstructed rowhouses but also in new rows erected by speculative builders “three or four at a time, each house [having] the distinction of an individual design.” The result, in the view of most designers and critics was entirely positive. Summing up recent architectural trends in 1903, Columbia University architecture professor A.D. F. Hamlin observed “our residence streets have begun to be interesting, our houses to possess individuality of style and design; and the gain to the city is great.”

   

For his design for the Ferry house Harry Allan Jacobs chose to work in the Neo-French Classic variant of the Beaux Arts style just coming into vogue in the early 1900s. Inspired by the French Classical Baroque, principally the works of Jules Hardouin Mansard, and the French Neo-Classical designs of Louis XVI period, this variant was characterized by its emphasis on planar wall surfaces and simple classical details. Among the notable early examples were Hunt & Hunt’s twin houses at 645-647 Fifth Avenue (1905, demolished) and Warren & Wetmore’s James A. Burden House at 7 East 91 Street (1902-05, which is both an individually designated New York City Landmark and within the Carnegie Hill Historic District). With the Ferry House design, Jacobs moved even beyond those works in the abstraction and simplification of his design, exhibiting an interest in unadorned planar wall surface, nuanced arrangements of solids and voids, carefully balanced proportions, and crisp, refined detailing that characterizes his work from this period.

   

The most overtly historic element of the Ferry House design is the treatment of the main entry with its concave segmental-arched surround framing a simple trabeated doorway surmounted by a carved lion’s head draped with a wreath and swags. It seems almost certain that this treatment was modeled after the doorway of the eighteenth-century house at 25 Rue Charlemagne in Paris, which had been illustrated in the Architectural Record in 1906. At the Ferry House the stylized, almost vulpine, lion’s head, wreath, and naturalistic garlands are handled with unusual fluidity and grace, suggestive of the Art Nouveau. The wreath motif is echoed in the design of the handsome paired wrought-iron-and-glass doors at the main entry. The entry is flanked by unusual Rococo-inspired curved wrought-iron scrolls that were perhaps intended to serve as hand grips for the front stoop. Less elaborate wrought ironwork is employed for the service entry to the east of main entry and the window gate in the west bay. The base is also enhanced by banded rustication and is capped by a stone cyma molding and frieze enriched with a Vitruvian scroll motif and paterae in low relief.

   

In the mid-section of the façade, the windows are grouped together in a tripartite arrangement at the center of the façade. This compositional device, which Jacobs also employed at the contemporaneous Guggenheimer house allowed him to leave “a large plain border of stone” around the windows. Here, through simple projections and moldings Jacobs articulated the framing stonework as giant pilasters, profiling the flat moldings framing the window bays with narrow bands of waterleaf-and-dart molding, which are echoed by the narrow moldings capping his abstracted pilasters. Jacobs balanced the strong verticals created by the giant pilasters and window surrounds with the heavy cornice and balustrade crowning the third story and the balcony beneath the third story windows. In the upper portion of his façade, Jacobs reduced the number of window openings, both to introduce variety in his design and to differentiate these bedroom stories from the public reception rooms on the second and third floors. Concerned with reducing the apparent height of this tall narrow building, Jacobs retained the original setback building line at the fourth story simply refacing the façade wall with the same rusticated limestone banding as the ground story base to create a strong horizontal emphasis. As was common with many of the renovations during this period, the original fifth story façade was taken down and rebuilt as a sloping pseudo-mansard faced with standing seam copper and lit by a pair of segmental arched dormers. This articulation of the fifth story as a mansard also serves to reduce the height of the building and enhances the French character of the design.

   

In addition to the Guggenheimer house, Jacobs produced a number of townhouse designs and one design for a brownstone converted to commercial use, the Hardman Peck piano company at 433 Fifth Avenue (1910, storefront altered), that can be related to the Ferry House because they share similar compositions [partis] ? the Guggenheimer house; the John W. Herbert, later Mrs. Frederick Lewisohn House, 835 Fifth Avenue (1910, demolished); the Andrew Miller Residence (demolished)? or similar “signature” decorative details ? the balcony at the Guggenheimer House; the cornices and balustrades at the R. Fulton Cutting house and Hardman Peck Store. All these buildings, as noted by a critic writing in the New York Architect in 1911, were characterized by a “purity of style and detail,” the “same feeling of restraint and good taste;” however, the Ferry House stands out as the simplest and least historicizing of Jacobs’ designs from this period, pointing the way for his works of the late 1910s and 1920s, such as the houses at 6, 8, and 10 East 68 Street he designed for Otto Kahn in 1919, where with the exception of sills and shallow ornament in the tympana of the three central windows, there was no ornament on the façades (all three within the Upper East Side Historic District; Nos. 6 and 8 significantly altered).

   

Albert & Charles Boni, Inc.

   

Albert Boni (1892-1981) and Charles Boni (1895-1969), the sons of insurance executive Charles Boni and Bertha Saslavlasky Boni, were raised in New Jersey. Albert attended Cornell and Harvard and Charles enrolled at Harvard, but both withdrew from college with the intention of going into publishing. To gain experience in the field, they opened the Washington Square bookshop in Greenwich Village in 1913, which soon became a gathering place for Villagers with literary and leftist leanings. The shop’s back room was converted into an impromptu theater for the Washington Square Players (Max Eastman, John Reed, Mary Heaton Vorse, etc.), an amateur group that developed into the Theater Guild. In 1914, the brothers launched their first publishing venture, The Glebe, a poetry magazine, which featured the work of still relatively unknown Imagist poets, Ezra Pound, Amy Lowell, H.D. [Hilda Doolittle], Ford Madox Ford, William Carlos Williams, as well as James Joyce. In 1915, the Bonis sold the shop to devote their full time to publishing. At the suggestion of Albert Boni, they began producing the Little Leather Library, miniature editions of classic books, which were mass-marketed through dime store sales and mail order and sold over a million volumes in their first year of operation. In 1917, Horace Liveright joined the firm, which incorporated as Boni & Liveright, and began publishing reprint editions of worthy recent works under the imprint of the Modern Library. Within six months, the partners quarreled and Liveright bought out the Bonis, although their name remained associated with the firm until 1928.

   

In 1923 Albert and Charles Boni again established a publishing house, Albert and Charles Boni, Inc. Among the important books published by their firm during the 1920s were Ford Madox Ford’s No More Parades (1925), Gertrude Stein’s The Making of Americans (1926), Upton Sinclair’s Oil! (1927), and Thornton Wilder’s The Bridge of San Luis Rey. In 1926 the brothers acquired the publishing house of their uncle Thomas Seltzer and with it the American rights to the novels of Marcel Proust. Throughout the late 1920s and early 1930s Albert and Charles Boni continued to publish English translations of the seven volumes of Remembrance of Things Past. Other notable works included Colette’s Claudine at School (1931) and Max Eastman’s translation of Leon Trotsky’s The History of the Russian Revolution (1931). Charles Boni tried to establish a paperback book club in the late 1920s, but the venture failed and he left the firm in 1930.

   

During the 1930s Albert Boni concentrated on publishing nonfiction and reprints. Telephone directory listings indicate that the business had five or six employees including Albert Boni and his wife Nell. In 1939, Boni began experimenting with microform printing techniques and established the Readex Microprint Corporation. He continued to experiment with reduction techniques and microfilming through the early 1940s, suspending operations in 1942. In 1945, when Amelia Ferry’s executors sold this house, Boni relocated to Chester, Vermont, where he resumed working on the technical difficulties involved in the microform process. By 1950 he was ready to begin publishing and began assembling orders from libraries and universities. Within fifteen years, Readex had more than 500,000 titles on film. Microform revolutionized historic scholarship and information processing. The company remained in the ownership of the Boni family for some time and is now a division of the NEWSBANK Corporation.

   

Subsequent History

   

In 1945 Amelia Ferry’s estate sold 26 West 56 Street to Della V. Lederer who acquired it on behalf of her husband Ludwig G. Lederer for his firm Lederer de Paris, manufacturer and importer of handbags and accessories. Two months after purchasing the building Della Lederer transferred ownership to the 26 West 56 Street Corporation, controlled by Ludwig Lederer. The Lederer firm remained in this building for a little over two years, sharing space in early 1947 with the Rumanian Legation, which took over the entire building in June.

 

In July 1950, the 26 West 56 Street Corporation leased the entire building to the Gold Key Club, which began interior renovations in the building. Purportedly a membership club, the Gold Key Club was actually an after-hours bottle club. The club operated until it was raided for violations of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law in February 1956. Sixty patrons in evening dress and seventeen club employees, including club president John R. Durante, who lived in an apartment in the building, were apprehended at the site. Vincent Mauro, an ex-convict with underworld connections, “said to have been a behind-the-scenes figure in the club’s operation,” was also arrested. Durante and Mauro pled guilty in 1957 and received suspended sentences.

 

Seven months after the police raid, the 26 West 56 Street Corporation sold this building to Abbate Associates, an interior decoration and industrial design firm headed by John Abbate.Abbate used a portion of the building as a residence and design studios and leased space to tenants including an advertising agency and portrait painter.

 

In May 1959, the building was purchased by Martinall Industries, Inc., a textile processor, “engaged largely in dyeing, finishing and printing textile fabrics,” which was part of the vast textile manufacturing empire of Lester Martin, who had died in April 1959. Martinall Industries began leasing space in the building to the fashion designer Arnold Scaasi for his design studio, showrooms, and residence. Scaasi, still in his twenties, had won the Coty award in 1958 and was considered one of America’s leading designers. He began showing his influential collections at 26 West 56 Street in June 1959 in lavishly redecorated rooms, styled by the fashionable interior designer Valerian Rybar. There, he made a practice of presenting his fashions at night, having the press and buyers dress up in formal attire, and providing his guests with champagne, sipped to the strains of violin music.

 

In February 1964, Martinall Industries conveyed the building to the Martin Foundation, a charitable trust established by Lester Martin in 1946 to aid educational and social services, which had inherited half of his estate. Soon after, alterations began to convert the building to offices for the foundation. In October 1965 the foundation dedicated its new building to Eleanor Roosevelt.Besides housing the foundation’s offices, 26 West 56 Street also contained the offices of the Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Foundation and Eleanor Roosevelt Cancer Fund, the renowned Dessoff Choirs, then under the direction of Maestro Paul Boepple, and the offices of Sidney Glazier, the Hollywood actor-producer, who had just completed an award winning documentary on the life of Eleanor Roosevelt. By 1968, the newly formed American Film Institute also had its New York City offices in the building. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Bennington College Council of Greater New York also had its offices in the building, where it hosted such events as “Three Evenings of and About Literature.” The Federal Bar Association of New York and New Jersey was also briefly quartered here in the early 1970s. In 1972, the Martin Foundation conveyed the building to the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities, an educational association representing virtually all New York’s regionally accredited nonprofit colleges and universities.” The Commission in turn leased office space to the Vassar College Capital Campaign and the Colgate University Campaign. The Commission retained ownership of the building until 1980 when it was sold to the Sepulveda Realty Corporation, a Netherlands Antilles Corporation. In 1981, it passed to British Crown Imports, Inc.

 

In 1988 the building was acquired by the Alarcon Holdings, Inc., which leases the building to the Spanish Broadcasting System (SBS), “the largest publicly traded Hispanic-controlled media and entertainment company in the United States,” founded by Pablo Raúl Alarcón (1926-2008). It is currently home to WSKQ-FM, La Mega/Mega Clásicos and WPAT-FM.

 

In an area today characterized by tall office buildings, this five-story townhouse forms part of a unique small-scale streetscape that was once typical of the neighborhood and is now rare in Midtown.

 

Description

 

Located near the center of block on the south side of West 56 Street, the E. Hayward and Amelia Parsons Ferry House is five stories tall and occupies almost all of its 20-feet-wide, 100-feetdeep lot, save for an L-shaped rear yard. The present Beaux Arts style façade dates from a 1907-08 alteration when the front stoop was removed, the lower three stories were extended forward to the lot line, the fifth story façade was taken down and rebuilt as a sloping (quasi-mansard) roof with dormers, and the lower stories were faced with limestone (now painted) and the roof covered with standing seam copper. Because the upper stories of neighboring brownstone at No. 24 remain unaltered and therefore set back from the Ferry house, a small portion of the Ferry house’s brick eastern sidewall is also visible.

 

West 56 Street Façade The façade is divided into a one-story base, two-story mid-section, and two-story set back attic. Base Above a high granite plinth, the base is clad with rusticated limestone and is divided into three bays with the wide main entry at the center of the façade. The center entry is approached by wide stone step, which in place of conventional railings has original decorative curved wrought-iron scrolled handgrips at either side of the entry. The recessed doorway is topped by concave tympanum enriched with an elegantly carved wreath and swags looped over a central lion’s head. The narrower side bays are set off by splayed lintels and keystones. The western bay contains a paneled stone bulkhead and a window installed after 1940, replacing an original service entrance. The eastern bay remains a service entrance. The center entry retains its original paired wrought-iron-and-glass doors; however, a non-historic hand bar has been installed on the western door. Non-historic metal address numbers “26” are affixed to the lintel above the entrance and the stone piers at either side of the entry. Beneath the numbers on the piers, are non-historic metal plaques with the logo of SBS, the Spanish Broadcasting System, on the eastern pier and a sign reading “Mega 97.9 FM, AMOR 93.1,WSKQ-FM/WPAT FM” on the western pier. Above the numbers there are non-historic metal torcheres installed c. 2008. These replace similarly designed torcheres that were installed sometime after 1940. A non-historic metal fire sprinkler sign and a non-historic round metal cap have been installed on the base of the eastern plinth flanking the entrance. The eastern bay retains its original wrought-iron-and-glass door which has been slightly modified by the installation of a non-historic lock and door knob. A non-historic security camera is attached to the eastern corner of the façade just above the doorway. In the western bay, the window is protected by a wrought-iron-grille. A non-historic sprinkler head and a non-historic security alarm box have been installed on the bulkhead. A non-historic sprinkler sign is affixed to the window sill. There is a non-historic metal water tap with a wire leading to a non-historic metal capped outlet near the base of the western pier. A non-historic fire alarm with a metal conduit leading to the base of the building is located near the western end of the facade. The base is capped by a stone cyma molding and frieze ornamented with Vitruvian scroll motif and paterae.

 

The smooth limestone middle section is laid with stones laid in alternating wide and narrow bands. The façade is framed by colossal pilasters and features a central two-story tripartite window set off by a molded surround enriched with a waterleaf-and-dart molding. The center window at the second story contains a historic fixed twenty-four light wood window. The narrower openings in the eastern and western bays retain their historic paired six-light wood casements. A stone (now painted) balcony supported by brackets extends along the base of the third story windows. The center opening retains its historic wood six-light French doors surmounted by a six-light transom. The side openings also retain their historic wood windows. These have hoppers topped by four-light paired casements crowned by four-light transoms. This section of the façade is crowned by a full entablature featuring a fillet articulated with a water leaf-and-dart molding, a plain frieze and a denticulated and modillioned cornice which supports two non-historic metal lights.

 

The fourth and fifth floors are set back to the line of the original rowhouse. The fourth story façade is rusticated and has two flat arched windows with splayed lintels and keystones. The windows are partially screened from view by a stone and terra-cotta balustrade that rests on the third story cornice. The windows retain their original molded wood casings but have non-historic sash probably replacing paired six-light casements topped by six light transoms. The eastern window has a non-historic iron security gates. A molded cornice enriched with a bead and reel motif caps the fourth story.

   

The party walls framing the mansard roof are faced with limestone. The mansard is covered with standing-seam copper sheathing and has copper covered dormers with segmental arched window openings capped by molded segmental cornices. The windows originally contained paired four-light wood casements with arched upper lights. These have been replaced with non-historic single-pane windows. Eastern Side Wall The small section of the eastern side wall visible above the second story is faced with painted brick with the side profile of the stone main façade visible at the north end of the wall and stone coping capping the sidewalls of the sloping roof.

 

- From the 2007 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

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