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Day 7 of Block-O-Ween. Today's theme is "Mask"

 

The Mask is a 1994 American superhero fantasy comedy film directed by Charles Russell, produced by Bob Engelman, and written by Mike Werb, based on the comic series of the same name distributed by Dark Horse Comics. The film stars Jim Carrey, Peter Greene, Amy Yasbeck, Peter Riegert, Richard Jeni, Ben Stein, Joely Fisher, and Cameron Diaz in her film debut. It revolves around an unlucky bank clerk finding a mask that grants the wearer cartoon-like superpowers.

 

"Our love is like a red, red rose.

And I am a little thorny.

Je t'adore! Je t'adore!

Shoot the window. I don't care!" - Jim Carrey, The Mask

Image taken from:

 

Title: "Joys and Sorrows: where to find, and how to exchange them: comprising Agnes; or, a Word for woman ... and other poems. By the authoress of “Amy of the Peak” [Jane M. Bingham]. [With a frontispiece designed by the authoress.]"

Contributor: BINGHAM, Jane M.

Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 11645.c.22."

Page: 8

Place of Publishing: London

Date of Publishing: 1847

Publisher: C. Gilpin

Issuance: monographic

Identifier: 001908865

 

Explore:

Find this item in the British Library catalogue, 'Explore'.

Download the PDF for this book (volume: 0) Image found on book scan 8 (NB not necessarily a page number)

Download the OCR-derived text for this volume: (plain text) or (json)

 

Click here to see all the illustrations in this book and click here to browse other illustrations published in books in the same year.

 

Order a higher quality version from here.

  

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New issue of the photo zine Tell mum everything is ok published by Éditions FP&CF.

 

Check the website !

 

www.editionsfpcf.com

  

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Look out

Copyright 2007 Ron Diorio

 

We'll be up at the Griffin Musuem for the juried show opening. Looking forward to meeting Brian Clamp and Amy Stein.

Amy Stein

Domesticated

Blue Sky Gallery

July 2 - August 2, 2009

Portland, OR

www.blueskygallery.org/

www.amysteinphoto.com

Name_Description

 

3- Japanese Dolls (Sakura Dolls) Mulan

Disney's Imperial Beauty Mulan -

Set of 4- Bamboo Plates- Made in Taiwan - Non Breakable- Historical painting

4- Wizard of Oz Munchkins

Disney Collector Doll-Enchanted Seasons collection - Spring Blossom Mulan 2001

Rose- Titanic Motion Picture Collector Doll - 1997 w/COA

Disney- Glitter Princess- Ariel

Disney- Glitter Princess - Snow White

Disney- Glitter Princess- Belle 2005

Cocoa-Cola Nascar Car Tin

Disneys Collector Dolls - Film Premier Edition- Imperial Beauty- Mulan 1998

Boyds Ltd. Bears and Hears "Miss Appleton- Story Time" figurine - PC# 2E/4077

Commemorative "Vanna" Limited Edition 1996

"Vanna" Silver- Limited Edition 1995

 

Barbie and Ken - USA Olympic Skater -Wind them up and they spin on their skates

1966 Fashion and Doll Reproduction - Fashion Luncheon Barbie -Collectible 1996

1966 Doll and Fashion Reproduction-Limited Edition- 30th Anniversary-Francie/ Barbie Doll's Modern Cousin with lifelike eyelashes, and bendable legs.

Shoppin Fun-Barbie & Kelly playset - Kelly really bounces, and magically picks up cereal and cookies

1996 Midnight Waltz Barbie-Ballroom Beauties Collection-

1996 Holiday Caroler Barbie- Porcelain

1996 Twirling Ballerina Barbie- Spin her crown and she magically twirls on her toes

Ocean Friends Kira-and her seal friend - Magical wet suit disappears and reappears in water

Jewel Hair Mermaid - Teresa- The longest hair ever! 1995

Coca Cola Picnic Barbie 1997

Fashion Fever Barbie

1999 Golden Allure Barbie - Special Edition

Fashion Fever Barbie 2004

Fashion Fever Kayla 2004

Fashion Savvy Collection - Tangerine Twist Barbie (African American)

Costume ball Barbie

1965 Fashion and Doll reproduction - Poodle Parade Barbie

Winter Reflection Barbie

 

Barbie - Hair Magic, with Hair extensions that change colors

My First Barbie Princess 1994

Walmart Special Edition- Country Bride Barbie - 1994

Jewel Hair Mermaid - Barbie 1995

Great Date - Ken - 1995

Spring Petals Barbie - 1995

Happy Meal Stacie

Emerald Elegance Barbie 1994

Original 1960 Fashion & Doll Special Edition Reproduction- Solo in the Spotlight - Barbie 1994

Walmart Special Edition- Sweet Magnolia Barbie 1996

Bubble Angel Barbie- magic wings make real bubbles

George (Washington)- Limited Edition Barbie 1996

Twinkle lights Barbie, she really lights up, White, Blue, Pink 1993

Calvin Klein Jeans, Bloomingdale's - Barbie 1996

Ken as Henry Higgins in My Fair Lady 1995 Hollywood Legends Collection- Limited Edition

Barbie as Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady - 1995 Hollywood Legends Collection- Limited Edition (Pink Dress)

Barbie as Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady - 1995 Hollywood Legends Collection- Limited Edition (White and Black Dress)

 

Medieval Lady - Barbie (Great Eras collection)

Teresa - Sun Jewel Barbie - 1993

Sapphire Dream Barbie 1995 - Society Style Collection - Limited Edition

Timeless Silhouette Barbie - 2000

Sunflower Barbie - Inspired by the Paintings of Vincent Van Gogh-Limited Edition 1998

Barbie Evening Flame 1991- 1 of 3 of the same doll

1960 Fashion and Doll Reproduction - Collector Edition - Enchanted Evening Barbie 1995

Flower Surprise Barbie 2002

Midge and Baby - Happy Family 2002

American Stories collection - special edition - Colonial Barbie

" " " - Pilgrim Barbie

" " " - Civil War Nurse Barbie

" " " - Pioneer Barbie

" " " - Pioneer Barbie

Barbie Pet Doctor / Adorable pets magically wiggle-waggle when you pet them

Barbie Evening Flame 1991- 2 of 3 of the same doll

 

Troll Barbie, mix and match troll hair for Barbie. With cool troll necklace for child to wear.1994

Pizza Party Skipper, everything for a complete pizza party. 1994

Collector Edition- Exotic Intrigue Barbie 2003

Pretty in Purple Barbie 1992

An Avon exclusive -Special Edition, Spring blossom Barbie 1995

Shaving fun Ken - Shave his magic color- change beard again and again 1994

Butterfly art - Ken - cool decorations for Ken and child to wear! 1998

Teresa - Spots n Dots Barbie, lookin cool at the hottest spots in town! 1993

An Avon exclusive -Special Edition, Spring Tea Party - Barbie 1997

Travel Train Fun - Barbie, Conductor and Hostess 2001

Sparkle Beach Barbie - Skipper 1995

Kelly- Love N Care - Make her chickenpox disappear

Skating Star Barbie 1995

Teresa - Twilight Gala- Barbie

Stars N Stripes - Army Barbie - Rendezvous with Destiny 1992

Barbie Fab - Fashions - 2002

Baywatch - Ken - Lifeguard races to the rescue on his waverunner! 1994

Glitter Hair Barbie - Colorful glittery gel for styling her hair 1993

My Graduation 2004 - Barbie

City Style- Barbie 2003

Special Edition - Air Force Barbie - Thunderbirds 1993

Barbie Collector Doll 1992

 

Ginnny & Friends Collection - Vogue Dolls 1993- 8" Mary had a little lamb - Collectable posable doll

Design Debut-Johnny- 17" Tall w/ golf bag and clubs, has COA piece no. 1192 of 2500

Collectors Dolls by Bradley- Cindy Lee - COA

1994 Pittsburgh Originals- At The Tea Party Collection- Kristea COA # 526 of 1000 w/complete tea set

1996- George Burns (born 1896) - An American Legend- by Effanbee Doll Co. - Limited to George Burns Centennial Year - includes video tape "The Sunshine Boys"

Lissi Doll - Limited Edition

Ashton Drake Galleries - "It's Time for Bed Pooh" - COA# 4306FD

Design Debut "Hannah" 1992

Lissi Doll - Limited Edition - " Jeena" 1992 Cert # 75 of 1000

 

1992 Design Debut- "Heather"

Ashton Drake Galleries- "Amy" COA # 1034FD

1992 - design Debut - "Tracy Tears"

Treasury Collection - "Shannon the Shamrock Fairy" - Paradise Galleries - Premier Edition

Paradise Galleries "Shannon" of the Emerald Isle - Premier Edition COA## F553

Bradley Dolls - "Val" Item# SD561

Edward M. Knowles- Heroines from the Fairy Tale Forest- "Snow White" COA# 4373C

Geppeddo Fairy Tale Series - "Goldilocks"

New Attitude Porcelain Boy Baseball player Doll w/baseball bat charm

 

Undercover Kids - animated collectable "Derek" Boy w/wreath

House of Lloyds 1990 Christmas Dreams

Genuine Porcelain Doll- Holiday Elegance - stand included

Dynasty Doll Collection - We Wish You a Merry X-Mas - Frances

Victorian Bows Collection - Genuine Porcelain doll by Melissa Jane - dressed in Red and white w/strips - 1997 The Brass Key COA incl.,

Vanna - Happy Holidays

Little Girl dressed in Red - about 6 " tall

box with 4 Snowman mugs, 4 mini Santa mugs, 1 Frosty the snowman mug, 1 Santa mug, cntr. Of tree ornaments

 

Shirley Temple - "Little Princess" Collectors Porcelain doll

1992 Hollywood Walk of Fame- Lucille Ball COA# 1865 of 3,000

The Hamilton Collection (Baby doll) "Wendy" COA # 1600A sculpted by Virginia Ehrlich Turner

The Hamilton Collection (Baby doll) "Danielle" COA # 4228A sculpted by Virginia Ehrlich Turner

9" Doll - Designer Guild collection - "Patty" COA# 0034 of 2000 worldwide- Artist Thelma Resch

Design Debut - Consuela COA# 0301 of 3360

 

Collector Edition - Barbie 2000

American Indian Barbie w/baby

Barbie- Evening Flame 1992 - 3 of 3 of the same dolll

Barbie - Star Steeper with horse / 2 pairs of reebock hi-tops for Barbie

Talk with me Barbie- w/ CD Rom -program her to talk / her mouth really moves

Teen Talk - Barbie- she says 4 different phrases 1991

Hollywood Legends Collection - Ken as The Scarecrow from wizard of oz

School Cool Barbie- W/ backpack, chalk board, and keychain

Toothfairy Barbie - w/ pouch 1994

Special Edition-Fun Barbie - 1994

Walt disney world 25th Anniversary Barbie

Fun to dress Barbie

Skipper - Sun Jewel

 

Brass Button Bears - 20th Century Collectables (1900-1990) 10 Bears in set-each dressed for a decade

"Vanna" Platinum Limited Edition 1995

"Vanna Gold Limited Edition 1996

Treasure Trolls - w/wishstone (set of 5)

Hip Hop Kids - "Girlfriend" soft filled doll w/eyes that open and close

"Cher" from the hit TV series clueless w/ cool ring for you inside Cher's animal backpack.

Classic Edition- Star Wars- 1999 Portrait edition Princess Leia

First in a Series - Elizabeth Taylor in Cleopatra (The Elizabeth Taylor Collection)

First in a Series - Frank Sinatra "The Recording Years"

Collection Edition- 1997- Lucy Does a TV Commercial" Episode 30

3 Kellogs beanbag breakfast bunch dolls- Snap, Crackle, and Pop

Marilyn Monroe - Emerald Evening Marilyn 1 of 2 of the same doll

 

Tiffany collection 1998 - "Tiffany Pacini" COA sewn on dolls back

Ashton Drake Galleries - "Little Women Collection" Artist Wendy Lawton "Meg" COA# 3235D -she sits on her satin stool, with embroidery in hand

Circus Parade- Clown Collection - 1990

Ltd Edition 2005 - Vanessa - by Vanessa Ricardi - COA sewn on dolls back

Beautiful Expressions Collectable - 1947 attire w/ purse and feather shawl

Collector's Edition - Kirsten Model# 14180

 

Shopping Time - Barbie 1997

"Teresa" , Barbies girlfriend - Spot Scene w/keychain frame and dalmation

Graduation Barbie Class of 1997 -

Graduation Barbie Class of 1998 -

Cut and Style Barbie, cut her hair and magically make it long again 1994

Wonder Woman Barbie

Teresa-Diamond Dazzle Barbie

 

Coca Cola Picnic Barbie

Winter Splender Barbie

Glamorous Gala - Barbie

Ken- Flower Surprise

Sea Holiday Barbie w/camera

City Seasons- Fall Collection - Autumn in Paris Barbie 1998

1962 Fashion and Doll Reproductions-Collector Edition- Silken Flame Barbie 1997

Sixties Fun Barbie 1997

Barbie for President 1991

The Great Eras Collection-Egyptian Queen Barbie 1994

Barbie as the Swan Lake Queen in Swan Lake 1997 (African American)

Limited Edition- Spiegel - Summer Sophisticate Barbie 1995

The Great Eras Collection - 1920's Flapper Barbie

Collection Edition - Barbie 2001

 

Bob Mackie " Queen of Hearts" Barbie

Bob Mackie " Moon Goddess" Barbie

Dolls of the world collection - Dutch Barbie 1993

Dolls of the world collection - German Barbie 1994

Dolls of the world collection - Native American Barbie 1994

Dolls of the world collection - Kenyan Barbie 1993

Dolls of the world collection - Puerta Rican Barbie 1996

Dolls of the world collection - French Barbie 1996

Dolls of the world collection - Indian Barbie 1995

Dolls of the world collection - Irish Barbie 1994

Dolls of the world collection - Native American Barbie 1992

Dolls of the world collection - Russian Barbie 1996

Dolls of the world collection - Polynesian Barbie 1994

Dolls of the world collection - Norwegian Barbie 1995

Dolls of the world collection - Arctic Barbie 1996

Dolls of the world collection - Mexican Barbie 1995

Dolls of the world collection - Japanese Barbie 1995

Dolls of the world collection - Moroccan Barbie 1998

Dolls of the world collection - Chilean Barbie 1997

 

Design Debut "Olivia" 1992 COA# 571 of 2280

Throughout the Years " A walk in the park" includes Mom, baby, carriage, and umbrella

Ashton Drake "Jo" from Little Women COA # 2070D 1994

Ashton Drake "Laura" from Little Women COA# 2178H 1992

Ashton Drake "Marmee" from Little Women COA# 10408A 1995

Royal Heirloom Collection by Tomich Inc. COA# 0487 of 3000

Porcelain Doll "Jessica" in red velvet dress and hat

Moments Treasured Collection "Dusty" COA# 2424 of 3000 Boy

Moments Treasured Collection "Lucy" COA# 640 of 2000

 

Design Debut Amy & Her Wagon COA# 1288/2000

Ashton Drake "Nellie" from Little House on the Praire- 1993 COA# 3736ZB

Design Debut "Stephanie" COA

Design Debut "Tracey" Baseball Player w/mit and ball COA

Design Debut "Elizabeth" 1992 COA

American Sweetheart Collection "Brianna" Itm# 25560

Designer Guild Collection "Pat" Boy doll COA#0913/2000 Limited Edition original artist doll

Morgan Brittany Collector Doll - "Earth Angel Kids w/hope. "Seth"

A Connoisseur Collection - By Seymour Mann - Shaka 16 " Ethnic Doll w/COA

 

Marilyn Monroe " Evening Emerald Marilyn" 1993

Marilyn Monroe "Silver Sizzle Marilyn" 1993

"Vanna" in Spain Limited Edition

A portrait of Vanna "Happy Mothers Day"

"The original" Mommy Doll 19" soft body - arms bend to hug and feed baby (Baby included)

Mattel's Chatty Cathy / The Talking Doll - Reproduction of original 1960 doll

Walt Disney for Burger King edition - Hunchback of Notre Dame - " Quasimodo

"Vanna" with Vanna White original fashions

Classic Creations-Hand crafted Porcelain Doll "WEI" 6" doll

Classic Creations-Hand crafted Porcelain Doll "HON" 6" doll

Walt Disney Co - Snow White and The seven Dwarfs- 6 1/2" Dolls - "Bashful"

"Dopey"

"Doc"

"Happy"

"Sneezy"

"Grumpy"

"Sleepy"

Disney's Beauty and the Beast - The Wedding" Prince"

 

Lissi Doll- World-Wide Collection 17" Doll - Bonita Itm# 76100

Lissi Doll- World Wide Collection 17" Doll Itm# 75812

Vanna Limited Edition - HSN - W/ Vanna White original fashions (Gray jump suit)

Special Edition - Holiday Magic- "Hollyberry" Sky Dancers

"Kelly" from TV's 90210 Beverly Hills

"Braondon" from TV's 90210 Beverly Hills

"Donna" from TV's 90210 Beverly Hills

Soldiers of the World "1776 American Patriot" and "1776 British Redcoat"

70th Anniversary Miss America Doll - "Blair" by Kenner

Exclusively Distributed by Presents, Turner Enterprises - "Scarecrow"

50th Anniversary "The Wizard of Oz" Glinda

"Scarecrow" The Wizard of Oz

"Wizard" The Wizard of Oz

"Astromaut" by Dakin

"John Smith" Disney's Pocahontas

"Kelly" from Saved by the Bell 1990 NBC series

 

"Melinda" The Tooth Fairy - by Gorhman - Imaginary People Dolls

18" "Canterbury Bell" Doll - by Bill O'Connor, Artist- Duck House, Inc. Ontario Canada COA# 699/1500 Worldwide

Ashton Drake "Mary" Little House on the Prairie- COA# KC238

Abraham (Abe) Lincoln - COA# 209- Authorized by the United States Historical Society

by Seymour Mann - "Sister Mary" COA

Princess Diana"The Queen of Hearts" 1997- COA by The Society for the Preservation of History, Inc. - Origianal First Memorial Doll Ever Issued.

 

Lissi Doll - "Jennifer"

Pittsburgh Originals - From the Heart "Tina" by Chris Miller- COA# 148 of 1,000 worldwide

Roosevelt Bear - Dressed as Magician - COA- The Wonderful World of Jane Withers Collectibles

Build A Bear- Black w/silver speckles - dressed as Pumpkin

Fine Pewter Figure - Star Trek "Spock" from The Motion Picure 1979

Disney "Belle" Beauty and the Beast - Enchanted Christmas

Warner Bros. - 1996 McDonalds Collectible - from Space Jam- Lola Bunny - Made for Denny's

Precious Moments Bear

 

Misc. stuffed animals, dolls, and mini figures- Loose

 

Barbie Christmas Tree, skirt

Picture in frame

Picture Puzzle in frame

 

Cntr. Of misc. Barbie furniture

Halloween Star "Estrella de halloween"

Halloween Enchantress "Hechicera Noche de Brujas"

Enchanted Halloween

Boo-tiful Halloween (glow in the dark dress!)

XXXOOO Barbie - Valentine Barbie

Valentine Romance

Valentine Style Barbie

Valentine Fun Barbie

With Love Barbie

Valentine Romance

Holiday Sisters "Barbie, Kelly, and Stacie"

Holiday Excitement

Special Edition - Holiday Season Barbie

Holiday Surprise

Festive Season Barbie

Santas Helper

Holiday Treats Barbie

Holiday Joy

Pinstripe Power - Limited Edition 1997

Ballroom Beauties Collection "Moonlight Waltz" Barbie 1997

Midnight Princess Barbie 1997

 

Barbie furniture

Misc. Barbie Clothes - at least 100 outfits

Chest with Barbie accessories

Lamp

Barbie Night Light

Several Barbie Containers

3- Barbie beanie rabbits (Easter)

Phone Book

Diary

Kelly/Nikki miniature Easter 1. Rabbit 1. Chick

Empress of Emeralds - Barbie Resin Egg

 

Christmas tree decorations

Wardrobe full of shoes/boots/skates (about 30 pairs)

Two new Barbie Outfits - Pkgs unopened

 

Bag of Misc. mini figures (dolls)

Giggling Pillsbury Dough Boy

Mini Pillsbury Dough Boy beanie

Praying little girl doll

Grand Ole Opry Bear

Circus Circus Bear

Little Girl with her first teeth, sticking her tongue out (very cute)

Bag of 3 pairs of doll shoes

12 Collector Series - Glasses - Disney Characters - 1 extra Pocahontas

Idaho Potatoe Stuffed Doll w/legs

Budweiser Label Stein - Giftware Mug

Misc. Figures

 

Plate "Fun in the Sun" (Frankie & Annette) COA

6- McDonalds Collector plates

Owl wooden plaque 1996

Angelique Doll

Mini plate and cup set - Raggedy Ann

4 pc. Traven set-Toothbrush Holder, Soap Holder, Cream Jar, Hair Comb

Peanuts - Christmas Ornament

AM/FM Backphone Radio unique behind the head design

Floral stationery, picture frame, and pen

Harmonica

Silver mouse, 2 baskets, figurine

Barbie case w/mini Barbie dolls

Pokemon 23K Gold Plated Trading Card - in Globe

Pkg. Of 10 stencils (plastic)

Mini chest for jewelry

1955 Chevrolet "Belair" - collector mini car

Sugar Town - Dr. Sugar's Office Porcelain Hanging Ornament

2 Mini Holloween globes

Humingbird ceramic night light

2 misc. platic containers

Boyz- Sun Kissed Summer

 

Young Curators, New Ideas

 

Organized by amani olu

 

Curated by Alana Celii & Grant Willing, Michael Bühler-Rose, Jon Feinstein, Laurel Ptak, Amy Stein, and Lumi Tan

 

Opening Reception: Wednesday, August 13, 2008

RSVP: rsvp@bondstreetgallery.com

Press Review: 4 -- 6 pm | Public Reception: 6 -- 9 pm

On View: Wednesday, August 13 -- Saturday, September 6, 2008

 

Exhibition Artists:

 

Charles Benton, Alison Brady, Brian Bess, Victor Boullet, Mikaylah Bowman, Olga Cafiero, Talia Chetrit, Tyler Coburn, Petra Cortright, C. Coy, Gerald Edwards III, Daniel Everett, Thobias Fäldt & Per Englund, Martin Fengel, Jason Fulford, Nicolas Grider, Pierre Hourquet, Konst & Teknik, Eke Kriek, Emily Larned, Bryan Lear, Miranda Lehman, Seth Lower, Matt MacFarland, Katja Mater, Kelci McIntosh, Mark McKnight, Erin Jane Nelson, Ilia Ovechkin, Robert Overweg, Alex Prager, M. River, Noel Rodo-Vankeulen, Asha Schechter, Trevor Shimizu, Alix Smith, Jo-ey Tang, Jesper Ulvelius, Anne De Vries, Hannah Whitaker, Karly Wildenhaus, Ofer Wolberger, Ann Woo and Damon Zucconi

 

bondstreetgallery.com

 

Bond Street Gallery

297 Bond Street, Brooklyn NY

F/G To Carroll St. / R to Union St.

Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

   

Remodeled in 1907-08 by the noted architect Harry Allan Jacobs for investment banker Isaac Seligman and long occupied by banker E. Hayward Ferry and his wife Amelia Parsons Ferry, this highly intact former townhouse is an exceptionally fine example of the restrained Neo-French Classic variant of the Beaux Arts style and forms part of “Bankers Row,” a group of five residences built for bankers on West 56 Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. Originally constructed in 1871 by the well-known New York architects D. & J. Jardine, this house was occupied from 1880 to 1907 by the family of George Spencer Hart, a leading wholesaler of dairy products and president of three streetcar lines, who also served as the director of several banks. In 1907-08, Jacobs extended the house at the front and rear and relocated the entrance to the ground story in response to the then current fashion for American basement plans. Reflecting a growing mode for individuated rowhouses, he created a new limestone façade and copper roof.

   

His façade design is distinguished by its use of unadorned planar wall surfaces, nuanced arrangement of solids and voids, carefully balanced proportions, and crisp refined detailing. The building’s rusticated base focuses on a large central entry with an elegantly carved lion’s head and garlands surmounting a pair of original iron-and-glass doors. The smooth limestone mid-section of the façade is framed by two colossal pilasters set off by narrow bands of waterleaf-anddart molding. The tripartite windows at the center of the façade retain their historic paired wood casements and transoms and are accented by a stone balcony at the third story. A heavy cornice and balustrade caps the third story, balancing the strong verticals created by the piers. Because of Jacobs’ concern with reducing the apparent height of this tall, narrow building and differentiating the bedroom stories, the fourth and fifth stories set back to the original building line and are articulated as a two-story attic crowned by a mansard roof with dormers. At the same time the mansard roofs enhances the French character of the design. Jacobs, who trained at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, won critical acclaim in the early decades of the twentieth century for his restrained and elegant residences, of which this house is an outstanding example.

       

E. Hayward Ferry was a prominent businessman, who served as first vice president of Hanover Bank from 1910 to 1929. He and his wife occupied this house from 1908 to 1935. In 1935, it became the headquarters of the distinguished publishing firm of Albert & Charles Boni. It was here that Albert Boni founded the Readex Corporation and began his first experiments with microform technology. After the Boni firm left the building in 1945, it served various uses. From May 1959 to early 1964, it was the salon, workshop, and home of the noted fashion designer Arnold Scaasi. In 1965, it became the headquarters of the Martin Foundation, a charitable trust established by textile magnate Lester Martin, and was dedicated to Eleanor Roosevelt. In addition to the offices of the Martin Foundation, the building housed the Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Foundation and Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Cancer Fund as well as other non-profit cultural organizations such as the newly established American Film Institute (c.1967-72). In 1972 the building was conveyed to the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities. It subsequently served as the offices of an importing firm and in 1988 became the New York City headquarters and studios of the Spanish Broadcasting System. In an area today characterized by tall office buildings, this five-story townhouse forms part of a unique small-scale streetscape that was once typical of the neighborhood and is now rare in Midtown.

   

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

   

Midtown and the Development of Vanderbilt Row

   

Far removed from the center of population at the tip of the Manhattan, the area surrounding Fifth Avenue between 42 Street and the southern end of Central Park remained rural in character well into the first half of the nineteenth century. Most of the territory was originally owned by the City of New York, which had been granted “all the waste, vacant, unpatented, and unappropriated lands” under the Dongan Charter of 1686. The city maintained possession of these common lands— which once totaled over one-seventh of the acreage on Manhattan—for over a century, only occasionally selling off small parcels to raise funds for the municipality. The city’s policy changed after the American War of Independence. In 1785 the Common Council commissioned surveyor Casimir Theodore Goerck to map out five-acre lots to be sold at auction. A new street called Middle Road, now known as Fifth Avenue, was laid out to provide access to the parcels. A second survey of additional lots was undertaken by Goerck in 1796 and two new roads, now Park and Sixth Avenues were created. Under the city’s plan, half of the lots were to be sold outright while the other half were made available under long-term leases of 21 years. Many of the parcels were acquired by wealthy New Yorkers as speculative investments in anticipation of future growth in the area. John Mason, one-time president of the Chemical National Bank, for example, acquired most of the lots on the east side of Middle Road in the East 50s in 1825. A number of public and charitable institutions also purchased or were granted large plots along the avenue; the Colored Orphan Asylum was located between 43 and 44 Streets, the Deaf and Dumb Asylum on 50 Street just east of Fifth Avenue, the Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum between 51 and 52 Streets, and St. Luke’s Hospital between 54 and 55 Streets. The rough character of the neighborhood—other tenants at this time included Waltemeir’s cattle yard at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 54 Street—persisted into the 1860s, when development pressures finally began to transform the area into a fashionable residential district.

   

The northward movement of population and commerce along Manhattan Island picked up momentum during the building boom that followed the Civil War. Four-story brick- and brownstone-faced row houses were constructed on many of the side streets in the area, while larger mansions were erected along Fifth Avenue itself. Pioneers in this development were the sisters Mary Mason Jones and Rebecca Colford Jones, heirs of early Fifth Avenue speculator John Mason and both widows of established Knickerbocker families. In 1867, Mary Mason Jones commissioned a block-long row of houses, later known as the “Marble Row,” on the east side of the avenue between 57 and 58 Streets. Two years later in 1869, her sister hired architect Detlef Lienau to design her own set of lavish residences one block to the south. Having established the area as an acceptable neighborhood for the city’s elite, other wealthy New Yorkers soon followed the Jones sisters northward up Fifth Avenue. The gentrification of the area was furthered by a number of important civic and institutional building projects initiated in the mid nineteenth century. Most notable was the planning and construction of Central Park in the late 1850s and 1860s; the preeminence of Fifth Avenue as the fashionable approach to the park was later solidified in 1870 when the city created a monumental new entrance at Grand Army Plaza. A number of ecclesiastical organizations also opened impressive new buildings on the avenue at this time; St. Thomas Episcopal Church at 53Street in 1870 (replaced by the present church by in 1906-13), the Collegiate Reformed Protestant Dutch Church at 48 Street in 1872 (demolished), the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church at 55Street in 1875, and the Roman Catholic St. Patrick’s Cathedral between 50 and 51 Streets in 1879 (James Renwick, Jr., a designated New York City Landmark).

   

The status of the area as the city’s most prestigious residential neighborhood was firmly cemented in 1879 when the Vanderbilt family began a monumental house-building campaign on Fifth Avenue. William Henry Vanderbilt—the family patriarch since the death of his father Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt in 1877—built his own palatial residence on the western block front between 51 and 52 Streets, while his two eldest sons each erected mansions just to the north. The scope of the work was so impressive and the influence of the family on the neighborhood so great that the ten blocks of Fifth Avenue south of Central Park came to be known as “Vanderbilt Row, “one of the most prestigious districts in late-nineteenth-century New York.

   

West 56 Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues and the Early History of 26 West 56 Street

   

Three blocks south of Central Park, West 56 Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues followed the trend of other blocks in the area as it became a fashionable location for many of the city’s most affluent citizens. By 1879 the entire blockfront on the north side of the street and all but four of the lots on the south side of the street had been developed with single family houses. Among the early occupants were Robert Bonner, editor of the New York Ledger, at No. 8; Union Bank president, Robert Schell, at No. 33; Rev. Thomas E. Vermilye, pastor of the Collegiate Reformed Church, at No. 15; and Rev. John Hall, pastor of the nearby Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, at No. 3. The block was also home to a number of prominent German-Jewish merchants including Adolph Lewisohn at No. 53; David L. Einstein, president of the Raritan Woolen Mill, at No. 55; Emanuel Lauer, a clothing manufacture and later an investment banker, at No. 53; and then crockery merchant, later department store founder, Nathan Straus, at No. 47. This house was one of a group of five brownstones extending from 22 to 30 West 56 Street erected by builder-developer, later architect, George W. DaCunha to the designs of architects David and John Jardine in 1871-72. In April 1872, while the houses were under construction, DaCunha conveyed the buildings to Jacob Tallman, a builder and real estate speculator whose construction business was located on West 53Street between Sixth and Seventh Avenues and who was involved with a number of development projects in the West Fifties. For several years the houses at 22, 24, and 28 West 56 Street were occupied by members of Tallman’s family. This house and 30 West 56 Street were leased to tenants. In 1877 Jacob Tallman sold his five West 56 Street houses. This house was acquired by Henry E. Sprague, a wholesale produce merchant with a business on Pearl Street. Henry Sprague and his wife Harriet resided in this house until 1880 when they sold it to Anna Dudley Hart, wife of dairy merchant George S. Hart.

   

George Spencer Hart was born in Cornwall, Connecticut, in 1837. In 1862, he moved to New York City and established George C. Hart & Co., wholesale dealers in butter and cheese. Headquartered on Pearl Street in Lower Manhattan, the firm grew to include branches on Warren Street in Manhattan, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and Liverpool, England. In 1871, Hart married Anna Dudley, daughter of Charles H. Dudley and Anna Eliza [Fairchild Dudley] Grant. Mrs. Grant’s second husband Henry (Harry) L. Grant was a broker and financer of city railway [streetcar] stocks and bonds and under his aegis, Hart acquired “an important interest in the Central Crosstown Railroad Company” in 1874 and served as the company’s president from 1885-97. He eventually gained control of two other streetcar lines, the Second Avenue Railway Company and the Christopher and Tenth Street Railroad Company, which he managed until all three of the railroads under his direction were consolidated with the Metropolitan Traction Company. Hart also served on the boards of several banks.

   

The Harts and the Grants resided together in this house until about 1890. Anna Hart died in 1893. Her sister and mother, who were the executors of her estate, subsequently conveyed this house to George S. Hart. In 1894 Hart married Frances Wheeler, daughter of George M. Wheeler of Scarsdale. In 1905 the Harts began a series of extensive trips and by 1907 they had decided to sell this house.

   

On July 22, 1907 the Harts sold 26 West 56 Street to real estate speculator Wesley Thorn.

   

The following day Thorn conveyed the house, subject to a mortgage he had obtained from the Title Guarantee & Trust Bank for $55,000, to investment banker Henry Seligman, who had recently built a mansion for himself at 30 West 56 Street (C.P.H. Gilbert, 1899-1901, a designated New York City Landmark). Thus, Thorn made a handsome profit and Seligman protected his interests by gaining control over a potential development site only two doors away from his house. Less than two weeks after he acquired this house, Seligman had architect Harry Allan Jacobs file plans with the Department of Buildings for extensive alterations including four-story front and rear extensions, upgrades to the plumbing, new bathrooms, new stairs, floors, and partitions, and a new limestone front. Construction began in mid-August 1907 and was completed in June 1908. In November 1908 Seligman sold the house to banker E. Hayward Ferry (1864-1940), subject to a restrictive covenant that stipulated that as long as Henry Seligman owned 30 West 56 Street, 26 West 56Street was to be “used and occupied as a private residence [by] one family only.” In choosing to make his home on West 56 Street, Ferry contributed to the long-standing association of this block with bankers and brokers which led to its being known as “Bankers’ Row.” In addition to Seligman, Ferry’s neighbors included Seligman’s banker brother-in-law Edward Wasserman at No. 33 (C.P.H. Gilbert, 1901-02, demolished), Arthur Lehman of Lehman Brothers at No. 31 (John Duncan, 1903-04, demolished?), banker-broker Harry B. Hollins at No. 12-14 (McKim, Mead & White, 1899-1901, a designated New York City Landmark), and Frederick C. Edey at No. 10 (Warren & Wetmore, 1901-03, a designated New York City Landmark).

   

E. Hayward and Amelia Parsons Ferry

   

Ebenezer Hayward Ferry (1864-1940), born in Peterborough, New Hampshire, was the son of the Rev. Charles Brace Ferry, a Unitarian minister, and Ellen Hayward Ferry, a descendant of the Haywards who settled in Massachusetts in the 1640s. E. Hayward Ferry graduated from Harvard in 1886. Soon after graduation, he began his banking career with the National Bank of Redemption in Boston. The following year he took a job with the Bay State Trust Company of Boston. He remained with Bay State until 1900, in later years serving as the company’s secretary. In 1900, he became a vice-president of the Shawmut bank and was instrumental in developing the bank’s credit department. Shawmut merged with the National Exchange Bank early in 1907 and during this period of reorganization E. Ferry Hayward accepted a position as vice president of the Hanover National Bank in New York City. He became first vice-president of Hanover in 1910 and served in that position until 1929 when Hanover merged with the Central Union Trust Company. Although he relinquished his vice-presidency, Ferry remained on the board of the newly formed Central Hanover Bank and Trust Company. Ferry also served on the boards of a number of major corporations including Bankers Trust, the Phelps Dodge Corporation, the Northern Pacific Railway, the Home Life Insurance Company, and the Old Dominion Company. He was involved in a number of philanthropic organizations. In the 1890s and early 1900s he served as secretary of the Ramabai Association, which supported the work of Pundita Ramabai, aimed at improving the lives of women in India and eliminating the practice of Sati (aka suttee). Later he was involved in fund raising for hospitals and was a member of the executive committee of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary.

   

Amelia Parsons Ferry (1863-1945), daughter of Sydenham C. and Harriet E. (Morton) Parsons was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, where her father was a merchant and a founder of the New England branch of the YMCA. Amelia Parsons graduated Smith College and married E. Hayward Ferry in 1889. They had one daughter, Harriet, born in 1891.

   

In 1890, Amelia Ferry’s sister Harriet (Hetty) Eddy Parsons married Arthur Curtiss James, the only child of the Ellen Curtiss and Daniel Willis James (1832-1907), one of the richest men in the United States, who controlled Phelps, Dodge & Company, as well as other mining and railroad interests in the west. The Ferrys and the Jameses had extremely close business and personal relationships. E. Hayward Ferry sat on the boards of the many mining and transportation companies in which Arthur C. James had inherited a controlling interest and James was on the board of Hanover Bank. According to newspaper accounts Amelia Ferry and Hetty James were active in the same charities, attended the same parties, and vacationed together with their husbands. This tradition solidified after 1911 when Arthur James purchased “Edgehill Farm,” the property adjoining his estate, “Beacon Hill,” in Newport and the Ferrys began spending their summers at “Edgehill” while continuing to reside at 26 West 56 Street during the winter months. In 1930, when the census was taken, the Ferrys were occupying No. 26 with three women servants: Alice Smith, Elizabeth McTieh, and Louise Condliff. By 1930 many of the single family townhouses on this block of West 56 Street had become boarding houses or had been subdivided into apartments and ground floor commercial space. Henry and Adelaide Seligman continued to reside at No. 30 in grand style with eleven live-in servants, but both were in their seventies and died within a few months of one another in 1933. This freed E. Hayward Ferry with regard to 26 West 56 Street and in 1935 he arranged to lease the house to Albert Boni as offices for the Albert and Charles Boni’s publishing firm. E. Hayward Ferry died in 1940; Hetty and Arthur James passed away in 1941; Harriet Ferry died in July 1945.

   

Harry Allan Jacobs

   

Harry Allan Jacobs (1872-1932) was born and educated in New York City, and began his architectural training at the Columbia School of Mines. After graduating in 1894 he continued his studies in Paris at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and was awarded the Prix de Rome by the American Academy in Rome. Following his return to this country, he joined the Society of Beaux-Arts Architects and began his own architectural practice in New York in 1900. His earliest known commission, dating from 1900, is a brick-and-limestone store-and-loft building at 133 Mercer Street within the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District. Early on he established a reputation as a designer of hotels with the Seville Hotel at Madison Avenue and East 29 Street (1901-02) and the Hotel Marseilles, 2689-2693 Broadway at West 103 Street (1902-05, a designated New York City Landmark), both exuberant Beaux Arts buildings clad in brick, with limestone, wrought iron, and terra-cotta trim.

   

Jacobs’ practice also focused on the design of elegant residences. An important early example is the Charles Guggenheimer residence at 129 East 73 Street (1907) in the Upper East Side Historic District. This neo-Italian Renaissance style townhouse, faced in limestone, served as a model for many of his later commissions. Other commissions earned Jacobs wide recognition, including a new façade design in the neo-Italian Renaissance style for the house of philanthropist R. Fulton Cutting at 22 East 67 Street (1908), the Regency-inspired James J. Van Alen House, now the Kosciuszko Foundation, at 15 East 65 Street (1917), and a residence for theater producer Martin Beck at 13 East 67 Street (1921), all in the Upper East Side Historic District. His country houses included “Meadow Farm,” the estate of financer, later governor, Herbert Lehman in Purchase, New York, and “Mountain View Farms,” the estate of movie producer Adolph Zukor in Nyack, New York. Jacobs also designed two major institutional residences ?the Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society Administration Building and Cottages in Pleasantville, New York (1908-12) and the neo-Italian Renaissance style Andrew Freedman Home at 1125 Grand Concourse in the Bronx (1924-25, a designated New York City Landmark), the latter in collaboration with architect Joseph

   

H. Freedlander, a specialist in institutional design. Jacobs returned to hotel design in 1927 with the neo-Renaissance style Hotel Elysee located at 54-60 East 54 Street.

   

Jacobs was a member of the Mayor Walker’s Committee on Plans and Survey, a predecessor to the New York City Planning Commission. He was a fellow of the American Institute of Architects and the American Academy in Rome and served as the president of Academy’s Alumni Association. He was very active in the Society of Beaux Arts Architects and the Architectural League of New York. He wrote extensively on real estate, planning, and architectural issues for newspapers and magazines. He also was the author of a number of one-act plays, including one written in collaboration with George S. Kaufman.

   

The Design of the E. Hayward and Amelia Parson Ferry House

   

In 1903 architectural critic Herbert Croly observed that high-stoop brownstone dwellings had become “extremely unfashionable, both in design and plan” and described a new movement “gradually gathering momentum toward the substitution of reconstructed American basement dwellings for old brownstone fronts.”

   

In some cases the reconstruction has gone no further than the destruction of the stoop, the placing of the entrance on the ground floor, and the rearrangement of the interior, but for the most part people demand that the old houses shall be utterly destroyed or subjected to such a drastic process of purging that every trace of brownstone is removed. And the process of reconstruction is covering ground with utmost rapidity.

   

The American basement plan was first introduced around 1880 and gained widespread popularity during the 1890s and first few years of the 1900s. In traditional rowhouses, visitors to the house would enter on the parlor level using a tall flight of stairs, the stoop, from the Dutch for “step,” set to one side of the façade. The main reception hall shared the first floor with the parlor, beyond which was another parlor, usually used for formal dining. The family dining room was located in the front of the basement with the kitchen at the rear. In the 1880s it became fashionable to have the dining room and parlor on the same floor, with a small butler’s pantry equipped with a dumbwaiter connecting to the basement kitchen. Once the ground floor dining room had been eliminated, the main entrance could be lowered to street level and the front basement space could be given over to a generous foyer leading to a grand staircase. Moving the main stair to the center of the house made it possible to have a larger, better lit parlor, extending across the entire building frontage. The parlor was treated en suite with the stair hall, which functioned as a secondary reception hall, and the rear dining room.

   

The introduction of this new rowhouse type, known as the American basement plan, coincided with an increasing desire for individualized designs. Reacting against “the monotony of the once fashionable … brown-stone front, in blocks of a dozen or more houses exactly alike,”architects and developers entered into “a persistent and deliberate striving after individuality” using a variety of different styles, designs, and materials to create distinctive façades that would be readily marketable as private, upper-class residences. This trend was reflected not only in the treatment of reconstructed rowhouses but also in new rows erected by speculative builders “three or four at a time, each house [having] the distinction of an individual design.” The result, in the view of most designers and critics was entirely positive. Summing up recent architectural trends in 1903, Columbia University architecture professor A.D. F. Hamlin observed “our residence streets have begun to be interesting, our houses to possess individuality of style and design; and the gain to the city is great.”

   

For his design for the Ferry house Harry Allan Jacobs chose to work in the Neo-French Classic variant of the Beaux Arts style just coming into vogue in the early 1900s. Inspired by the French Classical Baroque, principally the works of Jules Hardouin Mansard, and the French Neo-Classical designs of Louis XVI period, this variant was characterized by its emphasis on planar wall surfaces and simple classical details. Among the notable early examples were Hunt & Hunt’s twin houses at 645-647 Fifth Avenue (1905, demolished) and Warren & Wetmore’s James A. Burden House at 7 East 91 Street (1902-05, which is both an individually designated New York City Landmark and within the Carnegie Hill Historic District). With the Ferry House design, Jacobs moved even beyond those works in the abstraction and simplification of his design, exhibiting an interest in unadorned planar wall surface, nuanced arrangements of solids and voids, carefully balanced proportions, and crisp, refined detailing that characterizes his work from this period.

   

The most overtly historic element of the Ferry House design is the treatment of the main entry with its concave segmental-arched surround framing a simple trabeated doorway surmounted by a carved lion’s head draped with a wreath and swags. It seems almost certain that this treatment was modeled after the doorway of the eighteenth-century house at 25 Rue Charlemagne in Paris, which had been illustrated in the Architectural Record in 1906. At the Ferry House the stylized, almost vulpine, lion’s head, wreath, and naturalistic garlands are handled with unusual fluidity and grace, suggestive of the Art Nouveau. The wreath motif is echoed in the design of the handsome paired wrought-iron-and-glass doors at the main entry. The entry is flanked by unusual Rococo-inspired curved wrought-iron scrolls that were perhaps intended to serve as hand grips for the front stoop. Less elaborate wrought ironwork is employed for the service entry to the east of main entry and the window gate in the west bay. The base is also enhanced by banded rustication and is capped by a stone cyma molding and frieze enriched with a Vitruvian scroll motif and paterae in low relief.

   

In the mid-section of the façade, the windows are grouped together in a tripartite arrangement at the center of the façade. This compositional device, which Jacobs also employed at the contemporaneous Guggenheimer house allowed him to leave “a large plain border of stone” around the windows. Here, through simple projections and moldings Jacobs articulated the framing stonework as giant pilasters, profiling the flat moldings framing the window bays with narrow bands of waterleaf-and-dart molding, which are echoed by the narrow moldings capping his abstracted pilasters. Jacobs balanced the strong verticals created by the giant pilasters and window surrounds with the heavy cornice and balustrade crowning the third story and the balcony beneath the third story windows. In the upper portion of his façade, Jacobs reduced the number of window openings, both to introduce variety in his design and to differentiate these bedroom stories from the public reception rooms on the second and third floors. Concerned with reducing the apparent height of this tall narrow building, Jacobs retained the original setback building line at the fourth story simply refacing the façade wall with the same rusticated limestone banding as the ground story base to create a strong horizontal emphasis. As was common with many of the renovations during this period, the original fifth story façade was taken down and rebuilt as a sloping pseudo-mansard faced with standing seam copper and lit by a pair of segmental arched dormers. This articulation of the fifth story as a mansard also serves to reduce the height of the building and enhances the French character of the design.

   

In addition to the Guggenheimer house, Jacobs produced a number of townhouse designs and one design for a brownstone converted to commercial use, the Hardman Peck piano company at 433 Fifth Avenue (1910, storefront altered), that can be related to the Ferry House because they share similar compositions [partis] ? the Guggenheimer house; the John W. Herbert, later Mrs. Frederick Lewisohn House, 835 Fifth Avenue (1910, demolished); the Andrew Miller Residence (demolished)? or similar “signature” decorative details ? the balcony at the Guggenheimer House; the cornices and balustrades at the R. Fulton Cutting house and Hardman Peck Store. All these buildings, as noted by a critic writing in the New York Architect in 1911, were characterized by a “purity of style and detail,” the “same feeling of restraint and good taste;” however, the Ferry House stands out as the simplest and least historicizing of Jacobs’ designs from this period, pointing the way for his works of the late 1910s and 1920s, such as the houses at 6, 8, and 10 East 68 Street he designed for Otto Kahn in 1919, where with the exception of sills and shallow ornament in the tympana of the three central windows, there was no ornament on the façades (all three within the Upper East Side Historic District; Nos. 6 and 8 significantly altered).

   

Albert & Charles Boni, Inc.

   

Albert Boni (1892-1981) and Charles Boni (1895-1969), the sons of insurance executive Charles Boni and Bertha Saslavlasky Boni, were raised in New Jersey. Albert attended Cornell and Harvard and Charles enrolled at Harvard, but both withdrew from college with the intention of going into publishing. To gain experience in the field, they opened the Washington Square bookshop in Greenwich Village in 1913, which soon became a gathering place for Villagers with literary and leftist leanings. The shop’s back room was converted into an impromptu theater for the Washington Square Players (Max Eastman, John Reed, Mary Heaton Vorse, etc.), an amateur group that developed into the Theater Guild. In 1914, the brothers launched their first publishing venture, The Glebe, a poetry magazine, which featured the work of still relatively unknown Imagist poets, Ezra Pound, Amy Lowell, H.D. [Hilda Doolittle], Ford Madox Ford, William Carlos Williams, as well as James Joyce. In 1915, the Bonis sold the shop to devote their full time to publishing. At the suggestion of Albert Boni, they began producing the Little Leather Library, miniature editions of classic books, which were mass-marketed through dime store sales and mail order and sold over a million volumes in their first year of operation. In 1917, Horace Liveright joined the firm, which incorporated as Boni & Liveright, and began publishing reprint editions of worthy recent works under the imprint of the Modern Library. Within six months, the partners quarreled and Liveright bought out the Bonis, although their name remained associated with the firm until 1928.

   

In 1923 Albert and Charles Boni again established a publishing house, Albert and Charles Boni, Inc. Among the important books published by their firm during the 1920s were Ford Madox Ford’s No More Parades (1925), Gertrude Stein’s The Making of Americans (1926), Upton Sinclair’s Oil! (1927), and Thornton Wilder’s The Bridge of San Luis Rey. In 1926 the brothers acquired the publishing house of their uncle Thomas Seltzer and with it the American rights to the novels of Marcel Proust. Throughout the late 1920s and early 1930s Albert and Charles Boni continued to publish English translations of the seven volumes of Remembrance of Things Past. Other notable works included Colette’s Claudine at School (1931) and Max Eastman’s translation of Leon Trotsky’s The History of the Russian Revolution (1931). Charles Boni tried to establish a paperback book club in the late 1920s, but the venture failed and he left the firm in 1930.

   

During the 1930s Albert Boni concentrated on publishing nonfiction and reprints. Telephone directory listings indicate that the business had five or six employees including Albert Boni and his wife Nell. In 1939, Boni began experimenting with microform printing techniques and established the Readex Microprint Corporation. He continued to experiment with reduction techniques and microfilming through the early 1940s, suspending operations in 1942. In 1945, when Amelia Ferry’s executors sold this house, Boni relocated to Chester, Vermont, where he resumed working on the technical difficulties involved in the microform process. By 1950 he was ready to begin publishing and began assembling orders from libraries and universities. Within fifteen years, Readex had more than 500,000 titles on film. Microform revolutionized historic scholarship and information processing. The company remained in the ownership of the Boni family for some time and is now a division of the NEWSBANK Corporation.

   

Subsequent History

   

In 1945 Amelia Ferry’s estate sold 26 West 56 Street to Della V. Lederer who acquired it on behalf of her husband Ludwig G. Lederer for his firm Lederer de Paris, manufacturer and importer of handbags and accessories. Two months after purchasing the building Della Lederer transferred ownership to the 26 West 56 Street Corporation, controlled by Ludwig Lederer. The Lederer firm remained in this building for a little over two years, sharing space in early 1947 with the Rumanian Legation, which took over the entire building in June.

 

In July 1950, the 26 West 56 Street Corporation leased the entire building to the Gold Key Club, which began interior renovations in the building. Purportedly a membership club, the Gold Key Club was actually an after-hours bottle club. The club operated until it was raided for violations of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law in February 1956. Sixty patrons in evening dress and seventeen club employees, including club president John R. Durante, who lived in an apartment in the building, were apprehended at the site. Vincent Mauro, an ex-convict with underworld connections, “said to have been a behind-the-scenes figure in the club’s operation,” was also arrested. Durante and Mauro pled guilty in 1957 and received suspended sentences.

 

Seven months after the police raid, the 26 West 56 Street Corporation sold this building to Abbate Associates, an interior decoration and industrial design firm headed by John Abbate.Abbate used a portion of the building as a residence and design studios and leased space to tenants including an advertising agency and portrait painter.

 

In May 1959, the building was purchased by Martinall Industries, Inc., a textile processor, “engaged largely in dyeing, finishing and printing textile fabrics,” which was part of the vast textile manufacturing empire of Lester Martin, who had died in April 1959. Martinall Industries began leasing space in the building to the fashion designer Arnold Scaasi for his design studio, showrooms, and residence. Scaasi, still in his twenties, had won the Coty award in 1958 and was considered one of America’s leading designers. He began showing his influential collections at 26 West 56 Street in June 1959 in lavishly redecorated rooms, styled by the fashionable interior designer Valerian Rybar. There, he made a practice of presenting his fashions at night, having the press and buyers dress up in formal attire, and providing his guests with champagne, sipped to the strains of violin music.

 

In February 1964, Martinall Industries conveyed the building to the Martin Foundation, a charitable trust established by Lester Martin in 1946 to aid educational and social services, which had inherited half of his estate. Soon after, alterations began to convert the building to offices for the foundation. In October 1965 the foundation dedicated its new building to Eleanor Roosevelt.Besides housing the foundation’s offices, 26 West 56 Street also contained the offices of the Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Foundation and Eleanor Roosevelt Cancer Fund, the renowned Dessoff Choirs, then under the direction of Maestro Paul Boepple, and the offices of Sidney Glazier, the Hollywood actor-producer, who had just completed an award winning documentary on the life of Eleanor Roosevelt. By 1968, the newly formed American Film Institute also had its New York City offices in the building. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Bennington College Council of Greater New York also had its offices in the building, where it hosted such events as “Three Evenings of and About Literature.” The Federal Bar Association of New York and New Jersey was also briefly quartered here in the early 1970s. In 1972, the Martin Foundation conveyed the building to the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities, an educational association representing virtually all New York’s regionally accredited nonprofit colleges and universities.” The Commission in turn leased office space to the Vassar College Capital Campaign and the Colgate University Campaign. The Commission retained ownership of the building until 1980 when it was sold to the Sepulveda Realty Corporation, a Netherlands Antilles Corporation. In 1981, it passed to British Crown Imports, Inc.

 

In 1988 the building was acquired by the Alarcon Holdings, Inc., which leases the building to the Spanish Broadcasting System (SBS), “the largest publicly traded Hispanic-controlled media and entertainment company in the United States,” founded by Pablo Raúl Alarcón (1926-2008). It is currently home to WSKQ-FM, La Mega/Mega Clásicos and WPAT-FM.

 

In an area today characterized by tall office buildings, this five-story townhouse forms part of a unique small-scale streetscape that was once typical of the neighborhood and is now rare in Midtown.

 

Description

 

Located near the center of block on the south side of West 56 Street, the E. Hayward and Amelia Parsons Ferry House is five stories tall and occupies almost all of its 20-feet-wide, 100-feetdeep lot, save for an L-shaped rear yard. The present Beaux Arts style façade dates from a 1907-08 alteration when the front stoop was removed, the lower three stories were extended forward to the lot line, the fifth story façade was taken down and rebuilt as a sloping (quasi-mansard) roof with dormers, and the lower stories were faced with limestone (now painted) and the roof covered with standing seam copper. Because the upper stories of neighboring brownstone at No. 24 remain unaltered and therefore set back from the Ferry house, a small portion of the Ferry house’s brick eastern sidewall is also visible.

 

West 56 Street Façade The façade is divided into a one-story base, two-story mid-section, and two-story set back attic. Base Above a high granite plinth, the base is clad with rusticated limestone and is divided into three bays with the wide main entry at the center of the façade. The center entry is approached by wide stone step, which in place of conventional railings has original decorative curved wrought-iron scrolled handgrips at either side of the entry. The recessed doorway is topped by concave tympanum enriched with an elegantly carved wreath and swags looped over a central lion’s head. The narrower side bays are set off by splayed lintels and keystones. The western bay contains a paneled stone bulkhead and a window installed after 1940, replacing an original service entrance. The eastern bay remains a service entrance. The center entry retains its original paired wrought-iron-and-glass doors; however, a non-historic hand bar has been installed on the western door. Non-historic metal address numbers “26” are affixed to the lintel above the entrance and the stone piers at either side of the entry. Beneath the numbers on the piers, are non-historic metal plaques with the logo of SBS, the Spanish Broadcasting System, on the eastern pier and a sign reading “Mega 97.9 FM, AMOR 93.1,WSKQ-FM/WPAT FM” on the western pier. Above the numbers there are non-historic metal torcheres installed c. 2008. These replace similarly designed torcheres that were installed sometime after 1940. A non-historic metal fire sprinkler sign and a non-historic round metal cap have been installed on the base of the eastern plinth flanking the entrance. The eastern bay retains its original wrought-iron-and-glass door which has been slightly modified by the installation of a non-historic lock and door knob. A non-historic security camera is attached to the eastern corner of the façade just above the doorway. In the western bay, the window is protected by a wrought-iron-grille. A non-historic sprinkler head and a non-historic security alarm box have been installed on the bulkhead. A non-historic sprinkler sign is affixed to the window sill. There is a non-historic metal water tap with a wire leading to a non-historic metal capped outlet near the base of the western pier. A non-historic fire alarm with a metal conduit leading to the base of the building is located near the western end of the facade. The base is capped by a stone cyma molding and frieze ornamented with Vitruvian scroll motif and paterae.

 

The smooth limestone middle section is laid with stones laid in alternating wide and narrow bands. The façade is framed by colossal pilasters and features a central two-story tripartite window set off by a molded surround enriched with a waterleaf-and-dart molding. The center window at the second story contains a historic fixed twenty-four light wood window. The narrower openings in the eastern and western bays retain their historic paired six-light wood casements. A stone (now painted) balcony supported by brackets extends along the base of the third story windows. The center opening retains its historic wood six-light French doors surmounted by a six-light transom. The side openings also retain their historic wood windows. These have hoppers topped by four-light paired casements crowned by four-light transoms. This section of the façade is crowned by a full entablature featuring a fillet articulated with a water leaf-and-dart molding, a plain frieze and a denticulated and modillioned cornice which supports two non-historic metal lights.

 

The fourth and fifth floors are set back to the line of the original rowhouse. The fourth story façade is rusticated and has two flat arched windows with splayed lintels and keystones. The windows are partially screened from view by a stone and terra-cotta balustrade that rests on the third story cornice. The windows retain their original molded wood casings but have non-historic sash probably replacing paired six-light casements topped by six light transoms. The eastern window has a non-historic iron security gates. A molded cornice enriched with a bead and reel motif caps the fourth story.

   

The party walls framing the mansard roof are faced with limestone. The mansard is covered with standing-seam copper sheathing and has copper covered dormers with segmental arched window openings capped by molded segmental cornices. The windows originally contained paired four-light wood casements with arched upper lights. These have been replaced with non-historic single-pane windows. Eastern Side Wall The small section of the eastern side wall visible above the second story is faced with painted brick with the side profile of the stone main façade visible at the north end of the wall and stone coping capping the sidewalls of the sloping roof.

 

- From the 2007 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

Power in Numbers show at Nucleus Gallery - June 17th to June 24th.

 

Proceeds benefit the Red Cross.

 

All artwork 4 x 6 inches @ 100$

Artists include:

Aaron Jasinski, Adam Greeley, Alayna Magnan, Albert Chow, Alex Fuentes, Amanda Visell, Amy Kim Ganter, Andrea Offermann, Andrew Bell, Andy Kehoe, Adam Greeley, Anna Chambers , Anna Waltz, Annie Owens, Albert Chow, Attaboy, Ben Horton, Brendan Monroe, Brian Morris, Brianne Drouhard, Cameron Tiede, Christian Lorenz Scheurer, Christin Ciaccio Briggs, Chet Zar, Chu-Hui Song, Clio Chiang, Crystal Yin, Daisuke Tsutsumi, Daniel Lim, Dan Santat, Darren Quach , Debbie Huey, Edwin, Ushiro , Emma Goo, Eric Radomski, Fiel Valdez, Francesco LoCastro, Freeman Wang , Greg Storey, Blinky, Heather Chavez, Irineo Maramb Sanchez, Jacob MaGraw, Jaime Zollars, Jake Parker, Jason Han, Jasinski, Jay Baker, Jenny Gase-Baker, Jessi Dore Lawson, Jim Hsieh (Fists of Curry), Johnny Rodriguez, John Pham, Jon Han, Jon Sukarangsan, Jophen Stein, Josie Trinidad, Julie Nishioka, Julie West, Justin Ridge, Julio Stanley Flores, Karyn Raz, Kazu Kibuishi, Kelly Tunstall, Kendra Boggs , Kerry Horvath, Lee White, Lesley Reppeteaux, Lola Gil, Maria Go, Mari Araki, Michael Brown, Michel Gagne, Miss Mindy , Nathalie Roland, Nathan Spore, Nicolas Marlet,, Patrick Morgan , Paul Briggs, Peter Vattanatham , Rad Sechrist, Richard Pose, Robh Ruppel, Rob Schwager, Robert Kondo, Ronald Llanos, Ryan Delahoz, Saelee Oh, Skye Hwang, Sunni Han, Suzanne Husky, Tragnark, Wilson Swain, Yuri Hasegawa

 

Location

30 West Main Street

Alhambra, CA 91801

 

www.gallerynucleus.com/

  

The cover (pre cut & pinch creased) for Will Steacy's collection of essays, "The Photographs Not Taken", where he asked photographers around the country and abroad to write about a moment in their lives that evaded the camera. 29 of these essays are featured in this first printed edition of the project.

Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

   

Remodeled in 1907-08 by the noted architect Harry Allan Jacobs for investment banker Isaac Seligman and long occupied by banker E. Hayward Ferry and his wife Amelia Parsons Ferry, this highly intact former townhouse is an exceptionally fine example of the restrained Neo-French Classic variant of the Beaux Arts style and forms part of “Bankers Row,” a group of five residences built for bankers on West 56 Street, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. Originally constructed in 1871 by the well-known New York architects D. & J. Jardine, this house was occupied from 1880 to 1907 by the family of George Spencer Hart, a leading wholesaler of dairy products and president of three streetcar lines, who also served as the director of several banks. In 1907-08, Jacobs extended the house at the front and rear and relocated the entrance to the ground story in response to the then current fashion for American basement plans. Reflecting a growing mode for individuated rowhouses, he created a new limestone façade and copper roof.

   

His façade design is distinguished by its use of unadorned planar wall surfaces, nuanced arrangement of solids and voids, carefully balanced proportions, and crisp refined detailing. The building’s rusticated base focuses on a large central entry with an elegantly carved lion’s head and garlands surmounting a pair of original iron-and-glass doors. The smooth limestone mid-section of the façade is framed by two colossal pilasters set off by narrow bands of waterleaf-anddart molding. The tripartite windows at the center of the façade retain their historic paired wood casements and transoms and are accented by a stone balcony at the third story. A heavy cornice and balustrade caps the third story, balancing the strong verticals created by the piers. Because of Jacobs’ concern with reducing the apparent height of this tall, narrow building and differentiating the bedroom stories, the fourth and fifth stories set back to the original building line and are articulated as a two-story attic crowned by a mansard roof with dormers. At the same time the mansard roofs enhances the French character of the design. Jacobs, who trained at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, won critical acclaim in the early decades of the twentieth century for his restrained and elegant residences, of which this house is an outstanding example.

       

E. Hayward Ferry was a prominent businessman, who served as first vice president of Hanover Bank from 1910 to 1929. He and his wife occupied this house from 1908 to 1935. In 1935, it became the headquarters of the distinguished publishing firm of Albert & Charles Boni. It was here that Albert Boni founded the Readex Corporation and began his first experiments with microform technology. After the Boni firm left the building in 1945, it served various uses. From May 1959 to early 1964, it was the salon, workshop, and home of the noted fashion designer Arnold Scaasi. In 1965, it became the headquarters of the Martin Foundation, a charitable trust established by textile magnate Lester Martin, and was dedicated to Eleanor Roosevelt. In addition to the offices of the Martin Foundation, the building housed the Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Foundation and Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Cancer Fund as well as other non-profit cultural organizations such as the newly established American Film Institute (c.1967-72). In 1972 the building was conveyed to the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities. It subsequently served as the offices of an importing firm and in 1988 became the New York City headquarters and studios of the Spanish Broadcasting System. In an area today characterized by tall office buildings, this five-story townhouse forms part of a unique small-scale streetscape that was once typical of the neighborhood and is now rare in Midtown.

   

DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS

   

Midtown and the Development of Vanderbilt Row

   

Far removed from the center of population at the tip of the Manhattan, the area surrounding Fifth Avenue between 42 Street and the southern end of Central Park remained rural in character well into the first half of the nineteenth century. Most of the territory was originally owned by the City of New York, which had been granted “all the waste, vacant, unpatented, and unappropriated lands” under the Dongan Charter of 1686. The city maintained possession of these common lands— which once totaled over one-seventh of the acreage on Manhattan—for over a century, only occasionally selling off small parcels to raise funds for the municipality. The city’s policy changed after the American War of Independence. In 1785 the Common Council commissioned surveyor Casimir Theodore Goerck to map out five-acre lots to be sold at auction. A new street called Middle Road, now known as Fifth Avenue, was laid out to provide access to the parcels. A second survey of additional lots was undertaken by Goerck in 1796 and two new roads, now Park and Sixth Avenues were created. Under the city’s plan, half of the lots were to be sold outright while the other half were made available under long-term leases of 21 years. Many of the parcels were acquired by wealthy New Yorkers as speculative investments in anticipation of future growth in the area. John Mason, one-time president of the Chemical National Bank, for example, acquired most of the lots on the east side of Middle Road in the East 50s in 1825. A number of public and charitable institutions also purchased or were granted large plots along the avenue; the Colored Orphan Asylum was located between 43 and 44 Streets, the Deaf and Dumb Asylum on 50 Street just east of Fifth Avenue, the Roman Catholic Orphan Asylum between 51 and 52 Streets, and St. Luke’s Hospital between 54 and 55 Streets. The rough character of the neighborhood—other tenants at this time included Waltemeir’s cattle yard at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 54 Street—persisted into the 1860s, when development pressures finally began to transform the area into a fashionable residential district.

   

The northward movement of population and commerce along Manhattan Island picked up momentum during the building boom that followed the Civil War. Four-story brick- and brownstone-faced row houses were constructed on many of the side streets in the area, while larger mansions were erected along Fifth Avenue itself. Pioneers in this development were the sisters Mary Mason Jones and Rebecca Colford Jones, heirs of early Fifth Avenue speculator John Mason and both widows of established Knickerbocker families. In 1867, Mary Mason Jones commissioned a block-long row of houses, later known as the “Marble Row,” on the east side of the avenue between 57 and 58 Streets. Two years later in 1869, her sister hired architect Detlef Lienau to design her own set of lavish residences one block to the south. Having established the area as an acceptable neighborhood for the city’s elite, other wealthy New Yorkers soon followed the Jones sisters northward up Fifth Avenue. The gentrification of the area was furthered by a number of important civic and institutional building projects initiated in the mid nineteenth century. Most notable was the planning and construction of Central Park in the late 1850s and 1860s; the preeminence of Fifth Avenue as the fashionable approach to the park was later solidified in 1870 when the city created a monumental new entrance at Grand Army Plaza. A number of ecclesiastical organizations also opened impressive new buildings on the avenue at this time; St. Thomas Episcopal Church at 53Street in 1870 (replaced by the present church by in 1906-13), the Collegiate Reformed Protestant Dutch Church at 48 Street in 1872 (demolished), the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church at 55Street in 1875, and the Roman Catholic St. Patrick’s Cathedral between 50 and 51 Streets in 1879 (James Renwick, Jr., a designated New York City Landmark).

   

The status of the area as the city’s most prestigious residential neighborhood was firmly cemented in 1879 when the Vanderbilt family began a monumental house-building campaign on Fifth Avenue. William Henry Vanderbilt—the family patriarch since the death of his father Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt in 1877—built his own palatial residence on the western block front between 51 and 52 Streets, while his two eldest sons each erected mansions just to the north. The scope of the work was so impressive and the influence of the family on the neighborhood so great that the ten blocks of Fifth Avenue south of Central Park came to be known as “Vanderbilt Row, “one of the most prestigious districts in late-nineteenth-century New York.

   

West 56 Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues and the Early History of 26 West 56 Street

   

Three blocks south of Central Park, West 56 Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues followed the trend of other blocks in the area as it became a fashionable location for many of the city’s most affluent citizens. By 1879 the entire blockfront on the north side of the street and all but four of the lots on the south side of the street had been developed with single family houses. Among the early occupants were Robert Bonner, editor of the New York Ledger, at No. 8; Union Bank president, Robert Schell, at No. 33; Rev. Thomas E. Vermilye, pastor of the Collegiate Reformed Church, at No. 15; and Rev. John Hall, pastor of the nearby Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, at No. 3. The block was also home to a number of prominent German-Jewish merchants including Adolph Lewisohn at No. 53; David L. Einstein, president of the Raritan Woolen Mill, at No. 55; Emanuel Lauer, a clothing manufacture and later an investment banker, at No. 53; and then crockery merchant, later department store founder, Nathan Straus, at No. 47. This house was one of a group of five brownstones extending from 22 to 30 West 56 Street erected by builder-developer, later architect, George W. DaCunha to the designs of architects David and John Jardine in 1871-72. In April 1872, while the houses were under construction, DaCunha conveyed the buildings to Jacob Tallman, a builder and real estate speculator whose construction business was located on West 53Street between Sixth and Seventh Avenues and who was involved with a number of development projects in the West Fifties. For several years the houses at 22, 24, and 28 West 56 Street were occupied by members of Tallman’s family. This house and 30 West 56 Street were leased to tenants. In 1877 Jacob Tallman sold his five West 56 Street houses. This house was acquired by Henry E. Sprague, a wholesale produce merchant with a business on Pearl Street. Henry Sprague and his wife Harriet resided in this house until 1880 when they sold it to Anna Dudley Hart, wife of dairy merchant George S. Hart.

   

George Spencer Hart was born in Cornwall, Connecticut, in 1837. In 1862, he moved to New York City and established George C. Hart & Co., wholesale dealers in butter and cheese. Headquartered on Pearl Street in Lower Manhattan, the firm grew to include branches on Warren Street in Manhattan, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and Liverpool, England. In 1871, Hart married Anna Dudley, daughter of Charles H. Dudley and Anna Eliza [Fairchild Dudley] Grant. Mrs. Grant’s second husband Henry (Harry) L. Grant was a broker and financer of city railway [streetcar] stocks and bonds and under his aegis, Hart acquired “an important interest in the Central Crosstown Railroad Company” in 1874 and served as the company’s president from 1885-97. He eventually gained control of two other streetcar lines, the Second Avenue Railway Company and the Christopher and Tenth Street Railroad Company, which he managed until all three of the railroads under his direction were consolidated with the Metropolitan Traction Company. Hart also served on the boards of several banks.

   

The Harts and the Grants resided together in this house until about 1890. Anna Hart died in 1893. Her sister and mother, who were the executors of her estate, subsequently conveyed this house to George S. Hart. In 1894 Hart married Frances Wheeler, daughter of George M. Wheeler of Scarsdale. In 1905 the Harts began a series of extensive trips and by 1907 they had decided to sell this house.

   

On July 22, 1907 the Harts sold 26 West 56 Street to real estate speculator Wesley Thorn.

   

The following day Thorn conveyed the house, subject to a mortgage he had obtained from the Title Guarantee & Trust Bank for $55,000, to investment banker Henry Seligman, who had recently built a mansion for himself at 30 West 56 Street (C.P.H. Gilbert, 1899-1901, a designated New York City Landmark). Thus, Thorn made a handsome profit and Seligman protected his interests by gaining control over a potential development site only two doors away from his house. Less than two weeks after he acquired this house, Seligman had architect Harry Allan Jacobs file plans with the Department of Buildings for extensive alterations including four-story front and rear extensions, upgrades to the plumbing, new bathrooms, new stairs, floors, and partitions, and a new limestone front. Construction began in mid-August 1907 and was completed in June 1908. In November 1908 Seligman sold the house to banker E. Hayward Ferry (1864-1940), subject to a restrictive covenant that stipulated that as long as Henry Seligman owned 30 West 56 Street, 26 West 56Street was to be “used and occupied as a private residence [by] one family only.” In choosing to make his home on West 56 Street, Ferry contributed to the long-standing association of this block with bankers and brokers which led to its being known as “Bankers’ Row.” In addition to Seligman, Ferry’s neighbors included Seligman’s banker brother-in-law Edward Wasserman at No. 33 (C.P.H. Gilbert, 1901-02, demolished), Arthur Lehman of Lehman Brothers at No. 31 (John Duncan, 1903-04, demolished?), banker-broker Harry B. Hollins at No. 12-14 (McKim, Mead & White, 1899-1901, a designated New York City Landmark), and Frederick C. Edey at No. 10 (Warren & Wetmore, 1901-03, a designated New York City Landmark).

   

E. Hayward and Amelia Parsons Ferry

   

Ebenezer Hayward Ferry (1864-1940), born in Peterborough, New Hampshire, was the son of the Rev. Charles Brace Ferry, a Unitarian minister, and Ellen Hayward Ferry, a descendant of the Haywards who settled in Massachusetts in the 1640s. E. Hayward Ferry graduated from Harvard in 1886. Soon after graduation, he began his banking career with the National Bank of Redemption in Boston. The following year he took a job with the Bay State Trust Company of Boston. He remained with Bay State until 1900, in later years serving as the company’s secretary. In 1900, he became a vice-president of the Shawmut bank and was instrumental in developing the bank’s credit department. Shawmut merged with the National Exchange Bank early in 1907 and during this period of reorganization E. Ferry Hayward accepted a position as vice president of the Hanover National Bank in New York City. He became first vice-president of Hanover in 1910 and served in that position until 1929 when Hanover merged with the Central Union Trust Company. Although he relinquished his vice-presidency, Ferry remained on the board of the newly formed Central Hanover Bank and Trust Company. Ferry also served on the boards of a number of major corporations including Bankers Trust, the Phelps Dodge Corporation, the Northern Pacific Railway, the Home Life Insurance Company, and the Old Dominion Company. He was involved in a number of philanthropic organizations. In the 1890s and early 1900s he served as secretary of the Ramabai Association, which supported the work of Pundita Ramabai, aimed at improving the lives of women in India and eliminating the practice of Sati (aka suttee). Later he was involved in fund raising for hospitals and was a member of the executive committee of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary.

   

Amelia Parsons Ferry (1863-1945), daughter of Sydenham C. and Harriet E. (Morton) Parsons was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, where her father was a merchant and a founder of the New England branch of the YMCA. Amelia Parsons graduated Smith College and married E. Hayward Ferry in 1889. They had one daughter, Harriet, born in 1891.

   

In 1890, Amelia Ferry’s sister Harriet (Hetty) Eddy Parsons married Arthur Curtiss James, the only child of the Ellen Curtiss and Daniel Willis James (1832-1907), one of the richest men in the United States, who controlled Phelps, Dodge & Company, as well as other mining and railroad interests in the west. The Ferrys and the Jameses had extremely close business and personal relationships. E. Hayward Ferry sat on the boards of the many mining and transportation companies in which Arthur C. James had inherited a controlling interest and James was on the board of Hanover Bank. According to newspaper accounts Amelia Ferry and Hetty James were active in the same charities, attended the same parties, and vacationed together with their husbands. This tradition solidified after 1911 when Arthur James purchased “Edgehill Farm,” the property adjoining his estate, “Beacon Hill,” in Newport and the Ferrys began spending their summers at “Edgehill” while continuing to reside at 26 West 56 Street during the winter months. In 1930, when the census was taken, the Ferrys were occupying No. 26 with three women servants: Alice Smith, Elizabeth McTieh, and Louise Condliff. By 1930 many of the single family townhouses on this block of West 56 Street had become boarding houses or had been subdivided into apartments and ground floor commercial space. Henry and Adelaide Seligman continued to reside at No. 30 in grand style with eleven live-in servants, but both were in their seventies and died within a few months of one another in 1933. This freed E. Hayward Ferry with regard to 26 West 56 Street and in 1935 he arranged to lease the house to Albert Boni as offices for the Albert and Charles Boni’s publishing firm. E. Hayward Ferry died in 1940; Hetty and Arthur James passed away in 1941; Harriet Ferry died in July 1945.

   

Harry Allan Jacobs

   

Harry Allan Jacobs (1872-1932) was born and educated in New York City, and began his architectural training at the Columbia School of Mines. After graduating in 1894 he continued his studies in Paris at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and was awarded the Prix de Rome by the American Academy in Rome. Following his return to this country, he joined the Society of Beaux-Arts Architects and began his own architectural practice in New York in 1900. His earliest known commission, dating from 1900, is a brick-and-limestone store-and-loft building at 133 Mercer Street within the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District. Early on he established a reputation as a designer of hotels with the Seville Hotel at Madison Avenue and East 29 Street (1901-02) and the Hotel Marseilles, 2689-2693 Broadway at West 103 Street (1902-05, a designated New York City Landmark), both exuberant Beaux Arts buildings clad in brick, with limestone, wrought iron, and terra-cotta trim.

   

Jacobs’ practice also focused on the design of elegant residences. An important early example is the Charles Guggenheimer residence at 129 East 73 Street (1907) in the Upper East Side Historic District. This neo-Italian Renaissance style townhouse, faced in limestone, served as a model for many of his later commissions. Other commissions earned Jacobs wide recognition, including a new façade design in the neo-Italian Renaissance style for the house of philanthropist R. Fulton Cutting at 22 East 67 Street (1908), the Regency-inspired James J. Van Alen House, now the Kosciuszko Foundation, at 15 East 65 Street (1917), and a residence for theater producer Martin Beck at 13 East 67 Street (1921), all in the Upper East Side Historic District. His country houses included “Meadow Farm,” the estate of financer, later governor, Herbert Lehman in Purchase, New York, and “Mountain View Farms,” the estate of movie producer Adolph Zukor in Nyack, New York. Jacobs also designed two major institutional residences ?the Hebrew Sheltering Guardian Society Administration Building and Cottages in Pleasantville, New York (1908-12) and the neo-Italian Renaissance style Andrew Freedman Home at 1125 Grand Concourse in the Bronx (1924-25, a designated New York City Landmark), the latter in collaboration with architect Joseph

   

H. Freedlander, a specialist in institutional design. Jacobs returned to hotel design in 1927 with the neo-Renaissance style Hotel Elysee located at 54-60 East 54 Street.

   

Jacobs was a member of the Mayor Walker’s Committee on Plans and Survey, a predecessor to the New York City Planning Commission. He was a fellow of the American Institute of Architects and the American Academy in Rome and served as the president of Academy’s Alumni Association. He was very active in the Society of Beaux Arts Architects and the Architectural League of New York. He wrote extensively on real estate, planning, and architectural issues for newspapers and magazines. He also was the author of a number of one-act plays, including one written in collaboration with George S. Kaufman.

   

The Design of the E. Hayward and Amelia Parson Ferry House

   

In 1903 architectural critic Herbert Croly observed that high-stoop brownstone dwellings had become “extremely unfashionable, both in design and plan” and described a new movement “gradually gathering momentum toward the substitution of reconstructed American basement dwellings for old brownstone fronts.”

   

In some cases the reconstruction has gone no further than the destruction of the stoop, the placing of the entrance on the ground floor, and the rearrangement of the interior, but for the most part people demand that the old houses shall be utterly destroyed or subjected to such a drastic process of purging that every trace of brownstone is removed. And the process of reconstruction is covering ground with utmost rapidity.

   

The American basement plan was first introduced around 1880 and gained widespread popularity during the 1890s and first few years of the 1900s. In traditional rowhouses, visitors to the house would enter on the parlor level using a tall flight of stairs, the stoop, from the Dutch for “step,” set to one side of the façade. The main reception hall shared the first floor with the parlor, beyond which was another parlor, usually used for formal dining. The family dining room was located in the front of the basement with the kitchen at the rear. In the 1880s it became fashionable to have the dining room and parlor on the same floor, with a small butler’s pantry equipped with a dumbwaiter connecting to the basement kitchen. Once the ground floor dining room had been eliminated, the main entrance could be lowered to street level and the front basement space could be given over to a generous foyer leading to a grand staircase. Moving the main stair to the center of the house made it possible to have a larger, better lit parlor, extending across the entire building frontage. The parlor was treated en suite with the stair hall, which functioned as a secondary reception hall, and the rear dining room.

   

The introduction of this new rowhouse type, known as the American basement plan, coincided with an increasing desire for individualized designs. Reacting against “the monotony of the once fashionable … brown-stone front, in blocks of a dozen or more houses exactly alike,”architects and developers entered into “a persistent and deliberate striving after individuality” using a variety of different styles, designs, and materials to create distinctive façades that would be readily marketable as private, upper-class residences. This trend was reflected not only in the treatment of reconstructed rowhouses but also in new rows erected by speculative builders “three or four at a time, each house [having] the distinction of an individual design.” The result, in the view of most designers and critics was entirely positive. Summing up recent architectural trends in 1903, Columbia University architecture professor A.D. F. Hamlin observed “our residence streets have begun to be interesting, our houses to possess individuality of style and design; and the gain to the city is great.”

   

For his design for the Ferry house Harry Allan Jacobs chose to work in the Neo-French Classic variant of the Beaux Arts style just coming into vogue in the early 1900s. Inspired by the French Classical Baroque, principally the works of Jules Hardouin Mansard, and the French Neo-Classical designs of Louis XVI period, this variant was characterized by its emphasis on planar wall surfaces and simple classical details. Among the notable early examples were Hunt & Hunt’s twin houses at 645-647 Fifth Avenue (1905, demolished) and Warren & Wetmore’s James A. Burden House at 7 East 91 Street (1902-05, which is both an individually designated New York City Landmark and within the Carnegie Hill Historic District). With the Ferry House design, Jacobs moved even beyond those works in the abstraction and simplification of his design, exhibiting an interest in unadorned planar wall surface, nuanced arrangements of solids and voids, carefully balanced proportions, and crisp, refined detailing that characterizes his work from this period.

   

The most overtly historic element of the Ferry House design is the treatment of the main entry with its concave segmental-arched surround framing a simple trabeated doorway surmounted by a carved lion’s head draped with a wreath and swags. It seems almost certain that this treatment was modeled after the doorway of the eighteenth-century house at 25 Rue Charlemagne in Paris, which had been illustrated in the Architectural Record in 1906. At the Ferry House the stylized, almost vulpine, lion’s head, wreath, and naturalistic garlands are handled with unusual fluidity and grace, suggestive of the Art Nouveau. The wreath motif is echoed in the design of the handsome paired wrought-iron-and-glass doors at the main entry. The entry is flanked by unusual Rococo-inspired curved wrought-iron scrolls that were perhaps intended to serve as hand grips for the front stoop. Less elaborate wrought ironwork is employed for the service entry to the east of main entry and the window gate in the west bay. The base is also enhanced by banded rustication and is capped by a stone cyma molding and frieze enriched with a Vitruvian scroll motif and paterae in low relief.

   

In the mid-section of the façade, the windows are grouped together in a tripartite arrangement at the center of the façade. This compositional device, which Jacobs also employed at the contemporaneous Guggenheimer house allowed him to leave “a large plain border of stone” around the windows. Here, through simple projections and moldings Jacobs articulated the framing stonework as giant pilasters, profiling the flat moldings framing the window bays with narrow bands of waterleaf-and-dart molding, which are echoed by the narrow moldings capping his abstracted pilasters. Jacobs balanced the strong verticals created by the giant pilasters and window surrounds with the heavy cornice and balustrade crowning the third story and the balcony beneath the third story windows. In the upper portion of his façade, Jacobs reduced the number of window openings, both to introduce variety in his design and to differentiate these bedroom stories from the public reception rooms on the second and third floors. Concerned with reducing the apparent height of this tall narrow building, Jacobs retained the original setback building line at the fourth story simply refacing the façade wall with the same rusticated limestone banding as the ground story base to create a strong horizontal emphasis. As was common with many of the renovations during this period, the original fifth story façade was taken down and rebuilt as a sloping pseudo-mansard faced with standing seam copper and lit by a pair of segmental arched dormers. This articulation of the fifth story as a mansard also serves to reduce the height of the building and enhances the French character of the design.

   

In addition to the Guggenheimer house, Jacobs produced a number of townhouse designs and one design for a brownstone converted to commercial use, the Hardman Peck piano company at 433 Fifth Avenue (1910, storefront altered), that can be related to the Ferry House because they share similar compositions [partis] ? the Guggenheimer house; the John W. Herbert, later Mrs. Frederick Lewisohn House, 835 Fifth Avenue (1910, demolished); the Andrew Miller Residence (demolished)? or similar “signature” decorative details ? the balcony at the Guggenheimer House; the cornices and balustrades at the R. Fulton Cutting house and Hardman Peck Store. All these buildings, as noted by a critic writing in the New York Architect in 1911, were characterized by a “purity of style and detail,” the “same feeling of restraint and good taste;” however, the Ferry House stands out as the simplest and least historicizing of Jacobs’ designs from this period, pointing the way for his works of the late 1910s and 1920s, such as the houses at 6, 8, and 10 East 68 Street he designed for Otto Kahn in 1919, where with the exception of sills and shallow ornament in the tympana of the three central windows, there was no ornament on the façades (all three within the Upper East Side Historic District; Nos. 6 and 8 significantly altered).

   

Albert & Charles Boni, Inc.

   

Albert Boni (1892-1981) and Charles Boni (1895-1969), the sons of insurance executive Charles Boni and Bertha Saslavlasky Boni, were raised in New Jersey. Albert attended Cornell and Harvard and Charles enrolled at Harvard, but both withdrew from college with the intention of going into publishing. To gain experience in the field, they opened the Washington Square bookshop in Greenwich Village in 1913, which soon became a gathering place for Villagers with literary and leftist leanings. The shop’s back room was converted into an impromptu theater for the Washington Square Players (Max Eastman, John Reed, Mary Heaton Vorse, etc.), an amateur group that developed into the Theater Guild. In 1914, the brothers launched their first publishing venture, The Glebe, a poetry magazine, which featured the work of still relatively unknown Imagist poets, Ezra Pound, Amy Lowell, H.D. [Hilda Doolittle], Ford Madox Ford, William Carlos Williams, as well as James Joyce. In 1915, the Bonis sold the shop to devote their full time to publishing. At the suggestion of Albert Boni, they began producing the Little Leather Library, miniature editions of classic books, which were mass-marketed through dime store sales and mail order and sold over a million volumes in their first year of operation. In 1917, Horace Liveright joined the firm, which incorporated as Boni & Liveright, and began publishing reprint editions of worthy recent works under the imprint of the Modern Library. Within six months, the partners quarreled and Liveright bought out the Bonis, although their name remained associated with the firm until 1928.

   

In 1923 Albert and Charles Boni again established a publishing house, Albert and Charles Boni, Inc. Among the important books published by their firm during the 1920s were Ford Madox Ford’s No More Parades (1925), Gertrude Stein’s The Making of Americans (1926), Upton Sinclair’s Oil! (1927), and Thornton Wilder’s The Bridge of San Luis Rey. In 1926 the brothers acquired the publishing house of their uncle Thomas Seltzer and with it the American rights to the novels of Marcel Proust. Throughout the late 1920s and early 1930s Albert and Charles Boni continued to publish English translations of the seven volumes of Remembrance of Things Past. Other notable works included Colette’s Claudine at School (1931) and Max Eastman’s translation of Leon Trotsky’s The History of the Russian Revolution (1931). Charles Boni tried to establish a paperback book club in the late 1920s, but the venture failed and he left the firm in 1930.

   

During the 1930s Albert Boni concentrated on publishing nonfiction and reprints. Telephone directory listings indicate that the business had five or six employees including Albert Boni and his wife Nell. In 1939, Boni began experimenting with microform printing techniques and established the Readex Microprint Corporation. He continued to experiment with reduction techniques and microfilming through the early 1940s, suspending operations in 1942. In 1945, when Amelia Ferry’s executors sold this house, Boni relocated to Chester, Vermont, where he resumed working on the technical difficulties involved in the microform process. By 1950 he was ready to begin publishing and began assembling orders from libraries and universities. Within fifteen years, Readex had more than 500,000 titles on film. Microform revolutionized historic scholarship and information processing. The company remained in the ownership of the Boni family for some time and is now a division of the NEWSBANK Corporation.

   

Subsequent History

   

In 1945 Amelia Ferry’s estate sold 26 West 56 Street to Della V. Lederer who acquired it on behalf of her husband Ludwig G. Lederer for his firm Lederer de Paris, manufacturer and importer of handbags and accessories. Two months after purchasing the building Della Lederer transferred ownership to the 26 West 56 Street Corporation, controlled by Ludwig Lederer. The Lederer firm remained in this building for a little over two years, sharing space in early 1947 with the Rumanian Legation, which took over the entire building in June.

 

In July 1950, the 26 West 56 Street Corporation leased the entire building to the Gold Key Club, which began interior renovations in the building. Purportedly a membership club, the Gold Key Club was actually an after-hours bottle club. The club operated until it was raided for violations of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law in February 1956. Sixty patrons in evening dress and seventeen club employees, including club president John R. Durante, who lived in an apartment in the building, were apprehended at the site. Vincent Mauro, an ex-convict with underworld connections, “said to have been a behind-the-scenes figure in the club’s operation,” was also arrested. Durante and Mauro pled guilty in 1957 and received suspended sentences.

 

Seven months after the police raid, the 26 West 56 Street Corporation sold this building to Abbate Associates, an interior decoration and industrial design firm headed by John Abbate.Abbate used a portion of the building as a residence and design studios and leased space to tenants including an advertising agency and portrait painter.

 

In May 1959, the building was purchased by Martinall Industries, Inc., a textile processor, “engaged largely in dyeing, finishing and printing textile fabrics,” which was part of the vast textile manufacturing empire of Lester Martin, who had died in April 1959. Martinall Industries began leasing space in the building to the fashion designer Arnold Scaasi for his design studio, showrooms, and residence. Scaasi, still in his twenties, had won the Coty award in 1958 and was considered one of America’s leading designers. He began showing his influential collections at 26 West 56 Street in June 1959 in lavishly redecorated rooms, styled by the fashionable interior designer Valerian Rybar. There, he made a practice of presenting his fashions at night, having the press and buyers dress up in formal attire, and providing his guests with champagne, sipped to the strains of violin music.

 

In February 1964, Martinall Industries conveyed the building to the Martin Foundation, a charitable trust established by Lester Martin in 1946 to aid educational and social services, which had inherited half of his estate. Soon after, alterations began to convert the building to offices for the foundation. In October 1965 the foundation dedicated its new building to Eleanor Roosevelt.Besides housing the foundation’s offices, 26 West 56 Street also contained the offices of the Eleanor Roosevelt Memorial Foundation and Eleanor Roosevelt Cancer Fund, the renowned Dessoff Choirs, then under the direction of Maestro Paul Boepple, and the offices of Sidney Glazier, the Hollywood actor-producer, who had just completed an award winning documentary on the life of Eleanor Roosevelt. By 1968, the newly formed American Film Institute also had its New York City offices in the building. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Bennington College Council of Greater New York also had its offices in the building, where it hosted such events as “Three Evenings of and About Literature.” The Federal Bar Association of New York and New Jersey was also briefly quartered here in the early 1970s. In 1972, the Martin Foundation conveyed the building to the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities, an educational association representing virtually all New York’s regionally accredited nonprofit colleges and universities.” The Commission in turn leased office space to the Vassar College Capital Campaign and the Colgate University Campaign. The Commission retained ownership of the building until 1980 when it was sold to the Sepulveda Realty Corporation, a Netherlands Antilles Corporation. In 1981, it passed to British Crown Imports, Inc.

 

In 1988 the building was acquired by the Alarcon Holdings, Inc., which leases the building to the Spanish Broadcasting System (SBS), “the largest publicly traded Hispanic-controlled media and entertainment company in the United States,” founded by Pablo Raúl Alarcón (1926-2008). It is currently home to WSKQ-FM, La Mega/Mega Clásicos and WPAT-FM.

 

In an area today characterized by tall office buildings, this five-story townhouse forms part of a unique small-scale streetscape that was once typical of the neighborhood and is now rare in Midtown.

 

Description

 

Located near the center of block on the south side of West 56 Street, the E. Hayward and Amelia Parsons Ferry House is five stories tall and occupies almost all of its 20-feet-wide, 100-feetdeep lot, save for an L-shaped rear yard. The present Beaux Arts style façade dates from a 1907-08 alteration when the front stoop was removed, the lower three stories were extended forward to the lot line, the fifth story façade was taken down and rebuilt as a sloping (quasi-mansard) roof with dormers, and the lower stories were faced with limestone (now painted) and the roof covered with standing seam copper. Because the upper stories of neighboring brownstone at No. 24 remain unaltered and therefore set back from the Ferry house, a small portion of the Ferry house’s brick eastern sidewall is also visible.

 

West 56 Street Façade The façade is divided into a one-story base, two-story mid-section, and two-story set back attic. Base Above a high granite plinth, the base is clad with rusticated limestone and is divided into three bays with the wide main entry at the center of the façade. The center entry is approached by wide stone step, which in place of conventional railings has original decorative curved wrought-iron scrolled handgrips at either side of the entry. The recessed doorway is topped by concave tympanum enriched with an elegantly carved wreath and swags looped over a central lion’s head. The narrower side bays are set off by splayed lintels and keystones. The western bay contains a paneled stone bulkhead and a window installed after 1940, replacing an original service entrance. The eastern bay remains a service entrance. The center entry retains its original paired wrought-iron-and-glass doors; however, a non-historic hand bar has been installed on the western door. Non-historic metal address numbers “26” are affixed to the lintel above the entrance and the stone piers at either side of the entry. Beneath the numbers on the piers, are non-historic metal plaques with the logo of SBS, the Spanish Broadcasting System, on the eastern pier and a sign reading “Mega 97.9 FM, AMOR 93.1,WSKQ-FM/WPAT FM” on the western pier. Above the numbers there are non-historic metal torcheres installed c. 2008. These replace similarly designed torcheres that were installed sometime after 1940. A non-historic metal fire sprinkler sign and a non-historic round metal cap have been installed on the base of the eastern plinth flanking the entrance. The eastern bay retains its original wrought-iron-and-glass door which has been slightly modified by the installation of a non-historic lock and door knob. A non-historic security camera is attached to the eastern corner of the façade just above the doorway. In the western bay, the window is protected by a wrought-iron-grille. A non-historic sprinkler head and a non-historic security alarm box have been installed on the bulkhead. A non-historic sprinkler sign is affixed to the window sill. There is a non-historic metal water tap with a wire leading to a non-historic metal capped outlet near the base of the western pier. A non-historic fire alarm with a metal conduit leading to the base of the building is located near the western end of the facade. The base is capped by a stone cyma molding and frieze ornamented with Vitruvian scroll motif and paterae.

 

The smooth limestone middle section is laid with stones laid in alternating wide and narrow bands. The façade is framed by colossal pilasters and features a central two-story tripartite window set off by a molded surround enriched with a waterleaf-and-dart molding. The center window at the second story contains a historic fixed twenty-four light wood window. The narrower openings in the eastern and western bays retain their historic paired six-light wood casements. A stone (now painted) balcony supported by brackets extends along the base of the third story windows. The center opening retains its historic wood six-light French doors surmounted by a six-light transom. The side openings also retain their historic wood windows. These have hoppers topped by four-light paired casements crowned by four-light transoms. This section of the façade is crowned by a full entablature featuring a fillet articulated with a water leaf-and-dart molding, a plain frieze and a denticulated and modillioned cornice which supports two non-historic metal lights.

 

The fourth and fifth floors are set back to the line of the original rowhouse. The fourth story façade is rusticated and has two flat arched windows with splayed lintels and keystones. The windows are partially screened from view by a stone and terra-cotta balustrade that rests on the third story cornice. The windows retain their original molded wood casings but have non-historic sash probably replacing paired six-light casements topped by six light transoms. The eastern window has a non-historic iron security gates. A molded cornice enriched with a bead and reel motif caps the fourth story.

   

The party walls framing the mansard roof are faced with limestone. The mansard is covered with standing-seam copper sheathing and has copper covered dormers with segmental arched window openings capped by molded segmental cornices. The windows originally contained paired four-light wood casements with arched upper lights. These have been replaced with non-historic single-pane windows. Eastern Side Wall The small section of the eastern side wall visible above the second story is faced with painted brick with the side profile of the stone main façade visible at the north end of the wall and stone coping capping the sidewalls of the sloping roof.

 

- From the 2007 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

Author: ISM: A Community Project

8.5″ x 10.5″ (21.59 x 26.67 cm)

Full Color on White paper

110 pages

Publisher: ISM: A Community Project

ISBN-13: 978-0615659442

ISBN-10: 0615659446

 

A rare retrospective print collectible documenting the ISM polaroid project and touring exhibition including short stories, personal essays, and love letters celebrating instant film. The book also features polaroids from over 200 professional and amateur photographers from around the world.

 

Contributors: Aaron Bird, Aaron Feaver, Aaron Kraten, Adam Alvilar, Aimee Ellsworth, Akirophoto, Algis Kemezys, Alicia Heasley, Alzoubi Malak, Amelia Sellers, Amy Bach, Amy Floretta, Anastacia Grenda, Andrew French, Andrew Pandes, Angi Brzycki, April Lovett, Artur Adeszko, Ashlie Chavez, Astrid Lim, Ava Alamshah, Becky Holt, Becky Lewis, Bernadette Matthews, Bianca Placencia, Bradley Johnson, Bray Panfilo, Briana Tirado, C. R. Stecyk, Carmen Luceno, Caro, Casey Daurio, Cathy Cooper, Catlin Moore, Charity Capili, Charles Adler, Charlie Davidson, Cherie Ditcham, Chinako Miyamoto, Chloe Aftel, Chloe Caves, Christina Lancaster, Christopher Velasco, Cindy Ong, Colin Carri, Corrie Greathouse, Crissy Fetcher, Daniel Mehrer, Dániel Perlaky, Dave Bias, David Waldman, Dean Chou, Dena Mooney, Diane Bush, Diane Grajeda, Dusdin Condren, Ed Bopp, Eli Sebastian Brumbaugh, Elliot Kotek, Elsy Benitez, Emily Malan, Erin Orozco, Evelyn Henn, Faith Oftadeh, Fernanda Montoro, Francesca Tallone, Franck Doussot, Gerrit Roessler, Giuliana Petoia, Grant Hamilton, Grant Worth, Hannah Ross, Heather Cardone, Hilary Walter, Holly Larson, Hugh Hunter, Ixchel Lara, Jacqueline Fernandez, Jai Tanju, Jamie Livingston (Hugh Crawford), Janet Kim, Janine Kozlowski, Jay Lopez, Jennie Warren, Jennifer Pacia, Jennifer Pappas, Jenny Ung, Jenny Vorwaller, Jesse La Tour, Jesse Wright, Jessica Reinhardt, Jill Taylor, Joey Forehan, John Walsh, Joseph O’Neal, Joseph O’Neal, Josh Farnham, Joshua Honrado, Julie Kim, Kasia Gumpert, Kassia Meador, Katarina Sopcic, Katarzyna Borelowska, Kate Hinojosa, Kathy Van Torne, Kayleigh Lane, Kevin Dean, Kevin Kay, Kevin Rios, Kevin Staniec, Kim Vang, Kristen Barker, Kristen Simental, Krystal Glasman, Landon Lewis, Laurel Kate Sittig, Lauren Beacham, Lauren Klein, Lawrence Garrett, Lea Salazar, Leila Peterson, Leslie Cao, Lila Lee, Lilian Cooper, Lina Park, Lisa Przybylski, Liz Acosta, Lon Koontz, Luca Burattini, Luke Leyden, Mamie Young, Maria Stein, Marianne Williams, Marielle Bas, Mark Tricoli, Marlene Kelnreiter, Marshall Kappel, Matt Koelsch, Matt Maust, Matt Wignall, Max Crist, Melanie Moore, Michael Fuller, Michael Harris, Michael Salter, Michael Scully, Michele Iversen, Michelle Constantine, Mike Murciano, Mike Silva, Monica Crawford, Nicole Kenney & KS Rives, Nicole Possley, Nikki Nares, Nuvia Crisol Guerra, Olivia Tonin, Patrice Jackson, Paul Giambarba, Paula Peng, Philippe Reichert, Rachel Hillberg, Randy Shropshire, Richard Saguirre, Robbie Bruzus, Robert Worobec, Robin Halperin, Ruby Bratcher, Ruffy Landayan, Ryan Booth, Ryan Hammill, Sabrina Calle, Sam Davis, Sarah Day, Sarah Roesslar, Sarah Small, Sasha Lee, Shana Nys Dambrot, Shannon Leith, Shannon Sims-Lewis, Shelley Corcoran, Shon Kim, Sierra Ezell, Stefani Greenwood, Stephanie Ellis, Stephanie Thomas, Stephanie Watanabe, Susanne Melanie Berry, Suzanne Danziger, Suzanne Walsh, Tatiana El-Khouri, Tatiana Simonian, Tiffany Ellis, Tom Valencia, Toni Raquel, Tracey Taylor, Tristan Parrish, Virginia Dan, Wendy Peng, Wheat Würtzburger, Zoe Anastacia.

N. Main Street ~~~ Last winter, Kris Strand, President of Bekkum Library's Friends group, received an email from the local newspaper about the Tandem Poetry Tour coming to Wisconsin. (Kris has a LFL in her front yard, so the editor thought of her) Maya Stein and Amy Tingle of Food for the Soul Train were cooperating with Little Free Library Inc. to bring poetry and books to small rural communities along their bike route in the summer of 2014. Kris forwarded the email to me at the library, and I immediately checked out Amy and Maya's website and blog. I was so intrigued with the idea of travelling poets that I joined their kickstarter campaign. I contacted them through email and told them, "Westby wants you here!!" Amy and Maya graciously scheduled Westby on their route, and sent us a LFL to be assembled early in June. Volunteer David Anderson assembled and painted the LFL--his wife Susan says he used LOTS of paint---and then he delivere d it to a local artisan, Karen Hankee, who rosemaled the sides. I went to the City Council and asked if we could install the LFL in front of City Hall, and councilman Dan Helgerson advocated strongly for the placement! City manager Gregg Hanson installed the post soon after that meeting. Librarian Jess Reed, with help from the story hour kids, screwed the LFL to the post, & the preschoolers made bookmarks to put inside. The next day, we welcomed the Tandem Poetry Tour to town at our weekly Burgers-in-the-Park. Maya and Amy typed poetry for kids and adults, then we biked over to City Hall. The City Council and the Mayor were there to dedicate our new LFL, and Kris Strand presented the poets with a gift box of locally made treats. People are already using the LFL! The City Clerk loves to look out her office window and see people checking it out. Thank you so much for this opportunity to serve our community in another way! Cindy Brown, Director, Bekkum Memorial Libr ary.

Video artists Miguel Arzabe of San Francisco (pictured) and Benjamin Gardner of Iowa and painter Amy Sacksteder of Michigan headlined the Above and Below Gallery Talk and Opening Reception Jan. 19 at the Robert and Elaine Stein Galleries.

Hi,

I'm sorry I haven't updated all of you. Saturday turned out to be one of the most difficult days of our lives.

 

I can't remember what I've written - so I apologize if some of this is redundant. And to Tooktook (Evie Mali's Aunt who is an English teacher) I apologize for the grammar.

 

As you know on Friday night a small hole was found in Evie Mali's intestine. A wonderful doctor came to operate on her. At 2:14am the doctor called Rahpee's hospital room. Things seemed appeared to be going well.

 

Saturday morning around 7am the phone rang again in the hospital room, we were told that her blood pressure was very low. Dr Stein was called back to reevaluate her. They believed that her stomach was bleeding internally.

 

I believe that's where my last email ended - waiting for the doctor's evaluation.

 

Anyway, Rahpee spent that morning with Evie Mali, talking to her by her bedside. Shortly there after I went down and spent time with her as well. Her blood pressure was still low but she still looked strong. Her nurse Lorilee spent the day with nearly no rest counteracting her body's reaction to the surgery.

 

Rahpee and I returned to her room with her family standing by. I don't recall what time it was perhaps sometime after noon, but both doctors came up. Her main doctor explained to us about bleeding in the brain, of course I already knew pretty much what the four levels meant. Level 1 was minimum bleeding - level 4 represented severe bleeding - which of course means the brain has been damaged extensively.

 

He went through the whole process of explaining where the damage was - and that the x-rays from earlier that night showed level 3 bleeding. They were currently waiting for new x-rays. They had held off on the operation on her stomach. My mind is a little scrambled so I can't recall what happened exactly next. What I do know is that my in my heart I was going to keep pushing the doctors to continue on. Level 3 bleeding would make her life very challenging, but I wanted to see our baby girl grow up.

 

The doctors returned shortly there after - again explaining the bleeding in the brain. This time she was level 4.

 

I glanced at Rahpee and I knew at that very instant we would tell them to continue on and expect a miracle to make things ok. Not so much for her, but for us.

 

With the split second it took me to think that thought - he followed up that she was bleeding in the lower back of her brain. I'm not religious but I believe in God. At the point I know I was being given a sign to stop. We were being selfish.

 

All I can remember from that point is that I asked the doctor if her little brain was broken and he nodded. And Dr Stein who had worked on her stomach asked me if I wanted him to continue with the operation to help her stomach. And I repeated "her little brain is broken?", and he nodded and I looked at Rahpee and then had to say "no". Rahpee cried out "no!" to the answer we both knew I had to give.

 

Rahpee asked the doctor while crying "will she grow?" and the doctor responded with yes, but she won't be able to breath and the quality of her life would be very poor. The rest pretty much is a blur.

 

This is so hard to write. I can hardly see between the tears. However, I know that there were a lot of people praying for our little girl Evie Mali. And I needed to send this out to so you would know in what way you made a difference in this world and for me to acknowledge I know Evie Mali will make a difference as well.

 

So I'm going to finish this email, and I'm going to tell you what I know and what I believe to know and hopefully she will make a difference in your life everyday.

 

After much crying, I spoke to the doctor and asked him to hold on to her for another day (until Sunday) mainly because I wouldn't be able to get Rahpee discharged until then.

 

Saturday night we lie in her hospital bed cried and talked. As I think all people do in difficult times - I needed to know "why". Why, if all these great doctors and nurses that were placed before us did things not turn out how we so much wanted.

 

What I found in my heart is this... She was here to visit us - to let us know who we would be as parents - Rahpee and I had great fears of becoming mother and father. Evie Mali also taught us about life - I've so long worried about dying that sometimes I forgot about living.

 

In the 6 healthy days we had with her we shared with her moments we'll never forget.

 

I saw her eyes open when her mama spoke to her. And only that one time did I ever see her eyes open and when they did they saw only her mother. Of course I was not denied a special moment as well. I saw her make a mean little face when I spoke - I'm sure she recognized her daddy's voice - the one that used to wake her up in the middle of the night so she would kick me in the ear while in her mama's tummy.

 

We saw her stretch her legs, touch her ear when she slept, and hold her hands to her chest to calm herself like her daddy does. We saw her wiggle and lift her back up moving around until she was able to lay in the position she preferred, countering the nurses best intentions. We had all these wonderful moments, and she wasn't a weak sick little baby, she was just a stubborn little girl who knew exactly what she wanted and recognized her mommy and daddy.

 

On Sunday afternoon after the family had time time to say goodbye to her. Lorilee - Evie Mali's nurse - helped us spend that last precious moments with our daughter.

 

Lorilee also helped find a Father to baptize her on short notice. It didn't matter to me of what religion he was - I only knew that I wanted to give our little girl some kind of gift. Just one more way to show how much we love her. Regardless of my beliefs I needed to give all the gifts I could while we had her. Lorilee helped make that happen even after Rahpee's family were unable to find someone to do it. Just as before a person was put in her path or perhaps our path.

 

She stayed stable in her mother's arms. We took turns holding her and told her how much we loved her and would miss her. Rahpee sang songs to her, that I had heard so many times throughout the house during her pregnancy.

 

Rahpee gave Evie Mali a bath and dressed her so that she looked like a little angel. The nurses cried a little with us. And we said goodbye and kissed her on her sleeping head. I don't know how long we spent with her perhaps an hour. It was both the greatest and worst hour of our lives.

 

We left our baby angel with another angel - Lorilee. I know some people might prefer to have there loved ones die in their arms, but for us Lorilee became an angel, and besides our family and ourselves - I can think of no other person who could send our daughter on her way, than a woman who felt our pain and did her best to help our daughter and comfort us.

 

Lorilee who had worked so hard on Saturday to stabilize Evie Mali - would be the same angel who held Evie Mali in her arms until our baby girl went home. We didn't see her go to sleep, but I know that Lorilee held her ever so gently in her arms and gave her all our love.

 

We are so honored for the people who were placed in our path and took care of our little girl and gave us the strength we didn't know we could have.

 

R.N. Candace whose smile warmed us and watched over Evie Mali.

 

R.N. Tamrin who watched over Evie Mali

 

R.N. Joanne who watched over her when we couldn't.

 

R.N. Margarita who watched over her and called attention to Evie Mali's tummy. And no doubt felt our pain.

 

Dr. Pozin who quickly called in Dr. Stein for Evie Mali's tummy.

 

Dr. Stein who did his best to make Evie Mali's stomach all better.

 

Dr Vogt who did his best to help her little heart.

 

Dr. Gangitano who would have done all he could to help her if he could.

 

All the Doctors and nurses who from delivery room on Saturday April 12th 7:10 am until Sunday April 20th 7:15pm did their best to make Evie Mali's life the best possible.

 

R.N Olivia who was tough on rahpee but cared deeply.

 

R.N Alex who is an amazing nurse with two bull dogs.

 

R.N. Rachel, Amy, Linda, and Lope who watched over Rahpee during the first week.

 

R.N. and Angel Lorilee, who helped us in more ways than words can express.

 

All the people who prayed for Evie Mali across the country we thank you so very much.

 

I have a belief - be it right or wrong, that prayers do not change our paths. I dare not devalue your prayers but what I believe or at least in this case I would hold to be true:

 

Your prayers were not unanswered, your prayers were never really meant for Evie Mali, but her loving parents, family, and friends. In that way all of your prayers were answered, and there should be no doubt in your hearts that while we all wanted Evie Mali's path to be a bit different, I know now that she had a much larger distance to cover than we could ever imagine.

 

Not only was she meant to change our lives, but she was meant to change your life too.

 

People at the hospital asked again and again how did she get her name. And so for all your prayers for her dear family - here is Evie Mali's gift for you.

 

Her name "Evie" was thought of by her mother. When I looked up "Evie" it turned out to mean "Life" in Hebrew.

 

Her name "Mali", was a derivative of her mother's name. (Rahpee's first name is actually Malinee). When I looked up "Mali" it turned up to mean "Flower" in Thai.

 

We decided her first name would be Evie Mali (Life Flower).

 

Last night after we came home from saying goodbye to our daughter, the roses in front of our house were in bloom. I didn't know how to write this email until I went back out this morning and saw how many perfect roses were in bloom.

 

I love her name and the thought of it being forgotten was breaking my heart, but now I know that by sending this message out - I'm send out a gift from Evie Mali herself.

 

From this day on I know there will not be a day when somewhere in the world there is not a flower in bloom, and when I see a flower I won't be able to not think about my daughter and how very special life is.

 

Her short life meant a lot to us and I realize it meant a lot to so many other people I've never met.

 

Her gift to you is her name. When you see a flower in bloom think of how special life is, how beautiful it is. And maybe just remember the beautiful little girl Evie Mali, who reminded us what's important.

 

Thank you all again for your thoughts and prayers they helped change our lives.

-Jeremy & Rahpee

 

Enjoy the pictures, I think they speak for themselves.

Please link this button to:

handmadenationmovie.com

 

Press Release is HERE

 

Participating artists include:

Alena Hennessy, Amy Rice, Catherine Ryan, Catia Chen, Chris Crites, Daria Tessler, David Stein, Diem Chau, Emily Eibel, Erika Somogyi, Jen Corace, Jill Bliss, Kate Bingaman-Burt, Katy Horan, Keith Shore, Kelly Lynn Jones, Kim Weiss, Kime Buzzelli, Leah Chun, Lisa Congdon, Lisa Solomon, Merrilee Challis, The Polaroid Kidd (aka Mike Brodie), Monica Canilao, Nikki McClure, Pete Yahnke, Pippi Zornoza, Renee Garner, Sarah Anderson, Sarah Neuburger, Stephanie Syjuco, The Little Friends of Printmaking, Tom Vadakan, Tracy Bull, Veronica De Jesus, Will Bryant and Xander Marro.

Contributors' list and foreword pages for Will Steacy's collection of essays, "The Photographs Not Taken". The content took center stage with just a hint of red and clean, simple borders.

.

  

New issue of the photo zine Tell mum everything is ok published by Éditions FP&CF.

 

Check the website !

 

www.editionsfpcf.com

  

.

July 7th from 8PM to 12:30AM / suggested donation $7

 

729 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 between 7th and 8th street

secure $5-10 parking at American Parking- first lot on the left past 7th street

www.thehivegallery.com

myspace.com/thehivegalleryandstudios

OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE

 

THE HIVE GALLERY GROUP SHOW AND PERFORMANCES!!

July 7th 8PM to 12:30AM / suggested donation $7

729 S. Spring St. LA, CA 90014

Show Runs: July 7th-July 31st

 

www.thehivegallery.com

myspace.com/thehivegalleryandstudios

 

Featured Artist 1: Kristian Olson

Featured Artist 2: Justin McInteer

Tall Wall Artist: Codak

Small Wall Artist: Mike Bilz

Installation Artist: Justin Odaffer

 

July Artists:

 

Naomi Nowak / Evelyn Hahn / Tracy Molstovoy / Phillip Holmes / Toyin Oluwa /

Heidi Calvert / Gustavo Ponce /Martin Hsu /Cherubini /Ben Kwok /Kristyn Dors

/ Michelle Perone / Vicki Berndt / Dave Kawano / Alli Good / Mila Sterling

/ Carmen Luceno / Robert Maline / Michelle Mia Araujo /Tristan Schane / Amy

Shawley / Randy Horton / Birgitte Moos / Dennis Larkins / Holly Wood / Sean

Stepanoff / Lauren Gardiner / Miss Mindy / Cris Nolasco / Mear One / Laura

Diamond / Yuki Miyazaki / Neil Poyuzina / Gentry / Cherubini / Craig

Cartwright / Marilyn Montufar / / Paul Dragomir / Keri Jewell / Emi

Motokawa / Chris Peters / Veronica Agostini / Zoetica Ebb / Dan Bigelow / Snow Mack

/ Kevin Mack / Carl Lozada / CJ Metzger / Alex Gonzales / Mary

Spring / James Malone / Peter Romberg / Carla Tome / Antrese Wood / Nathan

Frizzel / Treiops Treyfid / Joe Dunavan / Adah Glenn /

Molly McGuire / Henry F. Cram / Darren le Gallo / Macsorro / Asylm / Melanie

Waldman / Courtney Oquist / Catherine Brooks / Dion Macellari / Melissa

Contreras / Matt Burlingame / Josh Talbott / Vicki Berndt / vague / Jeremy

Szuder / Nic Ultra / Brendan Sharkey / Serg / Kenji Tanaka / Jason Hadley /

Renee Lawter / Jose Lopes / Gabe Leonard / Ken Garduno / Nate Seubert / Kio

Griffith / Carol Powell / Wilson Hsu / Jophen Stein / Patrick Haemmerlein /

Marisa Silos / Airom Bleicher / Michele Waterman / Erin Lucia / Lindsay

Riley / Shannon of ShangriLa / L.Croskey / Jenna Colby / Justin McInteer /

Orion / Keith Wong / Aglaia Mortcheva / Tom Haubs /Erick Rodriguez / Alex

Schaefer / Sergio Vasquez / Melissa Moss / Travis Morley / LD Grant / ZOSO

/ Walt Hall / Max Grundy / Hembert Guardado / Ele Cold / Terri Woodward

 

Performances by:

 

Artichoke : (Indie / Pop / Acoustic) myspace.com/artichoketheband

DJ Estereo : (turntables: latin, brazil, afro, house, and soul) myspace.com/supersonidobarato

EA/Schpilkas : (turntables Urban Alternative) www.schpilkas.com

Evader : (turntables: downtempo) myspace.com/evadethis

MOAN RED: (Soulful Modern Rock 'n' Roll/Pop) myspace.com/ moanred

N8 : (rubberbands and surgical gloves) myspace.com/n8sound

Right Hand Band : (Blues / Rock / Jam Band) myspace.com/righthandband

RoMak & the Space Pirates : ( Punk / Pop / Electro) myspace.com/romakandthespacepirates

Parrisharris presents The KIngdom OF OM : (fashion /performance) www.justin.tv

& More TBA!

 

Resident Artists:

 

Travis Morley / Sensei / Chris Donham / Nathan Cartwright / 13:11 /

Greg Gould / Marcella Lineiro / Rebecca Paul /Annie Terrazzo / Sonik / Ichae

Ackso / Jimmy Bleyer / Vladimir Sierra / Justin Odaffer / Randy Kono /

Justin Ryan Polisky

  

Identifier: mortarboard1619barn

Title: Mortarboard

Year: 1909 (1900s)

Authors: Barnard College

Subjects: college yearbooks women's colleges Barnard College student activities

Publisher: Barnard College

Contributing Library: Barnard College

Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

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(Officers UNA BERNARDLOIS WEST A WAYFRANCES BURGER PresidentSecretaryTreasurer ii\ cm hersOSraimntc Amy Hill, 1905 Gertrude Stein, 1908 Marguerite Newland, 1908 Una BernardEleanor (rayTheodora Hall Frances Burger Louise AllenAgnes BurkeKatherine Gay Lena Cohen 1909 Ella OppenheimBlanche SamekPriscilla Stanton 1910 I )oris LongAlma Wiesner Hill Louise GreenawaltMadeline HirshAugusta LustgartenPenelope Girdner 1912 Emma RapelyeEdith Valet Lucy ThompsonLois Westaway Jessie Nottingham Marie MaschmedtMarie RivkinI )orothy Salwen Marion Rice 54 Sarttarh (Cltaptrr nf thr (Unllryintr iE^ual£>irffraiw ICrayur of Nrut $ ink i>tatr

 

Text Appearing After Image:

ANNA M. GORDON, 1001) MARIE L. FLINT, 1910 (Officers President ANTOINETTE L. CARROLL, 1909 Secretary-Treasurt 1ice-President Jttem Ihts faculty Charles A. Beard, Ph D. John L. Gerig, Ph.D. Maude A. Iluttman, A.M. -Mary K. .Simkhovitch, A.B. .lames T. Shotwell, Ph.D. Antoinette CarrollAnna Cordon Elinor HastingsEthel Ivimey Prances Burger Elizabeth Dunnet Doris Long Louise Allen I .ena CohenCalm Hoke iuoa Pauline JohnsonUna Logan 1310 Lilian EglestonMargaret Renton 1911 Mary.Rivken IU 12 Kaiig Tung PihOlga Rilke Anna Ver PlankLois West away Marie Flint Harriet Fox- Dorothy Reilly I loiothv Sal wen Rebecca FisholAlma Webster Powell

  

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"Echo 2009" - Verleihung des grössten europäischen Musikpreises am 21. 02. 2009 in der O2 World-Arena in Berlin.

 

© 2009 by SpreePiX Media Deutschland-

 

IMG_0785

Ride

Juliet Rowe

Showing: 4-21 September 2013

GALLERY 1

 

Juliet Rowe graduated from the Victorian College of the Arts in 2011 after completing her Bachelor of Fine Arts (honours) in Drawing. Her work blurs the lines of art, craft and design as she exploits a vast range of materials and techniques often in unorthodox ways. She has participated in shows at West Space, Seventh, Trocadero and Platform Contemporary and was apart of the 2011 Penthouse Mouse for Loreal Melbourne Fashion Week. (Growing up her family did not have a car and she does not yet know how to drive)

 

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

 

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Monotony

Agnes So, Amy May Stuart, Masato Takasaka.

Curated by Alison Lasek.

 

Showing: 4-21 September 2013

GALLERY 2

 

The title 'Monotony' is not to be taken too literally. The work of each of these three artists captures lyricism in the everyday and poetry of looking again. In the words of Gertrude Stein, “there is no such thing as repetition, only insistence”.

 

Agnes So tests the functionality of everyday objects in a series of choreographed performances. Recurrence grants multiple views and places the artist body into a position where it begins to replicate the role of the object itself.

 

Permanently on a treasure hunt, Amy May Stuart finds fascination in often overlooked aspects of lived experience. Collected images of handwritten ‘Cash Only’ signs draw attention to both their similarities and their differences.

 

Masato Takasaka revisits and reconfigures his own earlier artworks and returns to what’s in storage as an antidote to continual production. A bootleg recording of an exhibition of a bootleg recording of an exhibition opens this practice up, and reframes his work yet again, while simultaneously allowing things to break down just a little.

 

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Within a Room

Kate Price

 

Showing: 4-21 September 2013

GALLERY 3

 

Price presents the viewer with a space of reflection. A pine framework lining the floor of the space is enmeshed with painted figurative and abstracted forms. This new flooring could be seen to appear as a point of construction that harbours remnants or residues of the people and activities that had once resided there. This project aims to highlight how a space is embedded with a history and how within this is a description of the symbiotic relationship that exists between the space itself and the people that lived, worked or passed through it.

 

Kate Price lives and works in Melbourne. In 2010 she successfully completed her Bachelor of Arts (Fine Art) degree at the RMIT and returned in 2012 to complete her Bachelor of Art (Fine Art) Honours. She has lived and worked in Utrecht, Holland both in 2010 and 2011 and has exhibited in both solo and group exhibitions in Melbourne and Utrecht, Holland.

 

This project is supported by an Australian Artists’ Grant. The Australian Artists’ Grant is a NAVA initiative, made possible through the generous sponsorship of Mrs Janet Holmes à Court and the support of the Visual Arts Board, Australia Council for the Arts.

 

Amy Stein

Domesticated

Blue Sky Gallery

July 2 - August 2, 2009

Portland, OR

www.blueskygallery.org/

www.amysteinphoto.com

Seated are Brittney Stein of New Iberia, Mallory Pontiff of Carencro, Ashley Bonin of Morse, and Danielle Thibodeaux of Carencro. Standing on the back row are Dominic Sonnier of Eunice, Amy Giang of New Iberia, Coty Dillehay of Eunice, Amy Sylvester of Washington, Benjamin Soileau of Mamou, Jeigh Touchet of Arnaudville, Ramie Doiron of New Iberia, Alex Roach of Welsh, Jada Fabacher of Eunice, Kiley Bertrand of St. Martinville, Michele Boudreau of Lafayette, Holly Nezat of Port Barre, Jonathan Vaccaro of Mansura, Noel Briggs of Opleousas, and Alexis LaRocca of Lafayette. Not pictured is Brittany Roberie of Eunice.

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To download this photo, please click the three dots (•••) below and then click download/all sizes.

 

Ride

Juliet Rowe

Showing: 4-21 September 2013

GALLERY 1

 

Juliet Rowe graduated from the Victorian College of the Arts in 2011 after completing her Bachelor of Fine Arts (honours) in Drawing. Her work blurs the lines of art, craft and design as she exploits a vast range of materials and techniques often in unorthodox ways. She has participated in shows at West Space, Seventh, Trocadero and Platform Contemporary and was apart of the 2011 Penthouse Mouse for Loreal Melbourne Fashion Week. (Growing up her family did not have a car and she does not yet know how to drive)

 

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

 

-----

 

Monotony

Agnes So, Amy May Stuart, Masato Takasaka.

Curated by Alison Lasek.

 

Showing: 4-21 September 2013

GALLERY 2

 

The title 'Monotony' is not to be taken too literally. The work of each of these three artists captures lyricism in the everyday and poetry of looking again. In the words of Gertrude Stein, “there is no such thing as repetition, only insistence”.

 

Agnes So tests the functionality of everyday objects in a series of choreographed performances. Recurrence grants multiple views and places the artist body into a position where it begins to replicate the role of the object itself.

 

Permanently on a treasure hunt, Amy May Stuart finds fascination in often overlooked aspects of lived experience. Collected images of handwritten ‘Cash Only’ signs draw attention to both their similarities and their differences.

 

Masato Takasaka revisits and reconfigures his own earlier artworks and returns to what’s in storage as an antidote to continual production. A bootleg recording of an exhibition of a bootleg recording of an exhibition opens this practice up, and reframes his work yet again, while simultaneously allowing things to break down just a little.

 

----

 

Within a Room

Kate Price

 

Showing: 4-21 September 2013

GALLERY 3

 

Price presents the viewer with a space of reflection. A pine framework lining the floor of the space is enmeshed with painted figurative and abstracted forms. This new flooring could be seen to appear as a point of construction that harbours remnants or residues of the people and activities that had once resided there. This project aims to highlight how a space is embedded with a history and how within this is a description of the symbiotic relationship that exists between the space itself and the people that lived, worked or passed through it.

 

Kate Price lives and works in Melbourne. In 2010 she successfully completed her Bachelor of Arts (Fine Art) degree at the RMIT and returned in 2012 to complete her Bachelor of Art (Fine Art) Honours. She has lived and worked in Utrecht, Holland both in 2010 and 2011 and has exhibited in both solo and group exhibitions in Melbourne and Utrecht, Holland.

 

This project is supported by an Australian Artists’ Grant. The Australian Artists’ Grant is a NAVA initiative, made possible through the generous sponsorship of Mrs Janet Holmes à Court and the support of the Visual Arts Board, Australia Council for the Arts.

 

I took this photo to copy the image Amy Stein took of a man walking in a stranded envrionment

I like this piece for its playfulness and its honesty. The innocence and youthfulness of kiddy costumes on Halloween presented in the grimy urban setting of Harlem is fantastically ironic.

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