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View allAll Photos Tagged American+cranberrybush

The bright red fruits often persist on the

plants throughout the winter, good for ornamental

value but suggesting that they may not be especially

palatable for wildlife. Still, they are known to be

eaten by deer, moose, foxes, raccoons, chipmunks,

squirrels, skunks, mice, rabbits, grouse, pheasants,

robins, cedar waxwings, and other songbirds. They

are not normally eaten by birds until after they have

frozen and thawed several times.

plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/cs_viopa2.pdf

 

Textures are mine.

Filters from PhotoPad and Photoshop

Viburnum trilobum (cranberrybush viburnum, American cranberrybush, or high bush cranberry) is a species of Viburnum native to northern North America.

 

This is a commonly used berry in western Canadian cultures. Peoples of various origins both Native and European have used the berries for many years.

 

The Canadian French name for the berries is pembina. The name pembina was then applied to three rivers, one in Manitoba and North Dakota, one in Ontario, and one in Alberta.

 

The Ukrainians call the berry kalyna, which is now the name of an ecomusem in Alberta, Kalyna Country associated with Ukrainian Canadians.

 

In Ukraine, Viburnum opulus (kalyna) is seen as a national symbol, an emblem for both the Koliada festivities and the concept of young girl’s love and tenderness. It is the key element of the Ukrainian traditional wreath.

Title: The Aiken Nurseries Putney, Vermont

Identifier: aikennurseriespu1950aike

Year: 1950 (1950s)

Authors: Aiken Nurseries; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Plants Vermont Catalogs; Trees Vermont Catalogs; Flowers Vermont Catalogs; Nursery stock Vermont Catalogs; Horticulture Vermont Catalogs

Publisher: Putney, Vt. : The Aiken Nurseries

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

Hardy Shrubs In most of these varieties, we have in our nursery many heavier and larger specimens which we can sell within trucking distance. We would be glad to quote you on these larger sizes on request. AZALEAS. Native azaleas will be found listed under Broadleaf Evergreen and Ericaceous plants. JAPANESE BARBERRY. Berberis thunbergi. The most popular low hedging plant in the North. It will withstand 30 degrees below zero. The bright red berries stay on all winter. Autumn foliage is rich crimson. 12 to 18 in. 45c each. $4.25 per 10, $40.00 per 100. BUDDLEIA ALTERNIFOLIA. An uncom- mon hardy Buddleia growing to eight feet with long gracefully arching branches literally cov- ered with fragrant lilac colored flowers in late spring. 18 to 24 in. $1.00 each. BUDDLEIA ILE DE FRANCE. A dark purple fragrant variety of the old Buddleia mag- nifica. 18 to 24 in. plants $.75 each. $7.00 per 10. BUDDLEIA PINK CHARMING. Long panicles of pink (lowers. Grows to four feet or more. 75c each, $7.00 per 10. SIBERIAN PEA TREE, Caragana arborescens. Tall growing shrub with fern-like foliage, which produces yellow pea-shaped dowers in June. Very hardy. 4 to 5 ft. $1.00 each. SWEET PEPPER BUSH, Clethra alnifolia. One of the most useful shrubs grown. Spikes of very fragrant white flowers are borne in August when there are few flowering shrubs. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. FLOWERING QUINCE, Cydonia japonica. Six-foot shrub with large orange-red blossoms in May and quantities of small golden-yellow Quinces in Autumn. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. SCOTCH BROOM, Cytisus scoparius. A small finely cut foliage plant, growing to four feet and bearing yellow pea shaped flowers from mid- summer to fall. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. FEBRUARY DAPHNE, Daphne mezereum. Upright shrub growing to 3 feet in height. Almost before the snow is gone this shrub is covered with wine-colored flowers of indescribable fragrance. In late Summer it bears intensely scarlet fruit. 12 to 15 in. $1.25 each. DAPHNE CNEORUM—See Broadleaf ever- greens. WEEPING GOLDENBELL, Forsythia sus- pense. A weeping species with long, trailing branches, for planting at the top of retaining walls and other locations where weeping type is desired. We have the true type which is often hard to get. 3 to 4 ft. 75c each. WINGED EUONYMUS, Euonymus alatus. Picturesque winged bark gives it a Jaiianese effect. It attains the height of a small tree and has the customary brilliant foliage. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

FEBRUARY DAPHNE EUROPEAN BURNINGBUSH, E. Europaeus. Up to 15 feet in height and of erect habit, but the crowning glory is in the unbelievable profusion of gorgeous orange fruits which appear in October. These are held during the Winter but turn gray in color. The branches are used during the Winter for vases, producing an interesting oriental effect. One of the most valuable and least known of our common shrubs. 3 to 4 ft. $1.00 each. SHOWY FORSYTHIA, F. intermedia specta- bilis. Upright grower to 10 feet with large, deep vellow flowers. The best all round variety. 3 to 4 ft. $1.00 each. WOODWAXEN, Genista tinctoria. Slender branches, dee]) green the year round. Bright yel- low pea shaped flowers in June. 18 to 24 in. plants, 75c each, $7.00 per 10. HILLS OF SNOW HYDRANGEA, H. ar- borescens sterilis. Immense flower clusters, snow- white, in Tuly anil early August. Blossoms are borne on the new wood and it is a common prac- tice to cut this to the ground each Spring to in- crease the size of the flowers. 18 to 24 in. 90c each. PEE GEE HYDRANGEA, H. paniculata gran- diflora. Large panicles of white flowers in August which turn pink later. Bush form. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. BEAUTY BUSH, Kolkzvitaia amabilis. A very graceful 4 to 6-foot bush with arching branches, somewhat resembling Pink Weigela. It flowers profusely but not until it has become well estab- lished. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. AMUR RIVER NORTH PRIVET. Since the recent cold Winters this Privet has gained in favor, having at that time proved its absolute hardiness. 2 to 3 ft. 50c each, $4.00 per 10, $30.00 per 100. IBOLIUM PRIVET. Rich, glossy, green oval leaves and trim, upright growth. A beautiful Privet though the top is not quite as hardy as the other. 2 to 3 ft. 50c each, $3.00 per 10, $25.00 per 100. TARTARIAN HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera ta- tarica. An extremely hardy shrub growing to 10 feet with pink flowers in late Spring. Rapid grower. 18 to 24 in. 75c each. TARTARIAN HONEYSUCKLE RUBRA. A red flowered form of the above. 90c each. SWEET SYRINGA, Philadelphia coronarius. Grows to 12 feet. Creamy-white fragrant blos- soms. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. GOLDEN SYRINGA, P. foliis aureis. Dwarf Syringa with golden foliage. Compact habit. Flowers white and fragrant. 9 to 12 in. $1.00 each. VIRGINAL SYRINGA, P. virginale. Grows to 6 feet with immense double and single white flowers borne on the new growth both Summer and Fall. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. NINEBARK, Physocarpus opulifolius. Tall, rapid growing shrub eventually to 15 feet. Used for backgrounds. Flowers white in small heads. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. GOLDEN NINEBARK, P. opulifolius luteus. Like above except for golden foliage. Same sizes and prices as above. SHRUBBY CINQUEFOIL, Potentilla fruti- cosa. A dwarf shrub seldom over 3 feet. Single, yellow, strawberry-like flowers from July until October. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. PINK FLOWERING ALMOND, Prunus glandulosa sinensis. An old-fashioned, very hardy shrub so common in cemeteries and about aban- doned houses. Color, bright pink. 18 to 24 in. $1.00 each. WHITE FLOWERING ALMOND. Snow white. 18 to 24 in. $1.00 each. ROSE ACACIA, Robinia hispida. A dwarf pink flowered Locust growing only about 3 feet tall. Spreads rapidly and is very useful for covering steep banks and barren spots. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. THUNBERG SPIRAEA. 5. thunbergi. Fine, al- most mistlike white flowers in earliest Spring, and the very fine foliage gives a pleasing effect throughout the year. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. KOREAN SPIRAEA, S. trichocarpa. A new Spiraea somewhat resembling Vanhoutte, but blos- soming three weeks later. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. VANHOUTTE SPIRAEA, S. vanhouttei. The common white Spiraea with arching branches, commonly miscalled Bridalwreath. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. COMMON LILAC, S. vulgaris. Well known to everyone, usually blossoming at Memorial Day in New England. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. COMMON WHITE LILAC, 5. vulgaris alba. Grows taller than the purple form. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. HYBRID LILACS. Beautiful double flowering French Lilacs. 2 to 3 ft. plants, $1.50 each. Belle de Nancy,—a near pink Chas. Joly,—deep crimson Katherine Havemeyer,—near blue Mme. EeMoine,—pure white Pres. Grevy,—double blue COMMON SNOWBERRY, 5. racemosus. Pale pink flowers in Spring, but the snow-white fruit in Autumn and Winter are its most attractive feature. Will often grow under shade trees where other shrubs fail. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. AMERICAN CRANBERRYBUSH, Viburnum americanum. Grows to 10 feet. White flowers in June followed by bright scarlet fruit in Autumn. The fruit in the early days was used extensively for the same purposes as the common cranberry. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. WITHE-ROD, V. cassinoides. This 10-foot na- tive Viburnum has glossy, healthy foliage throughout the Summer. White flower heads in June and black berries in Autumn. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. ARROWWOOD. dentatum. Ten feet. Glossy- toothed foliage. White flowers are followed by intensely blue fruit in September. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. VACCINIUM CORYMBOSUM. The native Blueberry. Much used in landscape work for its gorgeous red and rose colored leaves in Autumn. Hardy in growth and delicious in fruit. B. 4 B. 2 to 3 ft. $1.50 each.

  

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Title: Aiken's trees shrubs wildflowers ferns fruits plants herbs

Identifier: aikenstreesshrub1941aike

Year: 1941 (1940s)

Authors: Aiken Nurseries; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Plants Vermont Catalogs; Ferns Vermont Catalogs; Shrubs Vermont Catalogs; Trees Vermont Catalogs; Wild flowers Vermont Catalogs; Nursery stock Vermont Catalogs; Horticulture Vermont Catalogs

Publisher: Putney, Vt. : The Aiken Nurseries

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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About This Book: Catalog Entry

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Text Appearing Before Image:

VIBURNUM ALNIFOLIUM—HOBBLEBUSH SAMBUCUS AMERICAN ELDER, Sambucus Canadensis. Likes plenty of moisture. Blossoms in July, purple berries in September. 3-4 ft. GOLDEN AMERICAN ELDER, Sambucus Canadensis A urea. Golden leaved form of American Elder. 3-4 ft. SCARLET ELDER, Sambucus Pubens. Large white flower panicles in early Spring followed by brilliant red berries in July. 3-4 ft. All the Elders are most attractive to birds. URAL FALSE SPIRAEA SORBARIA SORBIFOLIA. Grows to six feet with large panicles of white flowers in midsummer. 2-3 ft.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

SPIRAEA ANTHONY WATERER SPIRAEA, Spiraea Bumalda, Anthony Waterer. A low growing species with rather flat pink blossoms throughout the Summer and Autumn. 18-24 in. 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 2-2'/2 ft. 75c each, J6.50 per 10. BRIDALWREATH, Spiraea Prunifolia. The true Bridal- wreath, whose flowers, like tiny white roses, cover the stems before the leaves appear in the Spring. Upright growth. 2-3 ft. THUNBERG SPIRAEA, Spiraea Thunbergi. Fine, al- most mistlike white flowers in earliest Spring, and the very fine foliage gives a pleasing effect throughout the year. 2-3 ft. KOREAN SPIRAEA, Spiraea Trichocarpa. A new Spiraea somewhat resembling Vanhoutte, but blossom- ing three weeks later. 2-3 ft. VANHOUTTE SPIRAEA, Spiraea Vanhouttei. The common white Spiraea with arching branches, commonly miscalled Bridalwreath. 2-3 ft. SYRINGA JAPANESE TREE LILAC, Syringa Japonica. More of a tree than a shrub, as it grows twenty-five feet tall. The large clusters of white flowers are borne in early Summer after all other lilacs have gone by. 3-4 ft. PERSIAN LILAC, Syringa Persica. Ten feet. It blooms profusely. Pale lilac, very fragrant flowers in May. 2-3 ft. LATE LILAC, Syringa Villosa. A large-leaved variety growing ten to twelve feet tall with broad panicles of pink flowers in early June. 2-3 ft. COMMON LILAC, Syringa Vulgaris. Well known to everyone, usually blossoming at Memorial Day in New England. 2-3 ft. COMMON WHITE LILAC, Syringa Vulgaris Alba. Grows taller than the purple form. 2-3 ft. HUNGARIAN LILAC, Syringa Josikaea. An extremely valuable shrub of tall erect growth, glossy deep green foliage and rich purple flowers in big upright panicles in early Summer. 2-3 ft. $1.00 each. HYBRID LILACS Price except as noted: 2-3 ft. $1.00 eaeh, $8.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. $1.50 each, $12.00 per 10. BELLE DE NANCY. Rich double pink variety of medium height. CHARLES JOLY. Tall slender grower with dark crimson flowers having silvery reflex. Very conspicuous. CHARLES THE TENTH. Very large trusses of lilac- purple, similar to the Common Purple Lilac, but blos- soming when very young. MME. CASSIMIR PERRIER. Dwarf variety with double cream-white flowers. KATHERINE HAVEMEYER. A splendid medium tall grower with very large double light blue blossoms. MARIE LEGRAYE. Tall single pure white. MME. LEMOINE. Tall growing, double snowy white. PRES. GREVY. Immense clusters of double blue. SOUVENIR DE LUDWIG SPAETH. Vigorous single wine-red. LAMARTINE. An old and much loved favorite. Big, graceful sprays of bright rose lavender blooms very early in the Spring. 2-3 ft. $1.50 each. MONT BLANC. A superb giant white of tall majestic growth. Very double. 2-3 ft. $1.00 each. NEWER LILACS WALDECK-ROUSSEAU. Double. Immense flower heads. Double rose pink with a white center. 2-3 ft. $2.50 each. MISS ELLEN WILMOTT. Double creamy-white panicles of immense size. Twice as large as any other double white lilac. 2-3 ft. $2.50 each. \ [Bl RNUM CARLES I SYMPHORICARPOS SYMPHORICARPOS, Symphoricarpos Chenaulti. Four- foot shrub with gracefully arching branches covered with attractive light red berries in Autumn. 2-3 ft. COMMON SNOWBERRY, Symphoricarpos Racemosus. Pale pink flowers in Spring, but the snow-while fruit in Autumn and Winter arc its most attractive feature. Will often grow under shade trees where other shrubs fail. 2-3 ft. CORALBERRY, Symphoricarpos Vulgaris. Useful for planting gravelly banks and in the shrubbery border. Red berries thickly set along the arching branches persist well into the Winter and are useful for winter bouquets. 2-3 ft. HIGHBUSH BLUEBERRY VACCINIUM CORYMBOSUM. Valued not only for its fruit but for the waxy white flowers in early Summer and brilliant carmine foliage of Autumn. Plants balled and burlappcd. 2-3 ft. $1.00 each, $9.00 per 10. LOWBUSH BLUEBERRY VACCINIUM PENNSYLVANICUM. Nothing is finer for covering banks and carpeting the ground in acid soil wherever grass is unsuitable. One of the most valuable ground covers. Plant with it scattering bulb* of the Woodlily (see Lilies, page 13). Especially valuable near evergreens. Ten- inch sods. For Hybrid Blueberries, sec Fruits. VIBURNUM MAPLELEAF VIBURNUM, Viburnum Acerifolium. A slender Viburnum growing to four feet. White flower heads, black fruit, and pink foliage in Autumn. 18-24 in. HOBBLEBUSH, Viburnum Alnifolium. Grows only in moist shade. Sterile white flowers in early Spring sur- round a broad panicle of small green fertile flowers. Fruit in late Summer, red turning to black. 2-3 ft. AMERICAN CRANBERRYBUSH, Viburnum Americanum. Grows to ten feet. White flowers in June followed by bright scarlet fruit in Autumn. The fruit in the early days was used extensively for the same purposes as the common cranberry. 2-3 ft. MAYFLOWER VIBURNUM, Viburnum Carlesi. The past ten years Viburnum Carlesi has become quite widely known, but still is not fully appreciated. It stands 40 below zero without injury and the large clusters of Arbutus-like flowers of pink and white arc most delight- fully clove scented. 18-24 in. $2.50 each. WITHE-ROD, Viburnum Cassinoides. This ten-foot native Viburnum has glossy healthy foliage throughout the Summer. White flower heads in June and black berries in Autumn. 2-3 ft. ARROWWOOD, Viburnum Denlatum. Ten-foot glossv- toothed foliage. White flowers are followed by intensely blue fruit in September. 2-3 ft. WAYFARING-TREE, Viburnum Lantana. Large heavy leaves and big clusters of flowers in Spring followed by red berries which turn black in late Summer. 2-3 ft. NANNYBERRY, Viburnum Lentago. About twelve feet in height. Erect growing. Clean foliage, white flowers in May and June and bluish-black fruit in Autumn. 3-4 it. DWARF CRANBERRYBUSH, Viburnum Opulus Nanum. A very dwarf form of Viburnum growing only two feet tall. Is suitable for rockeries and very low hedges. 12-15 in. COMMON SNOWBALL, Viburnum Opulus Slerilis. Extremely hardy shrub known to everyone. Its only fault is its susceptibility to attacks of aphids. 2-3 ft. DOUBLEFILE VIBURNUM, Viburnum Tomentosum. Similar to the Japanese Snowball except for single flowers. 2-3 ft. WEIGELA WHITE WEIGELA, Heigela Candida. Grows six feet tall. 2-3 ft. RED WEIGELA. H eigela Eva Ralhke. A dark red dwarf variety. 18-24 in. CRIMSON WEIGELA, Weigela Floribunda. Blossoms somewhat lighter than Eva Rathkc and a stronger grow- ing bush. 2-3 ft. PINK WEIGELA, Weigela Rosea. Grows six to seven feet tall. 2-3 ft. YELLOW ROOT ZANTHORRIZA APIIFOLIA. Delicate, airy sprays of light green leaves and smoky panicles of pale purple flowers with yellow throats in June. Quickly carpets the ground with its^low moundlikc growth. Strong clumps. Price each Hardy Shrubs, except as noted, 75c, $6.(10 per 10. [8]

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Title: Aiken's trees shrubs wildflowers ferns fruits plants herbs

Identifier: aikenstreesshrub1942aike

Year: 1942 (1940s)

Authors: Aiken Nurseries; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Plants Vermont Catalogs; Ferns Vermont Catalogs; Shrubs Vermont Catalogs; Trees Vermont Catalogs; Wild flowers Vermont Catalogs; Nursery stock Vermont Catalogs; Horticulture Vermont Catalogs

Publisher: Putney, Vt. : The Aiken Nurseries

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

VIBURNUM AL-NIFOLIUM—HOBBLEBUSH SAMBUCUS AMERICAN ELDER, Sambucus Canadensis. Likes plenty of moisture. Blossoms in July, purple berries in September. 3-4 ft. GOLDEN AMERICAN ELDER, Sambucus Canadensis Aurea. Golden leaved form of American Elder. 3-4 ft. SCARLET ELDER, Sambucus Pubens. Large white flower panicles in early Spring followed by brilliant red berries in July. 3-4 ft. All the Elders are most attractive to birds. URAL FALSE SPIRAEA SORBARIA SORBIFOLIA. Grows to six feet with large panicles of white flowers in midsummer. 2-3 ft.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

VIBURNUM CARLESI SPIRAEA ANTHONY WATERER SPIRAEA, Spiraea Bumalda, Anthony tfaterer. A low growing species with rather flat pink blossoms throughout the Summer and Autumn. 18-24 in. 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 2-2'/2 ft. 75c each, $6.50 per 10. BRIDALWREATH, Spiraea Prunifolia. The true Bridal- wreath, whose flowers, like tiny white roses, cover the stems before the leaves appear in the Spring. Upright growth. 2-3 ft. THUNBERG SPIRAEA, Spiraea Thunbergi. Fine, al- most mistlike white flowers in earliest Spring, and the very fine foliage gives a pleasing effect throughout the year. 2-3 ft. KOREAN SPIRAEA, Spiraea Trichocarpa. A new Spiraea somewhat resembling Vanhoutte, but blossom- ing three weeks later. 2-3 ft. VANHOUTTE SPIRAEA, Spiraea Vanhouttei. The common white Spiraea with arching branches, commonly miscalled Bridalwreath. 2-3 ft. SYRINGA JAPANESE TREE LILAC, Syringa Japonica. More of a tree than a shrub, as it grows twenty-five feet tall. The large clusters of white flowers are borne in early Summer after all other lilacs have gone by. 3-4 ft. PERSIAN LILAC, Syringa Persica. Ten feet. It blooms profusely. Pale lilac, very fragrant flowers in May. 2-3 ft. LATE LILAC, Syringa Villosa. A large-leaved variety growing ten to twelve feet tall with broad panicles of pink flowers in early June. 2-3 ft. COMMON LILAC, Syringa Vulgaris. Well known to everyone, usually blossoming at Memorial Day in New England. 2-3 ft. COMMON WHITE LILAC, Syringa Vulgaris Alba. Grows taller than the purple form. 2-3 ft. HUNGARIAN LILAC, Syringa Josikaea. An extremely valuable shrub of tall erect growth, glossy deep green foliage and rich purple flowers in big upright panicles in early Summer. 2-3 ft. $1.00 each. HYBRID LILACS Price except as noted: 2-3 ft. $1.25 each, $9.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. $1.50 each, $12.00 per 10. BELLE DE NANCY. Rich double pink variety of medium height. CHARLES JOLY. Tall slender grower with dark crimson flowers having silvery reflex. Very conspicuous. CHARLES THE TENTH. Very large trusses of lilac- purple, similar to the Common Purple Lilac, but blos- soming when very young. MME. CASSIMIR PERRIER. Dwarf variety with double cream-white flowers. KATHERINE HAVEMEYER. A splendid medium tall grower with very large double light blue blossoms. MARIE LEGRAYE. Tall single pure white. MME. LEMOINE. Tall growing, double snowy white. PRES. GREVY. Immense clusters of double blue. SOUVENIR DE LUDWIG SPAETH. Vigorous single wine-red. LAMARTINE. An old and much loved favorite. Big, graceful sprays of bright rose lavender blooms very early in the Spring. 2-3 ft. $1.50 each. MONT BLANC. A superb giant white of tall majestic growth. Very double. 2-3 ft. $1.00 each. NEWER LILACS WALDECK-ROUSSEAU. Double. Immense flower heads. Double rose pink with a white center. 2-3 ft. $2.50 each. MISS ELLEN WILMOTT. Double creamy-white panicles of immense size. Twice as large as any other double white lilac. 2-3 ft. $2.50 each. SYMPHORICARPOS SYMPHORICARPOS, Symphoricarpos Chenaulli. Four- foot shrub with gracefully arching branches covered with attractive light red berries in Autumn. 2-3 ft. COMMON SNOWBERRY, Symphoricarpos Racemosus. Pale pink flowers in Spring, but the snow-white fruit in Autumn and Winter are its most attractive feature. Will often grow under shade trees where other shrubs fail. 2-3 ft. CORALBERRY, Symphoricarpos Vulgaris. Useful for planting gravelly banks and in the shrubbery border. Red berries thickly set along the arching branches persist well into the Winter and are useful for winter bouquets 2-3 ft. HIGHBUSH BLUEBERRY VACCINIUM CORYMBOSUM. Valued not only for its fruit but for the waxy white flowers in early Summer and brilliant carmine foliage of Autumn. Plants balled and burlapped. 2-3 ft. $1.00 each, $9.00 per 10. LOWBUSH BLUEBERRY VACCINIUM PENNSYLVANICUM. Nothing is finer for covering banks and carpeting the ground in acid soil wherever grass is unsuitable. One of the most valuable ground covers. Plant with it scattering bulbs of the Woodlily (see Lilies, page 13). Especially valuable near evergreens. Ten- inch sods. For Hybrid Blueberries, see Fruits. VIBURNUM MAPLELEAF VIBURNUM, Viburnum Acerijolium. A slender Viburnum growing to four feet. White flower heads, black fruit, and pink foliage in Autumn. 18-24 in. HOBBLEBUSH, Viburnum Alnifolium. Grows only in moist shade. Sterile white flowers in early Spring sur- round a broad panicle of small green fertile flowers. Fruit in late Summer, red turning to black. 2-3 ft. AMERICAN CRANBERRYBUSH, Viburnum Americanum. Grows to ten feet. White flowers in June followed by bright scarlet fruit in Autumn. The fruit in the early days was used extensively for the same purposes as the common cranberry. 2-3 ft. MAYFLOWER VIBURNUM, Viburnum Carlesi. The past ten years Viburnum Carlesi has become quite widely known, but still is not fully appreciated. It stands 40 below zero without injury and the large clusters of Arbutus-like flowers of pink and white are most delight- fully clove scented. 18-24 in. $2.50 each. WITHE-ROD, Viburnum Cassinoides. This ten-foot native Viburnum has glossy healthy foliage throughout the Summer. White flower heads in June and black berries in Autumn. 2-3 ft. ARROWWOOD, Viburnum Denlalum. Ten-foot glossy- toothed foliage. White flowers are followed by intensely blue fruit in September. 2-3 ft. WAYFARING-TREE, Viburnum Lantana. Large heavy leaves and big clusters of flowers in Spring followed by red berries which turn black in late Summer. 2-3 ft. NANNYBERRY, Viburnum Lentago. About twelve feet in height. Erect growing. Clean foliage, white flowers in May and June and bluish-black fruit in Autumn. 3-4 ft. DWARF CRANBERRYBUSH, Viburnum Opulus Nanum. A very dwarf form of Viburnum growing only two feet tall. Is suitable for rockeries and very low hedges. 12-15 in. COMMON SNOWBALL, Viburnum Opulus Sterilis. Extremely hardy shrub known to everyone. Its only fault is its susceptibility to attacks of aphids. 2-3 ft. DOUBLEFILE VIBURNUM, Viburnum Tomentosum. Similar to the Japanese Snowball except for single flowers. 2-3 ft. WEIGELA WHITE WEIGELA, Weigela Candida. Grows six feet tall. 2-3 ft. RED WEIGELA, Weigela Eva Ralhke. A dark red dwarf variety. 18-24 in. CRIMSON WEIGELA, Weigela Floribunda. Blossoms somewhat lighter than Eva Rathke and a stronger grow- ing bush. 2-3 ft. PINK WEIGELA, Weigela Rosea. Grows six to seven feet tall. 2-3 ft. YELLOWROOT ZANTHORRIZA APIIFOLIA. Delicate, airy sprays of light green leaves and smoky panicles of pale purple flowers with yellow throats in June. Quickly carpeU the ground with its low moundlike growth. Strong clumps. Price each Hardy Shrubs, except as noted, 75c, $6.00 per 10. [8]

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Viburnum trilobum at Deer Lake in Burnaby

 

Thanks to Danna (Curious Tangles) for setting me straight on this one! I was completely off base when I labelled it a Mountain Ash. I made a wrong assumption without even looking at the evidence—even though I noticed that it didn't really look like Mountain Ashes I'd seen before : > (

Nonetheless, am glad I photographed it. Now, I have to go back and sample the fruit again.

 

"(American Cranberrybush Viburnum, American Cranberrybush, Kalyna or Highbush or High Bush Cranberry) is a species of Viburnum native to northern North America, from Newfoundland west to British Columbia, south to Washington state and east to northern Virginia. It is very closely related to the European and Asian Viburnum opulus, and is often treated as a variety of it, as Viburnum opulus L. var. americanum Ait., or as a subspecies, Viburnum opulus subsp. trilobum (Marshall) Clausen.

 

It is a deciduous shrub growing to 4 m tall. The bark is gray and rough and has a scaly texture. The stems arch and are very dense, and the twigs are a reddish-brown color. The leaves are opposite, three-lobed, 6-12 cm long and 5-10 cm broad, with a rounded base and serrated margins; they are superficially similar to many maple leaves, most easily distinguished by their somewhat wrinkled surface with impressed leaf venation. The leaf buds are green. The bud scales are valvate. The flowers are white, produced in corymbs up to 13 cm diameter at the top of the stems; each corymb comprises a ring of outer sterile flowers 2-2.5 cm diameter with conspicuous petals, surrounding a center of small (5 mm), fertile flowers; the flowers are pollinated by insects. The fruit is an oblong red drupe 15 mm long and 12 mm broad, containing a single flat, white seed. Plants begin to produce fruit at approximately five years of age; when animals, including birds, eat the fruits, they deposit the seeds in another location in their droppings.

 

Although often called "Highbush Cranberry", it is NOT a cranberry. The name comes from the red fruits which look superficially like cranberries, and have a similar flavor and ripen at the same time of year. The fruits, sour and rich in vitamin C, can be eaten raw or cooked into a sauce to serve with meat or game." — Wikipedia

 

This particular tree was laden with fruit, which in the light appeared soft and succulent—an excellent illusion, as the one berry I sampled proved NOT to be. The eyes deceive sometimes....

Organic gardens are becoming quite popular lately as people commence to be aware of the consequences of corporate farming techniques. Many individuals who elect to live this lifestyle grow their own plants and herbs, to enable them to reap the benefits of them. Read this post to find out what you ought to do in terms of organic horticulture.

 

Transfer your chosen plants inside therefore they survive the winter. It's smart to save any expensive plants or people who will thrive in indoor heat. Use caution when digging across the roots of your own plant. You should maintain the root structure intact because of it to thrive after being potted.

 

Before you even position the first plant inside your garden, you should look at the composition of your own soil. Use a soil report done. It is actually affordable and you could make necessary adjustments, in accordance with the report, in your soil so it will be correctly enriched to encourage plant growth. Plenty of Cooperative Extension locations offer the service, and you could prevent ruining several crops by identifying the precise steps to adopt.

 

Be sure you remove weeds through the garden. Those nasty weeds can turn your beautiful garden in to a scruffy version of the former self. To aid with weed destruction, use white vinegar. White vinegar is natural, very inexpensive, and will really kill the weeds! Should you be too busy to pull weeds by hand, produce a white vinegar solution while keeping it handy to get a quick spray as needed.

 

Protect your tender deciduous shrubs. Tender, potted shrubs has to be protected if the weather is cold. Tie the tops tightly together, and cover the wigwam using a sheet or blanket draped loosely over it. Contrary to wrapping the plant with plastic, this technique promotes air circulation, which stops the plant from rotting.

 

Take into consideration adding some berry-producing evergreens in your landscaping. These year-round berries will provide the rest of your yard a lot-needed pop of color, especially in the winter months. Other winter plants range from the American Holly, Winterberry, The American Cranberrybush and also the Common Snowberry.

 

Organic gardening is simpler in case you have knowledge on the subject. Take into account that the guidelines offered listed below are only several of the great things that one could learn. www.perthflowers.co.uk/

seen on Tuesday ....at the NC Arboretum.

 

wishing you a happy TGIF :-)

 

...........................

 

Viburnum trilobum (American Cranberrybush Viburnum, American Cranberrybush, Kalyna or Highbush or High Bush Cranberry) is a species of Viburnum native to northern North America,

 

It is very closely related to the European and Asian Viburnum opulus, and is often treated as a variety of it,

 

Although often called "Highbush Cranberry", it is not a cranberry. The name comes from the red fruits which look superficially like cranberries, and have a similar flavor and ripen at the same time of year. The fruits, sour and rich in vitamin C, can be eaten raw or cooked into a sauce to serve with meat or game

 

This is a commonly used berry in Western Canadian cultures. Peoples of various origins both Native and European have used the berries for many years.

 

The Canadian French name for the berries is Pembina. The name Pembina was then applied to two rivers, one in Manitoba and North Dakota, and one in Alberta,

The Ukrainians called the berry Kalyna, which is now the name of an ecomusem in Alberta ...... from Wikipedia

Sainte-Angèle, Bécancour, Centre-du-Québec, Québec, Canada.

lieu historique national des Forges du Saint-Maurice,

Trois-Rivières, Mauricie, Québec, Canada

American Cranberrybush or Highbush Cranberry in its fall colors. Not really a cranberry, but the red fruits sort of look like cranberries - sort of.

26 september 2009

 

NL: Gelderse roos

E: Guelder Rose (European Cranberrybush, American Cranberrybush, Golden Leafed European Cranberry Bush)

F:Viorne Obier

D: Gemeiner Schneeball

Wetenschappelijk: Viburnum opulus

Familie: Kamperfoeliefamilie, Caprifoliaceae.

 

If you have time, please take a look here:

www.flickr.com/photos/47676341@N00/sets/72157603914861765/

Viburnum trilobum - This bush with red berries growing on it, is a species of Viburnum native to northern North America. The photo was taken in Putnam County, Carmel,NY not long after noon, when the sun was still high.

Title: The Aiken Nurseries

Identifier: aikennurseries1951aike

Year: 1951 (1950s)

Authors: Aiken Nurseries; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Plants Vermont Catalogs; Trees Vermont Catalogs; Wild flowers Vermont Catalogs; Nursery stock Vermont Catalogs; Vegetables Vermont Catalogs; Horticulture Vermont Catalogs

Publisher: Putney, Vt. : The Aiken Nurseries

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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THE AIKEN NURSERIES, PUTNEY, VERMONT Page 21 SHRUBBY CINQ.UEFOIL, Potentilla fruticosa. A dwarf shrub seldom over 3 feet. Single, yellow, strawberry-like flowers from July until October. 2 to :l ft. $1.00 each. PINK KI.OWERINt; ALMOND, Prunus glan- dulosa sinensis. An old-fashioned, very hardy shrub so common in cemeteries and about abandoned houses. Color, bright pink. 18 to 24 in. $1.25 each. WHITE FLOWERING ALMOND. Snow white. IS to 24 in. $1.2") each. ROSE ACACIA. Robmia hisptda. A dwarf pink lowered Locust growing only about :i feet tall. Spreads rapidly and is very useful for covering Keep banks and barren spots. 2 to 3 ft. $1.25 each.

 

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VIBURNUM CARLESI SPIREA THUNBERG SPIRAEA, 5. ihunbcrK,. Fine al- most mistlike white flowers in earliest Spring, and the very fine foliage gives a pleasing effect throughout the year. 2 to :! ft. $1.25 each. KOREAN SPIRAEA. 5. trichocarpa. A new Spiraea somewhat resembling Vanhoutte, but Blossoming three weeks later. 2 to 3 ft. $1.25 each. VANHOUTTE SPIRAEA, 5. ranhoutlei. The common white Spiraea with arching branches, commonly miscalled Bridal wreath. 2 to 3 ft. $'..25 each. SYRINGA-LILACS COMMON LILAC. 5. vulgaris. Well known to everyone, usually blossoming at Memorial Day in New England. 2 to 3 ft. $1.50 each. COMMON WHITE LILAC, S. vulgaris alba. grows taller- than the purple form. 2 to 3 ft. $1.50 each. HYBRID LILACS. Beautiful double flowering French Lilacs. 2 to 3 ft. plants $2.00 each. Belle de Nancy,—a near pink Chas. Joly, -deep crimson (Catherine Havemeyer.- near blue Mme. LeMoine. pure white Pres. Grevy,—double blue Chas. 10th. violet red Ludwig Sflaeth, purple V. red SYMPHORICARPOS COMMON SNOWBERRY. S. raccmosus. Pale pink flowers in Spring, but the snow-white fruit in Autumn and Winter are its most attractive feature. Will often grow under shade trees where other shrubs fail. 2 to 3 ft. $1.25 each. AMERICAN CRANBERRYBUSH, Viburnum amcricanunt. Grows to 10 feet. White flowe'-s in June followed by bright scarlet fruit in Autumn. The fruit in the early days was used extensively for the same purposes as the common cranberry. 2 to 3 ft. $1.25 each. WHITE-ROD. V. cassinoides This 10-foot na- tive Viburnum has glossy, healthy foliage throughout the Summer. White flower heads in June and black berries in Autumn. 2 to 3 ft. $1.25 each. ARROWWOOD, V. dent alum. Ten feet, (lossy- toothed foliage. White flowers are followed by intensely blue fruit in September. 2 to 3 ft. $1.25 each. WEIGELAS CANDIDA, best white weigela, tall grower, fragrant. 2 to 3 ft. $1.25 EVA RATHKE, dark red dwarf variety. 2 to 3 ft. $1.25 ROSEA, best pink variety 2 to 3 ft. $1.25 BRISTOL RUBY. Best red Weigela. New. very hardy. 7—8 ft. Blooms in June and July. 2—3 ft. $1.50 All shrubs listed at #1.00 each arc 5 of one kind for #4.00. Shrubs listed at #1.25 each are 5 of one variety for #5.00.

  

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Horticulture simply cannot only calm the mind, but it is very simple to leap into without having to spend large sums of money. It may also be a fantastic strategy to develop family bonds. Children are particularly fascinated with the way seeds become hearty vegetables and beautiful flowers. This will also give kids a fantastic life lesson about appreciating nature and passing time outdoors. This informative article will give you hints that can make it easier for anyone to enjoy a garden, and when you are enjoying it, you will certainly be prone to include others.

 

When you are growing vegetables with your garden, it is vital that you possess them in the spot where they may get no less than 6 hours of sun every day. Just about any vegetable you plant with your garden requires sunshine just for this duration. It enables them to grow from the proper manner plus much quicker. This holds true for some kinds of flowers.

 

Try to experience a plan with the garden. This is a good strategy to remember which plants are already planted in each area before they grow. It's also the best way to keep smaller plants from getting swallowed up by the rest of your garden.

 

Think about using evergreens in your yard that produce berries in the past year. These will assist give a garden a burst of color, even in the wintertime when other vegetation has lost their colors. Plants which you could purchase that supply color in the winter will be the Winterberry, the typical Snowberry, the American Holly, along with the American Cranberrybush.

 

Let them have an increase by watering them the cooled water that may be left after steaming vegetables. Also you can acidify soil for rhododendrons, gardenias plus more through the use of coffee or tea grounds. If fungus is ravaging your potted plants, sprinkle a certain amount of Chamomile tea about them, to see whether it helps.

 

Place a two inch layer of organic mulch with the base of your respective tall vegetable plants. The mulch helps keep the soil throughout the plants moist a little bit longer. Moreover, it would retain the weeds from growing. You'll save a huge amount of time when you don't ought to constantly pull out weeds.

 

Gardening is a superb activity that you can do all by yourself, or offer others. Regardless, the advice on this page will be helpful. Take advantage of the advice on this page to share with you your passion for horticulture together with the ones you cherish, or enjoy doing the work all by yourself. www.fourseasonsflorist.co.uk/content/62-guide-to-flowers

Title: The Aiken Nurseries catalog for 1947

Identifier: aikennurseriesca1947aike

Year: 1947 (1940s)

Authors: Aiken Nurseries; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Plants Vermont Catalogs; Trees Vermont Catalogs; Flowers Vermont Catalogs; Nursery stock Vermont Catalogs; Vegetables Vermont Catalogs; Horticulture Vermont Catalogs

Publisher: Putney, Vt. : The Aiken Nurseries

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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THK AIKEN NURSERIES, PUTNEY, VERMONT Patfe 27 MORROW HONEYSUCKLE, /.. morrowii. Low growing, fast spreading shrub. Cream-white flowers and bright red berries in the early Summer. 3 to 4 ft. $1.25 each. BAYBERRY, Myrica caroliniensis. A low grow ing shrub grown for the grayish-white waxy berries which remain tin during the Winter. B.iyberry candles are made from the w-ax of this plant. 18 to 24 in. $1.00 each, $9.00 per 10. SWEET SYRINGA, Philadelphus coronarius. Grows to 12 feet. Creamy-white fragrant blossoms. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. GOLDEN SYRINGA, P. folih aureis. Dwarf Syringa with golden foliage. Compact habit. Flowers white and fragrant. 9 to 12 in. $1.00 each. VIRGINAL SYRINGA, /'. virginale. Grows to d feel with immense double and single white flowers borne on the new growth both Summer and Fall. 2 to 3 ft. HI.00 each. NINEBARK, Physocarpus opulifolius. Tall, rapid growing shrub eventually to I > feet. Used for backgrounds. F"lowers white in small heads. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. GOLDEN NINEBARK, /'. opulifolius luteus. Like above except for golden foliage. Same sizes and prices as above. SHRUBBY CINQUEFOIL, Potentilla fruticosa. A dwarf shrub seldom over 3 feet. Single, yellow, strawberry-like flowers from July until October. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. PINK FLOWERING ALMOND, Prunus glandu- losa sinensis. An old-fashioned, very hardy shrub so common in cemeteries and about abandoned houses. Color, bright pink. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. WHITE FLOWERING ALMOND. Snow white. 15 to 18 in. $1.00 each. DOUBLE FLOWERING PLUM, Prunus triloba. A large shrub or small tree. Gorgeous double pink flowers in late May. 3 to 4 ft. $2.00 each. RHODORA, Rhodora canadensis. The native lavender form of the Azalea family. Grows 3 to 4 feet in height in any acid soil. FCxcellent for naturalizing around pools or along the edges of woodland paths. 2 to 3 ft. B. &. B. $1.50 each. FRAGRANT SUMAC, Rhus canadensis. Spread- ing and seldom over 3 feet tall. Fragrant leaves. Clusters of red seeds and ability to grow in poor soil are its recommendations. 3 to 4 ft. spread. $1.00 each. SHINING SUMAC, R. copallina. Usually 4 to 5 feet tall, taller in the South. Glossy green foliage which turns brilliant scarlet in Autumn. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. ROSE ACACIA, Robinia hispida, A dwarf pink flowered Locust growing only about 3 feet tall. Spreads rapidly and is very useful for covering steep banks and barren spots. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. THUNBERG SPIRAEA, S. thunbergi. Fine, al- most mistlike white flowers in earliest Spring, and the very fine foliage gives a pleasing effect through- out the year. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. KOREAN SPIRAEA, S. Irichocarpa. A new Spiraea somewhat resembling Vanhoutte. but blos- soming three weeks later. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. VANHOUTTE SPIRAEA. S. vanhouttei. The common white Spiraea with arching branches, com- monly miscalled Bridalwrcalh. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. COMMON LILAC, S. vulgaris. WeH known to everyone, usuallv blossoming at Memorial Day in New England. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. COMMON WHITE LILAC, S. vulgaris alba. Grows taller than the purple form. 2 to 3 (t. $1.00 each. COMMON SNOWBERRY, S. racemosus. Pale pink flowers in Spring, but the snow-white fruit in Autumn and Winter are its most attractive feature. Will often grow under shade trees where other shrubs fail. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. CORALBERRY, S. vulgaris. Useful for planting gravelly banks and in the shrubbery border. Red berries set along the arching branches persist well into the Winter and are useful for Winter bouquets. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. AMERICAN CRANBERRYBUSH, Viburnum americauum. Grows to 10 feet. White flowers in June followed by bright scarlet fruit in Autumn. The fruit in the early days was used extensively for the same purposes as the common cranberry. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. WITHE-ROD, V. cassinoides. This 10-foot native Viburnum has glossy, healthy foliage throughout the Summer. White flower heads in June and black berries in Autumn. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. ARROWWOOD, V. dentatum. Ten feet. Glossy- toothed foliage. White flowers are followed by intensely blue fruit in September. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. VACCINIUM CORYMBOSUM. The native Blueberry. Much used in landscape work for its gorgeous red and rose colored leaves in Autumn. Hardy in growth and delicious in fruit. B. & B. 2 to 3 ft. $1.50 each. Heavier specimens, $2.00 each.

 

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CLETHRA drown in Vermont, It's Hardy"

  

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Viburnum acerifolium. Pelham Bay Park, Bronx. All of our areas native viburnums are blue fruited, not red (thus Viburnum opulus var. americanum (American cranberrybush) - is not native to NYC). A common member of dry, shady forest understories. See with flower buds in spring.

Title: The Aiken Nurseries, Inc

Identifier: aikennurseriesin1940aike

Year: 1940 (1940s)

Authors: Aiken Nurseries; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Plants Vermont Catalogs; Trees Vermont Catalogs; Fruit Vermont Catalogs; Flowers Vermont Catalogs; Nursery stock Vermont Catalogs; Horticulture Vermont Catalogs

Publisher: Putney, Vt. : Aiken Nurseries, Inc

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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V. ALNIKOLIUM I tOHHI.EBl SI I Coralberry (iS. vulgaris). Useful t"«>r planting gravelly hanks and in the shrubbery border. Red berries thickly set along the arching branches persist well into the winter and are useful for winter bouquets. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. 60c each, $5.50 per 10. HIGHBUSH BLUEBERRY (Vaccinium corymbosum). Valued not only for its fruit but for the waxy white flowers in early summer and brilliant carmine foliage of autumn. Plants balled and burlapped. 2-3 ft. SI.00 each. $9.00 per 111; :!-! It. $1.50 each, $13.50 per 10. LOWBUSU BLUEBERRY i Vaccinium pennsylranicum). Nothing is finer for covering banks and carpeting the ground in acid soil wherever grass is unsuitable. One of the most valuable ground covers. Plant with it scattering bulbs of the Woodlily (See Lilies page 15). Especially valuable near evergreens. For Hybrid Blueberries see Fruits. VIBURNUM Mapleleaf Viburnum [V. acerifolium). A slender Viburnum growing to four feet. White flower heads, black fruit, and pink foliage in autumn. 18-24 in. 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 2-3 ft. 75c each. Hobblebush I', ulnifaliumi. (bows only in moist shade. Sterile white flowers in early spring surround a broad panicle of small green fertile flowers. Fruit in late summer, red turning to black. 2-3ft. 50c each, £4.50 per 10. American Cranberrybush {V. america- num). Grows to 10 ft. White flowers in June followed by bright scarlet fruit in autumn. The fruit in the early days was used extensively for the same purposes as the common cranberry. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. 75c each, $6.50 per 10: 4-5 ft. SI .00 each, $9.00 per 10. Mayflower V iburnum I . curlisi The past ten years V iburnum earlesi has become quite widely known, but still is not fully appreci- ated. It stands 111 below zero without injury and the large clusters of Arbutus-like flowers of pink and white are most delight full v clove scented. 18-24 in. $2.50 each. Sold out. White-Rod (V. cassinoides). This 10 ft. native Viburnum has glossy healthy foliage throughout the summer. White flower heads in June and black berries in autumn. 2-3 ft. 60c each, $5.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. $1.00 each, $9.00 per 10. Arrowwood (V. dentatum). 10 ft. Glossy- toothed foliage. White (lowers are followed by intensely blue fruit in September. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. 75c each, $0.50 per 10: 1-5 ft. 81.00 each, $9.00 per 10. Wayfaring-Tree I V. lanlana). Large heavy leaves and big clusters of flowers in spring followed by red berries which turn black in late summer. 2-3 ft. 50e each, $4.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. 60c each, $5.50 per 10. Nannyberry ( V. lenlago). About 12 ft. in height. Erect growing, ('lean foliage, white flowers in May and June and bluish-black fruit in autumn. 3-4 ft. 60c each, $5.50 per 10. European Cranberrybush (V. ojmlus). Al- though subject to attacks of the green aphids, yet it is well worth caring for. To 12 ft. in height. White flowers and heavy clusters of crimson berries in autumn. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. 75c each, $6.50 per 10. Dwarf Cranberrybush i V. ojmlus nanum). A very dwarf form of V iburnum growing only two feet tall. Is suitable for rockeries and very Five or more of one variety entitle you to the ten rate and the saving. HYBRID TEAS 2 Yr. No. 1, 60c each, $5.50 per 10 Price except as noted Countess Vandal. Plant Patent No. 38. A superposition of pink, copper, gold and salmon producing a peculiar effect changing as the bloom ages. $1.00 each, $10.00 per 12. Dame Edith Helen. Rose pink. Duchess of Wellington. Yellow. Eclipse. Long pointed buds with delicate tracery of green sepals around the rich gold of the petals. $1.25 each. Etoile de I lollande. Dark red. Gruss an Teplitz. Deep red. Hadley. Dark red. Mme. Butterfly. Pink and yellow. Mme. Caroline Testout. Large pink. Mme. Edouard I lerriot. (>range and red. Mrs. Aaron Ward. Pale yellow. Mrs. Erskine Pembroke Thorn. Golden"yel- low. Ophelia. Pink and white. President Hoover. Deep red with shading of orange and gold at base of petals. Radiance. Rose pink. Red Radiance. Deep pink. Rose Marie. Pose pink. Souvenir de Claudius Pernet. Yellow. Talisman. Red and gold. HYBRID PERPETUALS 2 Yr. No. 1, 60c each, $5.50 per 10 Frau Karl Druschki. Pure w hite. General Jacqueminot. Red. George Arends or Pink Druschki. Delicate blush pink. low hedges. 8-12 inches 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 12-15 inches $1.00 each, $9.00 per 10. Common Snowball (V. ojmlus sterilis). Ex- tremely hardy shrub known to everyone. Its only fault is its susceptibilitv to attacks of aphids. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10. Doublefile V iburnum ( V. tomentosum). Simi- lar to t he Japanese Snow ball except lor single flowers. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10. Japanese Snowball I P. tomentosum plicatum). Luxuriant foliage and resistant to insect and disease attacks. Large clusters of double flowers. 2-3 ft. (iOc each. WEIGELA White Weigela {W. Candida), Grows six feet tall. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10. Red Weigela (W. Eva Rathke). A dark red dwarf variety. 18-24 inches 50c each, $4.50 per 10. Crimson Weigela (lb. llunlm mlin. Blossoms somewhat lighter than Eva Pat like and a stronger growing bush. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10. Pink Weigela ill', rosea). Grows 0 to 7 ft. tall. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10. YELLOWROOT (Zanlhorriza ajriifolia). Delicate, airy sprays of light green leaves and smoky panicles of pale purple flowers with yellow throats in June. Quickly carpets the ground with its low moundlike growth. Strong clumps 50c each, $4.50 per 10. I lugh Dickson. Dark red. Mme. Albert Barbier. A comparatively new hybrid perpetual rose of vigorous habit of growth and of a salmon yellow color. A distinct addition to the list of hybrid per- petual roses. Mrs. John Laing. Pink, very fragrant. Paul Neyron. Light red. AUSTRIAN BRIAR ROSES Persian Yellow. (>Id fashioned deep yellow species. 75c each, $7.00 per 10.

  

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Title: The Aiken Nurseries Putney, Vermont

Identifier: aikennurseriespu1949aike

Year: 1949 (1940s)

Authors: Aiken Nurseries; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Plants Vermont Catalogs; Trees Vermont Catalogs; Flowers Vermont Catalogs; Nursery stock Vermont Catalogs; Horticulture Vermont Catalogs

Publisher: Putney, Vt. : The Aiken Nurseries

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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AZALEA IBOLIUM PRIVET. Rich, glossy, green oval leaves and trim, upright growth. A beautiful Privet though the top is not quite as hardy as the other. 2 to 3 ft. 50c each, $3.00 per 10, $25.00 per 100. TARTARIAN HONEYSUCKLE, Lonicera ta- tarica. An extremely hardy shrub growing to 10 feet with pink flowers in late Spring. Rapid grower. 18 to 24 in. 75c each. BAYBERRY, Myrica carolinicnsis. A low grow- ing shrub grown for the grayish-white waxy ber- ries which remain on during the Winter. Bay- berry candles are made from the wax of this plant. 18 to 24 in. $1.00 each, $9.00 per 10. SWEET SYRINGA, Philadelphia coronarius. Grows to 12 feet. Creamy-white fragrant blos- soms. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. GOLDEN SYRINGA, P. foliis aureis. Dwarf Syringa with golden foliage. Compact habit. Flowers white and fragrant. 9 to 12 in. $1.00 each. VIRGINAL SYRINGA, P. virginale. Grows to 6 feet with immense double and single white flowers borne on the new growth both Summer ind Fall. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each.

 

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SWEET PEPPER BUSH NINEBARK, Physocarpus opulifolius. Tall, rapid growing shrub eventually to 15 feet. Used for backgrounds. Flowers white in small heads. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. GOLDEN NINEBARK, P. opulifolius luteus. Like above except for golden foliage. Same sizes and prices as above. SHRUBBY CINQUEFOIL, Potentilla fruti- cosa. A dwarf shrub seldom over 3 feet. Single, yellow, strawberry-like flowers from July until October. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. PINK FLOWERING ALMOND, Prunus glandulosa sinensis. An old-fashioned, very hardy shrub so common in cemeteries and about aban- doned houses. Color, bright pink. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. WHITE FLOWERING ALMOND. Snow white. 15 to 18 in. $1.00 each. RHODORA, Rhodora canadensis. The native lavender form of the Azalea family. Grows 3 to 4 feet in height in any acid soil. Excellent for naturalizing around pools or along the edges of woodland paths. 2 to 3 ft. B. & B. $1.50 each. ROSE ACACIA, Robinia hispida. A dwarf pink- flowered Locust growing only about 3 feet tall. Spreads rapidly and is very useful for covering steep banks and barren spots. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. THUNBERG SPIRAEA, S, thunbergi. Fine, al- most mistlike white flowers in earliest Spring, and the very fine foliage gives a pleasing effect throughout the year. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. KOREAN SPIRAEA, 5. trichocarpa. A new Spiraea somewhat resembling Vanhoutte, but blos- soming three weeks later. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. VANHOUTTE SPIRAEA, S. vanltouttei. The common white Spiraea with arching branches, commonly miscalled Bridalwreath. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. COMMON LILAC, 5. vulgaris. Well known to everyone, usually blossoming at Memorial Day in New England. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. COMMON WHITE LILAC, S. vulgaris alba. Grows taller than the purple form. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. HYBRID LILACS. Charles Joly dark crimson flowers. 2 to 3 ft. $1.50 each. Mine. Le Moine double snowy white flowers. 2 to 3 ft. $2.00 each. COMMON SNOWBERRY, 5. racemosus. Pale pink flowers in Spring, but the snow-white fruit in Autumn and Winter are its most attractive feature. Will often grow under shade trees where other shrubs fail. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. AMERICAN CRANBERRYBUSH, Viburnum americanum. Grows to 10 feet. White flowers in Tune followed by bright scarlet fruit in Autumn. The fruit in the early days was used extensively for the same purposes as the common cranberry. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. WITHE-ROD, V. cassinoides. This 10-foot na- tive Viburnum has glossy, healthy foliage throughout the Summer. White flower heads in June and black berries in Autumn. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. ARROWWOOD, V. dentatum. Ten feet. Glossy- toothed foliage. White flowers are followed by intensely blue fruit in September. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. VACCINIUM CORYMBOSUM. The native Blueberry. Much used in landscape work for its gorgeous red and rose colored leaves in Autumn. Hardy in growth and delicious in fruit. B. & B. 2 to 3 ft. $1.50 each. "Grown in Vermont, It's Hardy

  

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Title: The Aiken Nurseries, Inc

Identifier: aikennurseriesin1940aike

Year: 1940 (1940s)

Authors: Aiken Nurseries; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Plants Vermont Catalogs; Trees Vermont Catalogs; Fruit Vermont Catalogs; Flowers Vermont Catalogs; Nursery stock Vermont Catalogs; Horticulture Vermont Catalogs

Publisher: Putney, Vt. : Aiken Nurseries, Inc

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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V. ALNIKOLIUM I tOHHI.EBl SI I Coralberry (iS. vulgaris). Useful t"«>r planting gravelly hanks and in the shrubbery border. Red berries thickly set along the arching branches persist well into the winter and are useful for winter bouquets. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. 60c each, $5.50 per 10. HIGHBUSH BLUEBERRY (Vaccinium corymbosum). Valued not only for its fruit but for the waxy white flowers in early summer and brilliant carmine foliage of autumn. Plants balled and burlapped. 2-3 ft. SI.00 each. $9.00 per 111; :!-! It. $1.50 each, $13.50 per 10. LOWBUSU BLUEBERRY i Vaccinium pennsylranicum). Nothing is finer for covering banks and carpeting the ground in acid soil wherever grass is unsuitable. One of the most valuable ground covers. Plant with it scattering bulbs of the Woodlily (See Lilies page 15). Especially valuable near evergreens. For Hybrid Blueberries see Fruits. VIBURNUM Mapleleaf Viburnum [V. acerifolium). A slender Viburnum growing to four feet. White flower heads, black fruit, and pink foliage in autumn. 18-24 in. 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 2-3 ft. 75c each. Hobblebush I', ulnifaliumi. (bows only in moist shade. Sterile white flowers in early spring surround a broad panicle of small green fertile flowers. Fruit in late summer, red turning to black. 2-3ft. 50c each, £4.50 per 10. American Cranberrybush {V. america- num). Grows to 10 ft. White flowers in June followed by bright scarlet fruit in autumn. The fruit in the early days was used extensively for the same purposes as the common cranberry. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. 75c each, $6.50 per 10: 4-5 ft. SI .00 each, $9.00 per 10. Mayflower V iburnum I . curlisi The past ten years V iburnum earlesi has become quite widely known, but still is not fully appreci- ated. It stands 111 below zero without injury and the large clusters of Arbutus-like flowers of pink and white are most delight full v clove scented. 18-24 in. $2.50 each. Sold out. White-Rod (V. cassinoides). This 10 ft. native Viburnum has glossy healthy foliage throughout the summer. White flower heads in June and black berries in autumn. 2-3 ft. 60c each, $5.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. $1.00 each, $9.00 per 10. Arrowwood (V. dentatum). 10 ft. Glossy- toothed foliage. White (lowers are followed by intensely blue fruit in September. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. 75c each, $0.50 per 10: 1-5 ft. 81.00 each, $9.00 per 10. Wayfaring-Tree I V. lanlana). Large heavy leaves and big clusters of flowers in spring followed by red berries which turn black in late summer. 2-3 ft. 50e each, $4.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. 60c each, $5.50 per 10. Nannyberry ( V. lenlago). About 12 ft. in height. Erect growing, ('lean foliage, white flowers in May and June and bluish-black fruit in autumn. 3-4 ft. 60c each, $5.50 per 10. European Cranberrybush (V. ojmlus). Al- though subject to attacks of the green aphids, yet it is well worth caring for. To 12 ft. in height. White flowers and heavy clusters of crimson berries in autumn. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 3-4 ft. 75c each, $6.50 per 10. Dwarf Cranberrybush i V. ojmlus nanum). A very dwarf form of V iburnum growing only two feet tall. Is suitable for rockeries and very Five or more of one variety entitle you to the ten rate and the saving. HYBRID TEAS 2 Yr. No. 1, 60c each, $5.50 per 10 Price except as noted Countess Vandal. Plant Patent No. 38. A superposition of pink, copper, gold and salmon producing a peculiar effect changing as the bloom ages. $1.00 each, $10.00 per 12. Dame Edith Helen. Rose pink. Duchess of Wellington. Yellow. Eclipse. Long pointed buds with delicate tracery of green sepals around the rich gold of the petals. $1.25 each. Etoile de I lollande. Dark red. Gruss an Teplitz. Deep red. Hadley. Dark red. Mme. Butterfly. Pink and yellow. Mme. Caroline Testout. Large pink. Mme. Edouard I lerriot. (>range and red. Mrs. Aaron Ward. Pale yellow. Mrs. Erskine Pembroke Thorn. Golden"yel- low. Ophelia. Pink and white. President Hoover. Deep red with shading of orange and gold at base of petals. Radiance. Rose pink. Red Radiance. Deep pink. Rose Marie. Pose pink. Souvenir de Claudius Pernet. Yellow. Talisman. Red and gold. HYBRID PERPETUALS 2 Yr. No. 1, 60c each, $5.50 per 10 Frau Karl Druschki. Pure w hite. General Jacqueminot. Red. George Arends or Pink Druschki. Delicate blush pink. low hedges. 8-12 inches 50c each, $4.50 per 10; 12-15 inches $1.00 each, $9.00 per 10. Common Snowball (V. ojmlus sterilis). Ex- tremely hardy shrub known to everyone. Its only fault is its susceptibilitv to attacks of aphids. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10. Doublefile V iburnum ( V. tomentosum). Simi- lar to t he Japanese Snow ball except lor single flowers. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10. Japanese Snowball I P. tomentosum plicatum). Luxuriant foliage and resistant to insect and disease attacks. Large clusters of double flowers. 2-3 ft. (iOc each. WEIGELA White Weigela {W. Candida), Grows six feet tall. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10. Red Weigela (W. Eva Rathke). A dark red dwarf variety. 18-24 inches 50c each, $4.50 per 10. Crimson Weigela (lb. llunlm mlin. Blossoms somewhat lighter than Eva Pat like and a stronger growing bush. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10. Pink Weigela ill', rosea). Grows 0 to 7 ft. tall. 2-3 ft. 50c each, $4.50 per 10. YELLOWROOT (Zanlhorriza ajriifolia). Delicate, airy sprays of light green leaves and smoky panicles of pale purple flowers with yellow throats in June. Quickly carpets the ground with its low moundlike growth. Strong clumps 50c each, $4.50 per 10. I lugh Dickson. Dark red. Mme. Albert Barbier. A comparatively new hybrid perpetual rose of vigorous habit of growth and of a salmon yellow color. A distinct addition to the list of hybrid per- petual roses. Mrs. John Laing. Pink, very fragrant. Paul Neyron. Light red. AUSTRIAN BRIAR ROSES Persian Yellow. (>Id fashioned deep yellow species. 75c each, $7.00 per 10.

 

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COUNTESS VANDAL ROSES 10 , DISCOUNT ALLOWED OX ALL ORDERS RECEIVED WITH CASH BEFORE MARCH 1

  

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Fruits du Pimbina / Pimbina frosted fruits

 

Sainte-Angèle, Bécancour, Québec, Canada.

The bright red berries of American cranberrybush.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Viburnum trilobum (American Cranberrybush)

 

Mountsberg Conservation Area, Ontario, Canada

American Cranberrybush Viburnum, American Cranberrybush or High Bush Cranberry (Viburnum trilobum) - The Grove National Historic Landmark, Glenview, IL - 5 December 2009

Highbush Cranberry, Waterville

One of my favorite small birds in our American Cranberrybush

Highbush Cranberry, actually a Viburnum. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viburnum_trilobum

Lots of people are starting to enjoy growing an organic garden. The easy to understand advice in this post will reveal how you can just go and start planting. Keep reading to find out some helpful suggestions and discover ways to make the most of them.

 

Pick your plants having an eye to increase the yield you may get. Often times, a cold-tolerant or disease-resistant hybrid may have a higher yield versus traditional ones.

 

A great way to make sure that your seeds sprout effectively would be to start them in smaller pots and after that transplant them when they get to the seedling stage. They may be then more prone to survive and also to become thriving, mature plants. The period between plantings may also be shorter. Once the mature plants are removed, you are able to replace all of them with fresh seedlings.

 

Plants need CO2 grow well. Most plants will grow better with additional CO2. Greenhouses help contain C02 to help keep levels high. Be sure to keep CO2 levels high to offer the very best growing environment for the plants.

 

Split up the irises. Boost your iris population whenever you divide up overgrown clumps. Once the foliage dies, go ahead and take bulbous irises and lift them. The bulbs, when harvested, should easily split by hand - enabling you to replant them for even more blooms next spring. Use a knife to split up rhizomes. Cut rhizomes from round the outside then dispose of the other center. At the least, each piece should have one strong offshoot. Do that cutting beside your backyard bed, to be able to place your brand-new groupings in to the ground immediately.

 

Try to find evergreen variants that produce berries. They feature terrific color through the dreariest times of the year when nothing else you might have planted has any hue remaining. Some plants which will provide color in the winter months range from the American Cranberrybush, the American Holly, the normal Snowberry, as well as the Winterberry.

 

Perfecting an organic garden is as simple as committing a little time, and being patient. Start using these guidelines to direct your time and energy within the right direction. The aforementioned hints can help whatever you're planning to grow. cannabisweedmarijuana.com/smoking-weed/joint/

Title: American medicinal plants of commercial importance

Identifier: americanmedicina77siev

Year: 1930 (1930s)

Authors: Sievers, A. F. (Arthur Frederick), 1885

Subjects: Botany, Medical; Medicinal plants; medicinal plants; ethnobotany; wild flowers; wild plants; weeds; traditional medicine

Publisher: Washington, D. C. : U. S. Dept. of Agriculture

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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Figure 3.—American cranberrybush (Vibur- num trilobum) Figure 4. -American elder (Sambucus cana- densis) AMERICAN ELDER Sambucus canadensis L. (Fig. 4.) Other common names.—Sweet elder, sambucus, elder flowers, elder blows. Habitat and range.—The elder bush is found in rich soil and low, somewhat damp ground from Canada southward to Florida and Arizona. Description.—Elder is a shrub attaining a height of 6 to 10 feet, its light gray, numerous stems being generally smooth and the younger ones containing a large white pith. The leaves are large and consist of 5 to 11 leaflets about 2 to 5 inches in length borne on short stalks. About June or July the flat-topped, fragrant clusters appear, composed of numerous, 5-lobed, wheel-shaped, creamy-white flowers. The clusters of edible fruits which follow are black or a very dark purple, small, round, shining, and juicy. Part used.—The flowers, gathered when fully opened and then quickly dried. The berries are also used to some extent. These must be very carefully dried, so that they will not become moldy. In limited demand only.

  

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2/17/18, Frederick County, Meyersville quad, rest station on I70

Title: The American outdoors : management for beauty and use

Identifier: americanoutdoors1000unit

Year: 1965 (1960s)

Authors: United States. Forest Service

Subjects: Outdoor recreation; Forest reserves

Publisher: Washington, D. C. : U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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S '■ Haw .iii. leaf skunkbusl squa stem - I in front of taller plan) Wild ctu rri' - in all Si nit uild- :'ood plar I five-petaled wild plums a: n. Plant fo: Kid- 'derberrhs. \ and nun ally in moist soil alone strea Plant for the black, bit by birds and prized for jellie* VUmnUIMia, ornamentals, native mainly in rs of many fi> white flcn tly blue- black edible ber: paired rldish in autumn, and compact regular form. inny places. American cranberrybush. with th and bright scarlet edible fniils like cranl Northeast's mot ornamental shrubs. Plant for decoration and wildlife cover and food. Hawthoi rts. These thorny shrubs or small trees are common in the East, especially in clearings and pa- d are scattered in western mountair have flowers with five spreading white petals, small reddish fruits like apples, and dense rounded crowns much used for bird nests. Plant for wildlife cover and food, screening, hedges, and ornament. .34 0—65 4

 

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llaivthoin

  

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Le Pimbina revêt ses parures automnales...

On American Cranberrybush, Arrowwood Viburnum

Viburnum opulus var. americanum - Aiton

High-bush Cranberry, mooseberry, American cranberrybush

AKA: Viburnum trilobum

Family: Adoxaceae – adoxas

Order: Dipsacales

Class: Magnoliopsida

Lake Mills Ledge Woods, Audubon Society's Faville Grove Sanctuary

oak and hickory woods

Lake Mills/Waterloo, Jefferson County

Wisconsin

June 2, 2020

DSCN9050

Last year's fruit and new foliage on American cranberrybush (Viburnum opulus subsp. trilobum).

Title: The Aiken Nurseries

Identifier: aikennurseries1946aike

Year: 1946 (1940s)

Authors: Aiken Nurseries; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Plants Vermont Catalogs; Trees Vermont Catalogs; Wild flowers Vermont Catalogs; Nursery stock Vermont Catalogs; Vegetables Vermont Catalogs; Horticulture Vermont Catalogs

Publisher: Putney, Vt. : The Aiken Nurseries

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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Page 28 THE AIKEN NURSERIES, PUTNEY, VERMONT PERSIAN LILAC, Syringa persica. Ten feet. It blooms profusely. Pale lilac, very fragrant flowers in May. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. COMMON LILAC, S. vulgaris. Well known to everyone, usually blossoming at Memorial Day in New England. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. COMMON WHITE LILAC, 5. vulgaris alba. Grows taller than the purple form. 2 to 3 ft. $1.00 each. SYMPHORICARPOS CHENAULTI. Four-foot shrub with gracefully arching branches covered with attractive light red berries in Autumn. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. COMMON SNOWBERRY, S. racemosus. Pale pink flowers in Spring, but the snow-white fruit in Autumn and Winter are its most attractive feature. Will often grow under shade trees where other shrubs fail. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. CORALBERRY, S. Vulgaris. Useful for planting gravelly banks and in the shrubbery border. Red berries set along the arching branches persist well into the Winter and are useful for Winter bouquets. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. AMERICAN CRANBERRYBUSH, Viburnum americanum. Grows to 10 feet. White flowers in June followed by bright scarlet fruit in Autumn. The fruit in the early days was used extensively for the same purposes as the common cranberry. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. MAYFLOWER VIBURNUM, V. carlesi. The past ten years Viburnum carlesi has become quite widely known, but still is not fully appreciated. It stands 40 below zero without injury and the large clusters of Arbutus-like flowers of pink and white .are most delightfully clove scented. 18 to 24 in. $2.50 each. WITHE-ROD, V. cassinoides. This 10-foot native Viburnum has glossy, healthy foliage through- out the Summer. While flower heads in June and black berries in Autumn. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. ARROW WOOD, V. dental urn. Ten feet. Glossy- toothed foliage. White flowers are followed by in- tensely blue fruit in September. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. WAYFARING-TREE, V. lanatana. Large heavy leaves and big clusters of flowers in Spring followed by red berries which turn black in late Summer. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each. EUROPEAN CRANBERRYBUSH, V. opulus. Although subject to attacks of the green aphids, yet it is well worth caring for. To 12 feet in height. White flowers and heavy clusters of crim- son berries in Autumn. 2 to 3 ft. 75c each.

 

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With regards to gardening the green way, every organic garden needs extra TLC. With knowledge, your gardening skill will improve dramatically. As the garden is important, your real goal would be to grow tasty produce which is healthy and does no injury to the surroundings or even the consumer. Utilize this advice to get your organic garden end up being the best around.

 

Your tool handles may be easily used as handy rulers. Tools with substantial handles, like rakes, hoes and huge shovels are ideal for taking measurements. Just lay your tool down on the ground then lay a yardstick next to the handle. Make use of a permanent marker to label distances. Once the need arises to measure something whilst in your backyard, the measuring tool you require will literally be "available," sketched in to the handles of the tools.

 

Annuals and biennials are an effective way to incorporate a a little bright color for your flower gardens. Your flower beds will appear distinctive from one season to a different. They may be used to complete gaps within your garden involving the perennials or shrubs so that your garden looks fuller. Notable varieties include cosmos, rudbeckia, petunia, hollyhock, marigold and sunflower.

 

Make sure to mow your lawn towards the appropriate length, always being sure that the cut is not really too close. Should you let your grass grow, the roots goes deeper making your lawn more resistant against dryness. Grass which is shorter includes a root system which is much easier to dry.

 

Make certain air can circulate around your plants, while keeping leaves moisture-free. Moisture around the surfaces of the plants is surely an invitation to pests and illness. Fungi is a kind of problem on earth of plants. Proactively treat fungi with the use of fungicidal sprays and treatments.

 

Consider adding some berry-producing evergreens for your landscaping. These year-round berries can give your entire yard a lot-needed pop of color, especially during the cold months. Other winter plants range from the American Holly, Winterberry, The American Cranberrybush and also the Common Snowberry.

 

Organic horticulture will allow you to develop a truly fresh and nutritious garden. It could take a bunch of work, yet it is worthwhile. www.fencingglasgow.org.uk/

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