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Allium sativum, commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion genus, Allium.

 

Its close relatives include the onion, shallot, leek, chive, and rakkyo.With a history of human consumption and use of over 7,000 years, garlic is native to central Asia, and has long been a staple in the Mediterranean region, as well as a frequent seasoning in Asia, Africa, and Europe. It was known to Ancient Egyptians, and has been used both for food flavoring andtraditional medicine.

 

Allium sativum grows in the wild in areas where it has become naturalized. The "wild garlic", "crow garlic", and "field garlic" of Britain are members of the species Allium ursinum, Allium vineale, and Allium oleraceum, respectively. Identification of the wild progenitor for common garlic is made difficult by the sterility of its many cultivarswhich may all be descended from the species, Allium longicuspis, growing wild in central and southwestern Asia.

 

In North America, Allium vineale (known as "wild garlic" or "crow garlic") and Allium canadense, known as "meadow garlic" or "wild garlic" and "wild onion", are commonweeds in fields.So-called elephant garlic, is actually a wild leek (Allium ampeloprasum), and not a true garlic. Single clove garlic (also called pearl or solo garlic) originated in the Yunnan province of China.

  

more candids here

 

www.flickr.com/photos/23502939@N02/albums/72157622769131641

  

More France here

 

www.flickr.com/photos/23502939@N02/albums/72157624934073273

I was photographing a snake when I spied this unusual plant nearby. A friend informed me that it was Allium Vineale, or Wild Garlic. Wikipedia referred to it as a "noxious weed". : ( My friend said I should call this shot "Medusa" because it reminded him of the Greek mythological monster having the face of a human female with living venomous snakes in place of hair. Seemed appropriate! Wildwood Lake, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

7/13/2020 Columbia, SC

 

Nikon D3400, AF-S DX Micro Nikkor 40mm f/2.8G

 

© 2020 R. D. Waters

This beautiful Common Blue was perching obligingly on some Crow Garlic just at the top of Woodham Fen this evening!

Ail des vignes - Wild onion - Ajo estéril

 

Allium vineale L. (fleurs)

Bord de champ (alt. 190 m)

Warnant-Dreye (province de Liège, Wallonie, Belgique)

The cow garlic buds I posted yesterday opened to produce tiny flowers like this with bulbils underneath. The flowers aren't much to see but this is still a new addition for my prairie wildflower species set. The fruit is a capsule but the seeds seldom set and propagation usually takes place when the bulbils are knocked off and grow into new plants.

 

Source and more info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_vineale

Lots of these odd looking things, growing in the garden ...

This was another ID mystery for me, which my flickr friends managed to solve in less than ten minutes. Ain't flickr something!

 

Crow garlic is an invasive species in North America introduced from Europe. More info: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_vineale

Pictured here is a Wild Garlic (Allium vineale) that I found by the shoreline at Nordre Spro, Nesodden. This photo was shot handheld in natural light with a spray painted brick wall as the background.

We seem to have a fabulous number of Marbled Whites this year, and the colonies seem to be spreading as well!

This was growing among the grasses just outside the Tewkesbury Nature Reserve Gloucestershire UK. Thanks for help in ID. I know it is not strictly a wild flower.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramsons

  

Allium ursinum – known as ramsons, buckrams, wild garlic, broad-leaved garlic, wood garlic, bear leek or bear's garlic – is a wild relative of chives native to Europe and Asia.[1] The Latin name is due to the brown bear's taste for the bulbs and its habit of digging up the ground to get at them; they are also a favorite of wild boar.

   

Habitat

  

Allium ursinum grows in deciduous woodlands with moist soils, preferring slightly acidic conditions. It flowers before deciduous trees leaf in the spring, filling the air with their characteristic garlic-like scent. The stem is triangular in shape and the leaves are similar to those of the Lily of the Valley (Convallaria majalis). Unlike the related Allium vineale (crow garlic) and Allium oleraceum (field garlic), the flower-head contains no bulbils, only flowers.[2] In the British Isles, colonies are frequently associated with bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta), especially in ancient woodland. It is considered to be an Ancient Woodland Indicator (AWI) species.

   

Edibility

  

The leaves of A. ursinum are edible; they can be used as salad, spice,[4] boiled as a vegetable,[5] in soup, or as an ingredient for pesto in lieu of basil. The stems are preserved by salting and eaten as a salad in Russia. A variety of Cornish Yarg cheese has a rind coated in wild garlic leaves.[6] The bulbs and flowers are also edible, though less famed for their taste than the leaves.

 

The leaves are also used as fodder. Cows that have fed on ramsons give milk that tastes slightly of garlic, and butter made from this milk used to be very popular in 19th-century Switzerland.

 

The first evidence of the human use of A. ursinum comes from the Mesolithic settlement of Barkær (Denmark), where an impression of a leaf has been found. In the Swiss Neolithic settlement of Thayngen-Weier (Cortaillod culture) there is a high concentration of pollen from A. ursinum in the settlement layer, interpreted by some as evidence for the use of A. ursinum as fodder.

   

Similarity to poisonous plants

  

The leaves of A. ursinum are easily mistaken for Lily of the Valley, sometimes also those of Colchicum autumnale and Arum maculatum. All three are poisonous and possibly deadly. A good means of positively identifying ramsons is grinding the leaves between one's fingers, which should produce a garlic-like smell. When the leaves of Allium ursinum and Arum maculatum first sprout they look similar, but unfolded Arum maculatum leaves have irregular edges and many deep veins while ramsons leaves are convex with a single main vein. The leaves of Lily of the Valley come from a single purple stem, while the leaves of A. ursinum have individual green-coloured stems.

 

Allium ursinum is a bulbous, perennial herbaceous monocot, that reproduces primarily by seed. The narrow bulbs are formed from a single leaf base and produce bright green entire, elliptical leaves up to 25 cm long x 7 cm wide. The inflorescence is an umbel of six to 20 white flowers only, lacking the bulbils produced by some other Allium species such as Allium vineale (crow garlic) and Allium oleraceum (field garlic). The flowers are star-like with six white tepals, about 16–20 mm in diameter.

 

It flowers in the British Isles from April to June, starting before deciduous trees leaf in the spring. The flower stem is triangular in cross-section and the leaves are broadly lanceolate similar to those of the lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis).

 

Kingdom: Plantae

Clade: Monocots

Order: Asparagales

Family: Amaryllidaceae

Subfamily: Allioideae

Genus: Allium

Species: Allium ursinum

Common Name(s): Wild Garlic, Ransom

  

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_ursinum

  

Allium ursinum – known as ramsons, buckrams, wild garlic, broad-leaved garlic, wood garlic, bear leek or bear's garlic – is a wild relative of chives native to Europe and Asia.[2] The Latin name is due to the brown bear's taste for the bulbs and its habit of digging up the ground to get at them; they are also a favourite of wild boar. In Europe, where ramsons are popularly harvested from the wild, similarity to poisonous plants such as lillies of the valley or Colchicum autumnale regularly leads to cases of poisoning.

  

Description

  

Allium ursinum is a bulbous, perennial herbaceous monocot, that reproduces primarily by seed. The narrow bulbs are formed from a single leaf base[4] and produce bright green entire, elliptical leaves up to 25 cm long x 7 cm wide with a petiole up to 20 cm long.[4] The inflorescence is an umbel of 6-20 white flowers only, lacking the bulbils produced by some other Allium species such as Allium vineale (crow garlic) and Allium oleraceum (field garlic).[5] [4]:394[6]:902 The flowers are star like with six white tepals, about 16–20 mm in diameter, with stamens shorter than the perianth.[4]

 

It flowers in British Isles from April to June,[4]:394 starting before deciduous trees leaf in the spring. The flower stem is triangular in cross-section and the leaves are broadly lanceolate similar to those of the lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis).

  

Distribution

  

It is native to temperate regions of Europe, from Britain east to the Caucasus.[7] It is common in much of the lowland British Isles with the exception of the far north of Scotland, Orkney, Shetland and the Channel Islands.[8]

  

Habitat

 

Allium ursinum is widespread across most of Europe.[9] It grows in deciduous woodlands with moist soils, preferring slightly acidic conditions. In the British Isles, colonies are frequently associated with bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta), especially in ancient woodland. It is considered to be an Ancient Woodland Indicator (AWI) species.[10]

  

Edibility

  

The leaves of A. ursinum are edible; they can be used as salad, herb,[11] boiled as a vegetable,[12] in soup, or as an ingredient for a sauce that may be a substitute for pesto in lieu of basil. The stems are preserved by salting and eaten as a salad in Russia. A variety of Cornish Yarg cheese has a rind coated in wild garlic leaves.[13] The bulbs and flowers are also edible. It is used for preparing herbed cheese, a Van speciality in Turkey.[citation needed]

 

The leaves are also used as fodder. Cows that have fed on ramsons give milk that tastes slightly of garlic, and butter made from this milk used to be very popular in 19th-century Switzerland.[citation needed]

 

The first evidence of the human use of A. ursinum comes from the Mesolithic settlement of Barkær (Denmark), where an impression of a leaf has been found. In the Swiss Neolithic settlement of Thayngen-Weier (Cortaillod culture) there is a high concentration of pollen from A. ursinum in the settlement layer, interpreted by some as evidence for the use of A. ursinum as fodder.[citation needed]

  

Similarity to poisonous plants

  

The leaves of A. ursinum are easily mistaken for lily of the valley, sometimes also those of Colchicum autumnale and Arum maculatum. All three are poisonous. Grinding the leaves between the fingers and checking for a garlic-like smell can be helpful, but if the smell remains on the hands, one can easily mistake a subsequent poisonous plant for bear garlic.[3] When the leaves of Allium ursinum and Arum maculatum first sprout they look similar, but unfolded Arum maculatum leaves have irregular edges and many deep veins while ramsons leaves are convex with a single main vein. The leaves of lily of the valley are paired, dull green and come from a single reddish purple stem, while the leaves of A. ursinum emerge individually and are bright green.

Portencross (Scottish Gaelic: Port na Crois) is a hamlet near Farland Head in North Ayrshire, Scotland. Situated about 3 km

west of Seamill and about 2 km south of Hunterston B nuclear power station, it is noted for Portencross Castle.

  

It has two harbours and a pier. The "Old Harbour" is actually a small tidal inlet next to the castle, and is part of the castle property. The larger harbour, "North Harbour", owned by the Portencross Harbour Trust, lies about 100 m north of the castle and was the main access point for fishing activity.

  

The Portencross Pier was built in the era of Clyde steamer cruising but was never used as much as other locations such as Largs, Fairlie or Wemyss Bay

In 2014 the North Ayrshire Ranger Service carried out a survey of the plants growing on the rocky shore, whinstone dyke, saltmarsh and 'machair-like' seaside vegetation. Species recorded included sea arrowgrass (Triglochin maritima); sea sandwort (Honkenya peploides); scurvy-grass (Cochlearia officinalis); common orache (Atriplex patula); sea club-rush (Scirpus maritimus); sea milkwort (Glaux maritima); salt mud-rush (Juncus gerardii); lesser sea spurrey (Spergularia marina); cliff sand spurrey (Spergularia rupicola); sea aster (Aster tripolium); red bartsia (Odonitites verna); silverweed (Potentilla anserina); bird's foot trefoil (Lotus geniculatus); sea pink/thrift (Armeria maritima); eyebright (Euphrasia nemorosa); yellow rattle (Rhinanthus minor); sea plantain (Plantago maritima); meadow cranesbill (Geranium pratense); purple loosetrife (Lythrum salicalia); pineapple weed (Matricaria matricariodes); curled dock (Rumex crispus); scentless mayweed (Matricaria maritima); corn sowthistle (Sonchus arvensis); marsh thistle (Cirsium palustre); lady's bedstraw (Galium verum); mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris); celery-leaved crowfoot (Ranunculus scleratus); ragged robin (Lychnis flos-cuculi); yellow flag iris (Iris pseudacorus); parsley water-dropwort (Oenanthe lachenalii); greater woodrush (Luzula sylvatica); amphibious bistort (Polygonum amphibian); crow garlic (Allium vineale var. compactum); Japanese rose (Rosa rugosa); alder (Alnus glutinosa); sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides); wood sage (Teucreum scorodonia); hemlock water-dropwort (Oenanthe crocata); sticky groundsel (Senecio viscosus); bloody cranesbill (Geranium sanguineum); bracken/brake (Pteridium aquilinium); yellow splash lichen (Xanthoria parietina); crab's eye lichen (Ochrolechia parella); sea ivory (Ramalina siliquosa).

El ajo silvestre es una planta bulbosa de la familia de las Liliáceas, que como varias especies de esta familia; cuenta con buenas propiedades medicinales y culinarias.

 

Se la conoce con muchos nombres como puerro silvestre, ajopuerro, ahoporro, ajo de gitano, ajo burrero, puerro de las viñas, ajete barbón, ajete silvestre, ajo porro de monte, ajos de cigüeña, ajo blandino, ajo elefante, ajo chilote

 

Las inflorescencias que presenta son esféricas y de gran tamaño con colores morados que podemos encontrar en herbazales, ribazos o cunetas. Después, para su uso en la cocina, podemos usar sus bulbos y sus tallos tiernos en ensaladas o guisos;

These are strong-smelling bulbous plants of which at least two species have become naturalised in New Zealand. A. vineale has for a long time been a pest in damp pastures where the narrow leaves are not easily detected but get you nose close and the distinctive smell is all yours and you can eat it

this is a great website

 

www.eattheweeds.com/allium-canadense-the-stinking-rose-2/

Family: Amaryllidaceae

 

Soon to blossom alongside the River Avon, in Bath, UK.

Mouche de Saint Marc (Bibio marci) sur Allium vineale.

wildflower

wilde bloem

 

Scientific name: Allium vineale

Wetenschappelijk: Allium vineale

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not use this photo for ANY purpose without my written permission

Good morning everyone. Been a while since I posted a wildflower series so I thought for today I do one on Crow Garlic (Allium vineale), which is also simply known as Wild Garlic or Field Garlic. I know...maybe not a "wildflower" in the true sense of the word, but close enough in my book :-)

 

Crow Garlic is an introduced species and shouldn't be confused with another species of wild garlic that is native to North America, being Canadian Garlic (Allium canadese). Of the two, Crow Garlic is more widespread here locally and a much larger plant. Plus Canadian Garlic tastes like an onion and also has a strong, onion-like odor. Crow garlic has a strong garlic taste and odor when you crush the bulblets.

 

As for these photos, they were taken at "the pond across the street" where there is a large patch of Crow Garlic that increases in size every year.

 

I hope you enjoy this short series and as always, don't forget to click on "view previous comments" if you don't see the additional photos in the comment section. Even better, scroll to them by clicking on the arrow thingy to the right of the above pic. And if you want to view any picture in the comment section large all you have to do is click on it where you'll also find the full and very informative text describing this plant.

 

Thank you for stopping by...and I hope you're having a truly nice first day of July and week.

 

Lacey

  

The Crow Garlic has entered it's "Bad Hair Day" phase! I love it when it is like this!

Good morning everyone. Been a while since I posted pics of an Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera). 2015 to be exact, so I thought it was long overdue to post a few. All of which are of a female, my favorite between the two sexes.

 

And for those of you not famiIiar with this dragonfly, keep in mind when viewing these pics it happens to be one of the smallest dragonflies in North America. About the size of a wasp with a body length that varies from only 0.8 - 1.0 inch (22 - 25mm). Concurrently, the scientific name, "tenera", means delicate and alludes to its small size.

 

As for these photos, the dragonfly appears to be perched on a man made object since it's so smooth and beautifully curved/shaped, but it's not. It's Crow Garlic (Allium vineale), of which I posted a pic of the entire plant in the comment section and my stream for a better view of it.

 

Thank you for stopping by...and I hope you're having a truly nice last week of June.

 

Lacey

 

ISO400, aperture f/10, exposure .004 seconds (1/250) focal length 300mm

   

Banded Demoiselle - Calopteryx splendens

Wild Onion or Crow Garlic - Allium vineale

   

Strandløk/Wild onion (Allium vineale) Spornes, Raet Nationalpark, Arendal, Norway

...nectaring on Crow Garlic (Allium vineale).

 

The Cabbage White is a non-native invasive species that was introduced from Europe in the 1860s and now ranges in North America from coast to coast from central Canada south through the United States (except the Florida Keys, southern Louisiana, and south Texas) to northwest Mexico. Worldwide it's the most common and adaptable butterfly on the globe. Found on every continent except Antarctica.

 

Habitat includes most any type of open space including weedy areas, gardens, roadsides, cities, and suburbs. The Cabbage White has continual broods and may be seen flying all months of the year when temperatures are higher than the mid-50s Fahrenheit.

 

Adult butterflies nectar from a very wide array of flowering plants including, but not limited to mustards, dandelion, red clover, asters, and mints.

 

The upperside of the wings on both males and females are white with grey - black tips on the forewings. It has a wing span of 1 3/4 - 2 1/4 inches (4.5 - 5.8 cm). Females can be easily distinguished by two submarginal black spots on each forewing, while males have only one. The underside of the hind wings can be yellow-green or gray-green, but spring and fall forms are typically smaller in size with less yellow and with reduced grey - black areas.

 

Cabbage white butterflies overwinter as pupae and emerge in early spring. After mating they lay their eggs on plants of the mustard family (crucifers), but particularly relish cabbage and broccoli plants. Eggs are usually laid on the underside of the leaf, where the caterpillars also hang out. Caterpillars are a velvety green with faint white lines along the sides. They chew big holes in the leaves. If you see this kind of damage, turn the leaf over and look carefully: you can probably apprehend the culprit.

 

ISO400, aperture f/11, exposure .001 seconds (1/800) focal length 300mm

  

Wild Garlic

Latin name: Allium vineale

 

Size: Leaves are round, hollow, arising from a bulb, 15 to 40mm long, 2 to 10 mm wide. Flowers are greenish white, small, and on short stems above the globe of aerial bulblets.

 

Distribution: This plant is found throughout the south of Ireland and the UK.

 

Flowering months: They start to grow in early spring.

 

Habitat: Found in the woodlands, in shady and damp conditions.

 

Special features: A perennial from bulblets that emits a strong garlic or onion smell when crushed. Primarily, a weed of small grains, turf grass and pastures. Wild garlic imparts a garlic-like flavour and odour on dairy and beef products when grazed. Additionally, small grains may become tainted with a garlic-like odour and/or flavour due to the presence of aerial bulblets at the time of harvest. All leaves have a garlic-like or onion scent. Flowering stems are the only stems that occur. These are slender, solid, waxy, unbranched. Flowers are produced at the top of the flowering stems. Aerial bulblets are ovoid, often wholly or partially replace the flowers, and are usually tipped by a long, fragile slender green leaf.

www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-room/environment-geography...

 

...perched on Crow Garlic (Allium vineale).

 

Crow Garlic originated in Europe. It can be found in the eastern half of the United States and the western region of the Pacific Northwest. It is widespread throughout the Midwest and is considered an invasive species and noxious weed. It is drought tolerant, and can grow in a wide variety of soil types ranging from heavy, wet soils to dry, sandy or gravelly soils. Crow Garlic is common in grain fields, pastures, meadows, lawns, gardens and waste places, as well as along roads, rivers and streams. It is a perennial bulbous plant that grows to 2 - 4 feet (60 - 120cm ) in height.

 

Crow Garlic typically flowers from May to June in the northern part of its range. Flowers and/or aerial bulblets are produced in dense spherical clusters 3/4 - 2 inches (2 - 5 cm) wide at the tops of long stems. Clusters are initially covered in a papery bract as seen above. Flowers are purplish to greenish (sometimes white), with 6 small petals, and are borne on short stalks above the bulblets. Aerial bulblets are commonly produced in place of some or all the flowers, and are oval or teardrop-shaped and very small 1/8 - 1/5 inch (0.5 - 1 cm) long. They are smooth, shiny, and often develop miniature, tail-like green leaves.

 

ISO400, aperture f/10, exposure .004 seconds (1/250) focal length 300mm

   

Good morning everyone. It's not often I post something on a Wednesday, but at the request of flickr friend Niveditha, I decided to post a series on wild garlic. Something I've been wanting to do for a long time, but never got around to it. It's been so long that except for one photo taken in 2011, the rest including the above were taken in 2008.

 

The most common wild garlic locally is a species known as Crow Garlic (Allium vineale) or Field Garlic, and for this series I'll refer to it as such so as not to confuse it with another species of wild garlic also found locally, being Canadian Garlic (Allium canadese). Of the two, the Crow Garlic is more widespread.

 

I included a side by side pic of both species in the comment section for comparison purposes. Otherwise all photos and text pertain to the Crow or Field Garlic.

 

I hope you enjoy this series and find the provided commentary informative.

 

Thank you for stopping by...and I hope you have a truly nice first day of February.

 

Lacey

 

ISO200, aperture f/6.7, exposure .008 seconds (1/125) focal length 240mm

Wild garlic (Allium vineale). On the morrow, I'm going to harvest a few bulbs and test the flavor. Apparently, it's quite pungent and significantly stonger than conventional garlic.

Ail des vignes - Wild onion - Ajo estéril

 

Allium vineale L. (inflorescence)

Bord de champ (alt. 190 m)

Warnant-Dreye (province de Liège, Wallonie, Belgique)

Photographed in Thakeham, West Sussex, down the lane where I grew up, one of my favourite places in the whole World. While I was taking this photo I could see a buzzard soaring overhead, hear a cuckoo and woodpecker chipping away and the scent was intoxicating, I love these woods and hope they never change. :-)

 

Allium ursinum – known as ramsons, buckrams, wild garlic, broad-leaved garlic, wood garlic, bear leek or bear's garlic – is a wild relative of chives native to Europe and Asia. The Latin name is due to the brown bear's taste for the bulbs and its habit of digging up the ground to get at them; they are also a favourite of wild boar. In Europe, where ramsons are popularly harvested from the wild, similarity to poisonous plants regularly leads to cases of poisoning.

 

Allium ursinum is widespread in nature across most of Europe. It grows in deciduous woodlands with moist soils, preferring slightly acidic conditions. It flowers before deciduous trees leaf in the spring, filling the air with their characteristic garlic-like scent. The stem is triangular in cross-section and the leaves are broadly lanceolate similar to those of the Lily of the Valley (Convallaria majalis). Unlike the related Allium vineale (crow garlic) and Allium oleraceum (field garlic), the umbel contains no bulbils, only flowers. In the British Isles, colonies are frequently associated with bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta), especially in ancient woodland. It is considered to be an Ancient Woodland Indicator (AWI) species.

 

The leaves of A. ursinum are edible; they can be used as salad, herb, boiled as a vegetable, in soup, or as an ingredient for pesto in lieu of basil. The stems are preserved by salting and eaten as a salad in Russia. A variety of Cornish Yarg cheese has a rind coated in wild garlic leaves. The bulbs and flowers are also edible, though less famed for their taste than the leaves.

 

The leaves are also used as fodder. Cows that have fed on ramsons give milk that tastes slightly of garlic, and butter made from this milk used to be very popular in 19th-century Switzerland.

 

The first evidence of the human use of A. ursinum comes from the Mesolithic settlement of Barkær (Denmark), where an impression of a leaf has been found. In the Swiss Neolithic settlement of Thayngen-Weier (Cortaillod culture) there is a high concentration of pollen from A. ursinum in the settlement layer, interpreted by some as evidence for the use of A. ursinum as fodder.

 

I love Crow Garlic, especially when it gets to the bad hair day style like this! (For The Weekly Colour Challenge - "Red And Green Together"!)

Other names :- Canada onion, wild garlic, meadow garlic, Canadian garlic

(Photograph taken on the riverbank under semi-natural deciduous trees, just below Glencar Waterfall in County Leitrim, Ireland)

 

Wild garlic (Latin name "Allium ursinum") is widespread in nature across most of Europe. It grows in deciduous woodlands with moist soils, preferring slightly acidic conditions. It flowers before deciduous trees leaf in the spring, filling the air with their characteristic garlic-like scent. The flower stem is triangular in cross-section and the leaves are broadly lanceolate similar to those of the lily of the valley ("Convallaria majalis"). Unlike the related "Allium vineale" (crow garlic) and "Allium oleraceum" (field garlic), the umbel (flower head) contains no bulbils, only flowers. In Britain and Ireland colonies are frequently associated with bluebells ("Hyacinthoides non-scripta"), especially in ancient woodland. It is considered to be an Ancient Woodland Indicator (AWI) species.

 

The leaves of "Allium ursinum" are edible; they can be used as salad, herb, boiled as a vegetable, in soup, or as an ingredient for pesto instead of basil. The stems are preserved by salting and eaten as a salad in Russia. A variety of Cornish Yarg cheese has a rind coated in wild garlic leaves. The bulbs and flowers are also edible.

 

The leaves of "Allium ursinum" are easily mistaken for Lily of the Valley, sometimes also those of "Colchicum autumnale" (autumn crocus - or meadow saffron) and "Arum maculatum" (Lords-and-ladies). All three are poisonous; potentially deadly incidents occur almost every year. Grinding the leaves between the fingers and checking for a garlic-like smell can be helpful, but if the smell remains on the hands, one can easily mistake a subsequent poisonous plant for "Allium ursinum". When the leaves of "Allium ursinum" and "Arum maculatum" first sprout they look similar, but unfolded "maculatum" leaves have irregular edges and many deep veins while "ursinum" leaves are convex with a single main vein. The leaves of Lily of the Valley come from a single purple stem, while the leaves of "Allium ursinum" have individual green-coloured stems.

  

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_ursinum

Wild garlic (Allium vineale).

 

From Wikipedia:

 

". . . is a perennial, bulb-forming species of wild onion, native to Europe, northwestern Africa and the Middle East. The species was introduced in Australia and North America, where it has become a noxious weed.

 

While Allium vineale has been suggested as a substitute for garlic, there is some difference of opinion as to whether there is an unpleasant aftertaste compared to that of common garlic (A. sativum).[citation needed] It imparts a garlic-like flavour and odour on dairy and beef products when grazed by livestock. It is considered a pestilential invasive weed, as grain products may become tainted with a garlic odour or flavour in the presence of aerial bulblets at the time of harvest. Wild garlic is resistant to herbicides, which cannot cling well to the vertical, smooth and waxy structure of its leaves."

Crow Garlic - also known as Wild Onion - grows to a height of 60cm. It bears small 2-4mm across flowers which are pink or green-white, wide bell-shaped, have protruding stamens and are on 1-2cm long stalks arising from round clusters of bulbils. These clusters are protected by a papery bract initially. The bulbils detach, falling to the ground and becoming new plants. The clusters are borne on round, stiff, smooth, often blotched stems. Leaves are grey-green, narrow, half-cylindrical and hollow.

 

Crow Garlic prefers dry grassland, disturbed ground and hedgerows. It is a native perennial, and is very common in the south of England, but records get fewer and fewer as you go north and it is rarely recorded in the north of Scotland. It is found commonly in Wales and southern Ireland less frequently in Northern Ireland.

Irrel - Südeifel (Germany), 9 juni 2011

 

Weinig tijd vandaag vanwege mijn verjaardag!

Heel veel dank voor alle felicitaties..:))

 

It's my birthday today, sorry I don't have so many time...

but thanks a lot for your great wishes..:))

 

NL: Kraailook

English: Wild garlic (Wild onion)

Français: Ail des vignes

Deutsch: Weinberg-Lauch

Wetenschappelijk: Allium vineale

Familie: Leliefamilie, Liliaceae

 

Thank to Annemiel for ID..:))

...also known simply as Wild Garlic or Field Garlic. The wasp appears to be a Great Golden Digger Wasp (Sphex ichneumonus), which helps give a sense of scale as to how small the flowers are.

 

Crow Garlic originated in Europe. It can be found in the eastern half of the United States and the western region of the Pacific Northwest. It is widespread throughout the Midwest and is considered an invasive species and noxious weed. It is drought tolerant, and can grow in a wide variety of soil types ranging from heavy, wet soils to dry, sandy or gravelly soils. Crow Garlic is common in grain fields, pastures, meadows, lawns, gardens and waste places, as well as along roads, rivers and streams. It is a perennial bulbous plant that grows to 2 - 4 feet (60 - 120cm ) in height.

 

Crow Garlic is a troublesome weed that is difficult to control. Aerial bulblets are similar in size to wheat grain, and are difficult to separate out of wheat contaminated during harvest. The bulblets can give flour a garlic flavor and odor. If wild garlic is used as forage by livestock and poultry, the resulting meat, milk and eggs can become tainted with a garlic odor and flavor. Crow Garlic is resistant to herbicides due to the structure of its leaves, being vertical, smooth and waxy. Herbicides do not cling well to it and therefore are not very effective. As a result, in large infested areas, a regime of fall tillage followed by spring tillage and a clean cultivated crop, if done for several years, will reduce the number of bulbs in the soil. For isolated patches, as in small gardens, hand removal is the most effective method.

 

Crow Garlic typically flowers from May to June in the northern part of its range. Flowers and/or aerial bulblets are produced in dense spherical clusters 3/4 - 2 inches (2 - 5 cm) wide at the tops of long stems. Clusters are initially covered in a papery bract. Flowers are purplish to greenish (sometimes white), with 6 small petals, and are borne on short stalks above the bulblets. Aerial bulblets are commonly produced in place of some or all the flowers, and are oval or teardrop-shaped and very small 1/8 - 1/5 inch (0.5 - 1 cm) long. They are smooth, shiny, and often develop miniature, tail-like green leaves.

 

ISO400, aperture f/11, exposure .001 seconds (1/800) focal length 300mm

   

Allium ursinum is a bulbous, perennial herbaceous monocot, that reproduces primarily by seed. The narrow bulbs are formed from a single leaf base and produce bright green entire, elliptical leaves up to 25 cm long x 7 cm wide with a petiole up to 20 cm long. The inflorescence is an umbel of six to 20 white flowers, lacking the bulbils produced by some other Allium species such as Allium vineale (crow garlic) and Allium oleraceum (field garlic). The flowers are star-like with six white tepals, about 16–20 mm in diameter, with stamens shorter than the perianth.

 

It flowers in the British Isles from April to June, starting before deciduous trees leaf in the spring. The flower stem is triangular in cross-section and the leaves are broadly lanceolate, similar to those of the lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis).

 

I have hundreds of these in my garden this particular clump grows on the lefthand side and gets quite a lot of Sun. The other really big clump is on the right and in a shaded part of the garden and have not yet bust in to flower.

 

The flowers in this photograph where still in the ground growing.

 

Kit: Nikon D 7100 & Nikkor 1. 3.5~4.5 lens

 

ref: 2966 - 23rd April 2020

Looks as if a snail has already left its mark! but that aside the buds were glistening in the early morning light which caught my eye during a early morning photography practice.

 

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